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1997

1997 Journals

February 1997 March 1997 April 1997 May1997 June 1997 July 1997 August 1997 September 1997 October 1997 November 1997 December 1997 
 

 

March 1997
Vol. 37 No. 2

Bromellad

Socie-C:y 0' Mew Zealand Inc.

'I

 

Bromeliad Society of New Zealand (Inc.)

Affiliated with the Bromeliad Society International Inc.

The Society was fonned on the 28th August, 1962.

The objects of the Society are to encourage the cultivation and study

of Bromeliads grown indoors or outdoors, and in particular:

(a) To promote discussion and arrange instruction on cultivation,
propagation and control ofdiseases.
(b) To provide a Library for members.
(c) To assist members to identify plants.
(d) To makeawards for outstanding new bromeliads.
(e) To hold Shows or public exhibitions ofbromeliads.
(t) To promote the distribution ofbromeliads amongst members
by exchange, purchase and sale, and to encourage the
importation of new plants.
(g) To affiliate with any Society or other body, and to do such
things as may be deemed necessary or desirable in the furtherance
ofthese objects.
(h) . To accept affiliation from other Societies having similar
objects.

All general correspondence should be sent to The Secretary,
Bromeliad Society ofNew Zealand, 40 Tirimoana Road, Te Atatu
South, Waitakere City, Auckland 8, New Zealand.

Back issues ofthe Bulletin (since September 1994) are available
from the Editor for $2 post paid. For issues prior to that please contact
Laurie Dephoff, Flat 1122 Lunn Avenue, Panmure, Auckland 6 ..

Please send articles & advertisements to the Editor, P.G. Box 11375,
Wellington. New Zealand. E-mail This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

President's Page

February has been a very busy month for the Society with the
competitive show and our general meeting shifted from the end to the
middle of the month, so as to fit in with the show arrangements.

The show was a great success at the new venue, so much so
that the committee has pencilled it in for the end of February next year.
For those people who did not visit the show I can only say that you
missed out on seeing once again a superb display with the standard of
plant in the competition being excelIent. As Peter Waters, the show
convenor, remarked it was nice to see a greater number of people
across the society getting 1 st and 2nds compared with the fewer people
of last years. My congratulations to all the prize winners and thanks to
alI who participated. A special thanks to those few people who helped
behind the scenes as without you the show would not have gone ahead.

The trip to Norma Cook's garden at Matakana was thoroughly
enjoyed by those people who visited it. We have a garden visit to Peter
Waters' place on March 23, which is before the next general meeting
so do avail yourself to see Peter's amazing colIection and perhaps
purchase some of his surplus plants.

Dave Anderson.

This month's cover: Tillandsia hondurensis (Rauh) in cultivation,
photo by Andrew Flower.

I bought this plant from Leo Trotman in February 1994, and Len
imported it from Tropiflora in the USA. It seems to be true to label
according to Derek Butcher's An Amateur's Guide to the Greyish
Leaved (sic) TILLANDSIOIDEAE (3rd ed., 1994) and it does look very
much like the photo in Hideo Shimizu Tillandsia Handbook (which
was apparently checked by Harry Luther of the Bromeliad
Identification Centre. Charles Ziff (1992) reported a suggestion that T.
harrisii (Ehlers) is a natural hybrid of T. hondurensis (and there is an
obvious similarity, I think) but this was said to be disagreed with by
Harry Luther and Paul Isley.

-Ed.

23

 

Februarv Meeting News

Well, what a week it has been with the show at the weekend
and the meeting hard on it's heels-most of us are looking for a short
rest. I am writing this on the Friday after the show, and just last night I
got the last of the plants back into place.

Thirty six members and two visitors-Jo Bolton and Leonie
Kirby-attended the meeting which was held early in the month to
enable those who came to the show to take the opportunity to attend the
meeting. We now have a six week break before the next meeting.

The show and tell table had some interesting plants which
included several from Zena Poulgrain. Firstly, two neoregelias which
were identified as N pauciflora. This is an unusual Neo. which grows
out on thin white stolons. The plant itself is tubular with dark green
leaves with brown spotting. There are two forms ofthis plant: the small
variety which grows to about 12 cm. and the large form which will
grow to around 20 cm. and has much longer stolons to around 30 cm.
and will festoon downwards from the pot, hence it is necessary to grow
this species in a hanging basket. They are best grown in the high light
and will then color up nicely. Zena also had a vriesea without a name
which was identified as Vr. bleheri, a small plant with dark purple
leaves around 12 cm. long, and will produce an inflorescence around
20cm. with bright yellow bracts and yellow flowers. An easy plant to
grow and as with most vrieseas does well in a shady place. And also
Neoregelia carolinae "tricolor" which had two pups. One was
variegated and the other was plain green. This happens quite often with
variegated plants, although the Neo. carolinae "tricolor" is usually
fairly constant with variegated pups. The green one will quite often
produce variegated pups the next time round, so don't throw it away.

Vicky Carter had an unnamed neoregelia which was not able to
be identified. Thyere are quite a lot of these about. Leslie Morgan
brought in Vriesea corcovadensis to verify that it was correctly named,
which it was. This is another easily grown plant, which was first
discovered in Brazil in 1894, and named after Mount Corcovado where
it was found. This is a small species which will grow to about 20 cm.
tall and will produce an attractive inflorescence with a branched spike
with red bracts and yellow petals. Laurie Dephoff brought in two

24

 

plants. A Tillandsia albida which was very stunted in growth, it had
two heads which were only about 12 cm. long but should grow to
about 50-60 cm. or 80 cm. including the spike. Perhaps this plant had
been not had sufficient other
plant which was in spike during
that day had closed up by the the

quite attractive plants 6 to

usually one at a time

grown as terrestrials.

Next on the agenda were slides presented by Graham
Alderson from Rangiora. Due to the fact that the weather down there
is very unsociable to bromeliads if you try to grow them outside (with
night temperatures down as low as minus six degrees celcius, or
perhaps less, and up to 35 degrees celcius or more during the day, and
with hot dry winds that tend to burn everything in sight, it is no
wonder that Graham has built himself a shadehouse and a polythene
hot

houses are framed

on to the plants,

The shade house of with

and to cut down
the heated clad with clear polythene There are
plenty of vents, and fans to circulate fresh air, which is essential when
growing bromeliads. The heat is supplied by a gas heater and all
systems are automatically controlled. Well-I did not think it was
possible to pack so many plants into one hot house, but there were
many different varieties in this one; from vrieseas, guzmanias,
nidulariums on the lower level, aechmeas and some larger tillandsias
half way up, to the epiphytic tillandsias in the upper levels. Many of
the or had flower advised

into flower around , just a

show. Graham had use of

here for

to extend our thanks Judith for
their efforts of coming to the show and staying on to come to the
meeting and share some of their experiences with us.

25

 

Door prizes were by John Lyall, Kay Wong Dick
Endt. The special raffle of Guzmania Ruby (in flower) went to
Christine Ensor.

NEXT MEETING

Tuesday 22 April

COMPETITIONS

Open flowering: Guzmania Cherry was first, from Peter Waters This
plant bright green leaves was a tall with
bright orange bracts and cream f10wers. Second was Guzmania Rana
from Len Trotman, which is very similar to Guzmania Cherry except
that it larger more plant (Guzmanias like to grown
rather and moist and do wherever you grow ferns.
Outside is fine so long as they are well sheltered). Others on the table
were Vriesea saundersii, Neoregelia Glossy Print, Neo. johannis
"rubra" X meyendorfii, Neo. Burgundy, gracilis.
Openfo/iage: First Peter Waters with Vriesea hieroglyphica. large
plant with broad green leaves banded with darker green. Second was
Len Trotman with Vriesea Midori, which is a cross between Vr.
gigantea "Seideliana" and . gigantea var. tesselata. was
another f£liriy plant wide green leaves with white.
Vrieseas also like to be grown shady and damp, but these varieties can
also be acclimatised to grow out in the bright light. They also make
excel house plants. ()thers on table Hohenbergia
correw~araU)Ol, Aechmea fasciata "marginata", Neoregelia
conc(mtrica "red", Neo. Small World, Neolarium Something Special,
Billbergia vittata and Bill. species.
Tillantl%ill flowering: First limbata, medium sized with
dark green leaves and an inflorescence about 50 cm. tall with
numerous branches and green bracts with whitish flowers, and was
presented by Win. Shorrock. Second was T. secunda from Joe
Murray, a large plant with dark pointed. leaves an
inflorescence around 60-80 cm. tall with numerous branches. This
plant had finished flowering but has dark purple flowers which hang

26

 

down from the underside of the bract and make a marvellous display.
After flowering the pups form on the flower spike. Both of these
lillandsias are suitable to culture. Others were . Feather
Duster, T mallemontii, T umbellata, T leiboldiana, T capitata X
flahellala, T tric%r var. melanocrater.

lin,n"'",, foliage: First l,cn Trotman T. xerographica, a
shaped plant with grey leaves blushing pink due to high light
conditions. Second equal \vere Pctcr Waters with T kruseana (which

possibly another name for T xerographica) John Scott with a
large clump of T kirkhoffiana. Also on the table were T harrisii, T
funkiana, T relfigiana, T T atroviridipetala, T
leonamiana.
Novice flowering: I st John Lyall with Tillandsia xiphioides sporting a

cream scented flower. 2nd Lester with Aechmea miniala
var. discolor, also sporting a nice inflorescence. 'fhere were also Ae.
recurvata and Neoregelia marmorata.
Novice foliage: I Bill Vermeer with Inferno, a
grown variegated plant with a bright red centre. 2nd was Lester Ching
with Neoregelia regalia, a nice small red-leafed plant. Also presented

Neoregelia Sharlock carolinae.

Greenhough points went to Peter Waters.

We had a rundown on the show which was very successful
with a record number of entries record sales. full will be
given elsewhere in the bulletin but I would just like to mention one
disappointment that I had with regards sales plants. We have stressed
many times that plants should be properly or mounted but
we did get quite a few unpotted plants. The show is the front window
of the society and I think we should take care in presenting the society

as good a light possible.

The president thanked all those who had to travel long

distances get plants to the show. 1 would to all

helped on sales tables, door the raff1e. Also thanks to
those who took plants home for me and lastly thanks to the N.Z. Orchid
Society the of gear.

Len Trotman.

27

 

Notice of Meeting

The Annual General Meeting of the Bromeliad Society of New
Zealand (Inc.) will be held at Greyfriars Church Hall on the 25th
Narch 1997, prior to the General Meeting, and will commence at
7.30pm. sharp.

AGENDA

OPENING, by the President.
APOLOGIES
MINUTES OF THE LAST A.G.M.
MATTERS ARISING
CORRESPONDENCE
FINANCIAL STATEMENT
PRESIDENT'S REPORT
ELECTION OF OFFICERS:

President
Vice Presidents (2)
Secretary
Treasurer
Editor
Librarian
Committee (4)

 

APPOINTMENTS:
Auditor
Patron
Historian

A.H.C. DELEGATES.
GENERAL BUSINESS
CLOSURE
Nominations to be lodged with the Secretary prior to the
meeting. Nominations will also be taken from the floor. In the event
of more nominations being received than positions available, the
results will be determined by ballot. Any proxy votes to be lodged
with the Secretary prior to the meeting.

28

 

Don't Throw Them Awav.

Bea Hanson, Auckland.

Before the Bromeliad Society was formed a few of us, all
members of the Cactus & Succulent Society, became very interested
in bromel iads. None of us knew much about them, books were scarce
so we more or less lumped the broms with the cacti and watered the
lot together. Looking back, it says something for broms and how they
can stand tough conditions!

After we formed the Bromeliad Society we were able to
exchange notes and pass on hints. Strangely enough, most of LIS had
the idea that after neoregelias etc. had flowered and produced one or
two offsets that was it-the old plant was tossed aside regardless of
what it looked like. I had always hated this way of treating the plants
and in the end decided to put them all together in a spare corner ofthe
garden. I watered them when I hosed other plants and once in a while
I was rewarded by another pup or two.

Owing to many reasons that corner was just left to itself
except for the watering. I was beginning to feel ashamed of it and
decided I must really get busy and clean it up. Instead I went into
hospital so no gardening for many months. At long last I was able to
do a little work with the plants and then one glorious day I was able to
start on that awlfull patch. I removed one or two plants and each had
one to three pups-to my surprise I must admit.

At last the great day arrived! All plants were out, cleaned and
some put back into the original place. There was a huge pile of pups
awaiting my attention but I did count them. Would you believe it
there were 41 beauties, some almost full grown! It took many days to
get them potted or into the garden and in the meantime one or two
mother plants were showing the odd pup or two.

So don't throw those older plants away, try and find a corner
to put them even if its part of your husband's vege garden!
You'll be glad you did.

29

 

Announcements

New Members: Welcome to the following, we wish you well with
your broms and hope you enjoy being with the Society:

Nancy Wilson, 6A Shaw Place, Matua, Tauranga
Rick & Sandy Van Doorne, 72 Esk Street, Tauranga

A. Bishop & B. Dawson, Box 48-087, Blockhouse Bay, Auckland
Robert & Betty Quirk, 18A Douglas Street, Gisborne
Peggy Rittey, 5B Longwood Lane, Tauranga
Allan Mitchell, 13 View Road, Campbells Bay, North Shore.
Trevor & Pam Signal, Lambert Road, RD2, Whakatane
Judith Kettle, 83C Owairaka Ave., Mt. Albert, Auckland
Charlie & Kay Wong, 5 Easton Park Parade, Glenfield, Auckland
Gay McDonald, 11 Waterview Road, Devonport, Auckland
John Lyall, 33 King Street, Grey Lynn, Auckland
Julie GreenhilI. 52 Rutherford Tee., Meadowbank, Auckland
The outing tlris weekend is to Peter Waters place at 22 Half Moon
Rise, Bucklands Beach. Time 1.30 pm. Bring a cup for your tea, and
a plate of munchies.

Subscriptions for the new year are now due. The Annual Meeting
will be held prior to the March general meeting, so please think about
the election of a committee-all positions are open for election so
contact the Secretary or any member ofthe committee for nomination.

You may have noticed that we have a new style ofjournal cover. We
will have a different cover photo each month and the Editor would
like some nice photographs of bromeliads to use. A color print is all
that is needed.

Tire Wellington Tillandsia Study Group will be meeting again at

1.30 pm on Sunday March 23. Venue will be Phyllis Purdie's at 5
Rochester Street, Wilton. Out-of-towners welcome!
Tire Tauranga Bromeliad Group will be meeting on Wednesday 9th
April at 1.30 pm. at the home ofNatalie Simmons.
30

 

Tlllandsla Cultivation

Norman Smith, Levin.

Last month 1 mentioned we would be looking at Tillandsia cultivation
guides. This is a reprint oj the one Norm Smith has prepared jor his
customers -Ed

Tillandsias -Air Plants
Fallacies and Facts.

 

Tillandsias or Air plants have been available for a few years. Unfortunately
for persons who have purchased them (and for the poor plant as
well) a number of fallacies have been built up. The end result in
many, if not most cases is that the plant eventually dies. People who
sell plants should know how they are grown, and other basic facts
about them. Now you may very well think that, but of course, I
couldn't possibly comment.

WHAT ARE THESE FALLACIES

Air Plants do not need water-They do in common with all living
things.
Air Plants can be grown anywhere-Not true. In nature they come
from a diverse range of places, and individual plants have particular
requirements as to light, water and temperature.
Air Plants never have roots-Not true, however, in cultivation they
may not always produce them.
Air Plants do not require feeding-Not true. They aren ' t gross
feeders, but can't live on air.
Air Plants do not have flowers-Not true. Grown correctly they all do
flower, but in a relatively few species they take years to reach
flowering size.
All Tillandsias are Air Plants-Not true. It may be possible to say that
all Air Plants are Tillandsias, but many Tillandsias certainly are not
air plants.

LET US CONSIDER SOME FACTS ABOUT THESE BOTANIC
WONDERS..

31

 

All Tillandsias, and there are some 400 recognised species,
come from the Americas, from the southern states of USA south to
the lower parts of Chile and Argentina. This vast range covers a wide

range zones-temperate to grow in
a very environments. Some beachessome
jungles, some grow locations
found in desert locations. on the
ground, rocks, some grow on
cacti. telephone and fence wires.

They are just as diverse in size, ranging trom 1 cm. to over 1
meter in height They come in a wide range of shapes, some beautiful,
some quite grotesque, but all interesting. The foliage ranges from
plain green to combinations of green, brown, red and others. Many
plants have a covering of scales that make them look grey,white or
silver. When they flower they are again very varied. The colours
cover just about all of those in a rainbow (individually not together)
plus more than one coloured many have
different surrounding the vary
too--all but these may be together as

delightful scent.

diversity there is no single I of the
species. two extremes of in which
they grow-Very Dry (Xeric) to Very Wet (Mesic) it is possible to
come up with four basic groups.

1. Those that grow very dry (Xeric)
2. Those that grow fairly dry (Sub Xeric)
3. Those that grow fairly wet (Sub Mesic)
4. Those that grow very wet (Mesic)
to be a degree of adjoining
belonging to group 1. group 4.
versa. There are some associated

very bright light 50%
shade. Apart from group 4. all of the others must dry out between
waterings on a daily basis. Those in group 1. would only want a light

32

 

misting, whereas those in group 3. would like a relative soaking. The
general rule in watering is the higher the temperature the more frequent
the watering. Ideally water the so that they h~.l\e dried
before If the temperature t:111s below 0 degrees C. it's essential
that the plant is dry particularly at night. In summer water every day. In
winter once a week may suffice. Temperature wise is protecting from
frost, avoid high temperatures unless you can provide very
high hmnidity.

Air plants do want feeding. Foliar feeding is best, however,
only very weak solutions should be used, that is about a quarter of the
amount recommended for house

question of water and feeding brings to another interesting
fact about Tillandsia Air Plants. Most if not all that qualify for
that title do take in water or food through their roots [/ think Norm
means not -Ed] 'Their if they any, only used hold
them onto whatever they may growing upon. and water are
taken in through their leaves, and to a large extent the scales on their
leaves facilitate this process, These scales are most noticeable on the
very species. make plant appear silver grey or In
these cases the scales serve other purposes. Namely to reflect light, and
protect from heat. You will notice that plants appear a lot more green
when are watered.

Many Tillandsias vegetively. after have
flowered the plant produces offshoots. Some only one, others are
rather more generous, and a well grown one of these may produce four
or more. Once offshoots are large enough they can be separated
and grown on until in turn flower, they can left so plant
forms a clump. Well grown plants of species that produce more than
one offset develop into large clumps that can be quite spectacular when
in flower. If well grown mature plants usually on annual
basis. Tillandsias of course be grown from however, this is
not for the impatient. It takes years (in some cases more than 10 years)
from germination to flowering plant.

Where to grow them? Indoors outdoors wherever can
supply simple needs-namely fresh preferably with movement
(wind). The right temperature, amount of light, water, according

(Continued (In ,I1oge 34)

33

 

Aechmea mexicana Tillandsia. capillaris
Alcantarea imperialis T. hamaleana
Neoregelia pascoaliana T. ionantha var scaposa
Puya mirabilis T.juncea
Slreplocalyx species T. myosura
Tillandsia butzii T. plagiotropica

T. caliginosa T. schiedeana
T. utriculata
Orders (with S.A.E.) and spare seed to:
Andrew Flower

P.O. Box 11-375, Manners Street P.O.
WELLINGTON.
(Continuedjrom page 33) Tillandsia cultivation

to the species, and food. They can be grown on almost anything. Glued
onto driftwood, hanging on a wire, or more conventionally in a pot.

Tillandsias are very popular house plants in the USA and in
Europe. Books on houseplants unfortunately seldom mention more
than one or two species (if they mention them at all) There are
specialist books, but most of these are quite expensive, and many
libraries do not have copies.

Want to know more? Ring Norman Smith" 06 -367 -9160.

34

 

OffICERS

Telephone
PATRON & LIFE MEMBER Mrs Bea Hanson (09) 527-6830
HISTORIAN & LIFE MEMBER Laurie Dephoff (09) 527-7789
PRESIDENT Dove Anderson (09) 638-8671
VICE PRESIDENTS Lester Ching (09) 534-4495
Joc Murruy (09) 444-41 10
SECRETARY Len Trotman (09) 838-9356
TREASURER Peter Waters (09) 534-5616
EDITOR Andrew Flower (04) 2399-659
LIBRARIAN Des Yeates (09) 838-6535
COMMITTEE Joe & Barbara Murray (09) 444-4110
Bev Ching (09) 534-4495
Glenys Guild (09) 810-9669
Don Strange (09)817-8611
AUDITOR Dawn Persson
A.H.C DELEGATES Patricia Sweeney and
Zen a Poulgrain
MEMBERSHIP SUBSCRIPTIONS

New Zealand NZ$ 14.00 Ordinary

NZ$ 4.00 Associate (same household)
Overseas NZ$ 20.00 ainnail Australia

NZ$ 25.00 ainnail USA & other overseas

MEnlNGS

FOURTH Tuesday of each month except December, at Greyfriars
Church Hall, cnr. Mt Eden and Windmill Roads, Auckland, at 7.30 pm.

 

Tillandsia harrisii R. Ehlers. Photo by Klaus Eistettcr. Reproduced from the
Journal oiThe Bromeliad Society [ne, 39: 2 March-April 1989 p. 75

Contents

President's Page 23
February Meeting News 24
Notice ofMeeting 28
Don't Throw Them Away, by Bea Hanson 29
Announcements 30
Tillandsia Cultivation, by Norm Smith 31
Seed Bank 34
Officers of the Society 35
Membership details, meetings 35

 

 

February 1997

Vol. 37 No. ,

Bromeliad

Socle-ey 0' lIew Zealand Inc.

 

BromeIiad Society of New Zealand (Inc.)

Affiliated with the Bromeliad Society International Inc.

The Society was fonned on the 28th August, 1962.

The objects of the Society are to encourage the cultivation and study

of Bromeliads grown indoors or outdoors, and in particular:

(a) To promote discussion and arrange instruction on
cultivation, propagation and control of diseases.
(b) To provide a Library for members.
(c) To assist members to identify plants.
(d) To make awards for outstanding new bromeliads.
( e) To hold Shows or public exhibitions of bromeliads.
(f) To promote the distribution of bromeliads amongst
members by exchange, purchase and sale, and to
encourage the importation of new plants.
(g) To affiliate with any Society or other body, and to do such
things as may be deemed necessary or desirable in the
furtherance of these objects.
(h) To accept affiliation from other Societies having similar

objects.

This month's cover: Tillandsia eizii growing at 2250 meters in
San Crist6bal de Las Casas, Chiapas, Mexico. Photo by Robert
Guess, reprinted from the Journal of The Bromeliad Society, Vol. 45

(4) July-August 1995. See article by Duncan Golicher in this issue.
Please send articles & advertisements to the Editor, P.0. Box 11

 

375, Wellington. New Zealand. E-mail This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

The opinions expressed in letters or articles in this magazine are the
author's own views and do not necessarily express the policy ofthe
Bromeliad Society of New Zealand.

2

 

President's Page

My to you all best wishes
you a late: however trust that enjoyed
festive season. [Lateness was more likely the editor's fault ...EdJ
This year the Society is off to a flying start with our annual
competitive show, brought forward to the weekend of February 8-9.

only is the earlier than there has a change
to the Road. As
the show not happen own through

active participation of the members-so please help in any way from
setting up the display etc. on Friday to helping with the teas and raffle
during the weekend. Do not forget to enter plants in the competition or

them along display.
The monthly for has also

second February 7.30pm.
gives the opportunity for those out-of-town members who come to the
show to stay on a day and be with us for the meeting. Graham Alderson
from Rangiora will be showing slides of some of his magnificent

and how them colder South climate.

The General is only over a
away, so another plea to ask if any of you would like to become
committee members and assist planning the Society's business for the
next year. Certainly not an onerous task, but one that is essential in
helping the Sociey continue to grow.

Looking to seeing all at the

Dave Anderson.

general correspondence should Bromeliad

of New 40
Waitakere City, Auckland 8, New
Back issues of the Bulletin (since September 1994) are available from
the Editor for $2 post paid. For issues prior to that please contact
Laurie Dephoff, Flat 1122 Lunn Avenue, Panmure, Auckland 6 ..

 

Januarv Meeting News

Forty members and four visitors turned out, which was quite a
good muster for the first meeting of the year. We were quite a bit late
getting started which of course makes for a late finish.

The main thrust of business focussed on the show to be held at
Mt. Albert War Memorial Hall on 8-9th February. Rosters were
circulated for volunteers to help, and a good response was recorded.
For any overall queries regarding the Show contact Peter Waters, and
queries regarding entries contact Joe Murray, and if you can help out
with food contact Bev. Ching who will be in charge of the kitchen.
Contact Len Trotman regarding sales plants.

The Show and Tell table was quite well stocked and contained
some interesting specimens. Laurie Dephoff brought in a Pitcairnia
heterophylla, and anything more unlike a bromeliad you would never
see. It had a profusion of sharp spines about IOcm. long with three pale
pink flowers and several very fine green leaves. These plants are
deciduous and could best be described as weird. Laurie also had two
Neoregelias which were performing unusually: first was Neo. cruenta
"rubra" that had an unusual pup that had been taken off and the plant
was producing two normal pups. The other one had produced a pup
which had turned into an inflorescence. These plants do funny things at
times!

Peter Waters had a Guzmania ronhoffiana which produces an
inflorescence unlike the usual Guzmania flower. This was a tall thin
spike rather like G. patula. Also Tillandsia hamaleana with soft green
leaves and pale purple flowers which unfortunately do not last very
long. Zen a Poulgrain had an unnamed vriesea which was thought to be
Vr. ensijormis, and Aechmea fulgens discolor "albo marginata" which
was almost on its way out, but was producing a small pup. These plants
are not easy to grow under our conditions. Gill Keesing had an
unnamed billbergia which was thought to be B. vittata, and Des Yeates
had a Neoregelia Black Knight which was thought to be grown too
shady: Neo's need plenty of light to grow properly.

Our discussion plants for the evening were vrieseas with
textured leaves, and what an array we had. The vrieseas that fall into
this category are usually quite large growers, and unlike the green

4

 

leafed varieties can generally be acclimatised to grow in the full sun
and therefore make good landscape subjects provided they are grown
in a sheltered place. Otherwise the wind can break and bend their
leaves and they will certainly be affected by the frost. The Vr.
Josteriana types seem to be quite dominant in this range of vrieseas,
and many hybrids have been produced from this parent with others
such as Vr. hieroglyphica, Vr. Jenestralis, Vr. gigantea and Vr.
platynema-and there are some beautifully patterned plants to be had.
Most of these vrieseas come from eastern and southern Brazil and
grow there at relatively low levels. All of these plants have very tall
flower spikes, sometimes over a meter tall, with brownish-yellow
flowers which open in the evening and close again around noon the
next day so that quite often the blooming is missed. They are
obviously pollinated by nocturnal creatures such as bats and moths.
They also exude a sweet sticky substance to attract their pollinators.
Some of them are self-pollinating but are quite easy to cross pollinate
provided you catch them fairly early in the day.

Some of the plants on the table were: Vr. Midori (Vr. gigantea
"Seideliana" X Vr. gigantea tesselata), with wide leaves, purplish
underneath with white/green striations. Vr. Intermedia (parentage
unknown to me) has light green leaves with purplish/brown wavy
crossbands [there are two "Intermedia" registered with the BSI-Vr.
barilletii X Vr. Jenestralis, and Vr. Viminalis Rex X Vr.
hieroglyphica-EdJ. Vr. hieroglyphica, probably known to most, and
referred to as "the king of the bromeliads". Vr. Splenreit, with similar
markings to Vr. splendens. Vr. Pahoa Beauty (Vr. gigantea
"Seideliana" X Vr. Josteriana "Seideliana"), Vr. Josteriana "rubra",
a handsome plant with wide dark green leaves banded with chocolate
brown and this one was sporting an inflorescence around one metre
and not yet fully extended. there were also many more, and too
numerous to describe here, but all exquisite plants that would make
any owner proud.

The discussion on these plants was ably led by Dave
Anderson who gave a detailed account of habitat and general growing
conditions.

5

 

NEXT MEETING

 

1 th, when Graham

This should be a
Meantime to seeing you at the
9th.

COMPETITIONS

Open flowering: 1 st Joe Murray with Neoregelia Rosy Morn
(formerly "morrisoniana") a large, wide leafed plant with light green
leaves blushing pink if grown in strong light and blushing strong pink
in the centre when in flower. The plants in collections in NZ were
originally imported from Em Bailey in NSW. 2nd Laurie Dephoff
with Neoregelia Maggies Pride: twin headded and well grown,

obviously light. This is another
Others on were Neo. carolinae
carolinae Super Ruby, Neo.
Aechmea discolor X ramosa,

Red Chestnut.
Open Dephoff first with
sedling, a large plant difTering from the normal species with its lime
green leaves splotched here and there with darker green. Peter Waters
was second with Quesnelia marmorata Tim Plowman, a tubular plant
of around six leaves 20cm. tall and curling back at the tips. It is not
very often we see a quesnelia on the table. Others were Neoregelia
Oeser Hybrid, Neo. Kahala Dawn, Neo. Empress, Aechmea
orlandiana Ensign, Ae. chantinii X phanerophlebia, Ae. fasciata X

nudicaulis, Nidularium unnamed !lower
heads.
Joe Murray with T
single spike of brilliant
Trotman always spectacular
pale purple pale purple petals.
albertiana, T leiboldiana, ,r.
olaguitensis.

Tillandsia foliage: T capitata "Guatemala" from Len Trotman was

6

 

first-mounted on driftwood and blushing pink from the high light. T
jalisco-montecola from Peter Waters was second, a large plant also
colored up from the high light. Also entered were T hulhosa, T arhiza
"major", T

streptopilylla, T r--------------,
tricolor, T
ionantha.

 

Ching
got first

Aechmea gamosepala Lucky

Stripes and Tillandsia limbata

respectively.

Novice foliage: Lester also got

first and second with Neomea

Pink Rocket and Nidularium

regelioides, Seems like it was

Lester's

Trophy
went to

Pitcairnia heterophylla. From Smith &
Downes, Flora Neotropica Fig. 141

Full
Halfpage
Quarter
Eighth page

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Single issue

15.00
8,50
4.25
2.00

7

1.80

 

Announcements

New member: Welcome to Shirley Sparks, Munro Road, Te Puna
RD6, Tauranga. We hope you will enjoy your time with the Society.

Don't forget the visit to Norma Cook's place at Matakawau on
the16th February. Norma is supplying lunch at $5 per head so please
let us know if you want this, and don't forget to bring a cup. We have
been invited to meet at Graham West's place at No. 1 Cameron Road,
Papakura, about 9.45am., have morning tea there and then follow the
leader to Norma's so that nobody will get lost.

The Annual General Meeting will be held before the March general
meeting and we will be electing a new President and Committee for
the ensuing year-so give some thought to putting your name forward
for one of the positions. The Employment Contracts Act does not
apply! ...and we are offering good pay and conditions.

The Perth Conference of Australian Bromeliad Societies is being
held on the 26-29 September of this year and application forms will
be available in the next few weeks. In conjunction with the conference
there will be the opportunity to have a three day bus tour of the
wildflower region.

Bertie Bromel will return next month. Meantime, he has been out
spotting in the garden centres (and trying not to be ill when he sees
the tillandsia displays). Last year it was reported that Vriesea splendens
had disappeared from New Zealand collections. Our intrepid
Bertie has spotted some rather nice specimens on sale in Palmers for
$19.95-someone may have grown them from seed. He reports that
they are labelled "Bromeliad Vriesea" and have interesting notes on
the label: "Vibrant, flaming flowering house plant. Mist regularlyMaintain
humidity. Keep moist, not wet, drier in winter. Requires
19-27C. Moderate to low light. Fertilize half strength monthly during
spring". The minimum temperature requirement may explain the
disappearance of this beautiful plant from local collections. Bertie
bought a couple, so we hope he will keep us up to date on their health!

8

fI" .,

 

Canopy Farming In Chiapas

Duncan Golicher, Mexico.

As a research ecologist working in Chiapas, Mexico, I have to
confront one of the most important and challenging problems facing
the conservation community today. What can be done to preserve the
dwindling areas of tropical forest? Here in southern Mexico, effective
protection of the limited number of local reserves is becomming
increasingly difficult in the face of the intense social and political
pressures caused by a rapidly growing population.

Not all tropical forests are part of vast areas of "jungle". The
landscape of Chiapas resembles more closely that of Europe or North
America, with small areas of tropical and montane woodland scattered
across a predominantly agricultural landscape. These remnants,
though small, are often extremely rich in both flora and fauna. In
order to keep these fascinating fragments, a use must be found for
them which can effectively compete with the economic returns offered
by converting them to cattle pasture or maize [corn] fields.

One solution lies in identifying suitable non-timber products
that can be cultivated within the forest. For such "canopy farming" to
work, the products must be an integral part of the ecology of the
woodland, they must have a reasonably high economic value and it
must be possible to produce them in a sustainable way. Ornamental
bromeliads fit these criteria. We are hoping that they can play an
important role not only in conservation, but also as a source of income
for members of the indigenous Mayan communities of the region,
most of whom live in conditions of extreme poverty.

As an example of the potential, one of our students is
studying lichens in a unique area of decisuous lowland forest. the
wcxxiland is loaded with many species of vascular epiphytes. Althpugh
I haven't done a count, comparisons with other data would
suggest that there are well over 5,000 tillandsias per hectare. A few
days ago he arrived with the news that the forest was being sold in
order to be burnt and converted to cattle pasture. The price is less than
$1000 per hectare (the soil is extremely poor). If each bromeliad had
a value of 25 cents, then they are worth more than the land. Yet if
nothing is done, in a year's time they will all have gone up in smoke.

If the important resource that brome1iads represent is to be

9

 

used, care must be taken to ensure it is used sustainably. Collecting
plants for sale with no thought to maintaining the population simply
won't do. Encouragingly we have had good results from reintroduction
experiments that have convinced us that it is feasible to implement
management techniques that can guarantee sustainable production
of plants.

Because tillandsia seeds are wind dispersed, very few seem to
find an establishment site. Of those that manage to stick to a piece of
tree bark (probably less than 1 %) fewer than 4% germinate. However,
it is not particularly difficult to germinate virtually 100% of the seeds
in a greenhouse. Large numbers of seedlings produced in this way can
be easily and quickly stuck onto trees (the main difficulty being
climbing the tree-we use ropes). We have successfully added several
hundred small plants to the population of Tillandsia eizii in a
local reserve in which the numbers ofthis spectacular bromeliad have
been severely depleted by over-collection in the past.

We are now starting up a pilot demonstration project with
members of a local rural community. The production process will
combine some "canopy farming" with cultivation in a small greenhouse.
For the present, we are stressing the cultivation aspect of the
project and have made no promises to the community regarding the
possible returns from such an enterprise. However, we are convinced
that it has considerable potential.

I would like to hear from anyone who is interested in our
project. I particularly would like to contact individuals or organisations
that might be able to help us to export and sell small numbers of
plants. I should point out that it will be a while yet before the
community we are working with produces a surplus of plants for sale.

Duncan Golicher

El Colegio de la Frontera Sur (ECOSUR)

San Cristobal de Las Casas

Chiapas, Mexico.

Fax -(967) 82322

email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

reprinted from The Bromeliadvisory (Bromeliad Society of Sowh
Florida) Vo/. 40 (2) February, 1997.

10

 

lener to The Editor.

Andrew Steens, Tauranga.

I read with interest the comments on commercial sales of
Bromeliads [Bulletin Vol. 36 (l0) November 1996]. Over the past ten
years I have worked with Bromeliads on a commercial basis, firstly as
export flowers (mainly to Japan, Hong Kong and New York), but
more recently also as flowering pot plants to the New Zealand florist
trade.

In both cases I take care to include information on care of
these products (from a commercial perspective, they are products like
any other. despite my own passion for them). This I believe is simply
good commercial practise, which should increase comsumer confidcn.:
e in the product and encourage repeat sales.

It disappoints me to see various Bromeliads for sale in
nurseries and florist shops which have no information attached, not
even the genus or species name. It disappoints me even more to see
poorly grown and presented plants.

I would encourage members to give the florist or garden
centre owner some gentle feedback if poor plants are seen, as most
people are not aware of what to expect from t~is magnificent family
of plants.

I attach the care guide (first edition!) that we give out with
our plants.

Andrew Steens

B. Hort, MNZSHS
Registered Horticultural Consultant.
BROMELIADS -CAREFULLY GROWN FOR YOUR
ENJOYMENT BY MAUAO FLOWERS

 

Bromeliads come from South America, where the 3,000 + species
have adapted to all types of ecosystems, including rainforests, alpine
conditions, cliff faces, deserts and beaches. Many Bromeliads are
epiphytic, which means they grow on trees (but are not parasitic) and
survive on nutrients from falling leaves and rainfall. Others are

11

 

terrestrial, living either on forest floors or on rocks and cliffs.

The widespread popularity of Bromeliads has resulted in a
huge number of hybrids becomming available. Some of the groups
that are available include:
Aechmea

The group most suited for indoor pot plants ego Aechmea
gamosepala, are epiphytic, have deep cups to hold water and outstanding
green or coloured foliage. The leaf edges are often slightly
spined and the flower spikes are spectacular.

The other group, ego Aechmea recurvata, are more hardy, and
therefore are often grown as outdoor plants or on balconies. They
have hard, spiny, grey green foliage which often turns bright pink to
purple at flowering, with the flowers held low in the vase.

Billbergia

Billbergia are very popular, easily grown, dependable
bloomers, with an interesting array of flower colours with a hanging
form and often dramatic foliage.

Guzmania

Bromeliads in this genus have glossy, strap-like, smoothedged
leaves which form a water-holding rosette. In many varieties
there are thin brown, purple or maroon lines which run parallel along
the length of the leaves. Clusters of red, white or yellow flowers
appear from behind orange, yellow or red bracts on a flower spike.
They are mostly epiphytic, however, a few are terrestrial.

Neoregelia

These Bromeliads have some of the most spectacular foliage
in cultivation. They develop blue or white flowers just above the
water level in the cup. The central portion of the leaves surrounding
the flowers develop bright colours ranging from pink to purple
depending on the variety. The spiny-edged leaves may also have red
spots and markings.

Nidularium

These Bromeliads are very similar in appearance to the
Neoregelias, but their flowers are often more spectacular. This group
of plants comes mainly from the lower levels of the rainforests .

Vriesea

These are medium size, mostly epiphytic plants \\ ith w it or

12

 

firm, variously green but often spotted, blotched or distinctly marked

The long-lasting spikes have
colored The
, pendulous or curved.

CARING FOR YOUR MAUAO FLOWERS BROMELIAD

The main irement water centre of

type plants, allowing some to flow pot at each
watering. The types should sprayed water over the
leaves at least once a week (or better still, place outside in light rain)
and more frequently in dl)' sunny conditions.

As a mle of thumb, the hard leafed, grey/green varieties ego
recurvala, need full or full sunlight Therefore place
on a balcony north-facing

The coloured, hard-leaf varieties such as some Neoregelias
and Aechmea jasciata need moderate to high light to bring out the
best colour. A northeastern window is a good spot.

The soft coloured as Aechmea
gamosepala and bum if
sunlight. Keep away in a well
room for best apperance.
The potting medium that Mauao Flowers Bromeliads are sold
in is specially designed for bromeliads. It's key characteristic is the
to provide drainage. tl)' to use
type of best). Liquid
all types by occasionally with a weak food.

Once flowering has finished new plants will form at the base
of the plant. These will usually flower in the next year. The young
plants can be removed and potted up when they are 113 to 112 the size

original or left on a clump. mother plant
produce -6 offshoots (pups).

Bromeliads have few pests and diseases. Spreading a few
slug pellets on the soil surface at flowering (if the plants are outdoors)
will control slugs and snails. Scale insects are easily conby
wiping leaves with cloth.

month we at a Tillandsia cultivation guides.

13

 

Aechmea brevicellis

Ae. mexicana

Alcanterea imperialis

Guzmania lingulat var. cardinalis
Guz. patula

Neoregelia pascoaliana

Puya mirabilis

Streprucalyx species
Tillandsia bartramii
T butzii

Tillandsia hamaleana
Tjuncea
T plagiotopica

T. pohliana
T. schiedeana
T. tricholepis
T tricolor Xjuncea
Vriesea hieroglyphica
Thanks to all those who keep us supplied with seeds -Pat
Sweeney, Len Trotman, Noel Scotting, Len Trotman, Morris Tarr.
Mike Pouigiase, Keith and Maureen Green and Wayne Rastall have
supplied us lately. And special thanks to our overseas friends who
send seed: Harvey Beltz from Lousiana, Ken Woods from Sydney,
Uncle Derek occasionally, Moyna Prince in Florida, Charles Dills in
California...

Orders (with S.A.E.) and spare seed to:
Andrew Flower

P.O. Box 11-375, Manners Street P.O.
WELLINGTON.
14

 

OFFICERS

 

Telephone
PATRON & LIFE MEMBER Mrs Bea Hanson (09) 527-6830
HISTORlAN & LIFE MEMBER Laurie Dephoff (09) 527-7789
PRESIDENT Dave Anderson (09) 638-8671
VICE PRESIDENTS Lester Ching (09) 534-4495
Joe Murray (09) 444-4110
SECRETARY Len Trotman (09) 838-9356
TREASURER Peter Waters (09) 534-5616
EDITOR Andrew Flower (04) 475-9697
LIBRARlAN Des Yeates (09) 838-6535
COMMITTEE Joe & Barbara Murray (09) 444-4110
Bev Ching (09) 534-4495
Glenys Guild (09) 810-9669
Don Strange (09)817-8611
AUDITOR Dawn Persson
A.H.C DELEGATES Patricia Sweeney and
Zena Poulgrain
MEMBERSHIP SUBSCRIPTIONS
New Zealand NZ$ 14.00 Ordinary

NZ$ 4.00 Associate (same household)
Overseas NZ$ 20.00 airmail Australia

NZ$ 25 .00 airmail USA & other overseas

MEETINGS

FOURTH Tuesday of each month except December, at Greyfriars
Church Hall, cnr. Mt Eden and Windmill Roads, Auckland, at 7.30 pm.

19

 

Display by the Society at Gardenz in Auckland,
September 1996 and awarded second prize for the
display of the Show. Photo per kind permission of Peter
Waters.

Contents

t

President's Page 3
January Meeting News 4

l

Announcements 8
Canopy Fanning in Chiapas, by Duncan Golicher 9
Letter to the Editor, by Andrew Steens 11
Seed Bank 14
Officers ofthe Society 19
Membership details, meetings 19

 

 

April 1997
Vol. 37 No. 3

Bromeliad

Socllei:y ., lIew Zealand Inc.

 

Bromeliad Society of New Zealand (Inc.)

Affiliated with the Bromeliad Society Incorporated
The on the 28th August 1962,

are to encourage and study
indoors or outdoors,

(a)
discussion and arrange cultivation,
propagation and control of diseases.
(b)
To provide a Library for members.
(c)
To assist members to identify plants.
(d)
To make awards for outstanding new bromeliads.
(e)
To hold Shows or public exhibitions ofbromeliads.
(f)
To promote the distribution ofbromeliads amongst members
by exchange, purchase and sale, and to encourage the
new plants.

(g)
with any Society or other
be deemed necessary
these objects.

(h) afl1liation from other
similar
All general correspondence should be sent to The Secretary,
Bromeliad Society ofNew Zealand, 40 Tirimoana Road, Te Atatu
South, Waitakere City, Auckland 8, New Zealand.

Back issues of the Bulletin (since September 1994) are available
from the Editor for $2 post paid. For issues prior to that please contact
Dephoff, Flat 1122 Lunn Avenue, Auckland 6 ..

The letters or articles in
not necessarily express

Please advertisements to the 1 -375,
Wellington, New Zealand. E-mail This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

President's Page

It is my pleasure as the new President of the Bromeliad Society
of New Zealand Incorporated to thank the outgoing President and
committee of 1996/97. A lot of work goes into keeping the Bromeliad
Society active during the year and during the bromeliad show. A
special thanks to committee members Dave Anderson, Len Trotman,
Peter Waters, Barbara & Joe Murray and other club members who gave
so much of their time and experience.

I am sorry to see Barbara & Joe Murray leave the committee as
their years of experience will be sadly missed.

Welcome to the committee for 1997/98 and with an active year
ahead of us we look forward to participation from all members to
support their committee for this year.

Thanks to Peter Waters for opening his home gardens up to
members. Although it rained in the morning, it was fine at Peter's place
and members enjoyed their visit, taking advantage of his sales stall to
enhance their own collections.

An excellent selection of plants on the sales table for the
March meeting was great to see giving members a great selection.
Don't forget to turn your surplus plants into cash, bring them along to
the monthly meetings.

Food for thought: Plants are like children, we enjoy their growth &
color for such a short time.

Lester Ching.

This month's cover: Quesnelia marmorata "Tim Plowman". Photo
by Peter Waters. This plant won first place in the section "Bigeneric or
other genus" at the Annual Show.

39

 

March Meeting News

was preceded the A.G.M.,

have a President, Lester

who Dave has completed
mandatory three years and was thanked for his hard work over those
years. A list of the new committee members will be published
elsewhere in the journal. [inside back cover -Ed]

Some plants brought in show and

and Guzmania sanguinea brevipedicellata
belonging to Cooke. This had three quite close
the top of the old plant and Heather was wondering how to get them
off. This can be a tricky operation and sufficient leaves must be
removed so as to be able to see the base of the pup where it joins the

plant, then gently pup off

slice stem with possible. good idea
harden the base of the pup for a few days before planting to lessen the
possibility of it rotting off. If the parent plant is not damaged, put it
aside and you may get another pup or two.

Lester had a rodrigueziana with pups

to know should be taken These can

at about to one size of the plant. In
experience tillandsias are reluctant to give a second round of pups so
don't worry if the parent plant is destroyed in the process.

An aechmea brought in by Win Shorrock was provisionally
identified asAc. A more positive can be

the plant flower hope to then. If
identification is then it an inflorescence with
red bracts and a conical flower head with yellow petals.

What should one do with the pups of Billbergia stolonifera?
Plant the whole plant in a hanging basket and let it develop. That was
advice given VermeeL Lowe neoregelia
identification, proved too

Our discussion plants for the evening were neorcgelia species
and was led by Peter Waters who brought in thirtysix species or
cultivars for inspection. I am sure we did not realise that so many
spccies plants existed in N.Z.

 

Neoregelias are the most popular bromeliadsto be seen In
collections of their colors when grown in the
light and many of lend themselves well as !'''JlU,''~'''j
plants. They were first discovered in 1825 and were at that time
described as tillandsias, then subsequently called regelias, aragelias,
and finally neoregelias as they are known today. There are now 98
known species, some of which were quite discovered,
neoregelias with a rosette flowers in of the plant

sometimes confused with nidulariums, studied
will be observed to have compound flowers in contrast to the simple
flowers of neoregelia. Quite a lot of the neoregelias are blushers,
which means that they color up in the centre at flowering time-these

colors range pink to the purple.
There two groups neoregelia: that are
and around Amazon basin, those that found close

de Janeiro (the latter making up the largest group). They do not grow
in any particular part of the forest canopy and can be found growing
on the ground as well as high up in the trees, They need good light,
good air and plenty water. When watering by
can be difficult get the water around the the plant
the spreading shape of the plant which tends to act as a water shed.
Because of this the underneath leaves and potting mix sometimes
dries out and makes a good breeding ground for scale, so watch this
carefully.

Do over fertilize neoregelias, if they are
shady situation during the as they up. The
on the table were: N. cathcartii, N. tarapotoensis, N. mooreana var.
eleutheropetela, N. carolinae Tigrina, N. carolinae Princeps, N.
carolinae Tricolor, N. marceloi, N. princeps, N. sapietibensis, N. Star

Brazil, elloniana, N. N. N. ampullacea
Purpurea, lilliputiana, martinelli, N. N. cyanea,
tristis, N. Marble N. leprosa, jluminensis.
maculata, N. smithii, N. coimbrae, N. marmorata, N. rubro vitta, N.
burle marxii, N. zonata, N. johnsonii, N. seideliana pascoalina, N.
kautskyi, N. carcharodon. Some of these have not been seen in N.Z.
before. I hope all of those right!

41

 

NEXT MEETING

 

Tuesday April. Be about
Tuesdays this Discussion will be
its relatives. Des Yeates
collection.

COMPETITIONS

flowering:! loe Murray with Nidulariwn innocentii
wittmackii. dark green plant with leaves
inflorescence with reddish bracts and white flowers. I have a feeling
that this plant was not innocentii, but never the less a beautiful plant.
2nd was Peter Waters with Aechmea nudicaulis Silver Streak. This

looks billbergia dark pink banded
silver-it needs be grown strong keep its
Others entered were two unnamed neoregelias, Guzmania Orner
Morobe, Vriesea jlamme, Aechmea jasciata, Nidularium julgens and
Nidularium terminale.

foliage: 1 with Vriesea hieroglyphcia,
seed-grown leaves here and

darker vvith Neoregelia Pink Sensation,
a medium-sized plant with shocking pink leaves. Also on the table
were Aechmea chantinii x ramosa, Neoregelia Rosy Morn, Neo.
Kahala Dawn, Neo. Red Cone x Red Flame, Neo Empress, Neo Solar

Something Special, another Vrie
hieroglyphica.
rillandsia Win T. jasciculata "Hondurensis"
mounted on driftw~ood was first. This plant had obviously been grown
in the high light and was nicely colored up with a tall branched
inflorescence. Peter Waters' T. guatemalensis was second (these

lants are in their this was of the
vvide-leafed spOIiing a tal inflorescence). Also on
table were T. caput-medusae, 1: lampropoda, T: multicaulis, T
malemontii, T. punctulata, T. concolor, T. caput-medusae x
streptophylla, T. jasciculata var. clavispica, T. stricta and T.
leiholdiana.

 

Tillandsiafoliage: 1st Dave Anderson with T compressa, a medium
sized plant narrow green, arching This
true comprcssa, which is not here very 2nd 'Was
'frotman's T: maya, a soft leafed plant similar to 1: capitata-grown in
the high light these will color up nicely. There were also T straminea,
T deppeana, T roland-gosselinii, T streptophylla, T streptocarpa, T
creatacea, T T novakii, T atroviridipetala, T gardneri,
Novice flowering: Lester Ching out first seeond places
Aechmeafasciala and Nidulariumji4/gens . Both were
grown plants.
Novice foliage: 1 st Lester Ching with a beautifully grown Canistrum
leopardinum. This plant grows fairly large and has light green leaves
with dark blotching. make nice plants

was Bill Vermeer with Vriesea platynema.
good plants and well in the

The Greenhough Trophy points went to Peter Waters. Door
prizes were won by Kath Grainger, June Sly and Julie Greehnill.
Special raffle of Tillandsia pohliana mounted on driftwood went to Jill
Keesing and prize of ? went Judith Kettle.

If would like a five talk about
collections or their triumphs and failures, please let us know. Also give
some thought about articles for the Bulletin and if possible a
photograph, the Editor will be rapped [wrapped? -Ed. .. .].

Len Trotman.

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43

 

Nonhland Bromeliad Group

Colleen Frew, Kawakawa

The group meetings over the last few months have taken us
all over the north. Our meetings are well attended and numbers are
increasing.

The Christmas pot luck lunch at Avon and Barbara Ryan's
was most enjoyable and everyone had a good look round Avon's
colorful garden.

In January we went to Pam and Stan Torkington's Farmbrook
Nurseries at Oakleigh, south of Whangarei where they have a wide
variety of plants, also several aviaries of different types of birds.

On Sunday February 23rd, the group travelled north to Cable
Bay in Mangonui. Helen and David Garland have a well developed
garden of unusual tropical plants, many in flower at this time of the
year. They also have a good number of bromeliads which obviously
like the climate up there. Recently the Garlands have put in a
picturesque fish pond-surrounded by orchids and bromeliads it
provided a pleasant tranquil area. Helen says that carrying the large
flat stones was very strenuous work but the effort was well worth it.

After lunch (Helen supplemented our package lunches with
seafood salad, pizza, sponges and homemade herb bread) we went
further north to Lake Ngatu, not far from Kaitaia. Here we went to
Peter Enticott's tropical nursery where we had a three hour conducted
tour. Peter gave interesting and instructive tips on propagating and
caring for the plants, including starting cuttings in sand, developing
different types of bananas etc. Although it rained heavily while we
were there, our spirits were not dampened and after a really interesting
afternoon it was home again, most people in well laden cars.

It showed a healthy interest that such a good crowd went the
distance, and I must note that one group comprised great grandmother,
grandmother, mother and son. Does this mean that we will
have the "follow on" for years to come?

44

 

Notes from The Bav of Plenty

The February meeting of the group was held at the home of
Alison Sears. We had decided to have the meeting in the morning
before the heat of the day. As well as members, we had Mr Murphy
there too and he made it rain for the two hours of the meeting.

Johanna Elder showed us plants with which she had won
prizes at the Auckland show and she gave us a resume of the show. A
great success in the larger venue.

After lunch we had another meeting for those who had
forgotten that the meeting was in the morning. Johanna showed her
plants again and other display plants were talked about. Just as well
we had plenty of hot water because tea seemed to flow all day.

We have persuaded more people to join the N.Z. Bromeliad
Society, and we are working on the rest. One member was concerned
about the lack of information about bromeliad culture at plant nurseries.
She intend to write to some nurseries to suggest a remedy.

Our next meeting was on Wednesday 9th April at 1.30pm. at
the home ofNatalie Simmons.

[Sorry, I have lost the name ofour worthy scribe .... Ed.]

lener To The Editor

Dear Sir,
Your front cover last month really gave me the blues. Was
there something wrong with your printer? Do you need a new one?

Yours etc.,
Mission the Point, Buckland's Beach

 

The Editor replies (sadly)
I PRCYtVSE NEVER TO TRY TO BEARTISTIC1IG.4/N.. I PRO'rVSENEVER TO TRY TO
BE ARTISTICAGAIN.. I PRO"tVSE fEVER TO TRY TO BE ARTISTICIIGIIIN.. ! PRCYtVSE /'EVER TO

TRY TO BE ARTlCTIC 1lGA/1t..1 Pf?CtIVSE toT TO Tl?Y TO BE I1I?TICTIC I/GAItI.I PrOWSE ror TV fT(Y TV BE AlmCTTC

IUW

4S

 

Annual Competitive Show

Peter Waters, Auckland.

The annual competitive show of the Bromeliad Society of

N.Z. held the weekend of This year we
announced a of venue as Eden Garden it was for
the previous few years was unable to provide enough undercover
space for plant sales and would have necessitated considerable expense
much to an adequate area.
The new venue is Mt. Memorial Hall has
been used for many years for other horticultural shows and which
proved to be ideal for our purposes. There is a large entrance foyer
where selling entrance tickets raffles place. small
display of bromeliads was set up here and at one end we had five or
six tables where we sold refreshments. A very good modern kitchen is
adjacent Through the wide entrance into main hall where
there landing then or five down a large expanse
of floor. At the front there was a large and colorful display of many
types of bromeliad: neoregelias around the edges rising through
aechmeas and to central oftillandsias. At back of
the and in ofthe a long oftabJcs were with
sales plants and initially the stage and floor also, although by the end
of the show there weren't many left. The rest of the hall was filled
with more than tables for the competitive show. were
covered with showed the exhibits great
advantage.

It was generally agreed that this hall was much more convenient
Eden Garden setting viewing and also the
excellent parking and we in fact booked next show
already. Financially it was successful even though the hire of the hall
was expensive we were. able to charge an entrance fee, which wecouldn't
do at Garden, and the of teas, and 7,500 of
plants helped to make a good profit. This will allow us to keep our
subscription from increasing.

The competitive was a great success and the most
gratifying aspect was that members shared 78 We
had entries from Christchurch, New Plymouth, Tauranga and Hamil

 

46

 

)

 

ton and I believe that this augers well for the future.

SHOW AWARDS

The following awards were made in the competitive sections
of the show:

Plant of the Show: Len Trotman, Tillandsia xerographica.

Best Tillandsia: Len Trotman, Tillandsia xerographica
Best Vriesea or Guzmania: Peter Waters, Guzmania Cherry.
Best Novice: 10 Elder, Tillandsiafasciculata "Hondurensis"
Best Arrangement: Zena Poulgrain
Most points in Show: Len Trotman.

 

Individual Classes:

Class 1 Aechmea 1 st Owen Paton Ae. fasciata purpurea
blooming 2nd Graham Alderson Ae. fasciata purpurea
3rd Len Trotman Ae. Lucky Stripes
Class 2 Aechmea 1st Graham Alderson Ae. Silver Streak
foliage 2nd Gill Keesing Ae. disticantha
3rd Win Shorrock Ae. Ensign
Class 3 Billbergia 1st Gill Keesing B. Purpurea
2nd Gill Keesing B. vittata
3rd Peter Waters B. rosea
Class 4 Cryptanthus 1st Peter Waters C. zonatus hybrid
2nd loe Murray C. Maggie
3rd loe Murray C. Dusk
Class 5 Guzmania 1st Peter Waters G. Cherry
blooming 2nd Len Trotman G. Ruby
3rd Len Trotman G. Rana
Class 6 Guzmania 1st Len Trotman G. Claret
foliage 2nd Len Trotman G. Peacockii
3rd Gill Keesing G. wittmackii
47

 

Class 7 Neoregelia
blooming
Class 8 Neoregelia
foliage

Class 9
Nidularium

Class 10
Tillandsia
small blooming

 

Class 11
Tillandsia
small foliage

Class 12
Tillandsia
medium
blooming

Class 13
Tillandsia
medium
foliage

Class 14
Tillandsia
large blooming

 

Class 15
Tillandsia
large foliage

Class 16
Vriesea
blooming

Class 17
Vriesea
foliage

1st
2nd
3rd

1st
2nd
3rd=
3rd=

1 st
2nd
3rd

1 st
2nd
3rd

1st
2nd
3rd

1st
2nd
3rd

1 st

2nd

3rd

1 st

2nd

3rd

1 st

2nd

3rd

1 st

2nd

3rd

1st
2nd
3rd
HC

Owen Paton
Jenny Gallagher
Judith Alderson

Judith Alderson
Owen Paton
Gill Keesing
Gill Keesing

Peter Waters
Owen Paton
Peter Waters

Graham Alderson
Len Trotman
Len Trotman

Len Trotman
Len Trotman
Graham Alderson

Peter Waters
Judith Alderson
Graham Alderson

Jo Elder

Len Trotman

Joe Murray

Len Trotman

Win Shorrock

Win Shorrock

Len Trotman

Peter Waters

Win Shorrock

Len Trotman
Graham Alderson
Graham Alderson

Graham Alderson
Len Trotman
Peter Waters
Peter Waters

48

N. Beta x Magnifica
N. Spotted Delight
N. Olwen Ferris
N. Manoa Beauty
N. Sheer Joy
N. hybrid
N. Bea Hanson
N. Ruby Lee
N. purpureum
N. fulgens "orange"
T dura
T leiboldiana

T. Feater Duster
T tectorum "Minuta"
T gardneri
T sucrei

T. umbellata
T. leiboldiana
T. velutina
T ionantha hybrid
T pohliana
T cretacea

T deppeana
fasciculata "Hondurensis"
T tectorum

T xerographica
T tectorum
T leucolepis

Vr. Coppertone
Vr. Belgische
Vr. splendens "Fire"

 

Vr. Intermedia x Red Chestnut
Vr. Midori
Vr. Hawaiian Sunset
Vr. hieroglyphica

 

Class 18 Bigeneric or 1st Peter Waters Quesnelia Tim Plowman
other genus 2nd Graham Alderson Hohenbergia correia-araujoi
3rd Marie Healey Fascicularia bicolor
Class 19 Miniature 1st Laurie Dephoff Dyckia platyphylla
2nd Joe Murray Neo. ampullacea
3rd Peter Waters Neo. Fireball x ampullaceae
Class 20 Variegated 1st Laurie Dephoff Ae. orlandiana "Ensign"
2nd Gill Keesing Neo. Empress
3rd Len Trotman Neo. carcharodon "tricolor"
Class 21 Novice 1 st Jo Elder T. fasciculata "Hondurensis"
blooming 2nd Vicky Carter Aechmea Jasciata
3rd Bev Ching Aechmea recurvata
Class 22 Novice 1st Karen Halls Vr. gigantea "Snow King"
foliage 2nd Bev Ching Vr. guttata
3rd Bev Ching Neoregelia hybrid
Class 23 Dish or Tray 1st Gill Keesing
or Novelty 2nd Barbara Murray
3rd Len Trotman
Class 24 Bromeliad 1 st Zena Poulgrain
Arrangement 2nd Len Trotman
3rd Win Shorrock
Class 25 Artistic 1st Barbara Murray
Arrangement 2nd Jenny Gallagher
3rd Gill Keesing
Class 26 Decorative 1st Len Trotman
Container 2nd Len Trotman
3rd Peter Waters

MANY MEMBERSHIP SUBSCRIPTIONS
ARE OVERDUE!
Subs should be paid before the Annual General Meeting in
March. Those who have not paid yet, please send your sub to
Peter Waters as soon as possible. Thank You.

49

 

President's Annual Repon to the A.G.M.

It is with pleasure that I present my 6th Annual Report as
President ofthe Bromeliad Society of New Zealand Incorporated.

The magazine is to many the backbone of the Society and I
would forst like to thank our Editor for the hard work he has put into
producing it, month in month out. As all members will have seen, we
are trying to put more color into the magazine but have to compromise
this with the production costs.

We had a change of venue this year for the annual competitive
show which turned out to be better both for the display and
competition and also financially for the Society. A special thanks to
those members who helped in so many ways.

The membership of the Society has stayed pretty constant at
over 200 members during the last few years which is gratifying from
the point of view that many horticultural societies have quite dramatically
lost members over this period. However I would like to see more
members attend our monthly meeting especially those who live in and
around Auckland.

I thank those members who have made their gardens available
to visit from the Society. I am certain that those members who have
participated in these outings have thoroughly enjoyed themselves.

I would like to thank the committee; especially the executive
for their hard work throughout the year and in doing so have made my
job so easy. Joe and Barbara Murray are both stepping down this year
and they will be sadly missed for all the solid work they have given to
the Society over the years. A special thanks to them.

Finally, I would like to offer my best wishes to the incom

 

ming committee and executive for a successful and enjoyable term

over the coming year.

Respectfully submitted,

Dave Anderson

PRESIDENT

50

 

BROMELIAD SOCIETY of NZ INe

 

FINANCIAL POSrTlON AS AT 28 FEBRUARY 1997

Funds 11,321.22

This is represented by:

Current Assets
Current account 4,199.83
:::'8T)osits 5,352..17 9,552.00

badges 1
Pots & labels 138.40 792.20
10,344.20

Less Current Liabilities
SUb:icr'ptions in advance 486.00
9,858.20

 

Non-Current Assets less 10% depreciation
Library and slides 265.17
Speaker and microphones 61.75

 

Calc/stapler/briefcases 88.69

~Itlns & carpet S47A2 1463.02
$11,321.22

T;","~~

REPORT re OF BROHELI' lETY OF NZ

examined H,c ial Staterlcnts books of of the Soc~e
and have received all the information and explanations that I req~ested.
In common with other organisations of a similar nature there is little contral
over inoome prior ~o its inclusion in the books and there are no practical
Accounting procedures to estimate the effects of this limited control.

I consider to have cl"Goerly kepi
Financial ements reflen and fair the 50cietj
and the fine"'" \ position date.

PUt 5S0N

Ii~ AC TD 1Y97

 

Garden Visit

Len Trotman, Auckland

9.00am on Sunday 16th February saw us on our way for a
garden ramble. Firstly to Graham and Pat West's place in Papakura

we had nice morning tea wander around garden.
Here we saw several glasshouses of bromeliads, and begonias
which are Graham's other passion. All were well grown and obviously
given plenty of T.L.C. The Papakura district suffers from
numerous frosts during winter, Graham all of tender

well protected. Onc the was Polygal,
which is made of a double skin with a corrugated filling. This keeps
the inside of the house at a reasonable temperture during the frosty

From here we travelled to Norma Cook's place at
Matakauwau which is near the end of the Manukau Penninsular. This
is around a hour's from Papakura we the
terrific scenery along the way--even when I led those following me
down the wrong road and had to turn back when the landscape

unfam sorry about But wc found our way and
arrhed at Norma's in good time.

Norma has a large collection of bromeliads, both in shadehouses
and out the and spent time
adnllring and checking ones would to have. This was
our lunch stop which was provided by Norma and her girls, and being
such a nice day many of the group took the advantage of having a

lunch the lawn the We raffle which was
Will Vicki Calter. On way home some of called at friend of
Norma's at PoIlock where we enjoyed another half hour or so before
continuing our way home.

All in this was very enjoyable day we like to
thank Pat and Graham and Norma for making this possible.

52

 

Announcements

New Members: Welcome to the following, we hope you have an enjoyable
time with the Society:

 

Jason R. Grant, University of Alaska Museum, Fairbanks, Alaska.
Christine Young, C\-Claris P.O., Great Barrier Island
Patty Laurie, 7 Lee Street, Whitianga
Mr & Mrs W. Clay, 9 Deborah Place, Mangere East.

 

Subscription rates are printed on the inside back cover. Subs are due
in March, and many are still unpaid. Please send your money to the
Treasurer (Peter Waters, 22 Half Moon Rise, Bucklands Beach,
Manukau City.) Thank you.

 

Seed Bank Notes

Andrew Flower, Wellington.

Firstly, heartfelt thanks again to those members and friends
who have been sending us seed lately. Thanks to Pat Sweeney, Len
Trotman, Mike Poulglase and Noel Scotting. And those generous
people overseas who keep us supplied: Charles Dill in California,
Harvey Beltz in Georgia, Moyna Prince in Florida, Ken Woods in
Sydney, and Duncan Golicher in Chiapas, Mexico.

This month we have some tillandsia seed collected from the
native habitats in Chiapas, Mexico, by Duncan Gollicher. These
include T. eizii which featured on our February cover and accompanying
article plus other Chiapas natives T. vicentina and T.
guatemalens is.

53

 

",\~.!.!.!.!.~.!.~.~.~.!.!.!.!.!.~..~..~.~.~.~~~-!.!.!..~.~.!~...!·!·!·!·!·~··~·~·~·!·~I"

3 s.~~:r::> ::J3~~::E<::... E

~ I~

~ . It

~ ~

..

.~

.. I~

.. I~
~ i~

~ I..

.. i..

.. Packets of seed SOc. each in NZ. :...

~ I...

~ Overseas $1 US or $1 Aust., airmail postage free. I~

~ I..

.. :...

Ail .........................................~.....................--...............--....--...~.---...-~---..-....-................-.............................! ..

 

"YYYYYYYYYYTYYTYYYYTYTYYYY ••YYTTYYT••TYT~

Acanthostachys strobilaceae Tillandsia hamaleana
Aechmea aquilega T ionantha var scaposa
Ae. mexicana T mauryana
Dyckia species? T plagiotropica
Guzmania monostachia T polystachia
Portea petropolitana var extensa T rotundata
Puya mirabilis T. utriculata
Ronnbergiadeleonii T. vicentina
Tillandsia butzii Vriesea gigantea "nova"
Tcalothyrsus Vr. hieroglyphica
Teizii Vr. platynema
Tfilifolia Vr. splendens varformosana
Tguatemalensis

Please save your spare seed and send it to us: in return you will
receive a free packet of seed and the undying gratitude of those patient
souls who grow these fascinating plants from seed. Money raised from
the sale of seeds will be used to import rare and exciting new varieties
from overseas. One day this may be the only practical way to obtain
new broms-so buy some seed now and start practising!
Orders (with S.A.E.) and spare seed to:
Andrew Flower

P.O. Box 11-375, Manners Street P.O.
WELLINGTON.
54

 

OFFICERS

 

PATRON & LIFE MEMBER
HISTORIAN & LIFE MEMBER
PRESIDENT
VICE PRESIDENTS

SECRETARY
TREASURER
EDITOR
LIBRARIAN
COMMITTEE

AUDITOR

A.H.C DELEGATES
Mrs Bea Hanson
Laurie Dephoff
Lester Ching
Dave Anderson
Des Yeates
Len Trotman
Peter Waters
Andrew Flower
Des Yeates
Bev Ching
Glenys Guild
Graham West
Bill Vermeer
Marjorie Lowe

D. Persson
Patricia Sweeney and
Telephone

(09) 527-6830
(09) 527-7789
(09)5:?4-4'4~5 ._
,51b '/-!5l /6

(09) 638-8671
(09) 838-6535
(09) 838-9356
(09) 534-5616
(04) 239-9671
(09) 838-6535
(09~1t.34'lejrO
,Jilt, .'-I!:,7j~'

(09) 810-9669
(09) 298-3479
(09) 638-9766
(09) 376-6874
Zena Poulgrain
MEMBERSHIP SUBSCRIPTIONS
New Zealand
Overseas
NZ$ 14.00
NZ$ 4.00
NZ$ 20.00
NZ$ 25.00
Ordinary
Associate (same household)
airmail Australia
airmail USA & other overseas
MEETINGS

FOURTH Tuesday of each month except December, at Greyfriars
Church Hall, 544. Mt Eden Road, Auckland, at 7.30 pm.

 

Len Trotman's Tillandsia xerographica won Plant of The
Show this year. Photo by Lester Ching.

 

Contents

President's Page 39
March Meeting News , 40
Northland Bromeliad Group, by Colleen Frew 44
Notes From the Bay ofPlanty 45
Letter to The Editor 45
Annual Competitive Sh()w, by Peter Waters 46
President's Annual Report to the A.G,M, 50
Financial Position 1997 51
Garden Visit, by Len Trotman 52
Announcements 53
Seed Bank notes, by Andrew Flower 53
Seed Bank 54
Officers of the Society 55
Membership details, meetings 55

 

 

 

June 1997
Vol. 37 No. 5

Bromelliad

Socliecy 01 lIew Zealand Inc.

 

Bromeliad Society of New Zealand (Inc.)

Affiliated with the Bromeliad Society Incorporated
The Society formed on the August, 1
The objects of the Society are to encourage the cultivation and study

of Bromeliads grown indoors or outdoors, and in particular:

To discussion arrange on cultivation,
propagation and of diseases,
(b) To provide a Library for members.
(c) To assist members to identify plants.

(d)
To make awards for outstanding new bromeliads.
To Shows or exhibitions bromeliads.
To the ofbromeliads amongst members
exchange, and sale, encourage
importation of new plants.
(g)
To affiliate with any Society or other body, and to do such
things as may be deemed necessary or desirable in the fur~
h"·r''''''0 of these
To other Societies having similar
objects.
All general correspondence should be sent to the Secretary, Bromeliad
Society of New Zealand" 40 Tirimoana Road, Te Atatu South, Waitakere
Auckland Zealand.

Back issues Bulletin (since 1994) lable from
Editor for $2 post paid. For issues to that please contact Laurie Dephoff,
Flat 1122 Lunn A venue, Panmure, Auckland 6.

The opinions expressed in letters or articles in this magazine are the author's
own do not express the polh)· ofthe Bromeliad
.S'ociety of Ne11 ,

Please send articles & advertisements to the Editor, P.D. Box 11-375,
Wellington, New Zealand. E-mail This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

President's

It was sad to report the passing ofNoel Scotting who had given
many of to the Bromeliad Society.

Patricia Pcrratt is moving with husband to Australia live.
Pat will be missed after giving many years of service to the N .Z.
Bromeliad Society and the experience of the annual show and display.

very mild autumn lulled into winter long
way off. Beware those of us who are prone to frosts. When temperatures
drop remember to put covers over our dear bromeliads or shift
them inside.

Grape pieces available the last meeting are
great for mounting tillandsias. If you have a rotating tumbler put some
grape vine pieces in with some reasonable size stones and the vines
will rounded smoothed ready glueing tillandsias (this
infonmltion was on and I well using).

Thought: anyone who has an unnamed mature plant bring it into the
monthly meeting our of experts will help identification.

Lester Ching.

President.

This ll{Ollth's cover photos: Tillandvia AF261 flowcring in
cultivation, photos Andrcw Flower. This has becn our
collections for a long time labelled "ionantha var. scaposa" but in
recent years taxonomists have been telling us to label it Tillandsia
kolbii & 1981 should we?

discussion Bertie Bromel to

explain what has been going on in the naming department, and tries to

provoke further research into some interesting anomalies in this

naming saga.

75

 

Meeting News

Well the weather cleared up nicely after all the rain of the

past days It IS quite for the time of . Thirty
people turned out the meeting and we had visitors,
Chas Ensor and Pam Dellar.

This was Patricia Perratt's last meeting and we
presented her of and a signed all the

been rnember the 970's and
served as librarian and committee member for many years. The
family is moving to Brisbane and I am sure Patricia will become
involved with society over there we will doubt hearing
from her from time to time. Son Mark is also getting married and
intends settling in Singapore. We wish Patricia and the family all the
best for the future.

Bea gave us a talk how became
involved with bromeliads and how the Society got started.
The discussion plants for the evening, dark-leafed
brorneliads, led by Peter Waters and Len Trotman. There are

a number of these dark-leafed plants, mostly in genus
neoregelia, aechmea, vriesea,. nidularium and cryptanthus. They
appear to fall into two distinct categories-those that darken up more
when grown the low and that darken up when
grown in the light aechmeas generally f~lll into former
category whilst the others, and especially the neoregelias, fall into the
latter category. The dark eoloring is caused by the pigment in the
leaves and is by plant to absorb or block ultraviolet rays
the sun.

There was quite a lineup of plants on the table including
Aechmea Red Vase, Ae. Black Panther, Ae. warrisii rubra, Ae. By
Ae. Black Jack, Billbergia Nita, Hallelujah, B. Carrone Black,

B. Sangre, Nidularium inocentii var. nana, Neolarium Thor,
Cryptanthus Black Mystic, Vriesea bleheri, Vr. fosteriana, Vr.
intermedia rubra, Neoregelia Tarbaby, Neo. melanodonta, Neo. Deep
Pleasure, Nco. concentricG. Neo ampullaceae, and Neo. Takemura
princeps. Some of the plants were beginning to lose a little of their
76

 

calor due to the onset of the winter months and therefore less intense

NI,:XT MEETING
Tuesday 24th June when we will be on the right side of the
shortest day and all down hill for Spring and Summer, and the sooner

better as far am concerned. you then.
Topic Aechmea chantinU its hybrids, discussion led
famous expert Peter

COMPETITIONS

flowering: Peter Waters Vriesea phillipo-coburgii,

plant with light green and an inflorescence around
80cm. heavily branched with rcd and yellow bracts. Grow these in a
sheltered, shady place out of the frost. 2nd was John Scott with
Guzmania sanguinea, a beautiful plant with bright red and yellow

leaves which calor up on plants at flowering time. They
often only which appears the top of
making

Others on the table were Aechmea Jasciata with six flower
heads, Ae. Tam Star, several Ae. recurvata which are always colorful
at this time of the year, Nidularium billbergioides, Guzmania Mini

Guzmania Moonlight, wittmackii, Neoregelia
carolinae X

foliage: 1 Peter Waters Neoregelia Medallion-this
the first time we have seen this plant at a meeting, and what a
beautiful plant with dark green leaves and all of the inner leaves
brilliant red. This plant does not flower and is sometimes reluctant to

pups. 2nd Len Trotman with Vriesea jiJsteriana
Chestnut. A decorative with dark leaves blotched

Others included Neoregelia carcharodon "tricolor", Neo.
Red Apple X Yellow Delicious, Neo. Fosperior Perfection, Nidularium
innocentii var. innocentii, Canistrum triangulare, Aechmea Jasciata
"variegata", and Orthophytum "variegata.

77

 

Tillandsia flowering: T. rothii presented by Peter Waters was first
which had a nicely colored inflorescence with yellow and red bracts.
2nd was T guatemalensis from John Scott, and others included T

tenuifolia, T. Houston, T and T
acauscalentesis (what a
believe T.

st Laurie Dephoff

was Joe Murray with
due to being grown

were: T. velickiana, T plumosa, T ventanaensis, T
chapeuensis, T streptophylla.
Novice flowering: Hard leafed T. stricta from Lester Ching was first
and Nidularium billbergioides was second. Also there were
Guzmania lingulata and Tillandsia somnians entered.
Novice foliage: was won by John Lyall with a nicely mounted
Tillandsia rodrigueziana which would have been a lot more colorful

had the high light. Also Neoregelia
Lcster Ching which with John.
Neoregelia marmorata, Carnival

Trophy points went
to all and congratulations

Len Trotman.

ADVERTISING RATES

Single issue year

15.00

8.50

4.25

2.00 1.80
78

 

MEMORIUM

 

We were all saddened to hear that Noel Scotting
had passed away. Noel had belonged to the society
for many years and while she was not able to attend
meetings regularly she was always on hand to help out
whenever we were putting on a display. Over the last
few years Noel had been one of our judges, a task that
she took very seriously. Being a trained florist she had
a great eye for form and arrangement.

Noel was a great battler and over the years
turned her property in Whitford into a beautiful garden
full of bromeliads, palms, succulents and many other
unusual plants. She was a very generous person and
would give away plants and cuttings quite freely.

Over the last two or three years she had been
busy upgrading the property.
Noel's funeral service was held in her garden
and was attended by several of our members.
She will be sadly missed and we extend our
sympathies to the family.

Len Trotman.

79

 

Nonhland Bromeliad Group

Colleen Frew, Kawakawa

Our group has now been functioning for more than a year and
we have found out more and more about bromeliads, as well as make
many new friends. The visits to each others gardens have helped
many of us organise and reorganise our own setups. The raffles, sales
and trading tables have enabled many people to increase their collections.

 

In March Jacqui O'ConnelJ hosted the group and we were
able to see the excellent presentation of her bromeliads.
The next meeting at Avon Ryan's home was well patronised
and everyone had a happy hour wandering around the colorful garden.

Jane and Bert Penney's section at Otaika, Whangarei, was a
myriad of plants, many bromeliads, succulents, orchids and cacti were
attractively displayed in every available space, with some pleasant
areas to sit and enjoy the beautiful gardens.

Everyone is looking forward to the next meeting which will
be hosted by Maureen and Keith Green at their Maungakaramea
property in June.

WINTER

 

I am researching winter color in bromeliads, both flower and
foliage. The period covered is mid-May to mid-August.

Any information would be welcome from those society members
growing bromeliads outdoors all year, either in the ground, on
logs, trees or rocks, or in pots.

Marjorie Lowe

C\-1 Wallingford Street, Grey Lynn, Auckland.

Phone (09) 376 6874

Fax (09) 376 4539

--------------------------------.

 

80

 

Announcements

New members: welcome to the following, and good growing!

Clive Melling, 5 Beresford St., Bayswater, North Shore
Pam Deller, Box 8 Patumahoe
Clive Higgie, Box 11, F ordell, Wanganui
Gloria Rapson, 103 Mansels Rd., Greerton, Tauranga
Rainer & Hilde Blank, 348 Blackbridge Rd., Albany RD4, North
Shore .

.)
Displays: We had advice that the Gardenz show would be held at
Western Springs over Labour weekend this year and will be held in
marquees. You will remember that alst year we won the second prize
for the best display at this event. Also there is to be an Epsom Show
this year on the 12-16 November at the Epsom Showgrounds which
will be organized by the A&P Society who run the Royal Easter
Show ... more about these at a later date.

List ofbromeliad species in New Zealand: a list has been compiled
of all the bromeliad species believed to be alive and well in NZ. This
numbers approx. 650. While it is obvious that there will be some
mistakes because of identification problems, a list that is 90%
correct is better than no list at all. Anyone interested in a copy please
contact Peter Waters.

Index to Neoregelias, by Shane Zaghini: An alphabetical list of
neoregelia photos in this colorful book, including parents where

)

known and hybridiser with page references, and spelling corrected to
international standards. Copies available from Peter Waters.

The Wellington Tillandsia Study Group will be meeting at 1.30pm
on Sunday 27 July. Venue Morris and Myra Tarr, 32 Plunket
Avenue, Petone.

81

 

DIscussion Corner

Bertie Bromel

Dear Bertie,

This note is prompted by your article on page 214 of your
December 1996 bulletin. I have a number of T. guatemalensis from
various sources over many years. All have flowered identically and as
best I can determine fit the description ofthe species.

Most plants produced two or three pups, but occasionally an
odd plant does not. Hope these comments will be of interest.
Ken Woods, Castle Hill N.S.W.

* * * * *

"Should I store pollen in the fridge or in the freezer?"
Wayne, Paraparaumu

In the refrigerator. Some people report success with some plants by
keeping pollen in the deep freeze, but the usual commercial storage
ranges are 0 to 10°C. and 10 to 50% relative humidity depending on
the genus. Bertie keeps his pollen and seed fresh by storing them in
the fridge in glass jars with some silica jell to keep humidity down.

* * * * *

"People keep telling me to relabel my Tillandsia ionantha var
scaposa as T. kolbii. Is this true? Fuzzled of Petone.

Hmmmm. Bertie's first smart remark is, that depends on
whether your plant is T. kolbii or T. ionantha var scaposa! But, of
course, conventional wisdom has been telling us that T. ionantha var.
scaposa is a synonym for T. kolbii. [Interestingly, the editor's word
processor has this cute trick of providing what it calls a tip ofthe day,
when it has nothing better to do. The current one reads "You should
never dive into murky waters" I suspect that is just what Bertie is
about to do. It is, of course, something his Uncle Derek would never
do-Ed].

Is there one population of closely related plants out there
which some people call ionantha var scaposa and another lot call
kolbin Or are there two different populations, corresponding to the
two names? The current BSI list of valid bromeliad binomials (ie., a
generic and a specific name) recognises only T. kolbii, and lists
ionantha var. scaposa as a synonym ie., an alternate, incorrect, name
for the same species. The Director of the Bromeliad Identification
Centre, Harry Luther, has written:

82

 

"A third variety [of ionantha] characterised by a scapose,
occasionally compound inflorescence has been described as var.
scaposa. As this plant has little in common morphologically with T.
ionantha and occurs at much higher elevations in pine-oak cloud
forests perhaps a better designation is T. kolbii described by Till and
Schatzl .... Collectors who acquire this plant (under either name)
should be advised that conditions suitable for T. ionantha may be
fatal to T. kolbii. Keep it damper and much cooler."!

It seems clear, then, that we are supposed to have just the one
population with two names. To put the question in a local perspective,
the Editor has kindly supplied our cover photos of one of his
plants, identified as AF261, that was labelled Tillandsia ionantha var.
scaposa when he bought it from Len, and which is typical of the plant
we have in our collections under that name. But this is the one we are
being told to relabel as Tillandsia kolbii (Till & Schatzl 1981). In fact
Eric Gouda, Curator of Collections at the University of Utrecht
Botanic Gardens has identified the photo on our front cover as
representing T. kolbii.

Lets have a look at some history. The story seems to go as
follows. In 1941 L.B. Smith described a plant known as "Standley
63065" and called it Tillandsia ionantha var. scaposa. Plants were
collected in Guatemala, where it is naturalised at altitudes of 1500 to
1950m according to Smith & Downs (page 913). It was distinguished
from T. ionantha var ionantha in virtue of it having a short flower
scape (stem) whereas var. ionantha has no scape. Hence "scaposa."
And one assumes that the rest of this plant's characteristics are
consistent with T. ionantha, to which it is supposedly more closely
related than it is to any other species. And for many years, plants
labelled as T. ionantha var. scaposa have been available in the
horticultural trade.

Then, in 1981, the taxonomist Waiter Till and S. Schatzl
described a plant collected in Oaxaca, Mexico at a place called Sierra
Madre del Sur near Copala (ca 40km WSW of Tlaxiaco) naturalised
on oak trees at 1750 to 2000m. They named it T. kolbil, and it is this
population that we are being told includes T. ionantha var scaposa

(L.B. Smith, 1941) from Guatemala.
There remains the prospect that there are, in fact, two distinct
populations... Murmurings of this began to surface in 1995, and that
scourge of taxonomists Uncle Derek reported as follows:

"Those who were at the Adelaide Conference [Easter 1995]
would have heard Renate Ehlers suggesting that T. kolbii was not the

83

 

same as T. ionantha var scaposa. Ever curious, I obtained the original
description in Smith & Downs (page 912) (sic). Here T. ionantha v.
scaposa is shown to be an "ionantha" with a short scape (or flower

stem). appears in my "Tillandsia"
that the "true" T. kolbii
floral bracts, to name
will be looking more Tillandsia
"kolbii" see what plant I do that
other owners do the same? If you about
the names p details are in the of the

'Amateurs Guide'.

Derek then translated the Till & Schatzl description of T kolbii
as follows:
"Plant -flowering 10cm high, stemless
Leaves -densely rosulate, slightly flexuous towards the left, moderately
thin and soft, pale green, densely white lepidote, up to 9cm long.
Leaf sheath -inside almost dark brown, gradually merging with blade,
7-8mm involute.
Leaf blade -triangular, thin acute.
Scape -
Stape bm<:ts -the tip,
densely
Inflorescence distichous, 4em wide, 5
flowered.
Floral braets -leaf like, 3 to 3.5cm long, lanceolate, pale green,
lepidote, 1.5 times longer than the sepals, ecarinate.
Flower -sub-sessile.
Sepals -sub-glabrous, all barely connate, narrow elliptic, obtuse,
green, edges white membranous, half as long as the petals.
Petals -purple violet, the bottom third white, making an erect tube,
3.5cm long.
Filament -thin, white, the upper part thickened and violet, slightly
twisted, than the petals.
Anthers -yellow.
Stigma
Ovary -green.
~Sierra
Madre del Sur 40km
WSW to 2000m on Oak trees. 1979
(Holo WUy,l

There do seem to be some problems trying to match the plant
AF261, with this official description of T kolba, for example:

84

 

The filament is the stalk supporting the stamen -which can be
seen clearly 011 back closeup sticking above pollenbearing
anthers. In T ko/bii it is described as thin and white with the
upper part thickened and violet, and being a little shorter than the
petals. In AF26 the upper part is white, it is considerably
longer than the petals. In this with L.B. Smith's description
of ionantha as having"... stamens and pistillong-exserted ...."

In T ionantha the floral bracts are said to be shorter than the
in T. they said to L5 times long. In A F261 the
floral bracts are consistent with T. ionantha description.

In T ko/bii, the sepals are said to be green with white edges,
whereas AF261 sepals are a paler violet than the petals which is more
in keeping with a typical ionantha floweL

In AF26 the inner sheathes are light green, not brown at
all. Interestingly, the plant Howers more vigorously some seasons,
and in a bad spring the inflorescence is depauperate and hides in the

kolbii and flowering this r-r----------------,

floral bracts a bit like like T kolbii!
Where all leave us? With more work to Hopefully
our officer, Peter will be inspired look out
for plants labelled as scaposa

or

summer, and their

characteristics against

taxonomic descriptions.

Hopefully Uncle Derek has

done more and

bring up to Only 1

will Bertie venture to offer an oJ

opinion as to what we should 0

be labelling our plants what )]

look like AF26

Refcrcnces:

I. Harry Luther, "Clarification",
Journal ofThe Bromeliad Society
Inc, July-August 1988, p. 165

2. Till & S. Plant
and Evolution 138, 259-262,
Tillandsia kolbii, from Till & Schatzcl (1981).

3. Derek Butcher, "Tillandsia kolDimensions
in cm., a = habit; b = flower; c =

bii", Bromeletter, November/De

 

inflorescence; d = floral bract; e = petal (left),

cember 1995 p. 8
gynoeceum & stamens (right)

85

 

~••••AAA•••A•••••AAA••••••••44•••••••••AA

~

_.......................................................................................-.. -...-...-............._..............._........._.........................._.....·········_·_·······I.P

 

3 S::E:::E:I:> E3~~~I~

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..
!"..

.. !"..
.. II>

 

..
i"..

..
1"..

..
;1>

 

..
I"..

..
!"..

.. Packets of seed SOc. each in NZ.
II>

 

..
I...

.. Overseas $1 US or $1 Aust., airmail postage free. I...

..
i"..

..
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A ..............................................................._.......................__................_.........._.._............................._._._.............................._.........J ~

 

P••TYTTTTT • • TTTTTT.TT.TTT••••TT. TTTT ••T.~

Acanthostachys strobilaceae Tillandsia butzii
Dyckia encholirioides T balbisiana

D. species? T caliginosa
Fosterella penduliflora T guatemalensis
Guzmania gloriosa (Ecuador) T hamaleana
monostachia T plagiotropica
G. squarrosa (Ecuador) T polystachia
Puya coerulea var violaceae T vicentina
P. mirabilis
Vr. platynema
Ronnbergia deleonii
Werauhia sanguinolenta
Wittrockia amazonica

Please save your spare seed and send it to us: in return you will
receive a free packet of seed and the undying gratitude of those patient
souls who grow these fascinating plants from seed. Money raised from
the sale of seeds will be used to import rare and exciting new varieties
from overseas. One day this may be the only practical way to obtain
new broms-so buy some seed now and start practising!

Orders (with S.A.E.) and spare seed to:

Andrew Flower

P.O. Box 11-375, Manners Street P.O.
WELLINGTON.
86

 

OFFICERS

 

PATRON & LIFE MEMBER
HISTORIAN & LIFE MEMBER
PRESIDENT
VICE PRESIDENTS

SECRETARY
TREASURER
EDITOR
LIBRARIAN

COMMITTEE

AUDITOR

A.H.C DELEGATES
Mrs Bea Hanson
Laurie Dephoff
Lester Ching
Dave Anderson
Des Yeates
Len Trotman
Peter
Andrew Flower
Des Yeatcs
Bev
Glenys Guild
Graham West
Bill Vermecr
Marjorie Lowe

D. Persson
Patricia Sweeney and
Telephone

(09) 527-6830
(09) 527-7789
(09) 576-4595
(09) 638-8671
(09) 838-6535
(09) 838-9356
(09) 534-5616
(04) 2399-659
(09) 838-6535
(09) 576-4595
(09) 810-9669
(09) 298-3479
(09) 638-9766
(09) 376-6874
Zena Poulgrain

MEMBERSHIP SUBSCRIPTIONS

New Zealand NZ$ 14.00 Ordinary

NZ$ 4.00 Associate (same household)
Overseas NZ$ 20.00 ainnail Australia
NZ$ 25J)O USA other overseas
MEEDNIS
FOURTH Tuesday of month except December, at Greyfriars

Church Hall, 544. Eden Road, Auckland, 7.30 pm.

19

 

Contents

President's Page 75
May Meeting News 76
Memorium, Noel Scotting by Leo TrotmaD 79
Northland Bromeliad Group, Colleen Frew 80
Announcements 81
Discussion Corner, Bertie Bromel 82

S~B~ ~

Officers ofthe Society 87
Membership details, meetings 87

 

 

May 1997
Vol. 37 No. 4

Bromelliad

Soclie.y 0' Mew Zealand Inc.

 

Bromeliad Society of New Zealand (Inc.)

Affiliated with the Bromeliad Society Incorporated

The on the 28th August,
of
Society are to encourage
indoors or outdoors,
and study
(a)
(b)
(c)
discussion and arrange
tion, propagation and control of diseases.
To provide a Library for members.
To assist members to identify plants.
cultiva

 

(d) To make awards for outstanding new bromeliads.
(e) To hold Shows or public exhibitions ofbromeliads.
(t) To promote the distribution ofbromeliads amongst members
by exchange, purchase and sale, and to encourage the
of new plants.

(g) with any Society or do such
be deemed necessary the furthese
objects.

(h) affiliation from other similar
All general correspondence should be sent to the Secretary, Bromeliad
Society ofNew Zealand" 40 Tirimoana Road, Te Atatu South, Waitakere
City, Auckland 8, New Zealand.

Back issues ofthe Bulletin: (since September 1994) are available from the
Editor for $2 post paid. For issues prior to that please contact Laurie Dephoff,
Flat 1122 Lunn Avenue, Panmure, Auckland 6.

The in letters or articles in the author
not necessarily express Bromeliad

Please advertisements to the 1-375,
Wellington, New Zealand. E-mail This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

2

 

President's Page

A with a

Well that is what it seems, having to redraw the door raffle
twice, and no one owning up to winning the President's raffle. The
winner had to be identified by the President.

For people who to buy sales table
bonanza. those selling found worth while,
People with along-there are always

of buyers waiting.
It was good to see people at the meeting early so we can get
started. We open at 7.00 pm. and would appreciate any help members
give. Do the to the same
do need

meeting begins,

See you at the next meeting 27 May 1997.

My apologies to Win Shorrock for being a month late in
thanking you for the billbergia presented for the President's raffle,

Food for Don't throw old as wmners
from "has beens",

Lester Ching,
President.

Front cover: Tillandsia fasciculata var uncispica. Photo by Werner
Rauh, reprinted from the Journal of The Bromeliad Society Inc.,
May-June 93. From Dominican this
smaller and cultivation

Back cover: Vriesea hieroglyphica, photo by Jo Elder. This plant is
flourishing in the garden of Gladys Fisher in Tauranga, where it grows
in filtered light. The proud owner reports that it looks "superb!!" and

certainly

59

 

April Meeting News

A great turnout of 40 members all enthusiastic about the
evening's program. The President is very keen to get the meetings
started at 7.30 but this proves very difficult as everyone is busy
catching up on the news and also some members are unable to get to an
early start ... however we did manage to get underway by 7.40pm.

We had another reminder about the conference in Perth on
September26-29 and also a request for someone to speak at this event.
If anyone would like to do this please contact the Secretary. We also
put out a feeler for visits to members gardens before the winter sets in.
Anyone offering, please see one of the committee members.

There is one copy of the B.S.I. Journal missing from the
library-this is the 1967 issue, if anybody has this could they return it
to Laurie Dephoff please.

The Show and Tell table was once again well patronised with
Pat Lawson bring a nidularium for identification. This was a light
green plant with dark spots on the inner leaves and one which we have
always known as Nidularium regelioides but it appears that this is not
correct: instead it should be Nid. leprosa. Dave Anderson brought in a
Tillandsia which was labelled T. remota which it wasn't. It was a green
leafed plant with pink bracts and white flowers. This was identified as

T. tenuifolia Emerald Forest.
Marjory Lowe had a billbergia of green leaves lightly banded
with silver and two beautiful flower heads with bright red bracts.
Unfortunately we could not identify this plant but it was thought that it
could be B. venezuelana [ "B. venezuelana" is no longer a valid name
-it is now B. rose a -Ed.]. It had apparently been grown in too much
shade.

Aechmea recurvata x calyculata was brought in by Peter
Waters. A small plant with bronzy leaves and black leaf tips and a
short inflorescence of yellow and orange. This had been grown in full
sun for maximum color. Does anyone know if this plant has a name?
[There was a Hummel hybrid, Gemma, which was Ae. recurvata x
calyculata, and more recently in 1982 an Australian cross by Jim
McQueen between Ae. calyculata and recurvata var. ortgesii called
Ae. Solo.-Ed.]

60

 

Win Shorrock brought in a Fascicularia bicolor for
identification. This plant was around 20cm. with light green silvery
leaves and blushing brilliant red at the ccntre.

Des Yeates gave short talk about how became involved
with the society and some of his favourite plants. Des joined the
society three years ago and now has around three hundred plants
whieh he says his ill they do take a time
to after. of Des' spare time taken with and I
believe he is quite a whizz at this. Des brought in his favourites
including Vriesea hieroglyphica, Aechmea recurvata with several
flower heads growing on ponga an with
two flower heads, Aechmea Wine, several well-grown
Neoregelias, and a couple of tillandsias which he is just starting to
collect. He also said he was looking at creative ideas for mounting his
broIns.

If anyone else like to a brief along lines
please let us know and we will slot you in.

Our discussion plant for the evening was Tillandsia
Jasciculata and various forms and relatives. Tillandsiafclsciculata
can found in areas from Florida through the central states and into
the northern parts of South America. There are quite a number of
different varieties which are highly variable in their habit These
plants are quite hardy and easily adaptable to mounting or pot
culture. The plants on the table included:

T. Jasciculata var. dens is pica, which is one of the natives of Florida,
will grow to tall has a branched inflorescence with red
braets.
T. fasciculata "Hondurensis," and as the name indicates is a native of
Honduras where it grows on rocks. The leaves tend to be rather
succulent and vase-shaped rosette. inflorescence is
red/yellow. color nicely grown bright
light.

T. Jasciculata "Magnificent" is another, quite large, plant from
Panama. The magnificent which
has dark branches (there one on competition table
which had eight branches). This one also colors up nicely in the bright
light.
61

 

T. Jasciculata "All Yellow," a seedling which came from Peter
Johnson in Paraparaumu. nice open rosette of but not as
yet flowered so we are looking forward to seeing this one in flower.
T. Jasciculata ex Guatemala, around 12 cm. with an open rosette of
stiff green leaves. The inflorescence this IS a short
spikc.
T. Jasciculata ex Central America are medium sized plants with
grey/green stiff leaves. These plants are very hardy and can be grown
either mounted potted. They colorful inflorescences of
yellow/orange/red and can either or branched spikcs.
T. Jasciculata var. clavispica, one of the central American varieties,
has a very heavily branched inflorescence.
T. rotundata (formerly T. Jasciculata vaL rotundata) native
to America and to 60cm. tall narrow grccn!grey
leaves which grow in an upright fashion. The inflorescence rises
above the leaves and has a conical shaped flower head with yellow
bracts. Grow in light maximum color.
T. vicentina has numerous dark green leaves to about 1 The
inflorescence is branched with pinkish bracts. Prefers a cool spot with
good air circulation. This one comes from Guatemala [it is also native
to Mexico -Ed]
T. tric%r Leiana is a native ofHonduras and a cultivar of the normal
T. tricolor. It has narrow, rather arching leaves around 20cm. The
branched inflorescence is yellow and with flowers.
T. Iithophitic fClrm comes from Mexico, where
it grows on the rocks. It has stiff narrow leaves, red in color and about
30cm. long. The simple inflorescence has yellow bracts. Grow in high
light
T. "Hondurensis" is much foml than the
Mexican populations and will grow to 60cm. The leaves are wider
and the inflorescence will reach 80cm-branched with red and yellow
bracts.
T. rhomboidea similar shape to jl7scicu/ata but rather oblong
with softer green leaves to around 20cm. The inflorescence is orange!
red with short branches.
T. xftlsciculata to be like and color
up light.
62

 

T. vicentina x rodrigueziana has numerous narrow, dark green leaves
which downwards around 30cm.
T. Polita comes from Honduras and has stiff narrow leaves of greengrey.
inflorescence rises the leaves slender stem with
numerous fingers with orange braets protruding from the top.
T. jalisco-montecola hails from Mexico where it grows in the
deciduous forest The leaves stiff and reach 60cm. The
inflorescence is a very colorful yellow and red with purple flowers.
The spike is usually branched. Grown in high light this plant will turn
NEXT MEETING

Tuesday 27 May.

COMPETITIONS

Openjlowering: 1st Pat Ijawson with Ochagavia carnea, a well grown
plant twin heads, in flower. These are stunning in
flower with soft green spiny leaves and powder pink inflorescences. It
is not often wc see these in the competition. 2nd was Dave Anderson
with Aechmea a eross between jasciata and Ae.
chantinii. Others on the table were Aechmea jasciata x Neoregelia
carolinae, Nidularium procerum, Nidularium innocentii wittmackii,
Nidularium julgens, Neoregelia imperfecta, Neoregelia Gee Whizz,
Neoregelia Flaming Lovely, Neomea San Diego, Vriesea racinae,
Guzmania lingulata Fortuna, Guzmania monostachia, Aechmea
fasciata.
Open foliage: 1st Len Trotman with Neoregelia Royal Hawiian. 2nd
equal were Dave Anderson Aechmea chantini i and Laurie
Dephoff with Hohenbergia correia-araujoi. Others entered were
Aechmea phanerophlebia, Billbergia De Leon, Neoregelia Oeser
Variegata, Neoregelia Gee Whizz, Aechmea Vriesea
phillipocoburgii.
Tillandsia jlowering: Dave Anderson first with T. guatemalensisthis
was the foml and had 60cl11. inflorescence. Win

 

Shorrock was second with T. tectorum, a large plant which Win says
she grows outside. Others were T. punctulata, T. stricta, T. Jasciculata
Magnificent, T. schusteri, T. rothii, T. Jasciculata Pereal.
Tillandsia foliage: 1 st Dave Anderson with T. roezlii. This is a new
one to us and is quite a striking plant with soft green leaves with brown
spots similar to Vriesea guttata. We are looking forward to seeing this
one in flower. 2nd was Win Shorrock with T. limbata which had been
grown in high light for maximum color. Others on the table were T.
roland-gosselinii, T. caput-medusae, T. jalisco-montecola x capitata
"rubra", T. paleacea and T. kirchoffiana.
Novice foliage: Bill Vermeer was first with Vriesea hieroglyphica, a
large well grown plant, and Lester Ching was second with Aechmea

 

Fredricke. There was also a Neoregelia Beefstake on the table.
Novice flowering: Lester Ching took out first and second place with:

 

Tillandsia pueblensis, a small silver tillandsia with a nice flower spike,
and Neoregelia Bayou Beauty-a nice colored plant.

 

Greenhough Trophy points went to Dave Anderson.

Don't forget that subs are now due. Thanks to all those who
have sent their subs to me along with a nice note saying how much they
enjoyed the journal! The Editor will be rapt, wrapped, wrapped or just
plain pleased with these. We like to get this sort of feedback from
members, or if you have any brickbats to throw please send those as
well.

Our meeting dates for the rest ofthe year are:

May: committee 8th, general meeting 27th.

June: committee 12th, general meeting 24th.

July: committee 10th, general meeting 22nd.

August: committee 14th, general meeting 26th.

September: committee 11th, general meeting 23rd.

October: committee 9th, general meeting 28th.

November: committee 13th, general meeting 25th.

no meeting in December.

Len Trotman.

64

 

\

r )

I

Notes From The Bav of PleolV

Alison Sears, Tauranga.

The April meeting was held at the home ofNatalie Simmons.
Her garden has a lot of large trees and in a shaded area was a huge
lapageria with dozens of flowers. It must have been there for many
years. We were all very envious because some of us have small plants
which are reluctant to flower. There must be a secret remedy for
success. [I always thought that Lapageria rosea, if that's what we are
talking about here, goes into a profound shock if transplanted and can
sit for many years before "taking off' -1 had one that sat for about
five years and then grew and flowered magnificently. 1 planted
according to instructions that they like a cool root run but sun on their
leaves.-Ed.]

Natalie also has large shadehouses full of orchids, bromeliads
and tillandsias. We talked about the plants on display and we would
like members to bring more plants to our meetings for "show and tell"
to help us to identify the different types. There were two new
members as well as twenty two other members at the meeting so the
walls were stretched to accomodate us all.

We are reluctant to move into a hall but may have to do so in
the future.
Our next meeting will be at Andrew Steen's home in Matapiki
Road on the 11 th June at 1.30pm.
The new covers on the magazine are great so the Editor need
not continue to write "I promise never to try to be artistic again."
Your worthy scribe admits to being Alison Sears.

ADVERTISING RATES

Single issue Min. 6 per year
Full page 15.00 13.50
Half page 8.50 7.65
Quarter page 4.25 3.85
Eighth page 2.00 1.80

65

 

Where is That Robin;»

Bea Hanson, Auckland.

Yes, missing again. In it has been floating about
somewhere for over months. Who has it this time? It is very
disappointing and I am sorry it has happened again. I fail to understand
this happens.

The Robin was started so members unable to attend meetings
could discuss their plants, exchange photos of their plants etc. All
went for first two or three rounds then things began go
wrong. I am sorry for those members whose snaps are still missing
and do hope they still turn up. As for the Robin I feel the best thing to
do be to cancel It is shame there no in having
it missing for long periods.

If it comes in I will return any photos to their owners. I do
hope can manage to get back here it worries me to think the
photos are missing.

Have a look round and see if you have put the robin in some
corner and forgotten it.

The Editor has a dreadful sinking feeling.... he remembers
receiving the Robin, but not posting it on. Last year he moved
house, and there was 30 years of accumulated papers for the
Robin lost There are still 40 cartons of papers in
garage, so will start hunting. But will he be game to 'fess up?

 

Announcements

New Members: Welcome, and hope have pleasant association
with the Society:

 

Margaret Mangos, 11 Terrace, Tauranga.
Andrew And Rhonda Maloy, 26 Pomaria Road, Waitakere City.
Ngaire Raymond, IIA Hauraki Crescent, Browns Bay.
Jane , C\-Post Shop, Raumanga, Whangarei.

 

Subscriptions now overdue, this issue of the bulletin will

last those who are now unfinancial. We indicated on
envelope if this applies to you. A red dot by your address label means
you have not as at 3th Please remit Peter Waters, 22
Half Moon Rise, Bucklands Beach. $14, or $18 two at the same
address. [If you have paid and still been "red dotted" the Editor

-sometimes makes mistakes. Not

WINTER

 

I am researching winter color in bromeliads, both flower and
foliage. The period covered is mid-May mid-August.

Any information would be welcome from those society members
growing bromeHads outdoors an year, either the
ground, on logs, trees or rocks, or in pots.

Marjorie Lowe
C\-1 Wallingford Street, Grey Lynn, Auckland.
Phone (09) 376 6874
Fax (09) 376 4539

 

..........

 

67

 

Winter Care Bromeliads

The following articles are reprinted in the hope they may be of
assistance to members,

For Newer Members, by Bea Hanson, (reprinted from our Bulletin
September 1993)

Cold winds, some frosts, too rain! These can cause
problems with bromeliads growing outside even shade or
glasshouses.

Now is the time we should all keep our eyes open and watch
our that unless you have the perfect for
them. Very few us have I guess!

Even under cover problems do occur during the winter
months. Some of us have nasty brown marks appear on leaves of
thick-leaf tillandsias. Thcy spoil the whole look of the plant and we
are very upset this. After some discussion have to the
conclusion it could be caused by two things. After the plants have
been misted, if they were near the roof of the glasshouse etc. sudden
sun beating down on them could have caused burns. Cold will also
cause these marks.

Be sure try and choose a dry day to your plants and do
them early so they will dry out by night. Watch your plants with an
eagle eye as these damaged leaves arrive quite quickly and once they
do it too late,

Most have outside bromeliads damaged hail. It

not only scars leaves but can even split leaves. This is a great pity as

nothing can be done toremedy the damage. If hail is forecast, any

really treasured broms be moved under somewhere.

I had the day someone bewailing some

of her outside broms had rotted in the centre. This can happen in the

winter. Leaves and rubbish collect in the centre of plants and if we

have a lot of rain it starts to rot. Ever smelt it? Whew!

I suggested she out rubbish and hose out the

centre. Then it must be left to dry. If rot hasn't gone too nu that

generally solves the problem. If it has then the whole centre must be

pulled out. It comes away quite easily and should be kept in a drier

place until pups appear.

In a big outside colleeton it quite to go round all

the plants and see how they are all standing up to the winter but it is

well worth the effort.

68

 

Everyone is busy but this little extra work might just save the
loss of some of your favourite plants. After all what's more important
than your bromcliads?

~ ~ ~ ~

.1 11

.1 11 ~ .1

Do You Get Frost? by Will UI Doo (reprinted from our Bulletin
March 1989)

the we had many severe frosts and I
used to cover plants with newspaper. This was quite good but it
had one or two drawbacks.

there was even a of the papers would
away. cat decided have game underneath them that didn't
help matters either.

Then I decided use bed covers anything like
and it was much better but then there was drying of them. If it
rained on top of the frost they were usually a mess. Recently I read
something in a magazine and the writer was evidently in the same
position I was.

He said sheets were not the answer as you cannot anchor
them down and the same thing happens if you use paper. He complained
the wind rips them away and, Ict's facc it
YOU like a wet sheet put over you to keep you warm? A humourous
guy.

Now he apparently has answer-keep a good supply
old blankets. Bludge them from your friends, go to garage sales, pick
them up wherever you can. If you want to anchor them then you can
put something lightish the but heavy enough keep
blanket in place. What didn't say was how it them to
dry. It would be a lot longer than thinner things.

He also said if can plant your brams near a river or
some sort ofwatcr that would hcJp--evcn pool your yard would
because heat off the water will help.

He finished by saying BE PREPARED-don't let the frost
creep on you. This all very well, how about you
have a pool, river, lake etc. near you?

Well, I am not unduly worried. With all the panic over the

ozone getting holes it I wouldn't surprised ihve have lot

(Continued on page 70)

69

 

Acanthostachys strobilaceae T. guatemalensis
Aechmea aquilegia T. hamaleana
Ae. mexicana T. ionantha var scaposa
Dyckia species? T. rnyosura
Fosterella penduliflora T. plagiotropica
Guzmania monostachia T. polystachia
Puya coerulea var violaceae T. utriculata

P. mirabilis T. vicentina
Ronnbergia deleonii Vriesea gigantea
Tillandsia butzii Vr. hieroglyphica
T. balbisiana
Vr. platynema
T.
caliginosa Werauhia sanguinolenta
Wittrockia amazonica
Payment may be by cheque made out to the BSNZ (NOT to A.
Flower) or cash. or stamps. or seed to swap.
Orders (with S.A.E.) and spare seed to:
Andrew Flower

 

P.O. Box 11-375, Manners Street P.O. WELLINGTON.
(Continued/ram page 69) Winter care."

fewer frosts in the future. It will scotch the problem of covering broms
in winter so that is a good thing. But will that outweigh all the bad
things that are going to come from it? As the TV ad says "Think about
it" -Pity Mr Doo hasn't written more for us! It would be interesting ifshe
were able to give us an update on those good and bad things ... Ed.

70

 

OFFICERS

 

Telephone
PATRON & LIFE MEMBER Mrs Bea Hanson (09) 527-6830
HISTORIAN & LIFE MEMBER Laurie Dephoff (09) 527-7789
PRESIDENT Lester Ching (09) 576-4595
V1CE PRESIDENTS Anderson (09) 638-867
Des Yeates (09) 838-6535
SECRETARY Trotman (09) 838-9356
TREASURER Peter Waters (09) 534-5616
EDHOR Andrew Flower (04) 2399-659
LIBRARIAN Des Yeates (09) 838-6535
COMMITTEE Ching 576-4595
G lenys Guild (09) 810-9669
Graham 298-3479
Bill Vermeer (09) 638-9766
Marjorie Lowe (09) 376-6874
AUDITOR D. Persson
ARC DELEGATES Patricia Sweeney and Zena Poulgrain
MEMBERSHIP SUBSCRIPTIONS
New Zealand NZ$ 4.00 Ordinary

NZ$ 4.00 Associate (same household)
Overseas NZ$ 20.00 airmail Australia

NZ$ 25.00 airmail USA other overseas

MEETINGS

 

FOURTH Tuesday of each month except December, at Greyfriars
Church Hall, 544. Mt Eden Road, Auckland, at 7.30 pm.

19

 

Contents

President's Page 59
April Meeting News 60
Notes From the Bay ofPlenty, Alison Sears 65
Where is That Robin? Bea Hanson 66
Announcements 67
Winter Care ofBromeliads 68
S~B~ W
Officers of the Society 71
Membership details, meetings 71

 

 

 

July 1997
Vol. 37 No. 6

Bromeliad

Society 0' lIew Zealand Inc.

 

Bromeliad Society of New Zealand (Inc.)

Affiliated with the Bromeliad Society Incorporated
Society tOlmed on August,
The objects of the Society are to encourage the cultivation and study
of Bromeliads grown indoors or outdoors, and in particular:

To discussion arrange on cultivation,
propagation and of diseases.
(b) To provide a Library for members.
(c) To assist members to identify plants.

(d)
To make awards for outstanding new bromeliads.
To Shows or exhibitions ofbromeliads.
To the distribution ofbromeliads amongst members
exchange, and sale, encourage
importation of new plants.
(g)
To affiliate with any Society or other body, and to do such
things as may be deemed necessary or desirable in the furtherance
of these
To affiliation other Societies having similar
All general correspondence should be sent to the Secretary, Bromeliad
Society of New Zealand" 40 Tirimoana Road, Te Atatu South, Waitakere
Auckland New Zealand.

Back issues Bulletin (since 1994) available from
Editor for $2 post For issues to that please contact Laurie Dephoff,
Flat 1122 Lunn A venue, Panmure, Auckland 6.

The opinions expressed in letters or articles in this magazine are the author's
own views and do not necessarily express the policy ofthe Bromeliad
Society of New Zealand

Please send articles & advertisements to the Editor, P.O. Box 11-375,

Wellington, New Zealand. E-mail This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

President's Page

In spite cold last ng a good of bromc I
enthusiasts braved weather the June

New members were welcomed and I hope enjoy the experience
of our meetings, and make new friends with a common interest 10
bromeliads.

The new sound system to be approva
not many said so. attending
what is being throughout meeting.

Cups of tea and coffee at half time seem to be successful and
enjoyed by all. Please don't forget a donation to cover costs. Tea
breaks will be limited to 15 minutes so the meetings can progress on.

The table looked sad with few offered
Please bring alongas always people to
especially new members who want to extend their range of bromeliads.

Name tags are at the door on entry. Please wear them and
return after the meeting has finished. It is much nicer to talk to
someone who their name.

I hear Sweeney is We recovers
back for our meetingvvc miss you. Get soon Pat.
Watch out for cold nights where bromeliads are outside, make

sure they are covered up.
See you at the next meeting.
Marjorie would to write outlining wh

bromeliads you groWlOg and whether have shade
survive.

Lester Ching.

Front cover: Cultivars of Aechmea chantnii-Samurai (upper) and
"variegata" Photos by Rehak of Sydney

to us by Guild.
Back cover: is really didisticha. Unfortunately thc
Editor always gets these two names muddled up, and noticed the
mistake after the covers were printed! See reference to this plant on
page 93.

91

 

June Meeting News

As expected we had a cold evening but once inside with the
heaters going we had a very cosy evening, with 40 members attending.
This included five new members and one visitor. We hope they
enjoyed the evening.

We had a p.a. system on loan which proved to be quite
effective so we will be considering purchasing one of these. They
come with a label microphone which leaves the speaker with hands
free to hold up plants or whatever. There have been complaints for a
long time about not being able to hear speakers so hopefully if we do
get one ofthese the problem will be solved.

We also had a trial run with supper during the break and this
was also well received. Some of you will remember that we had this as
a regular feature some years ago but was discontinued due to lack of
support... Let us know if you want this continued.

We were given a short rundown on the Gardenz Show being
held at Western Springs over Labour Weekend, 24-27 October and the
Epsom Garden Show being held at the Epsom Showgrounds on 12-16
November.

The President spoke about the proper presentation of sales
plants and it was noted that some plants were not being properly potted
or mounted. Plants in pots should be properly rooted, otherwise offered
bare root and out of pots, priced accordingly.

The Show and Tell table was well stocked and the discussion
on these was led by Dave Anderson. Some of the plants brought in
were: Tillandsia brachyphylla from Dave Anderson which had two
flower heads. We do not see this one very often. Bill lronside had a
Tillandsia secunda with inflorescence, and numerous pups-this plant
produces pups on the inflorescence and is usually very generous with
them. It is a handsome plant when in flower with a spike up to 80cm.
with numerous branches and dark purple flowers which hang down
from the underside of the stem. Bev Ching had a Nidularium fulgens
which had yellowing leaves and also some of the leaves rotting away at
the base. This plant had been kept under the bench and had probably
been affected by leaching from plants above. This is something that
bromeliads do not take kindly to. Gill Keesing brought in a plant for

92

 

identification. was identified as Neolarium Chantriere. cross
between Nidulariumfulgens and Neoregelia carolinae. These are best
if grown in fairly high light to bring out the color in the foliage.

There a Tillandsia comarapensis brought in Len
Trotman. This is new the here is sim] to T.
didisticha. Also one of the Skotak hybrid neoregelias which had
reverted to green after originally being a variegated plant, and which
was producing a variegated pup.

you any bromcliads or you have a to be
identified, please bring them in to the meeting.
Bev Ching gave us a mini talk about how she became

in bromeliads and brought along somc of her collcction
to show what shc had grown and how she had grown them. Bev has
been with the society about two years and in that time has built up a
nice collection. Most of the plants were in flower and were well
grown and most had been grown Some the plants were:
Nidularium procerum, Nid. fulgens, Neoregelia concentrica and a
collection of reds all in good condition and color. Aechmea
gamosepala and triangularis both spike. Tillandsia punctulata
and lindenii. has been involved with committee work over
a year and is currently the door person while husband Lester is our
current President.

Our discllssion for evening were Aechmea
chantinii and re plants. 'rhls section was led Peter Watcrs who
brought in most of the plants on the table, and what an array there
was. Aechmea chantinii is a hard plant to grow in this part of the
world and requires very and environment to well. I
have tried several times to ild up collection these but
unfortunately they just kept going backwards until I finally gave up
on them, but Peter seems to have the right conditions for them and he
has produced fine specimens. discovered in 1 these
plants were namcd after Chantini are to the Amazon
valley where they grow epiphytically on the trees mostly in full
sunlight. They vary in color from light green with silver banding to
almost black also silver ideal conditions
many will grow to a metcr but there are also smaller types. The
inflorescences are mostly quite tall and stand well above the leaves.

93

 

The bracts which are red hang down from the stem, and the
flowers are and Ae. chantinii has used extensively
for breeding, resulting in numerous hybrids.

Some of the Ae. chantinii cultivars on the table were:
Samurai, Amazonica, Stripe on Stripe, Pink Black Goddess,
Dwarf and Little Harv. Some of the were: chantinii ramosa,
X fendleri, X corombosa, X retusa, X phanerophlebia, and X
fasciata (Ae. Fredricke). Some of the related plants displayed were:
Ae. zebrina, lessmami. retum, Ae. J.C. Superstar, Morris
Henry Hobbs. in all impressive display Don't if you
want to build up a collection of these plants make sure you have a
nice warm area and keep up the humidity.

Door were on the agenda prizes to Win
Shorrock, Marjory Lowe and Marie IIealey while the special raffle of
Tillandsia duratii in spike went to Graham West.

NEXT MEETING

Tuesday July 22nd, and beware that there are five Tuesdays
this month. The discussion will be bromeliads suitable hanging

This Id be interesting so see you can come up
with. Also don't forget we can always do with someone to give a
short talk, so let me know if you would like to do this and also don't

if you would like contributc an artielc for the the
editor will be to from

COMPETITIONS

Open/lowering: was won Joe with Nidularium innocentii
var. wittmackiana. This was one of the largest plants that I have seen
in this variety with an equally large flower head. Second was Peter
Waters with Guzmania Amaranth had inflorescence with
amcthyst-colored bracts. Others on table were Aechmea recurvata
and several hybrids of this, Nidularium fulgens, Neoregelia
Takemura Princeps.
Open foliage: First plaee went to Peter Waters who displayed a
Vrieseu Pahoa Beauty X fosteriana. This plant had been grown in

94

 

high light and was beautifully colored up tinged with pink. Second was
loe Murray with a very large, well grown Vriesea platynema. Others
included Neoregelia Grace X Passion, Neoregelia carolinae X
Painted Lady X concentrica, Neo. carolinae X concentrica X Royal
Burgundy, Vriesea platynema var variegata, Vr. ospinae var gruberi.
Tillandsiaflowering: T. cyanea took first place, with twin spikes both
with a flower. This plant was entered by Zen a Poulgrain. Dave
Anderson's T. roseospicata took second place-a large plant with
narrow silvery-green leaves and a spike of around 60cm. Both plants
were pot grown. Others were T. punctulata (2), T. stricta, T. lindenii,

T. brachycaulos X streptophylla, T. juncea, T. crocata.
Tillandsia foliage: First Len Trotman with T. tectorum "miniature," a
clump of four mounted on driftwood. Second was Peter Waters with T.
butzii "miniature," also a clump of perhaps two dozen plants with long
fine green leaves. Also included were T gardneri, T. kirchojjiana, T.
rotundata.
Novice flowering: First Lester Ching with Billbergia villata, an
impressive plant with tall green leaves banded with silver and sporting
a large pendant inflorescence. Second was Gay McDonald with
Vriesea maxoniana with two pure yellow inflorescences. The only
other plant on this table was Aechmea Foster's Favorite.
Novicefoliage: First Gay McDonald with a well grown, highly colored
Neoregelia Takemura Princeps. Second was Lester Ching with an
equally well grown Vriesea platynema. There was also a neoregelia
hybrid on the table.
There were not as many plants on the competition tables as
there usually are but this was probably due to the fact that we are in
mid-winter and plants do not calor up so well at this time of year. The
sales table was also lacking in plants and also probably due to the same
reasons.

Leo TrotmaD.

95

 

Notes From The Bav of Plenty

Alison Sears

The June meeting of the group was held at the nursery of
Andrew Steens. In the February issue of the bulletin Andrew explained
his setup, so I'll not elabourate on that except to say that by
the time he had finished explaining the different varieties we were
more confused than ever! the next time we visit we will take labels,
notebooks and even tape recorders! Andrew made us most welcome
and we were amazed at the extent of his work.

We went to the house and garden of Colleen Ross for
afternoon tea. Her two acre garden is in winter mode but still colorful
with lots of roses still in flower. No, she hasn't been bitten by the
bromeliad bug yet but its only a matter of time. We all know that
feeling.

Our beginners have expressed the wish for more workshops
etc., so we will try to oblige even if it is a case ofthe blind leading the
blind for most of us.

Our next meeting will be on Wednesday 13th August at
1.30pm at the home of Johanna Elder. We hope to have Trevor
Nicholls from Taupo as our guest speaker.

WINTER

 

I am researching winter color in bromeliads, both flower and
foliage. The period covered is mid-May to mid-August.

Any information would be welcome from those society members
growing bromeliads outdoors all year, either in the ground, on
logs, trees or rocks, or in pots.

Marjorie Lowe

C\-1 Wallingford Street, Grey Lyon, Auckland.

Phone (09) 376 6874

Fax (09) 376 4539

96

 

....

I

Announcements

New Members: Welcome to the following, we hope you enjoy your
membership in the Society.

Peter Brady, 56 Marsden Ave., Mt. Eden, Auckland.
Rosemary & Megan Thomas, 265 Lake Road, Takapuna, North
Shore .

 

The Second International Botanical Illustration Contest is being
held this year by the Brazilian Bromeliad Society. Paintings must be
in color, and must be ofbromeliads. There are two sections: Botanical
illustration and Artistic illustration. Anyone interested should contact
the Editor forthwith.

The Wellington Tillandsia Study Group is meeting at 1.30 pm.,
Sunday 27 July at 32 Plunket Avenue, Petone.

The Bay ofPlenty Bromeliad Group is meeting at 1.30 pm, Wednesday
13 August at the home of Johanna Elder.

Lener to The Editor

The Tauranga Bomeliad Group would like to express their
appreciation to the Editor of the Brom Bulletin for such an interesting
and informative booklet which members look forward to receiving
each month.

The colored front and back pages are a big improvement and
add to its presentation.
Thank you Andrew Flower from Tauranga.

97

 

AReliable Bromeliad Book Source

Andrew Flower, Wellington.

Over I have found one which
most of the available bromeliad books still in print. Rainbow Gardens
Bookshop in Vista, California, is a specialist mail-order business who
are easy to deal with and totally reliable. They ship by air or sea, and

can send US$ cheque just give your credit
ils. You fax, phone cmail them cost of

Current publications they list include:

Blooming Bromeliads, R. Bensch (1994) Over 1.000 color photos.
reviewed in February. $ 119.95

Bromeliaceae (1987)

color photos $
Tillandsia Handbook, Shimizu (1992) 120 color photos. $ 19.95
Beauty ofthe Bromeliads, T. Lea (1984) 62 color photos. $ 5.95

Bromeliad'i, L Duval (1890) edition, $ 39.95
Bromeliads: Cultural Manual, 1992) $ 3
Bromeliads Orchids. 99 2.95
Cumulative index of Bulletins of Ihe Bromeliad Society Inc., 1951

 

1980. C. Reed (1981) $ 6.95

Catalog of Earth Stars (Cryptanthus) and Tropical Collections,

Southern 1993-94). color photos, h?w photos
pages. $6.95

Plants and Bromeliads, Wall/c. 994 RHS
50 color photos, $5.95
Flora Ne 0 trop ica, Smith & Downs. Pt. I Pitcarnioidea $56.95, Pt.2
Tillandsioidea $61.95

of The (Bromeliaceae, subfamilv Tillandsioidea)

Gouda. 26 page b&w $49.95
Growing of Australia ( $14.95

Rainbow Gardens Bookshop, 1444 E. Taylor Street., Vista, CA 92084,
USA. Phone 619,758-4290 Fax 619.945-8934 email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

Tillandsia Eric Knobloch

Derek Butcher, Adelaide.

In recent years this hybrid has become more commonly
grown but it has been difficult to ascertain what it should look like.
This article has been sent to the Queensland Society, the

N.S.W. Society, and the New Zealand Society because of the residence
of two of the plant owners and perhaps ourcobbers over the
Tasman may be able to assist us.
Let us go back to 1978 where the following appeared in the
Journal of The Bromeliad Society.

Tillandsia 'Eric Knobloch'-A Beautiful New Hybrid.
Joseph F. Carrone, Jr.

This lovely new hybrid, a cross between Tillandsia
brachycaulos and Tillandsia streptophylla, was made in
July, 1967. When the seeds were mature, a full year later,
they were spread over the surface of the same tree fern slab
on which the seed parent, T. brachycaulos, was growing.
Within two-and-a-half years, the little seedlings grew into
strong tufts of thread-like leaves two inches long. They
were then removed and potted into dark brown osmunda in
small individual pots. During the next year, growth accelerated
noticeably, leaves thickened, and overall-spread increased
to nearly six inches across.

By 1973, and nearly full grown, they stood about nine
inches tall and looked just like little fountains of arching
leaves; their grace and symmetry made for stunning plants.
In fact, they became the centre of attraction among all other
tillandsias in our greenhouse. Furthermore, they had such a
new look from any other tillandsias seen in this area that a
friend asked me to display one at the Greater New Orleans
Bromeliad Society Show to be held that month. Needless to
say, this beautiful little plant generated quite a bit of excitement.

 

In July of the same year, several plants came into bloom
for the first time. What a surprise it was to see the upper
half of the plant turn from a grey-green to a yellow-orange,
then to orange-scarlet, and finally, to a deep rose red! The

99

 

thick, leafy scape is straight; the inflorescence is densely
bipinnate, forming a tight head of flowers. Sepals are green
to rose-red; Is are deep violet--<l striking contrast
set against rose-red color leaves.

The plant remains in for three or more,
while the rose-red color endures for still another two or three
weeks.

It is with a great measure of satisfaction and pleasure that
I can name new tillandsia bloom-in
honor of who has great esteem authority
on bromcliads: one who a dear, persona friend for
nearly twenty years; namely, Mr. Eric Knobloch, of Mary
Plantation in Delacour, Lousiana.
reprinted from the Journal of The Bromeliad Society Inc., March

 

April 1978 p.72-73.

Remember that time bothered a grex or

one plant from that grex can given a cultivar name. So the name

"Eric Knobloch" could have covered the whole batch of seed raised and

not just the plant illustrated. We can only guess as to range of plants
were released under this name because it would seem impossible
the number Eric Knoblochs circulation offsets from
illustrated. Usually we would expect all progeny from thae

seed pod to look similar when two species are crossed. However, a

separate crossing even using the same parents can get a different result.

Using the same species but different clones can give different results
BUT, be between streptophylla T. brachycau-

The discussion when I received photograph

a plant owned by Neville Ryan in Queensland. This looked like a T.

streptophylla with its bulbose base but had a flower arrangement you
would expect on a T. capitata. I guessed this to be T. Eric Knobloch
though not exactly with the photograph in 1
IS no reference cross been done
by Dimmitt Arden in USA!) but I my bones
something has happened somewhere. I have also been unable to trace
any written record that this cross has occurred "naturally" although it
seems feasible. Natural hybrids do tend to be ignored by botanists and
are a vital evolution. are listed in & Downs

 

perhaps the largest listing appears in Pamela Koide's Bird Rock
Tropicals catalogue. Even then we know, there are more!

So I had my problems in aligning Eric Knobloch with Neville
Ryan's plant and THEN I received a photo from larka and Nina
Rehak! This showed two Eric Knoblochs--Dne with a long scape and
the other with no scape as in T. brachycaulos. It is possible that both
do have the same parents ie., T. streptophylla and T. brachycaulos.
But there has also been sufficient time since 1978 for seed to have set
on a true Eric Knobloch and we are now dealing with F2 seedlings
which are really Eric Knobloch's children!

Are you growing Eric Knobloch? If so, what does it flower
like and where did you get it? Have you come across references to a
natural hybrid with this parentage?

Any answers would be gratefully received by the writer at 25
Crace Road, Fulham, South Australia 5024, Australia. Alternatively,
NZ readers could send them to the Editor who will in return send
them a Tillandsia seedling of his choice (not Eric, though!).

101

 

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~

:.. ~ i..
~ :~
~ !~
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~

:...

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.. Packets of seed SOc. each in NZ. :...

:...

:: ~ Overseas $1 US or $1 Aust., airmail postage free. i~

... !...

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,...T•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••""

 

Please save your spare seed and send it to us: in return you will
receive a free packet of seed and the undying gratitude of those patient
souls who grow these fascinating plants from seed. Money raised from
the sale of seeds will be used to import rare and exciting new varieties
from overseas. One day this may be the only practical way to obtain
new broms-so buy some seed now and start practising!

Orders (with S.A.E.) and spare seed to:
Andrew Flower

P.O. Box 11-375, Manners Street P.O.
WELLINGTON.
102

 

OFFICERS

 

Telephone
PATRON & LIFE MEMBER Mrs Bea Hanson (09) 527-6830
HISTORIAN & LIFE MEMBER Laurie DephoiI 527-7789
PRESIDENT Lester Ching (09) 576-4595
VICE PRESIDENTS Dave Andersol1 638-8671
Des Yeates (09) 838-6535
SECRETARY Len Trotman (09) 838-9356
TREASURER Peter Waters 534-5616
EDITOR Andrew Flower (04) 2399-659
LIBRARIAN Des Yeates 838-6535
COMMITTFF Bev Ching (09) 576-4595
Glenys Guild (09) 810-9669
Graharn West 298-3479
Bill Vermeer (09) 638-9766
Marjorie Lowe 376-6874
AUDITOR D. Persson
A.H.C DELEGATES Patricia Sweeney and Zena Poulgrain
MEMBERSHIP SUBSCRIPTIONS
New Zealand NZ$ 14.00 Ordinary

NZ$ 4.00 Associate (same household)
Overseas NZ$ 20.00 airmail Australia
NZ$ 25.00 airmaillJSA & other overseas

MEEnNGS

FOURTH Tuesday of each month except December, at Greyfriars
Church Hall, 544. Eden Road. Auckland, at 7JO pilL

19

 

Tillandsia distichia. Photo by Mike Poulglase, Wellington.

Contents

President's Page 91
June Meeting News 92
Notes From The Bay ofPlenty, Alison Sears 96
Announcements 97
Letter to The Editor 97
A Reliable Bromeliad Book Source, Andrew 98
Flower

Tillandsia Eric Knobloch, Derek Butcher 99
Seed Bank 102
Officers ofthe Society 103
Membership details, meetings 103

 

 

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