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1998

1998 Journals

February 1998 March 1998 April 1998 May 1998 June 1998 July 1998 August 1998 September 1998 October 1998 November 1998  
 

 

 Bromeliad
Society of New Zealand Inc.
February 1998
Vol. 38 No. 1
Bromeliad Society of New Zealand (Inc.)
Affiliated with the Bromeliad Society Incorporated
The Society was formed on the 28th August, 1962.
The objects of the Society are to encourage the cultivation and study
of Bromeliads grown indoors or outdoors, and in particular:
(a) To promote discussion and arrange instruction on cultiva—
tion, propagation and control of diseases.
(b) To provide a Library for members.
(c) To assist members to identify plants.
(d) To make awards for outstanding new bromeliads.
(e) To hold Shows or public exhibitions of bromeliads.
(f) To promote the distribution of bromeliads amongst mem-
bers by exchange, purchase and sale, and to encourage the
importation of new plants.
(g) To affiliate with any Society or other body, and to do such
things as may be deemed necessary or desirable in the flir-
therance of these objects.
(h) To accept affiliation from other Societies having similar
objects.
All general correspondence should be sent to the Secretary, Bromehad
Society of New Zealand,, 40 Thimoana Road, Te Atatu South, Waitakere
City, Auckland 8, New Zealand.
Back issues of the Bulletin (since September 1994) are available from the
Editor for $2 post paid. For issues prior to that please contact Laurie De-
phoff, Flat 1/22 Lunn Avenue, Panmure, Auckland 6.
The opinions expressed in letters or articles in this magazine are the au—
, thor’s own views and do not necessarily express the policy of the Bromeliad
Society of New Zealand.
Please send articles & advertisements to the Editor, PO. Box‘ 11-375,
Wellington, New Zealand. E-mail to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
PI'BSilIBIIfS Page
1. It was good to see so many people at the first meeting of the year.
2. The sales table looked really good with so much for sale. I hope the
sellers did well as I know the buyers really enjoyed the large variety.
3. Congratulations to Des Yeates for his first talk on neoregelias which
was enjoyed by all. We will be asking some other members if they
would like to give a talk on their bromeliads.
4. We are looking forward to the February Bromeliad Show as it
promises to be the best yet. With so much competition and with
excellent plants in the diSplay to really set the Show off. Don’t forget
help from members is required for the Show to be a success:
Canteen
Door sales
Raffle tickets
Sales table
There are two days Saturday lt and Sunday 22nd, hours 10am to
1
pm and 1
pm to 4pm. All help will be appreciated. Setting up is on
Friday from 10.00am.
Good luck to all the contestants in the competition during the
Bromeliad Show.
The four bones: Every organization has four bones in its “body”:
There are the “wish bones” who wish someone else would do the work.
There are the “jaw bones” who do all the talking, but very little else.
There are the “knuckle bones” who knock everything that anybody else
tries to do.
Finally, there are the “back bones” who get under the load and do all
the work. (reprinted from The Commentary, Broward County Inc.)
Think about it.
Regards to all,
Lester Ching
Front cover: Billbergia Selby, photo by Bob Spivey. Reprinted from
the Journal of The Bromeliad Society 46 No.4, July-August 1996. A
hybrid between B. tessmanii and B. eloisea made by David Uguccioni
at Selby Gardens in Florida.
lanuarv Meeting News
Well the new year got off to a good start with 42
members and one visitor, Clare Schatzdorfer. Even with windows
and doors open we sweltered through the evening. We are going
through one of the hottest periods for a long time due to this El
Nino weather pattern, however we are not nearly as badly off as
some parts of the country—at least we have plenty of water in our
dams here. Also spare a thought for other parts of the world like
some areas of Australia and also parts of North America.
I do hope that you are managing to keep your broms fi'om
getting sunburnt. Do not attempt to put plants out in the fiill sun
at this time of the year without first acclimatising them. Quite a
lot of plants, especially neoregelias, will take full sun provided
they are acclimatised first. I find that 30% shade suits most
bromeliads and just keeps those UV rays at bay... particularly at
riskl to £1111 sun are the vrieseas, guzmanias and nidulariums.
The Show & Tell table was well patrinised and some: of
the plants brought in were; Orthophytum Gary Hendricks,
Neophytum Firecracker and Neophytum Ralph Davis. All of these
were coming into flower and were bright red all over. They must
be kept in full sun to produce this color. There was a true
Tillandsia orogenes (a name often applied in the past to T.
guatemalensis) [and mis-spelled as “T. orgenes” - Ed]. Another
that we have had wrongly named is Tillandsia karwz'nskyana
which turned out to be T. utriculata var. pringliz'. We now have
the true T. karwinskyana here as reported by Dave Anderson.
And still another wrongly named plant which we have had in our
collections for some time is Billbergia elegans. Peter Waters now
has the true plant and this was on show. Megan Thomas brought
ina Tillandsz'a viridiflora which appeared to have been burnt by
the sun. These plants need good light to keep their color but not
full sun. An interesting small vriesea in spike was brought in by
Laurie Dephoff and was identified as Vrz'esea Komet. Des Yeates
4
had a couple of tillandsias which were identified as T. harrisii
and T. velutz‘na. The latter was in flower and was an all-over red.
Quite an exceptional plant when in flower. Dave Anderson
brought in a plant that we have had in our collections as Vrz‘esea
harmsiana but has now turned out to be Vr. olmosana var.
pachamamae—so if you have a “Vr. harmsiana” in your
collection check it out, it may be wrongly named.
Peter Waters brought along several neoregelias to
illustrate the difference between blooming and non-blooming
neo’s for Show purposes (refer the conditions of entry No. 8,
page 9)
Our discussion for the evening was neoregelias and was
ably led by Des Yeates. This is a very wide field with nearly 100
species and thousands of hybrids. The thing to keep in mind
with neoregelias is that they need plenty of good light, with
many being able to take full sun after a period of acclimatisation.
The ones that are not so good in fiill sun are the variegates and
the blushers—they tend to bleach out. Afier the Aechmea
fasciata, the neo’s seem to be the most widely collected of the
bromeliads. They are easy of culture and make excellent
landscape subjects especially when planted en-masse. They still
have to be watched in the frosty areas. There was quite a
collection of hybrids on the table all in good color as well as
some recent imports such as Neo. Flandria, Neo. Royal
Cordovan, Neo. Tangerine, Neo. Pink Sensation and several
miniature variegates. This is a good time of the year here for
neoregelias, and if what I saw last night is anything to go by then
we should have a good display at the Show.
Door prizes were taken out by Win Shorrock, Di Tarr
and Paul Pinkerton, while the special raffle of Tillandsia
fasciculata in spike was won by Peter Waters. Peter informed us
that this was the first time he had won a raffle at the meeting.
My advice is, buy a Lotto ticket.
NEXT MEETING
Tuesday 24th February. Discussion will be winners from
the Show. We hope to have the judges on hand for comments.
Don’t forget the Show on the 21st and 22nd.
COMPETITIONS
Open flowering: First was Orthophytum vagans “Variegata”
presented by Joe Murray. It was 45cm. tall with green leaves
edged with cream and a rosette of red bracts and white flowers.
Second was Laurie Dephoff with Aechmea fasciata
“Marginata,” another well-grown and impressive plant. Also
included were Vriesea species, Vr. corcovadensis, Vr.
hieroglyphica, Vr. Splendreit (two), Neoregelia eltoniana, Neo.
Cherokee, Neo. Solar Flare, Nidularz'um innocentii var striata,
Guzmania Cherry Variegata and Aechmeafulgens X ramosa.
Open foliage: First was Joe Murray wih Vriesea fosteriana
“Rubra,” a beautiful plant with wide dark green leaves and
chocolate brown markings, and second was Peter Waters with
Neoregelia Tangerine, which is one of the new N. carolinae
varieties and colors up quite nicely in low light. There were also
Neoregelia Takemura Grande, Neo. Kahala Dawn, Neo.
Peppermint Stick, Neo. carolinae “Tricolor,” Neo Bold Streak X
macwilliamsii, Vriesea ospinae var. gruberi, Vr. platynema and
Nidularium Chantrieri.
Tillandsia flowering: T. Hondurensis with three spikes just
coming into flower with dark purple petals was first and was
presented by Len Trotman. Second was T. lucida from John
Scott’s collection. One of the soft leaf tillandsias with green
leaves and a 45cm. inflorescence with lilac bracts. Also on the
table were T. cacticola, T. limbata, T. beutelspacheri, T.
disticha, T. aeranthos, T. floribunda “major” and T. stricia.
T
illandsia foliage: First Len Trotman with T. xerographica and
6
second was Joe Murray with T. stricta which had several heads
of almost black leaves. Others included T. tectorum
“miniature,” T. duratii, T. Creation (cyanea X platyrachis), T.
fuchsii, and T. latifolia.
Novice flowering: Aechmea fasciata “Silver King” presented
by Diane Tarr was first, these are always winners when grown
properly as this one was, and Neoregelia Painted Desert
presented by Graham West was second. Another well grown
plant. Also displayed were Neoregelia Manoa Beauty,
Nia’ulariumfulgens and T
illandsia fuchsii.
Novice foliage: Megan Thomas came first with a Neoregelia
hybrid and Brian Dawson came second with Nidularium Nat De
Leon. Others were Aechmea Mirlo and Vriesea platynema X
guttata.
Congratulations to all the winners and thanks to all those
who entered plants. Keep up the good work. Greenhough
Trophy points went to Laurie Dephoff. The evening ended with
the sales ballot, the table being well stocked with plants.
Len Trotman.
Hordes Devoor Puos, Close Glasshouse
Tauranga, 25 January
BSNZ member Andrew Steens reports that his first Open
Day and Bromeliad Sale attracted over 1,000 visitors—forcing him to
close his glasshouse display. More than 1,500 plants were on sale,
mainly Aechmea and Nidularium species 8: hybrids, also Guzmania,
Neoregelia and Billbergia. “Pup sales were especially popular for peo—
ple wanting a low-cost entry into the plants for landscaping or for
potting up...” said Andrew, who is planning a repeat sale next Winter.
The Bromeliad Society was well advertised at the sale, so perhaps we
may gain a few new members as well.
7
Bromeliau Society Ill NI . comnetitive Show
SCHEDULE OF CLASSES
l Aechmea Blooming
2 Aechmea Foliage
3 Billbergia
4 Cryptanthus
5 Guzmania Blooming
6 Guzmania Foliage
7 Neoregelia Blooming
8 Neoregelia Foliage
9 Nidularium
10 Tillandsia Small Boomijg .
l l Tillandsia Small Foliage
12 Tillandsia Medium Blooming
l3 Tillandsia Medium Foliage
14 Tillandsia Large Blooming
15 Tillandsia Large Foliage
l6 Vriesea Blooming
17 Vriesea Foliage
l8 Bigeneric or other genus not listed above
19 Miniature bromeliad
20 Variegated bromeliad
21 Novice Blooming
22 Novice Foliage
23 Dish or try garden or novelty Blaming
24 Bromeliad arrangement
25 Artistic or floral arrangement
26 Decorative container
CONDITIONS OF ENTRY
NZ.
1 Exhibitors must be financial members of the Bromeliad Society of
2 A maximum of two plants may be entered in each class.
8
Plants must have been grown by exhibitor for at least three months
rior to show.
Plants must be clean and healthy, free from scale and insects and
drained of water. Pots must be clean and potting mix free of weeds
d other plant material. Each plant should be correctly labelled
where possible, with no abbreviations. Labelling not necessary in
Classes 23 to 26.
Plants may be potted only in standard clay, terracotta, green or black
plastic or unadomed bonsai pots. Tillandsias may be mounted on
driftwood or similar.
No commercial leaf shine, cream or milk may be used to enhance the
appearance of the plant.
A pot may contain single or multiple plants provided they are at-
tached to a single rootstock.
A plant which has changed in shape or colour because of impending
blooming is permitted in blooming classes only. i.e. Neoregelias with
blushing centres.
Tillandsias must be firmly attached to mounts and must look estab-
lished. They may be single or multiple plants within the stated mea.
surements. Fiji Trophy awarded for Best Tillandsia.
10 Tillandsia sizes are:- Small, up to 15cm. (6?); Medium, 15 to 30cm.
(6 to 12” ); Large 300m up (12” plus). These measurements exclude
inflorescence and mount.
11 Miniature bromeliad may be single or have multiple heads, no plant
more than 12.5cm high excluding inflorescence. Tillandsias are not
emitted in this class.
12 Variegated bromeliad is a plant with white, pink or red longitudinal
tripes on leaves.
13 ovice classes are for members of less than three years standing and
ho have not won a prize in a bromeliad show.
14 Olive Allan Trophy for Best of Show chosen fiom Classes 1 to 20
only.
15 Class 24 Bromeliad Arrangement has bromeliads only and must use
only natural materials. Plastic pots are not allowed. Em Bailey Tro-
hy for Best Arrangement awarded to winner of this class.
16 Class 25 Artistic or floral arrangement may use other types of plant
but must include a significant amount of bromeliad material.
17
Class 26 Decorative Container may contain one bromeliad only but
may have multiple heads
18
Entries may not be removed from show until after 4pm on Sunday.
19 Unless mentioned above other rules as B.S.I. standard show. Final
decision rests with Competition Stewards.
20 Entries will be accepted between 3pm and 6pm only on the Friday
before the Show.
Announcements
New members: Welcome to the following new members, we hope
you enjoy your time with the Society:
Anna Rolfe, 3/7 Crescent Road, Parnell, Auckland.
Paul & Jean Gillon, 2/2 Howard Road, Northcote, North Shore.
Our Annual Show dates are lt and 22nd February 1998 and setup
will be on Friday the 20th from 10:00 am until 6:00 pm and we will
require plants for the display and helpers to set up. We will also be
making up a roster for helpers on the sales table, door raffle sales and
helping in the kitchen. It’s not too late to let us know if you can help
in these areas.
OurAnnual Dinner is being held on Saturday the lt February at the
Springs Restaurant, costing around $27.50. If you would like to come,
make your booking with Dave Anderson.
The Xth Australian Bromeliad Conference is to be held in Cairns on
the 27-30th August 1999. This will be run by the Cairns Bromeliad
Study Group, and they are asking at this stage for expressions of
interest so that they can make some plans. If you think you would like
to attend, the Secretary has some forms which give an idea of cost.
These can be posted back yourself, or give it to Len Trotrnan and he
will post it back for you.
Annual subscriptions are now due. These can be paid at the meeting
or posted to the Treasurer, Peter Waters, at 22 Half Moon Rise,
Bucklands Beach. Auckland.
The Annual General Meeting will be held prior to the March meet-
ing, and if you would like to serve on the committee please let the
Secretary know.
10
What You Should Know About Billllergias
Don Beadle, Florida.
reprinted from The Bromeliadvisory, Bromeliad Society of
South Florida, 41 #2, February 1998.
It may well be that the billbergia was appreciated by the
natives of ancient South American civilizations before recorded
history. But they did not leave evidence of their appreciation the
way the early 19th century Europeans did in their many mar-
velous horticultural journals, gazettes and magazines. That was
the age of the great collectors and the great collections, and the
billbergia was introduced to Europe in 1815 where it charmed
and intrigued the horticultural community. Hand colored draw-
ings of these early imports dramatically illustrate this interest.
There are now over 60¥described species with many distinc-
tive varieties. The native Eijange for the billbergia 1s pnmarily
eastern Brazil in the loweZ; elevations, but several species are
found 1n Peru, Ecuador, V'enezuela and as far north as central
Mexico. 3‘
Billbergias resemble aechmeas 1n form and habit and m fact
differ taxonomically in only small ways such as structural
details of the pollen grains and whether or not the sepal tip is
"prickly." (The billbergia is "not.
") In habitat, the billbergia is
usually epiphytic 1n clumps; preferring airy locations with bright
shade or indirect light. In; captivity, the billbergia is usually
individually imprisoned in heavy, wet soil, in dank, dismal,
deep shady locations. .
Glowing descriptions of the beauty of the billbergia bloom
inevitably end' with the deflating phrase, "unfortunately, the
bloom is so short lived, lasting no more than two weeks." This,
coupled with the outrageous allegation, "billbergias are the
easiest to propagate and grow of all bromeliads," has done much
11
to disillusion, discourage, and deter the grower from an adventure
with the billbergia.
The Billbergia has much to offer the grower today. A variety
of sizes allow the growing of 3" tall, stoloniferous rosettes and 1+
meter clumps of Billbergia rosea or B. stenopetala. The thin,
tubular shape of the helicoid Billbergia allows enjoyment of the
color, form, and spectacular bloom without the sacrifice of grow-
ing area. The efforts of hybridizers have resulted in the availabil-
ity of new, hardy, and constantly colorful cultivars to which the
bloom is merely an embellishment.
CULTURE
The Billbergia prefers whenever possible to be grown in an
open, porous mix with good drainage. Since the majority. of
growers inevitably custom design their own concoction, no spe-
cific recommendation is made here. I use the commercial
PROMIX because of its convenience and availability.
Billbergias do not universally develop large, strong root
systems and the PROMIX packs well enough to support the tall
plants when they become top heavy when watered. I grow many
of them high overhead in the shade house and have never become
adjusted to having them diving down on me when I fill them with
water.
For shape and size seem to be more a matter of esthetics
than anything else, particularly in judged bromeliad shows. I
become embarrassed when I behold a single small Billbergia
alone and forlorn in the center of a huge, unattractive plastic pot.
Please, do not do this. Most tubular Billbergias suffer from a lack
of conventional conformation when displayed as single plants.
They are naturally gregarious and seem to prefer clumping and
community life and are best shown competitively as neat clumps.
When left to choose their own arrangement, they seldom con-
12
form, unfortunately, to our ideas of What orderly should be. The
attractive arrangement of a clump requires the grower to remove
the old mother plants when they begin to lose their glamour. Gaps
need to be filled in by removing young offsets and replanting
them in a more appropriate spot. Pruning should be merciless in
order to keep a loose, open clump that will allow free access to air
and light. An unattended clump will soon pack the pot with
green, scaly, skinny things that will do little toward encouraging
the grower to acquire more Billbergias. The spectacle of a well-
grown, hanging pot of colorful Billbergias in full bloom is a
rewarding and spiritually uplifting sight.
Watering is another subjective subject. Most growers
schedule their watering by the clock and calendar, mystical signs,
weather conditions, their general emotional state, etc. I recom-
mend a dispassionate approach based on whether the Billbergia is
wet or dry. My only problems have occurred from excess in one
direction or the other. Billbergias do not seem to be overly
sensitive to watering and I will confess to leaning toward too little
rather than too much. Theiiimposition of a degree of stress into
the everyday life of the Billbergia seems to produce a hardier,
more compact, colorful, well—formed plant. This desirable condi-
tion is more easily attainediwhen the Billbergia is kept on a strict
diet. :
No single factor contribtites more to the unattractiveness of a
Billbergia than does overfééding. Balance, in Billbergias as in all
things, is the key word. Ifiyou grow healthy plants in locations
where they get good light for long periods with lots of moving air,
you may feed them well and reap all the benefits therefrom. If you
grow them in low light in stagnant conditions, then feeding is a
shamefully cruel process and you should look within and seek
counsel. .
My soil-less PROMIX provides only small initial doses of
trace elements that are quickly used up. Peters Peat Lite mixes
contain a balanced basic mixture of nutrients together with the
13
needed trace elements. I usually mix Peters to a concentration of
well under 1/4 teaspoonful per gallon [5 litres], which is contin-
uously added to my water by a marvelous little proportioning
device. I do not know if this is the proper amount but it
has apparently done no harm.
A summary of ideal growing conditions for Billbergias would
be to grow them in open, elevated, airy locations with good light
for long periods, with moderate amounts of good water, and
with a MINIMUM of fertilizer. Most Billbergias will survive
from just above freezing to over 1 10°F. [45°C] Billbergia
sanderiana and most of its hybrids surprised me by ignoring 19°
F. [-8°C] for 30 hours. The large helicoids begin to expire or to
be seriously damaged in the low 40s. [5-9°C] They are surpris-
ingly tender. The best temperature range for color and confor—
mation seems to be cool to 50° F.V=[10°C]at night with balmy
70-75° [20-23°C] days. I thrive under those conditions myself,
but if they exist in south Texas it's for only one or two days in
the spring and fall, and that's all. Weare all dealt conditions that
are probably not ideal for the variety of plants we try to grow,
and I have found the Billbergia willing to adapt to a wide range
of conditions. I've seen them grown well in Illinois basements,
New York apartment windows, hilltops in California, under the
trees of Florida, anywhere at all in Australia, and even in the
unrelenting winds of Corpus Christi. But this cannot happen by
ignoring the particular needs of the plant. I note that the people
who grow show quality neoregelias and vrieseas invariably
grow show-quality Billbergias. The reciprocal is also true. The
key must be caring.
Bllbergias are a little more obliging at breeding time than
are some other bromcliads. The appropriate parts are readily
accessible and the process is well known. I have, however, set
seed only about 15% of the times I've attempted to make a
hybrid. That cold fact, to me, fails to validate that bit of
14
frivolous folklore that suggests how easy it is to propagate the
Billbergia. The Billbergia also frequently fails to bloom. When a
neoregelia fails in this fashion, it becomes famous. I heartily
recommend hanging pots to permit the use of otherwise unused
space above the rest of your plants and allow maximum exposure
to free air and light. Almost any pot can he adapted to hang with
a modicum of ingenuity and will add much to the appearance of
your growing area. The spectacle of sunlight through the leaves is
an added pleasure not available when your Billbergia lives under
a bench. Today's grower, when beginning a Billbergia collection,
is presented with a dizzying array of desirable Billbergias from
which to choose. In the past, only old standard, garden varieties
were available. The packed pots of Billbergia nutans, B. pyrami~
dalis, and a token helicoid or two usually defined the Billbergia
for the average grower. A modern collection could begin with
Richter's B. 'Fascinator,‘ Carrone's B. 'Pink Champagne,‘ Thom's
& Schwarz's B. Strawberry; B. 'Manda's Othello,‘ Beadle's B.
'Caramba' and B. 'Hallaluja-h.‘
The spectacular bloom %of Billbergia pyramidalis is best dis-
played in the marginated cultivar B. Kyoto. For foliar color in
species Billbergia, try B. ai‘noena var. viridis or B. amoena var.
rubra Interesting form with attractive spines is available with B
horrida and B. sanderiana
Try them. You'll like them.
Editors note.
The “Helicodea” subgroup referred to includes Billbergia meyeri
B. incarnata, B. stenopetala B. chiapensis, B. microlepis, B.
formosa, B. tessmannii, B. rosea, B. oxysepala, B. violacea, B.
rupestris, B. brachysiphon, B. alfonsijohannis, B. decora, B.
venezuelana [now included in B. rosea], B. cylindrostachya, B.
rubicunda, B. zebrina, B. cardenasii, B. velascana, B. kuhlmanii,
B. porteana, B. magnifica, B. macrolepis, B. pallidiflora, B.
robert-readii and B. mexicana.
15
Notice I“ Meeting
The Annual General Meeting of the Bromeliad Society of New
Zealand Inc., will be held at Greyfriars Hall Mt. Eden PRIOR to
te March meeting on the 24th March commencing at 7.30 PM.
AGENDA
Opening
Apologies
Minutes of the last A.G.M.
Matters Arising
Correspondence
Financial Statement
President’s Report
ELECTION OF OFFICERS
President
Vice Presidents (2)
Secretary
Treasurer
Editor
Librarian
Committee
APPOINTMENTS
Patron
Historian
Auditor
A.H.C. Delegates (2)
Scientific Officer.
General Business
Closure
16
i i i i i i i i i i i
Bertie is waiting with bated breath to see
niscussinn comer iv who wins class 10 at the competitive Show...
with Bertie Bromel it i xi, E? i if i, ‘i i, E, E5
Dear Bertie,
Thanks for your efforts re. my troubles with my Vriesea
hieroglyphica seed [September, 1997]. While no solutions were
given the discussion has given me food for thought. I sow in a
mixture of bark, peat, perlite & powdered charcoal plus a pinch of
Terrasole. I think my problem could be lack of light and too much
feeding. I shall keep trying.
Keith Kerr, Christchurch.
Bertie is puzzled (surprise!). You mention feeding may be
the cause of your seedlings demise, and in your original letter you
said “...they germinate but then start to fade...” The inference
here is that you are feedingthe seedlings soon after germination?
You should not do that! Bfertie sows his Vr. hieroglyphica seed
afier disinfecting them with sodium hypochlorite (J
anola) or
Chinosol. Seed is placed on top of the medium in a small seed
tray half full with wet Sphagnum moss (dried), covered with a
sprinkling of germination igmedium comprising peat plus com-
posted bark and sometimes‘hsome fine pumice mixed in. IfJanola
was used, seeds are watered with a Benlate solution—otherwise
plain water from the dehumidifier—the tray is covered with glass
and held in a warm humid place and left until the seedlings are 4
or 5m high. Then the glass is removed and after a week or so
the seedlings are moved to the growing-on house which is a
twin-skinned plastic covered affair with no drafts and heated to a
minimum of 11°C . Only when the seedlings are moved to the
growing-on house do they receive any fertiliser - regular foliar
mistings with a very weak nutrient solution (about IOppm. Nitro-
gen). When the seedling are getting crowded, about 10mm high,
they are transplanted into community pots, spaced about 2cm
apart, and not planted into single pots until at least 3 to 5 cm high.
Vri‘esea hieroglyphica seedlings seem to hate drafts, too.
17
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VVYYYYVVYYYYYYYVVVVVYVVYVVYVVVVVVVVYVVVV‘
Aechmea emmerichii T
illandsia magnusiana
Ae. kertesziae T. cryptantha
Ae. luddemanniana T. juncea
Ae. tillandsioides T. straminea
Billbergia viridiflora T. velickiana
Puya mirabilis T. corallz'na
Guzmam'a wittmackiz' (red
form) T. s'calaris
Guz. desautelsii T. tricolor
Pitcairnea xanthocalyx Vriesea duvaliana
T
illandsia brachycaulos Vr. fosteriana
T. gardnerz' Vriesea “corallina”
T. hamaleana Werauhia sanguinolenta
Orders (with S.A.E.) and spare seed to:
Andrew Flower, P.O. Box 11-375 WELLINGTON 6340
Red Flowered T
illandsias of Brazil
A book by Renate Ehlers, 23cm x 16cm, card cover, 66 pages, 27
colored photos and 17 line drawings. It describes 17 species
including three new ones, and is written in German with English
translation alongside. All the tillandsias in this group are dainty
plants with beautiful flowers. Includes suggestions for successful
cultivation. Cost $A24, order fi'om Derek Butcher, 25 Grace
Road, Fulham 5024, South Australia. Checks payable to The
Bromeliad Society of South Australia.
l8
Telephone
PATRON & LIFE MEMBER Mrs Bea Hanson (09) 527-6830
HISTORIAN & LIFE MEMBER Laurie Dephoff (09) 527—7789
PRESIDENT Lester Ching (09) 576—4595
VICE PRESIDENTS Dave Anderson (09) 63 8-8671
Des Yeates (09) 838-6535
SECRETARY Len Trotman (09) 83 8-9356
TREASURER Peter Waters (09) 534-5616
EDITOR Andrew Flower (04) 2399-659
LIBRARIAN Des Yeates (09) 838—6535
COMMITTEE Bev Ching (09) 576-4595
Glenys Guild (09) 810-9669
Graham West (09) 298-3479
Bill Vermeer (09) 638-9766
Marjorie Lowe (09) 376-6874
AUDITOR D. Persson
A.H.C DELEGATES Patricia Sweeney and Zena Poulgrain
IEHBEIISIIII' SIIBSGBII'TIIIIS
New Zealand NZ$ 14.00 Ordinary
NZ$ 4.00 Associate (same household)
Overseas NZ$ 20.00 airmail Australia
NZ$ 25.00 airmail USA & other overseas
MEETINGS
FOURTH Tuesday of each month except December, at Greyfriars
Church Hall, 544. Mt Eden Road, Auckland, at 7.30 pm.
19
Billbergia horrida. Photo by Andrew Flower
Contents
President’s Page 3
January Meeting News 4
1998 Competitive Show, Entry Conditions 8
'Announcements 10
What You Should Know About Billbergias, Don
Beadle 11
Notice of Meeting 16
Discussion Corner, Bertie Bromel l7
Seed Bank 18
Ofiicers of the Society 19
Membership details, meetings 19

 

Bromeliad
Society of New Zealand Inc.
March 1998
Vol. 38 No. 2
Bromeliad Society of New Zealand (Inc.)
Affiliated with the Bromeliad Society Incorporated
The Society was formed on the 28th August, 1962.
The objects of the Society are to encourage the cultivation and study
of Bromeliads grown indoors or outdoors, and in particular:
(a) To promote discussion and arrange instruction on cultiva-
tion, propagation and control of diseases.
(b) To provide a Library for members.
(c) To assist members to identify plants.
(d) To make awards for outstanding new bromeliads.
(e) To hold Shows or public exhibitions of bromeliads.
(f) To promote the distribution of bromeliads amongst mem-
bers by exchange, purchase and sale, and to encourage the
importation of new plants.
(g) To affiliate with any Society or other body, and to do such
things as may be deemed necessary or desirable in the fur-
therance of these objects.
(h) To accept affiliation from other Societies having similar
objects.
All general correspondence should be sent to the Secretary, Bromeliad
Society of New Zealand,, 40 Tirimoana Road, Te Atatu South, Waitakere
City, Auckland 8, New Zealand.
Back issues of the Bulletin (since September 1994) are available from the
Editor for $2 post paid. For issues prior to that please contact Laurie De-
phoff, Flat 1/22 Lunn Avenue, Panmure, Auckland 6.
The opinions expressed in letters or articles in this magazine are the au-
thor ’s own views and do not necessarily express the policy of the Bromeliad
Society of New Zealand.
Please send articles & advertisements to the Editor, PO. Box 11-375,
Wellington, New Zealand. E-mail to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
PIGSillelll'S Page
A great night was enjoyed by all who were there, but where
where all the others? Recovering from the Show. Well they missed a
fantastic meeting which produced some great preliminary results and
they really looked good.
Much of our success is largely due to Marjorie Lowe who
organised the advertising with such devotion and dedication. It was an
excellent job. Well done Marjorie.
Although entries at the show were slightly down there were
some excellent exhibits and the results were in the awards—congratu-
lations to all the winners. Be there for the next meeting to hear the
financial results.
The AGM takes place at the next meeting and volunteers are
needed to help on the committee and other duties as well.
I have been asked by some members if cups of tea will
continue during 1998. If this is required, we need someone to take up
the challenge to provide the time etc.
Plants are need for the sales table this month. I do hope there
are still some bromeliads lefi for the sales table.
Competition rules will be on display during the monthly
meetings. Membership fees are now due 33 14 per person, plus $4 for
associate members from the same address only.
SHOP ASSISTANT
We can not always oblige but we can always speak obligingly.
Voltair
1694-1778
Lester Ching
1998
This months cover: Two old garden favorites this month—on the
front Aechmea recurvata var benrathii (photo by Nina Rehak of
Sydney) and on the back Tillandsia aeranthos (photo by Renate Ehlers
of Stuttgart). Both these plants thrive in the light-frost or frost-free
garden in New Zealand. Well, they do in Wellington!
23
February Meeting News
Well, in contrast to the sweltering hot night in January, I
noticed a few cardigans being worn. Perhaps the sting has gone out of
the sun, although this was not noticeable over the weekend of the
Show.
We had rather a small gathering with 42 members including
several new members and one visitor. There was also a lack of plants
on the sales table, but this was to be expected with an enormous
number of plants being sold at the show, and I also think that the show
had an effect on our attendance.
What can I say about the show except that it was a boomer and
exceeded our expectations; final figures will be announced at the
A.G.M. A lot of credit goes to Marjorie Lowe who handled our
advertising superbly and it is advertising that gets people through the
door, who in turn help pay the expenses of running a show with some
left over to boost our bank balance. This in turn helps to keep our
subscription rates at a reasonable level. We had many helpers working
over the three days, setting up, manning the show and helping with the
breakdown. These were all thanked by the President at the meeting.
There were not many plants on the Show & Tell table except
for a couple of Neoregelias for identification. It is a bit difficult to put
a name to some of these. However there were three plants brought in
by Peter Waters which had undergone name changes. These were
Canistrum Iindenii var. roseum which has been transferred to a new
genus Edmundoa, Cannistrum cyanthifarme which has been
transferred to Wittrockia, and Neoregelia olens Vulcan X cruenta
which is now named Neoregelia Noble Descent. If you have any of
these plants please check your labels.
Our discussion centered around some of the winning plants
from the show and we had judge Dave Anderson to make comments
and answer any queries regarding these plants. There were some very
nicely grown plants among the winners but the quality of the plants
generally was perhaps not as good as last year. The bad winter season
may have had some bearing on this. The flowering plants are especially
difficult to get just right for show time.
Door prizes were won by Zoe DeAth, Peter Brady and Elaine
24
Duddy. The special raffle prize went to Bea Hanson.
NEXT MEETING
Tuesday March 24th, commencing with the Annual General Meeting.
Discussion plants will be red-leafed bromeliads, discussion led by
Len Trotrnan.
COMPETITION RESULTS
Open flowering: First equal was Laurie Dephoff with Neoregelia
Rose Flush which lived up to its name with a rosy blush all over the
plant, and Peter Waters with Neoregelia pendula X eleutheropetala.
This is one of the unusual Neos with short leaves around 8cm. long
and two pups on long stolons. The parent plant was blushing bright
red in the centre. There was no second place. There were also Vriesea
corcovadensis, Vr. Hazel, Aechmea fasciata, Neoregelia Magenta,
Neo. Roseo Lineata, Neo. concentrica and several Neo. hybrids.
Open foliage: First Peter. Waters with Vriesea fosteriana var.
seideliana, a nice wide—leaf plant with dark green, brown and white
markings grown in strong light to bring out the color. These vrieseas
with textured leaves can be acclimatised to grow out in the sun as
opposed to the green-leaf varieties which need shady conditions.
Second was Gil Keesing with Neoregelia Gold Fever, which had also
been grown in the strong light to bring out the color. Also showing
were Vriesea hieroglyphica, Vr. platynema, Vr. Pahoa Beauty X
fosteriana, Billbergia Beadle hybrid, B. vittata, Ananas Variegata,
Aechmea nudicaulis var aqualz's and Cannis leopardinum.
Tillandsia flowering: First was Glenys Guild with T. imperialis, a
well grown plant with a huge red spike. Second was Win Shorrock
with T. fasciculata Hondurensis. Growing on driftwood, this was an
impressive plant with a 300m. spike. Others on the table were T.
mallemontz'i, T. chiapensis, T. capitata Silver Rose, another T.
imperialis and a T stricta with five flower spikes.
Tillandsia foliage: Win Shorrock was first with T. hitchcockz'ana (or
should this be a vriesea? there seems to be some controversy about
this). Second equal were T. ampla and T. bourgaei. Ithink both were
25
presented by Joe Murray. There were also T. ehlersiana and T.
fendleri.
Novice flowering: Marjory Lowe was first with an impressive
Nidularium innocentii var. wittmackii with two heads, both in flower.
Second equal with Neoregelia Fairy Paint X chlorosticta and Megan
Thomas with Neoregelia Maggies Pride.
Novice foliage: First Graham West with Aechmea Tam Star, and
second was Brian Dawson with Billbergia soundersii.
The Greenhough Trophy points went to Laurie Dephoff with
Neoregelia Royal Flush.
Len Trotman.
Editor’s note:
Some newer members may wonder why Len mentioned the
controversial question of whether Win Shorrock’s “T
illandsia
hitchcockiana” in the Tillandsia foliage section is really a Vriesea...
Well, officially, IT IS..'
Vr. hitchcockiana is one of those grey-leafed vrieseas which look just
like a tillandsia but are included with vriesea because early botanists
distinguished tillandsias by an anatomical detail— “vrieseas” have a
small fold on the base of their petals, “tillandsias” do not. These days,
botanists are classifying more in accordance with evolutionary
relationships, and in 1993/96 Jason Grant moved a lot of tillandsia-
like vrieseas, including Vr. hitchockiana, into the tillandsia genus.
But the Director of the Bromeliad Identification Centre, Harry Luther,
has witheld sanctioning the changes until the whole job of working
out the relationships between the remaining vrieseas and tillandsias
are completed. In other words, he is not prepared to accept half a job!
In De Rebus Bromeliacearum II published in Selbyana, The
Journal of the Marie Selby Botanical Gardens, Vol 18(1) May 1997,
Harry wrote: “Although a number of Vriesea 3.1. have been
transferred to Tillandsia s.s. (Grant 1993b; 1996) ...[I feel] it is
premature to accept those changes; however we note them under both
Tillandsia and Vriesea.” -
So I don’t think we should deduct Gill’s points !
26
"BIBS Fl'flll the Bay I" ”fill"
Anne Connolly
The February meeting was held at the home of Lorna Grey,
and although there was no guest speaker it turned out to be a very
instructive meeting with 19 members attending.
Loma’s garden was really interesting and she certainly had
some unusual plants. We all coveted her Vriesea hieroglyphica, and
her beautiful Aechmeapectinata in flower. Thank you Lorna.
Gladys Fisher’s rendering of “A word of warning to New
Members”, taken from the International Bromeliad Society Journal,
was greeted with much laughter.
Many plants were brought in for display. Questions were
asked regarding these—discussions followed—which were really in-
teresting and instructive. Some plants were beautiful, and there was
one with frostbite—again discussion followed—and members learnt.
Hopefiilly this will encourage more members to bring plants for
discussion.
The next meeting will be held at homes of Nancy Wilson, 6a
Shaw Place, and thence to Ngaire Thomas, 127a Hinewa Road. Com-
mencement 1.30pm, Wednesday April 8th.
Biology of the Bromeliads reissued.
Dr David Benzing’s classic study, The Biologz of The
Bromeliads, has been out of print for some time. The work has now
been re-published by the Bromeliad Society of Victoria (Australia).
The contents are the same as the original publication, but the format
has changed to A4 with the spine made of plastic binding combs.
Cost is SA 74 including postage for one copy. Cheques
should be made out to B.A. Lewis and orders sent to:
Mr Bruce Lewis
75 Elgin Street
Hawthorn VIC, AUSTRALIA 3122.
30 27
Annual Show Results 1998
l Aechmea . lst Len Trotman Ae. fasciata Morgana
blooming 2nd Gill Keesing Ae. firlgens discolor X
3rd Lester Ching Ae. fulgens discolor
2 Aechmea lst Bev. Ching Ae. pineliana
foliage 2nd Len Trotman Ae. fasciata Morgana
3rd Laurie Dephoff Ae. orlandiana Ensign
3 Billbergia lst Peter Waters B. Hallelujah
2nd Peter Waters B. hybrid Beadle #942
3rd Joe Murray B. vittata
4 Cryptanthus lst Peter Waters C. Goldie Langdon
2nd Gill Keesing C. Black Knight
3rd Len Trotman C. Pink Starlight
5 Guzmania lst Peter Waters G. Tiffany
blooming 2nd Len Trotman G. Fiesta
3rd Len Trotman G. Indian
6 Guzmam'a lst Peter Waters G. sanguinea Tricolor
foliage 2nd Peter Waters G. Peacockii
3rd Len Trotman G. Fiesta
7 Neoregelia lst Win Shorrock Neo. Black Knight
blooming 2nd Len Trotman Neo. Gee Wiz
3rd Gill Keesing Neo. Little Prince
8 Neoregelia foliage lst Gill Keesing Neo. Gold Fever
2nd Bev. Ching Neo. Charm
3rd Gill Keesing Neo. Bea Hanson
9 Nidularium lst Gill Keesing Nid. Chantrieri
2nd Peter Waters Nid. Sao Paulo
3rd Len Trotman Nid innocentii witackia..
10 Tillandsia lst Len Trotman T. recurvrf'
olia
small blooming 2nd Peter Waters T. hondurensis
3rd Laurie Dephoff T. ehlersiana
11 Tillandsia 1st Len Trotman T. tectorum mini
small foliage 2nd Peter Waters T. magnusiana
3rd Peter Waters T. atroviridipetala
28
« \ / - ' -
12 Tillandsia lst Peter Wafers T. chiapensis
medium blaming 2nd Len Trotman T. tectorum
3rd Len Trotman T. Maya
13 Tillandsia lst Len Trotman T. streptophylla
medium foliage 2nd Win Shorrock T. tectorum
3rd Laun'e Dephoff T. seleriana
14 Tillandsia lst Win Shorrock T. fasciculata Hondurens
large blooming 2nd Glenys Guild T. imperialis
3rd Len Trotman T Creation
15 Tillandsia lst Len Trotman T. tectorum
large foliage 2nd Win Shorrock T. leucolepis
3rd Peter Waters T. jaliscomonticola
16 Vriesea blooming lst Len Trotman Vr. altodasserae
2nd Len Trotman Vr. Eva
3rd Joe Murray Vr. hybrid
l7 Vriesea foliage lst Peter Waters Vr. gigantia X erythrod.
2nd Gill Keesing Vr. Purple Cockatoo
3rd Peter Waters Vr. Mint Julep
18 Bigeneric or other lst Peter Waters Quesnelia Tim Plowman
genus 2nd Jenny Gallagher Fascicularia bicolor
3rd Ioe Murray Orthophytum vagans var.
19 Miniature lst Jenny Gallagher Dyckia platyphylla
2nd Peter Waters Neoregelia Zoe
3rd Laun'e Dephoff Deuterocohnia
- lorentziana
20 Variegated lst Peter Waters Neoregelia hybrid
2nd Peter Waters . Neoregelia hybrid
3rd Laurie Dephofi‘ Neoregelia Kahala Dawn
21 Novice blooming lst Michael Polglase Tillandsia fasciculata
2nd Graham west Neoregelia Grace
3rd Russell Haydon Neo. carolinae tn'color
22 Novice foliage lst Lester Ching Neo. carolinae tricolor
2nd Graham West Vr. fenestrah's hybrid
3rd Russell Haydon Neoregelia Bea Hanson
29
23 Dish or tray lst Barbara Murray
or novelty 2nd Win Shorrock
3rd Gill Keesing
24 Bromeliad 1st Gill Keesing
arrangement 2nd Barbara Murray
3rd Rosemary Thomas
25 Artistic arrange- 1st Jenny Gallagher
ment 2nd Barbara Murray
3rd Rosemary Thomas
26 Decorative con- 1st Peter Waters Billbergia Strawberry
tainer 2nd Win Shorrock Dyckia fosteriana
3rd Len Trotman': Neoregelia Imperfecm
Plant of the Show: Peter Waters, Quesnelia marmorata Tim Plow-
man.
Best Tillandsia: Len Trotrnan, T
illandsia tectorum ‘mini’
Best Guzmania or Vriesea: Peter Waters, Guzmania sanguinea
“tricolor”
Best Novice: Lester Ching, Neoregelz'a carolz‘nae “tricolor”
Best Arrangement: Gill Keesing
Most points in Show: Peter Waters.
AWEII'IISING BATES
Single issue Min. 6 per year
Full page 15.00 13.50
Halfpage 8.50 7.65
Quarter page 4.25 3.85
Eighth page 2.00 1.80
30 27
Announcements
New members: Welcome to the following, we hope you enjoy your
membership in the Society:
Nick Miller, 91 Te Akau Road, RD4 Rotorua
Kaylene Jackson, 63 Connaught Street, Blockhouse Bay, Auckland
Myra Tonga, 35 Westbrooke Ave., Takanini, Manukau City
Elaine Duddy, 87a Waiatarua Road, Remuera, Auckland.
John Humphry, 2/40 Tawera Rd., Greenlane, Auckland.
RA & HM Dunne, l3 Tahi Tce., Glen Eden, Waitakere City
Carol Pearce, 3O Telstar Place, Beachhaven, North Shore
Nigel Russell & Glenys Lindsay, 1 Tizard Place, Birkenhead
S. J. Gray, 2/57 Moana Avenue, Onehunga, Auckland.
Harvey Wilson, 2/92 Old Mill Road, Westrnere, Auckland.
Beryce Hazell, 280 Great South Road, Papakura
Claire Smythe, I93 Godley Road, Titirangi, Waitakere City.
Margaret Bryant, 2/25 Larchwood Avenue, Westrnere, Auckland.
Darilyn LaBelle, 1/25 Montrose Street, Pt. Chevalier, Auckland.
Nadege & Andy Horrell, 4a Fitzroy St., Ponsonby, Auckland.
Bill & Ivy Stovold, 51 Otumoetai Road, Tauranga.\
Annual Meeting: The Annual General Meeting will be held at
Greyfriars Hall Mt. Eden PRIOR to the March general meeting on the
24th March, commencing at 7:30pm.
Subscriptions are NOWDUE: if you haven’t paid, please send your
sub. to Peter Waters as soon as possible. Thanks.
Correction: Last month’s frent cover photograph of Billbergia Selby
was attributed to Bob Spivey.... Harvey Beltz has pointed out that, in
fact, Vern Sawyer made that photo.
The Editor doesn’t receive a very large mailbag...‘ in fact, he
receives very few communications from members (except from peo-
ple complaining that the bulletin is late. Which this one probably will
be!)... please feel free to write and comment on what you see in the
Bulletin, and what you would like to see. Otherwise, you’ll just get
what the Editor likes! [see - I didn’t ask you to actually write an
article yourself...]
31
fillfllldfl'fl
iallflIII/Ifl var scannsa P
Andrew Flower, Wellington.
Last June, Bertie Bromel in his “Discussion Comer” related
the history of T
illandsia ionantha var scaposa, it’s subsequent re-
naming to T
illandsz'a kolbii, and some ensuing controversy. (BSNZ 38
#5, June 1997, pp.82-85)
To recap briefly. In 1941 LE. Smith described a plant from
Guatemala as T. ionantha variety scaposa. This plant has been
popular in our collections for some time. But in 1981, Walter Till in
Vienna named a new discovery from Oaxaca, Mexico, as Tillandsia
kolbii and we were told that this new species included the plants we
had previously known as Tillandsia ionantha var. scaposa. In other
words, we were advised to change the labels on our “scaposas” to
“kolbii”., and many of us did.
Then doubts began to surface! The first I heard of it was the
Adalaide conference of Australian Bromeliad Societies in 1995,
where German botanist Renate Ehlers was heard to suggest that there
may, in fact, be two different varieties out there in the bush: one
relating to Smith’s “Scaposa” and another to Till’s “kolbii.” Oh! dear!
Three botanists have commented on Bertie’s discussion.
First, Harry Luther, Director of the Mulford B. Foster Bromeliad
Identification Centre at the Marie Selby Botanical Gardens in Florida
wrote on 17 July 1997:
“There are often problems with wide ranging, variable species. First,
regarding T. ionantha var. scaposa as a variety of T. ionantha; these
taxa have little in common, the foliage, the conformation of the
rosette, the shape and size of the trichomes are all different. No
population of T. ionantha that I have seen from NW Mexico to Costa
Rica looks at all like var. scaposa. All populations (with the possible
exception of var. van hyningiz’) look like T. ionantha. All have a
pseudosimple inflorescence with violet petals. I also note that [L.B.]
Smith is the only one who states the floral bracts are shorter than the
sepals (perhaps the uppermost one or two may be a bit shorter),
Gardner, Rauh, Utley, MacVaugh and myself finds them equalling to
32
much exceeding the sepals. Also note that T. ionantha usually forms
dense clusters; T. kolbii and var. scaposa rarely form dense clusters
either in the wild or cultivation. Also note the rosette of leaves
doesn’t flush red, only the scape and primary bracts; the bracts on T.
ionantha are hardly visible on a flowering plant.
The type of T. kolbii is from Oaxaca. These plants are grey,
rather small and usually have a distichously arranged inflorescence.
The type of var. scaposa is from Guatemala and is larger
with greener leaves, often a compound inflorescence. When com-
pound, the central spike is usually polystichously flowered, the
lateral branches are often distichously flowered. All of the plants I’ve
seen of kolbii or var. scaposa have lavender (more or less) never
violet petals.
I believe that the Oaxacan plant and the Guatemalan plants
are parts of a cline in all features and that neither is conspecific with
T. ionantha. In my view the correct name is T. kolbii.
Another item of note: the illustration used by Smith to
illustrate T. ionantha in the monograph was the same one used to
illustrate the original description of T. ionantha var. scaposa.
Regarding the exsertion of the anthers and style, this charac-
ter is sometimes difficult to ascertain, it can vary from bloom to
bloom. This happens with T. plagoiotropica, matudae, kammii and
others especially when cultivated too warm and dry.
I hope this answers some of your questions. I’m sure that
others will never agree. Perhaps the molecular people will be able to
finally be able to deal with this sort of problem.”
Eric Gouda, from the Biology Department of the University
of Utrect in theNetherlands, originally identified my photo of var.
scaposa (on our cover last June) as T. kolbii. Then he read Bertie’s
article, and said on Sept.24 1997: “I did some research...and you are
right, it is not close to T. kolbii! I had not seen specimen of T. kolbii,
only the drawing of Walter Till and he noted on his reprint of his
publication (hand written) syn: T. ionantha var. scaposa....”
Walter Till from the University of Vienna commented on 10
December 1997: “... I have compared the type specimen of T.
(Continued on page 34)
33
kAAAAAtAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA‘AALAAAAAAAAMJ
”Q :7
< .>
r:
1 ii
3 l;
4 gs.
3 Packets of seed 50¢. each m NZ. 2;
1 Overseas $1 US or $1 Aust., airmail postage free. g:
. t>
A"vYYVYVYVVVvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvv't"
Aechmea emmerichii T
illandsia juncea
Ae. kertesziae T straminea
Ae. luddemanniana T. magnusiana
Billbergia brasiliensis T. tricolor
B. viridiflora Vriesea duvaliana
Puya mirabilis Vr. fosteriana
Guzmam'a desautelsii Vr. “corallina”
Pitcairnia cf. atrorubens Vr. scalaris
Pit. xanthocalyx Vr. Coppertone
T
illandsia hamaleana Werauhia sanguinolenta.
T. incamata Dyckia species ?
Orders (with S.A.E.) and spare seed to:
Andrew Flower
PO. Box 11-375, Manners Street PO.
WELLINGTON.
(Continued
fiom page 33)
ionantha var. scaposa with T. kolbii and have the impression that both
are not identical albeit closely related. The plant figured on the cover
of “Bromeliad Society of New Zealand Inc. vol. 37 # 5” actually seems
to be T. ionantha var scaposa.”
Next month (or the one after) I will try to put all this into plain
language — meantime any further comments are welcome! Meantime, if
we had a sweepstake how about T. kolbii var scaposa... or T. scaposa...
34
Telephone
PATRON & LIFE MEMBER Mrs Bea Hanson (09) 527-6830
HISTORIAN & LIFE MEMBER Laurie Dephoff (09) 527-7789
PRESIDENT Lester Ching (09) 576-4595
VICE PRESIDENTS Dave Anderson (09) 63 8-8671
Des Yeates (09) 83 8-6535
SECRETARY Len Trotman (09) 83 8-935 6
TREASURER Peter Waters (09) 534-5616
EDITOR Andrew Flower (04) 2399-65 9
LIBRARIAN Des Yeates (09) 838—6535
COMMITTEE Bev Ching (09) 576—4595
Glenys Guild (09) 810—9669
Graham West (09) 298-3479
Bill Vermeer (09) 63 8-9766
Marjorie Lowe (09) 376-6874
AUDITOR D. Persson
A.H.C DELEGATES Patricia Sweeney and Zena Poulgrain
MEMBERSHIP SUBSCRIPTIONS
New Zealand NZ$ 14.00 Ordinary
NZ$ 4.00 Associate (same household)
Overseas NZ$ 20.00 airmail Australia
NZ$ 25.00 airmail USA & other overseas
IIIEIIIISS
FOURTH Tuesday of each month except December, at Greyfriars
Church Hall, 544. Mt Eden Road, Auckland, at 7.30 pm.
19
President’s Page
February Meeting News
Notes fiom the Bay of Plenty, Anne Connolly
1998 Competitive Show, Results
Announcements
Tillandsia ionantha var. scaposa, Andrew
Flower
Seed Bank _
Oflicers of the Society
Membership details, meetings
23
24
27
28
31
32
34
35
35

 

Bromeliad
Society of New Zealand Inc.
April 1998
VOL 38 No. 3
Bromeliad Society of New Zealand (Inc.)
Affiliated with the Bromeliad Society International Inc.
The Society was formed on the 28th August, 1962.
The objects of the Society are to encourage the cultivation and study
of Bromeliads grown indoors or outdoors, and in particular:
(a) To promote discussion and arrange instruction on cultiva-
tion, propagation and control of diseases.
(b) To provide a Library for members.
(c) To assist members to identify plants.
(d) To make awards for outstanding new bromeliads.
(e) To hold Shows or public exhibitions of bromeliads.
(f) To promote the distribution of bromeliads amongst mem-
bers by exchange, purchase and sale, and to encourage the
importation of new plants.
(g) To affiliate with any Society or other body, and to do such
things as may be deemed necessary or desirable in the fur—
therance of these objects.
(h) To accept affiliation from other Societies having similar
objects.
All general correspondence should be sent to the Secretary,
Bromeliad Society of New Zealand, 33 Marsden Avenue, Mt. Eden,
Auckland 4, New Zealand.
Back issues of the Bulletin (since September 1994) are available
from the Editor for $2 post paid.
The opinions expressed in letters or articles in this magazine are the
author’s own views and do not necessarily express the policy of the
Bromeliad Society of New Zealand.
Please send articles & advertisements to the Editor, PO. Box 11-375,
Wellington, New Zealand. E—mail to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Pl‘flSillEllfS Page
It is my pleasure to thank Len Trotman who is standing down
after many years as Secretary. Len’s contribution to the Bromeliad
Society of New Zealand is almost legendary with information, support
and organising of activities over many years. Len, who remains on the
committee, is looking forward to a lighter work load.
A special thanks to Andrew Flower our Editor for all his work
in producing our Journal plus all the extra articles of interest that are
put in. Please Andrew could the Journal come out a few days earlier as
some members are not receiving them until after the monthly meeting.
The President could also help. [sorry, didn’t realise Mercury Energy
also delivers your mail up there — Ed]
To Peter Waters I also thank for all the work that is put in as
Treasurer, the talks and plants Peter and Len bring in for the discussion
talks.
Thanks also to the life members for all their work; Bea
Hanson, Laurie Dephoff, Patricia Sweeney and Harry Martin. A.H.C.
delegates Patricia Sweeney and Zena Poulgrain, many thanks for your
time & efforts over the year. Thanks also to the committee members
for their efforts this year, for without them the Society would cease to
exist.
The bromeliad show was a great success for the Society thanks
to the efforts of Committee members and society members alike.
Welcome to Dave Anderson as Secretary as we lookforward
to an active year getting under way.
The A.G.M. was a lively meeting with many members having
a say giving the new committee a lot of feedback and direction so we
have positive ideas to work on for 1998. More feedback is required so
committee members understand members’ requirements. The sales
table was excellent, resulting in good results. Good to see Bromeliad
books for sale as well it was great, keep it up.
Members are still enquiring about garden visits during the
year, one of which will be Bev. and I who have only been in our new
place for 14 months. A date will be decided on by next meeting.
Lester Ching.
This month’s covers: Tillandsia labelled “abdita,” - photos by An-
drew Flower. This plant looks like T. brachycaulos to me. Any com-
ments on the difference between these two species anyone?
39
March Meeting NEWS
A large number of people turned out for the A.G.M. which
preceded the monthly meeting.
After the Minutes of the last year’s A.G.M., the Financial
Statement, and the Correspondence were read; the following officers
were elected to the committee:
Following a lengthy discussion it was decided to set the
subscriptions for next year 1999-2000 at $20 single and $5 for an
associate. The show trophies were then presented as had been detailed
in the March bulletin.
The monthly meeting started with a full table in the Show and
Tell section. Len Trotman had brought in a polystyrene slab 35cm. by
400m. mounted with T
illandsia bergeri; — cheek by jowl - showing how
these plants thrive when set into small holes pushed through the slab
with their roots growing extensively. Neoregelia Peggy Peach was
shown as this particular clone always pups and sets flower when quite
small, it just never grows very big. T
illandsia tenug'folia Silver —a
recently imported plant is almost certainly T
illandsia araujei - (just
coming into flower). T
illandsia kirchhoffiana seems to have enjoyed
Auckland’s long warm summer as this clump from Dave Anderson has
sent up two more flower spikes after only one flower spike last year.
Mind you this was nothing compared with John Scott’s plant at the
show which had 14 spikes on it. There was an Aechmea nudicaulis in
full flower brought in for naming as were two Neoregelias, ‘Maggies
Pride’ and carolinae X ‘Princeps’ x concentrica. Dick Endt had an
Aechmea ‘Little Harve’ chantinii x rubens (?) -Baensch, which he had
recently purchased from a nursery in Te Awamutu. Laurie Dephoff
displayed a Puya species ‘Rio Pampas’ in full flower (1 metre high)
which he had obtained from Andrew Flower [did anyone try to identifi;
it? photo? - Ed]. Peter Waters had 3 species which are very rare in NZ;
Neoregelz'a angustifolia with its stoloniferous offshoots Vriesea
gradata with a twisted flower spike and Hohenbergia vestita.
40
Len Trotman lead the discussion on the plant of the month
which this month was red leafed bromeliads where naturally
Neoregelias were to the fore. The main pointers to keeping high
colour in the Neos. is to give them very bright light and little if any
fertiliser. Be careful through the summer months if you are growing
them in full sun as they will bleach and burn when they are not given
some form of shading. Without getting too technical the red
colouration is the plants mechanism of reflecting the light and
preventing the leaves from burning; similar to humans going brown.
The Neos. on show were ‘Fireball’, one that has been around' for a
long time, German Hybrid, made many years ago by Dr Oeser, Big
Red, Gespacho, Nefretiti, ‘Star of Brazil’, Checkmate, Something
Special, Juliette, Spring Song, Pink Fireball, Voodoo, Gold Fever,
and lastly Fosperior ‘Perfection’. There are literally hundreds of
different hybrids and the ones shown above are just a small selection.
Also discussed were 2 Aechmeas, warasii var rubra & Red Flamingo
and 2 Vrz'eseas heterostachays rubra & Eva and Nidularium x
Chantrieri. All in all a good cross-section of red leaved plants.
The special raffle prize this month was the unusual bigeneric
Guzriesea Jeanie which was won by Laura Goss.
COMPETITIONS
Open Flowering: First equal were Pat Lawson with a Vr.
phillipocoburgii and Peter Waters with a Guz. sanguinea tricolor- two
beautiful plants the first with a 1.2m high flower spike, and the
second a very rare variegated form of the species. Also in the
competition were Guz. danielii- wrongly named as this species is not
in NZ and is probably Guz. gloriosa, Neo. concentrica Red,
Quesnelia quesneliana var quesneliana, Ae Tarn Star, and Neo.
Takemura Princeps.
Open Foliage: Peter Waters was first with a Neo. cruenta x
marmorata— an uncommon plant, whilst second equal was Len
Trotman with a Neo. Fosperior ‘Perfection’ and Marie Healey with
Ae. fasciata ‘Silver King’. In the competition were Neos. Empress
Variegata, Small World No l, kautskyi, carolz‘nae x carcharodon, and
41
Vr. platynema variegata. BROMELIAD SOCIETY Of NZ INC
T
illandsia Flowering: Len Trotman’s T. Creation (cyanea x W
platyphylla) a recently made hybrid was first, with second being a m FAYMENTS,
shared between Peter Waters’ T. multicaulis and Wyn Shorrocks T. Balancebscrl at Westpac 1/3/97 $4,199.83 Bulletin $3,586.55
. . Su ‘ptions 2,807.04 Bulletin postage 1,196.77
strzcta. There were also on the table T. secunda, T. strzcta, and T. mm was (flat) 336725 Book purchases 296.12
crocata With it’s numerous very fragrant flowers. Raffles (nett) 1,030.50 Hall hire 550.00
T
illandsia Foliage: First was Laurie DephofPs T. tectorum followed :fitfitms ("a“) 221:: 3:12:23” 5‘ “my “s“ 217332
by Peter Waters’ T. hildae. In the competition were'T. fasciculata, T. Door 231.90 Auditor 60.00
fasciculata xflabellata Red, T kirchhofliana, and T. Maya (claimed gm gigg'gsem Z'fgg'gg :figti": 1 Egg:
to be a natural hybrid between T capitata and T. xerographica). . Seed ”.5 (mm) 185.30 Am levy ' 51.90
Novice Flowering: Flrst was Gary McDonald and second Brian .. Advertlsms 45-50 Pnzesmns 149-50
Dawson Interest 389.17 Show rentals 1,195.00
' _ Decrease in Term Deposit 1,342.97 Show advertising 219.25
Novice Foliage: F1rst was Gary McDonald and second was Graham Showexpenses 106.70
West. , _ Balance at Westpac 28/2/98 6,049.06
My apologies for not getting the names of the plants.
The Greenhough went to Len Trotman’s T. Creation. . $16,880.95 $16,880.95
. . Excess Income - $1,849.23
Congratulations to all the wmners.
NEXT MEETING Tuesday 28th April. '
Dave Anderson
Thanks, Len
The Editor wants to add special thanks to Len Trotman for m" ' w
his contributions to the Bulletin. More recently, Len has done an Rim 1-9-15 1-9-91 rm
amazing job with his reports on the meetings, and especially his ' mg; $7.133 37.2%: 317.1;
. . . . . . ‘l .4 1 . 6 .1
helpful h1nts as he writes. And over the years he has contributed Raffle 536.00 336.60 860.50 magma 34.65 6.00 0 or
more than his share of general articles, especially those basic ‘g‘ufi'amm $38 22:38 226.00 mm 1:2}: 2333 3:3;
guides which were so helpful for new members. T“ 9"” $3 232:3: a? 34000 3:33
I also very much appreciate all Len’s work importing new _ Tasupplies ' 152251
varieties of bromeliads so we can broaden our collections. Lets W W
hope the bureaucrats and their regulations don’t slow him down! macaw 31.5.45 $1,624.72 $5.19s
Thanks, Len. Andrew Flower.
42 47
“DIES fl‘lllll “I8 Bay of PIEIIW
Kevin Schollum
Our April meeting was held on a fine day at Nancy Wilson’s.
Joanne Elder chaired the meeting and gave us a report on the
Bromeliad Show in Auckland. She also mentioned the request for a
monthly meeting and a bus trip to Auckland later in the year. We
viewed Nancy’s garden and bromeliads which were growing very well.
We then went to Ngaire Thomas’ place and considering the
limited time to set up her garden from almost nothing, it all looked in
great shape; her bromeliads were also looking good. -
New members were made welcome and were asked to sub-
scribe to the NZ Bromeliad Society. At the Show and Tell there were
many plants of great interest and discussion followed.
Next meeting is to be held at Owen Bird’s place at 27 Linley
Terrace on June 10th.
The thought
What we see depends largely on what we are looking for.
Lester Ching
(Yes, Lester did have a thought this month... but he just
had too much else to say to fit it all on his page!)
ADVERTISING RATES
Single issue Min. 6 per year
Full page 15.00 13.50
Halfpage 8.50 7.65
Quarter page 4.25 3.85
Eighth page 2.00 1.80
43
Northland Bromeliad Gl'llllll
Colleen Frew
Hello everyone, here we are at the end of another brom year
and looking forward to more happy times together. From all reports
those of you who were able to go to the Bromeliad Show in Auckland
thought it was a great display and you probably have your new broms
in position by now.
It is an especially good growing time for our plants, also there
are many inflorescences and flowers making a really bright showing
in our gardens.
Freda Nash hosted the group at her place on 15th February (a
week earlier than usual). Isn’t it amazing how many plants you can
get into a small space if you spend some time in organization. Freda
has utilised her area very well and she has some interesting plants,
many succulents and bromeliads.
Maureen Green gave us a short talk about cannistrums.
Natives of south-east Brazil, they prefer shade and moisture, maybe
filtered light. They are often epiphytic. The name is derived from the
Latin word canistra which means “little basket.” Some varieties are
C. lindeniz', C. Ieopara’inum [not a valid species name - Ed], C.
giganteum [some of these are labelled, incorrectly, “C. gigantea” -
Ed.] and others.
‘ Jacqui is making enquiries from Heather Thorbum about the
Expo in April and sje will let us know about it at the next meeting.
Some members have already offered to lend stands if we have a
display.
. As usual there were many raffles (thanks to Maureen and
Keith, Iris and Colin) and the trading table was well supported.
Another trip to Auckland is planned in the not too far distant
future.
44
r i d \
r i d \
Announcements
New members: Welcome to the following;
Mr C. Taucher, 53 Queen Road, Tauranga
Mr M. Clow, 99 Beach Road, Tauranga
Lois Buchanan, RDl, Kohukohu, Northland
Deidre Dixon, 304 Redoubt Road, Papatoetoe RDl, Manukau City
B & S Luff, 10 Olive Crescent, Papatoetoe, Manukau City.
Monica Bailey, 274 Spencer Road, Lake Tarawera RDS Rotorua
Lynley Breeze, 46 Manuwai Drive, Matua, Tauranga
Margaret Craig, 440 No. 2 Road, RD2, Te Puke
Barry Jones, 11 Norrie Street, Te Puke.
Also welcome to Miep Vermeer and Clifford Gibbons who have
joined as associate members.
Forthcoming Auckland Meeting Activities:
April 1998 (Tuesday 28th)
variegated bromeliads, presented by Dave Anderson
mini talk by Lester Ching
May 1998 (Tuesday 26th)
cryptanthus, presenter to be notified
mini talk; mounting bromeliads by Len Trotman.
June 1998 (Tuesday 23rd)
billbergia, presented by Peter Waters
mini talk; fungicides, insecticides & fertilisers by Dave Anderson
July 1998 (Tuesday 28th)
unusual genera, presented by Lester Ching
mini talk; outside gardens by Marjorie Lowe
. Members should note these down, in case their bulletins are late.
45
Garden Visits:
To Dick Endt, 108 Parker Road Oratia on 3 May from 1.30pm. Please
bring a cup and plate.
To Bev. and Lester Ching, 32 Pandora Place, Pakuranga on 7 June
from 1.30 pm. Please bring a cup and plate. Be sure to attend as a
good day is assured.
Blooming Bromeliads: The Society has two copies of this excellent
book for sale at $ 190 each. Please contact Peter Waters.
Purple Christmas: Candles...
(a cautionary tale about our cover of December 1997)
Those with a philatelic phetish surely appreciate the value of a
slip in the printer’s ink department. As a random example, take
the 2d. blue “full face Queen” printed in Auckland by J. Davies
Print in Auckland from 1862 thru 1864. One might pay $30 for
a true blue, unused, specimen displaying early (slight) plate
wear. But should one desire a pale er milky blue version, one
would have to part with $50. Should one lust after a bluish slate
hue, the ante goes up to $250. Dare one covet the greenish slate?
$350 is the clue!
Alas, bromeliophiles lack such subtlety! There have been com-
plaints from some quarters that their T. imperialis was purple!
Alas, what can the Editor say in his defense... well, perhaps an
explanation. The covers each month are printed on his home
printer, which manages to produce ten copies per hour. He has to
print 225 copies, and the printer can only hold eleven bits of
paper at a time. Disregarding Bromeliad Society work, he still
works 60 hours per week at his jobs. So. In his desperate efforts
to get the bulletin out on time, he often has to print the bulletins
overnight—rising every hour on the hour and reloading the
printer (since it takes a minimum of 23 hours to print the
covers). In order not to disturb Mrs Editor, the dog, the sheep,
the chickens or the two cats, he sneaks out in the dark and fills
the beast by the light of a small lamp. But in the gloom he can’t
see if an ink cartridge is running out and the color changing ever
so subtlety! Gee, its tough being the Editor.... [sobl]
46
Vr. platynema variegata. BROMELIAD SOCIETY Of NZ INC
illandsia Flowering: Len Trotman’s T. Creation (cyanea x W
platyphylla) a recently made hybrid was first, with second being a m FAYMENTS,
shared between Peter Waters’ T. multicaulis and Wyn Shorrocks T. Balancebscrl at Westpac 1/3/97 $4,199.83 Bulletin $3,586.55
. . Su ‘ptions 2,807.04 Bulletin postage 1,196.77
strzcta. There were also on the table T. secunda, T. strzcta, and T. mm was (flat) 336725 Book purchases 296.12
crocata With it’s numerous very fragrant flowers. Raffles (nett) 1,030.50 Hall hire 550.00
illandsia Foliage: First was Laurie DephofPs T. tectorum followed :fitfitms ("a“) 221:: 3:12:23” 5‘ “my “s“ 217332
by Peter Waters’ T. hildae. In the competition were'T. fasciculata, T. Door 231.90 Auditor 60.00
fasciculata xflabellata Red, T kirchhofliana, and T. Maya (claimed gm gigg'gsem Z'fgg'gg :figti": 1 Egg:
to be a natural hybrid between T capitata and T. xerographica). . Seed ”.5 (mm) 185.30 Am levy ' 51.90
Novice Flowering: Flrst was Gary McDonald and second Brian .. Advertlsms 45-50 Pnzesmns 149-50
Dawson Interest 389.17 Show rentals 1,195.00
' _ Decrease in Term Deposit 1,342.97 Show advertising 219.25
Novice Foliage: F1rst was Gary McDonald and second was Graham Showexpenses 106.70
Show competition expenses 245.17
West. , _ Balance at Westpac 28/2/98 6,049.06
The Greenhough went to Len Trotman’s T. Creation. . $16,880.95 $16,880.95
. . Excess Income - $1,849.23
Treasu r: “
NEXT MEETING Tuesday 28th April. '
The Editor wants to add special thanks to Len Trotman for m" ' w
his contributions to the Bulletin. More recently, Len has done an Rim 1-9-15 1-9-91 rm
mm 11% ‘9 7 1m
amazing job with his reports on the meetings, and especially his ' mg; $7.133 37.2%: 317.1;
3.23 mmhasum “'52:,‘62 smogggg $14,;6000
. . . . . . ‘l .4 1 . 6 .1
helpful h1nts as he writes. And over the years he has contributed Raffle 536.00 336.60 860.50 magma 34.65 6.00 0 or
more than his share of general articles, especially those basic ‘g‘ufi'amm $38 22:38 226.00 mm 1:2}: 2333 3:3;
guides which were so helpful for new members. T“ 9"” $3 232:3: a? 34000 3:33
I also very much appreciate all Len’s work importing new _ Tasupplies ' 152251
varieties of bromeliads so we can broaden our collections. Lets W W
hope the bureaucrats and their regulations don’t slow him down! macaw 31.5.45 $1,624.72 $5.19s
42 47
BROMELIAD SOCIETY of NZ INC
FINANCIAL POSlTlQN AS AT 28 FEBRQARY 1§9§
Accumulated Funds $12,751.61
This is represented by:
Current Assets
Current account 6,049.06
Term Deposits 4,007.76 10,056.82
Books ' 105.00
Spoons & badges 83.00
Pots & labels 72.80 260.80
10,317.62
Less Current Liabilities
Subscriptions in advance 714.00
9,603.62
Non-Current Assets less 10% depreciation .
Library and slides 283.65
Speaker and microphones 1,705.95
Calc/stapier/briefcases 79.82
Projector 449.99
Show signs & carpet 628.58 3147.99
$12,751.61
TO MEMBERS OF BROMELIAD SOCIETY 0? NZ (INC)
Treasurer:
AUDITORS REPORT _
FOR YEAR ENDED 28 FEBRUARY 1998
I have examined the Financial Statements and Books of Account
o f the _ Bromeliad Society (Inc) and obtained all the
information and explanations I required.
In common with other organisations of a similar type, control
over income prior to its being recorded in the books is
limited: and there are no recognised audit procedures to
ascertain the effects of that limited control.
subject to the constraints mentioned above, in my opinion the
Financial Statements give a true and fair view of the
society’s transactions for the year and its financial
situation at that date.
ow «WM
DAWN PERSSON AUCKLAND
ACIS ANZIM ACTD MNZTI March 1998
48
Wellington Tillanllsia Stllllv Emllll
Andrew Flower
Indoor tillandsia collection of Beryl McKellar. Photo by Andrew Flower
Last month we met at Beryl McKellar’s home in John-
sonville. We had the usual show & tell and sales table. All good stuff,
but what I really wanted to know was: how do people grow tillandsias
in their living room? Here was the chance to see an example.
Beryl has a creative solution. Her collection is mounted on
pieces of bark and driftwood, a picture book cunningly glued on the
back of the mount, and then hung on a mesh sceen. To avoid water
damage, a sheet of plasic is placed behind the mesh to protect the
wall, and the bottom is tucked under a cloth laid over the divan
underneath (see photo). The plants all seemed happy enough, Beryl
mists them every morning in summer, every 3 or 4 days in winter and
feeds them with Bio Gold fish emulsion at 1/4 strength every month or
so. I think it would be very helpful if other members were to send us
a brief note about how they grow their broms, and if possible a photo
or two of their setup. That way we all get new ideas.
Next Meeting: Sunday 31 May at Anwyl Bromeliads 1.30pm.
’ 49
LAQAAAAl.AAAAAAAAAAAAALAAAA‘AAAAAAAAA‘AAAJ
‘ ......... 3'
" >
v: >
4e >
4 >
< a»
4 b
4 >
«c v
< >
1 i
< >
< _ >
: Packets of seed 50¢. each in NZ. ;
ft Overseas $1 US or $1 Aust., airmail postage free. :
e v
‘V'V'W'VWVV‘WWVi'WVVWvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvu‘
Aechmea kertesziae T
illandsia juncea
Ae. luddemanniana T. straminea
Billbergia brasiliensis T. magnusiana
B. viridz' ora Vriesea duvaliana
Puya mirabilis Vr.fosteriana
Pitcairnea cf atrorubens Vr. scalaris
Pit. xanthocalyx Vr. fCoppertone
Tillandsia hamaleana Dye/(fa species .7
T. incarnata 3
Please save your spare seed and send it to us: in return you will
receive a free packet of seed and the undying gratitude of those patient
souls who grow these fascinating plants from seed. Money raised from
the sale of seeds will be used to import rare and exciting new varieties
from overseas. One day this may be the only practical way to obtain
new broms—so buy some seed now and start practising!
Orders (with S.A.E.) and spare seed to:
Andrew Flower
PO. Box 1 1-375, Manners Street PO.
WELLINGTON.
50
Telephone
PATRON & LIFE MEMBER Mrs Bea Hanson (09) 527-6830
HISTORIAN & LIFE MEMBER Laurie Dephoff (09) 527-7789
PRESIDENT Lester Ching (09) 576-4595
VICE PRESIDENTS Des Yeates (09) 83 8-6535
Graham West (09) 298-3479
SECRETARY Dave Anderson (09) 63 8-8671
TREASURER Peter Waters (09) 534-5616
22 Halfmoon Rise,
Bucklands Beach,
AUCKLAND
EDITOR Andrew Flower (04) 23 9-9659
LIBRARIAN Des Yeates (09) 83 8-6535
COMMITTEE Len Trotman (09) 83 8—93 56
' Bev Ching (09) 576-4595
Glenys Guild (09) 810-9669
Marjorie Lowe (09) 376-6874
Brian Dawson
AUDITOR Dawn Persson
A.H.C DELEGATES Patricia Sweeney and
Zena Poulgrain
LIFE MEMBERS Harry Martin
Patricia Perratt
Patricia Sweeney
SCIENTIFIC OFFICER Peter Waters (09) 534-5616
MEMBERSHIP SIIBSGIIII’TIIIIS
NZ NZ$ 14.00 Ordinary [1999, NZ$ 20]
NZ$ 4.00 Associate (same household) [1999, NZ$ 5]
Overseas NZ$ 20.00 airmail Australia [1999, NZ$ 25]
NZ$ 25.00 airmail USA & other overseas [1999, NZ$ 30]
FOURTH Tuesday of each month except December, at Greyfriars
Church Hall, cnr. Mt Eden and Windmill Roads, Auckland, at 7.30 pm.
Contents
President? 5 Page
March Meeting News
Notes from the Bay of Plenty, Kevin Schollum
Northland Bromeliad Group, Colleen Frew
Announcements
Annual Accounts
wellington Tillandsia Group, Andrew Flower
Seed Bank
Oficers of the Society
Membership details, meetings

 

' ul 1998
Bromellad Mus No. a
Society of New Zealand Inc.
June Meeting News 92 ‘
Notes from Northern Bromeliad Group, Colleen J
Bromeliad Society of New Zealand (Ine.)
Affiliated with the Bromeliad Society International Inc.
The Society was formed on the 28th August, 1962.
The objects of the Society are to encourage the cultivation and study
of Bromeliads grown indoors or outdoors, and in particular:
(a) To promote discussion and arrange instruction on cultiva-
tion, propagation and control of diseases.
(b) To provide a Library for members.
(c) To assist members to identify plants.
(d) To make awards for outstanding new bromeliads.
(e) To hold Shows or public exhibitions of bromeliads.
(f) To promote the distribution of bromeliads amongst mem-
bers by exchange, purchase and sale, and to encourage the
importation of new plants.
(g) To affiliate with any Society or other body, and to do such
things as may be deemed necessary or desirable in the fur—
therance of these objects.
(h) To accept affiliation from other Societies having similar
objects.
All general correspondence should be sent to the Secretary,
Bromeliad Society of New Zealand, 33 Marsden Avenue, Mt. Eden,
Auckland 4, New Zealand.
Back issues of the Bulletin (since September 1994) are available
from the Editor for $2 post paid.
The opinions expressed in letters or articles in this magazine are the
author’s own views and do not necessarily express the policy of the
Bromeliad Society of New Zealand.
Please send articles & advertisements to the Editor, PO. Box 11-375,
Wellington, New Zealand. E-mail to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
President's Page
An excellent meeting with more people coming to the meet-
ings to learn more about bromeliads and the chance for members to
purchase plants to extend their range.
Recently there has been an excellent range of plants for sale
and we hope will continue to flourish.
Also we have a new wave of speakers and is great to see the
support and encouragement they are receiving.
Well done Bev.
Thought: The first duty of an historian is to be on guard against his
own sympathies.
Lester Ching.
This month’s cover: Aechmea purpureorosea, photo by Graham
Alderson from Rangiora. Graham says that “Grown in high light this
plant pups profusely. Has long narrow stiff leaves with very sharp
black spines. The leaves are of a yellow tone. The flower spike is ap—
prox. 180mm long with pink bracts and deep blue flowers. Lasts a
long time. Good and showy.”
Thanks for the photos, Graham - Ed.
91
lune Meeting NEWS
Fifty eight members attended our monthly meeting. Well there
can be no complaints that the weather is keeping people away, as it is
certainly a very mild Winter and meeting night was no exception.
Lester Ching lead the discussion on the Show and Tell plants.
"Plants of Nid. chantrieri, Ae. caudata in flower, Bil. Yayee, Bobtail;
and an unknown Dickia were on display. Finally there was a massive
600m. diameter clump of Till. bergeri!
Dave Anderson gave a mini talk on fertilizing Bromeliads.
Basically all plants benifit from fertilizing, approximately 1/2 -1 tspn.
of a balanced dry fertilizer per gallon of water every 2 to 3 weeks with
the following provisos:
0 If you are happy with how your plants are growing don ’2‘ change !!
0 Do not fertilize your plants when they are in dormancy through the
cold Winter months and also make sure the plants are not carrying
lush growth into this period when they will badly suffer.
0 Warm growing temp’s. and high light conditions are needed for the
plants to profit from fertilizer, albeit that in Auckland this year the
temperatures are such that the plants have not stopped growing.
0 It is preferable to have the pH of the fertilizer solution between 5.5
and 6.5 i.e. slightly acidic so that the plants will uptake the
nutrients.
0 Small amounts of slow release fertilizers on top of the mix help;
however do not allow any of it into the plant cups.
0 Do not feed Neoregelias as they tend to develop long green leaves,
or certainly be very careful if you do.
0 The ‘Hozon’ proportioner is a simple way of fertilizing a large
collection.
The discussion plants this month were Nidulariums. Bev Ching gave
us a most informative talk on them. They were discovered in 1854
with the known 60 odd species occuring in the rain forests of Eastern
to Southern Brazil on the Atlantic coast. They vary in size from
15cm. to 750m. and have green to purple maroon foliage which is
easily damaged. Some of the plants displayed were:
Nid. burchellii - A small stoloniferous plant.
92
Nid. fulgens - One of the very few Nidplariums that can be grown in
high light.
Nid. billbergioides ~ A species that has lovely lemon yellow or orange
red primary bracts.
Nid. Chantrieri -fulgens x innocentii - A plant with a dark red flower.
Nid. innocentii var. lineatum - One of the many forms of Nid.
innocentii
Nid. Oddball - A procerum cultivar with striking leaf colours.
Nid. regelioides - A plant with spotted leaves and pink bracts.
The door prizes going to Des Yeates, Christine Ensor, and Dick Endt
COMPETITIONS
Open Flowering: First Laurie Dephoff with a Billbergia sanderiana
and second equal was Len Trotman with a Vriesea. Midori and Dick
Endt with Guzmania Moonlight . Also in the competition were
Neoregelia Magenta; Nidularium regelioides; Vriesea Red Rock and
Vr. barilletii; and 2 clumps of Aechmea recurvata which always
flowers at this time of the year.
Open Foliage: Pat Lawson was first with a Vrieseafenestralis,-(this
plant looked like a Vr. platynema cross and not Vr. fenestralis) and
second was Marjorie Lowe with Neoregelia Sharlock. In the
competition were Neoregelias Empress Variegata, Crimson Nest,
Inferno, Burnsies Spiral, and Royal Hawaiian; Vrz'esea ospinae var.
gruberi; Aechmeas Burgundy, pinelz'ana, nudicaulis striata rubra;
Cannistrums tringulare, Iindenii and lindenii var. roseum; Guzmania
Gisela.
T
illandsia Flowering: Wyn Shorrock’s T. stricta with 16 flower
heads was first, with second going to Joe Murray’s T. lindeniz'. There
were also on the table T’s. stricta, guatemalensis, punctulata, and
schiediana.
T
illandsia Foliage: First was Len Trotman’s T. tectorum followed
by Jenny Gallagher’s T. tectorum. In the competition were T.
gardneri, caliginosa, velutz'na, ehlersiana, and streptophylla.
Novice Flowering: First was Gay McDonald’s T
illandsia pamelae (?
certainly a lovely flower spike) and second Brian Dawson and Tony
93
Bishop’s Billbergz'a vittata.
Novice Foliage: First was Gay McDonald with Vriesea Red Chestnut
x platynema and second was Brian Dawson and Tony Bishop’s
Neoregelia Apricot Beauty.
The Greenhough Trophy went to Laurie Dephoff‘ with a Billbergia.
sanderiana.
Congratulations to all the winners.
NEXT MEETING Tuesday 28th July.
Dave Anderson
Notes From Northern Bromeliall Grout)
Colleen Frew, Kawakawa.
There have been some very good meetings with new
members coming in with fresh ideas about bromeliads, and, among
other things, how to display these spectacular plants to best
advantage.
At Jane and Bert Penny’s home at Otaika we saw what
maximum use of a section can produce. They have plants
everywhere, inside and out, making it one of the most interesting
gardens with bromeliads, succulents, unusual plants and trees.
Bromeliads f1r in so well with other plants that they are a joy to
possess.
Freda Nash in Whangarei also has used many fascinating
ways to display her broms, giving many of us ideas to try out in our
gardens. Her use of driftwood, which she gets from Hawkes Bay, is
amazing. '
Maureen and Keith Green always make the group welcome
at their gardens at Maungakaramea. They are towers of strength for
the group. Maureen often gives short talks at meetings, very helpful.
Recently she spoke about plants that “quill” their new pups and gave
suggestions as to what to do about the problem.
(Continued on page [02)
94
cent.
Bromeliallas II "0890
Marjorie Lowe, Auckland.
On a recent day that was in turn both sunny and cloudy, Pat
and Jim Lawson’s Pakuranga garden looked warm, lush and invit-
ing. In a photograph only the bare branches of the magnolia, malus
and cordon apples would reveal that this is m1d-J
une Only two
days before it had poured down 1n torrents. But the rain stopped, the
sun came out and everything returned to normal—no woebegone
and bedraggled flowers and foliage, no beaten-down perennials. As
appealing in winter as in summer, what has come to be described as
.,__Pacific style, is very rewarding for the gardener.
Originally the site was flat farmland. The section running
west to east, is at the end Of a cul ’de sac, with the eastern end
sloping down to the banks of the Tamaki River estuary This day
the tide was and the river surface glassy except where ducks
paddled by. Overhead were flights of seabirds. Last season the
birdlife included a black swan—very appropriate for Swan Cres-
Raised beds in the front garden, built up with volcanic soil,
N o . 7 bark and pumice, are mounded well above the railway
sleepers, giving excellent drainage. Trees, palms and treefems in
these beds give fuurther height and their canopies protect and shade
some of the plants beneath.
Pat has about a thousand bromeliads and, of these, the vast
majority are in the ground. A few are in pots collected over the
years and are often moved to the front entry when at their best. On
one of the trellises T
illandsia somnians is climbing rapidly. Trees
and palms are also used. The Washingtonia fan palm beside the
north terrace has had its lower leaf stems partially removed, leaving
natural pockets for planting. The photograph on page 96 shows
Neoregelia carolinae and some Tillandsiasjust tucked in. Easy!
Plants are placed in the garden in approximation of their
natural requirements and moved to sunnier or shadier positions if
necessary. Most, when grown outdoors, seem to stand more sun
(especially in winter) than one is led to expect.
Basic care includes grooming—the removal of dead leaves
95
reservoir and sending food down into the plant. In dry periods cups are
checked to make sure they are full. Occasional use is made of
slow-release fertiliser. No plant is pampered, if it does not perform
within a reasonable period, out it goes. The only exceptions are a few
that during some winters (not this one so far) receive protection in an
east window in the garage. Frosts are rare here and the trees, palms and
treeferns give adequate protection for most plants.
Color is everywhere. Sudden intense splashes, jewel-like,
lighten up the garden. From the cerise, red, magenta and purple
e-
Washingtonia trunk with tillandsias, Neoregelia carolz'nae photo by Margaret Peart.
neoregelias; the yellow, red and orange nidulariums; and the yellow/
red vrieseas to the many shades of the aechmeas, all are longlasting (2
to 6 months plus). Foliage plays its part as well. The lime-green leaves
of Billbergia Santa Barbara are valued as are the variegated forms,
especially aechmea and neoregelia which have forms for both sun and
shade. Azaleas, camellias, cyclamen, impatiens, strelitzia, succulents
and many more also liven the winter landscape.
Some really tough plants earn their place in the sun. Pat says
that the forms of Neoregelia carolinae she has, var. carolinae and var.
tricolor, are hardy, in color for months, and stand in filll sun;
96
'dry side. Aechmea comata x
Neoregelz‘a concentrica is “tough as old boots”; Neoregelia Lavendar
Mist takes fulls sun all year, hot and dry conditions; a potted Neo-
regelia Takemura Grande Silverado is in sun all year round in a heat
trap by the front door; Nidularium Channieri, a slowish grower, looks
stunning with sun shining through spiny, mauve-magenta leaves.
Aechmeas for full sun include Ae. pineliana and Ae, caudata, both
almost indestructable.
For part or dappled shade it is hard to go past Aechmea
fasciata whose inflorescence lasts about ten months. Pat finds that hers
flower better if grown on the
W 4 ,
nallyi variegata almost always
has an inflorescence at some
stage of development and the "
leaves are striking. In the right ..
position, Nidularium billber—
gioides (orange and red 9;
forms), Nid. procerum (15-
200111. across, brick-red with
unusual jade-blue flowers) «a» g
give 4 to 6 months color. g ‘-
Vrieseas fenestralis, platy— '
nema and Red Chestnut bring
all year foliage contrasts. u,
The Lawsons’ garden
is much visited, photographed :
and admired—understandably it
so. It is open alternate years ’3
for the Trinity and Uxbridge N‘- " ‘
Festivals. This year Uxbridge \
is from the lt to 24th _ “ " .. =
November. Vnesea phzlhpo-coburgn, photo by Margaret
Peart This plant was in full spike, about one
meter high, at our March meeting, and is still
flowering for Pat Lawson 4'/z months later. Pat
keeps it in a terracotta pot, hot and dry on a
norflifacing deck with sun all year.
97
“DIES irom the nail 0f Plenlv
Kevin Schollum, Tauranga.
Isobel Clotworthy was host for our July meeting when twenty
people attended, including three from Kawerau. After looking at
lsobel’s garden and plants we commenced the meeting with prgramme
ahead being arranged, as follows;
Wednesday 12 August 1.00pm at John Kenyon’s Te Puna nursery,
followed with afternoon tea at Decor Nurseries.
Wednesday 9 September at Margaret Mangos, 11 Lynley Terrace
' Monday 5 October, trip to Trevor & Pam Signal, Lambert Road.
Wednesday 14 October at Kevin and Bertha Schollum 73 Emmett
Street, Greerton. '
We have been invited to put a display in the 1998 Spring
Orchid Show in Greerton Hall on 25, 26, 27 September.
Our show and tell produced a collection of interesting plants,
a T
illandsia guatemalensis was superb with a flower spike about 1.2
meters tall and owner Anna Stacey told us that she applies sheep
pellets. It looked as though it was enjoying it.
Recently the Bay of Plenty Times had an article on Gladys and
Harry Fisher’s garden—it had several colored photos of bromeliads in
situ and showed how popular they are now.
ADVERTISING RATES
Single issue Min. 6 per year
Full page 15.00 13.50
Half page 8.50 7.65
Quarter page 4.25 3.85
Eighth page 2.00 1.80
98
AIIIIIIIIIIDEIIIGIIIS
Welcome to the following new members, we hope you enjoy your
membership:
Paula & Sonja Heron, 46 Beresford Street, Bayswater, North Shore.
John & Brenda Vevers, l l Layton Road, Whangaparaoa
J. Griffiths, 1 Beach Road, Waikawa. Picton.
Forthcoming Auckland Meeting Activities:
July 1998 (Tuesday 28th)
Slides from World Conference in Houston, Peter Waters
mini talk; outside gardens by Marjorie Lowe
August 1998 (Tuesday 25th)
unusual genera, presented by Lester Ching
WellingtonTillandsia Study Group meets Sunday July 26th at Morris
and Myra Tarr’s house - 1.30pm.
New Edition
The very popular Tillandsia Hand-
book by Hideo Shimizu has been
expanded in this new edition - now
it has 134 pages and 380 color
photos - many in habitat
Stocks now available - $ 62 incl. GST, post free in NZ.
Order with payment to Anwyl Bromeliads
PO. Box 57-021, Mana, Wellington 6230.
Phone 04 2399-659, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
99
[BHBI‘S
Derek Moon
Main Road
Kerikeri
Bay of Islands
July 21, 1993
Dear Dave Anderson,
I enjoy reading thejoumal each month and find the articles interesting
and helpful. I don’t wish to seem to be nit-picking but in one article
alone in the June 1998 issue, I noticed 15 spelling or printing errors. »
Some of these were every-day words, others scientific names of
plants. I realise that providing the articles and the production of the
journal are all labours of love, and I suppose that so long as the
“message” gets across to readers, that’s the main thing, however, this
is a- learned publication and should be written as accurately as
possible.
Perhaps you could find someone to proof-read to eliminate some of
the errors?
In the meantime, keep up the good work.
Yours sincerely,
Derek Moon
(Signed)
Editor ’s response:
DELETED ! ! !!
(wiser council prevailed ..... here’s a picture instead (see page 98)
100
T
illandsia guatemalensis (small form) photo by Andrew Flower
Dear Editor,
Recently someone asked me if people grow bromeliads hydro-
ponically. I couldn’t answer.
I wonder, do people grow broms hydroponically? If so, with
what sort of success and the types of system(s) used?
This person told me he had bought a brom about 6 weeks prior
and put it in his hydro. unit and its size had trebled. Sounded great, I’d
like to hear what other folks do. Thank you.
Regards,
Lois Buchanan.
Kohukohu.
Editor replies: Yes, people do grow broms hydroponically. I’ve seen
articles on it and if I ’m still here next month I’ll give you the info. If
not, no doubt the new Editor will! (If not, I’ll mail it to you anyway).
101
kAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAALAAAAAAL‘JAAAA‘ALLAAAAAI
V r
4 r
j S E E D B A N K . :
4 >
44 >>
44 b>
4 b
«4 I»
a b
I? " t
g Packets of seed 50¢. each in NZ. :
: Overseas $1 US or $1 Aust., airmail postage free. it;
§ I
7WVvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvv‘rVVYVVVVVVYYVYVVVYYYV
Aechmea luddemanniana T
illimdsia hamaleana
Aechmea coelestz's albo-marginata T. juncea
Billbergia brasiliensis T. incarnata
B. viridz' ora T. magnusiana
Dyckia Big Black
Puya mirabilis
Pitcairnea cf atrorubens
Orders (with S.A.E.) and spare seed to:
Andrew Flower
PO. Box 11-375, Manners Street P.O.
WELLINGTON.
(C
ontinued
from page 94) Notes fiom Northern Bromeliad Group.
At one meeting I gave a talk about tillandsias, illustrated with
some photos John had taken that morning with his digital camera, then
printed off through the computer. He also demonstrated some methods
and materials to attach tillandsias to driftwood, etc.
The bromeliad display at Expo Northland, at Kensington Park,
Whangarei, was very popular with the public and the group entry in the
floral design Award was lovely. Gold sprayed sago palm leaves, fresh
flowers and bromeliads made a striking entry even if it did not win first
prize! Next year the club is considering having a showe in conjunction
with another local floral group.
Meetings are held fourth Sunday of each month.
102
PATRON & LIFE MEMBER
HISTORIAN & LIFE MEMBER
Mrs Bea Hanson
Laurie Dephoff
Telephone
(09) 527-6830
(09) 527-7789
PRESIDENT Lester Ching (09) 576-4595
VICE PRESIDENTS Des Yeates (09) 838-6535
Graham West (09) 298-3479
SECRETARY Dave Anderson (09) 63 8—8671
TREASURER Peter Waters (09) 534-56 l 6
22 Halfmoon Rise,
Bucklands Beach,
AUCKLAND
EDITOR Andrew Flower (04) 239-9659
LIBRARIAN Des Yeates (09) 838-6535
COMMITTEE Len Trotman (09) 83 8—9356
Bev Ching (09) 576—4595
Glenys Guild (09) 810—9669
Marjorie Lowe (09) 376-6874
Brian Dawson
AUDITOR Dawn Persson
A.I-I.C DELEGATES Patricia Sweeney and
Zena Poulgrain
LIFE MEMBERS Harry Martin
Patricia Perratt
Patricia Sweeney
SCIENTIFIC OFFICER Peter Waters (09) 534-5616
MEMBERSHIP SIIBSGIIIPTIIINS
NZ NZ$ 14.00 Ordinary [1999, NZ$ 20]
NZ$ 4.00 Associate (same household) [1999, NZ$ 5]
Overseas NZ$ 20.00 airmail Australia [1999, NZ$ 25]
NZ$ 25.00 airmail USA & other overseas [1999, NZ$ 30]
MEETINGS
FOURTH Tuesday of each month except December, at Greyfriars
Church Hall, cnr. Mt Eden and Windmill Roads, Auckland, at 7.30 pm.
Photo by Andrew Flower. Both key out as T
iHamlsia queroensis,
One on left bought as “T. latifolia var. divericata” (has a compound
spike) the other “T. purpurea Purple”. Comments anyone?
Contents
President’s Page 91
June Meeting News 92 ‘
Notes from Northern Bromeliad Group, Colleen J
Frew 94
Bromeliads Al Fresco, Marjorie Lowe 95
News fi’om The Bay of Plenty, Kevin Schollum 98
Announcements 99
Letters 100
Seed Bank 102
Oflicers of the Society 103
Membership details, meetings 103

 

President’s Page 71 .,
Announcements 76 .5
' 1m 1998
Bromehad hofss No.5
Society of New Zealand Inc.
«5: '
Bromeliad Society of New Zealand (Inc.)
Affiliated with the Bromeliad Society International Inc.
The Society was formed on the 28th August, 1962.
The objects of the Society are to encourage the cultivation and study
of Bromeliads grown indoors or outdoors, and in particular:
(a) To promote discussion and arrange instruction on cultiva-
tion, propagation and control of diseases.
(b) To provide a Library for members.
(c) To assist members to identify plants.
(d) To make awards for outstanding new bromeliads.
(e) To hold Shows or public exhibitions of bromeliads.
(f) To promote the distribution of bromeliads amongst mem-
bers by exchange, purchase and sale, and to encourage the
importation of new plants.
(g) To affiliate with any Society or other body, and to do such
things as may be deemed necessary or desirable in the fur-
therance of these objects.
(h) To accept affiliation from other Societies having similar
objects.
All general correspondence should be sent to the Secretary,
Bromeliad Society of New Zealand, 33 Marsden Avenue, Mt. Eden,
Auckland 4, New Zealand.
Back issues of the Bulletin (since September 1994) are available
from the Editor for $2 post paid.
The opinions expressed in letters or articles in this magazine are the
author ’s own views and do not necessarily express the policy of the
Bromeliad Society of New Zealand.
Please send articles & advertisements to the Editor, PO. Box 11-375,
Wellington, New Zealand. E-mail to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
PI‘GSIIIBIII'S Page
With sixty members, and four visitors, we have had our best
night ever—our previous best being 57 some years ago.
One of our visitors was Bobby Tower from Gold Coast Aus-
tralia and holidaying in New Zealand. Welcome back Bobby.
Please note the changes in discussion plants in June and July.
Sorry about the changes but we are subject to speakers being avail-
able.
Charge for the door is 50c. Please bring some change with you
as $20 notes are dificult to change as no float is carried at the door.
More labels need to be worn, please ensure you have yours on. -
Cooler nights are here, do not forget to keep your bromeliads
under cover as those of you who get frosts could expect some damage.
Place plants under tree cover or use shade cover over plants allowing
approximately 500mm gap between plants and shade cover.
Congratulations to Len Trotman. Len was presented on Sun-
day 3rd May 1998 with his qualification as a National Flower Judge in
New Zealand by the Auckland Horticultural Council. It has taken
three years to complete this cource with 12 months studying at Tech.
and 2 years in the field of judging. Well done Len.
Thought for the month:
Remember to keep old bromeliads after they flower and pup as they
usually pup again many times before they die.
Lester Ching.
This month’s cover: T
illandsia rotundata, photo by Andrew Flower.
Didn’t come out as well as it was supposed to, and no time to change
it! sorry about that. This is one of those people used to confuse with T.
fasciculata, I think. It grows at 1400 - 2500 meters, usually in pine and
oak forests from Chiapas (Mexico) to Honduras and Guatemala. The
natural hybrid T. Polita is thought to be a cross between T. rotundata
and T. rodrigueziana. Illustrated plant growing in our conservatory.
71
May MGBIiIIQ NEWS
Another large number of members attended our monthly
meeting with quite a few new members coming along. All people
seemed to enjoy the proceedings with some participating in a cup of tea
at the break - thanks to those who organized it which will hopefully be
ongoing through the Winter months.
Lester Ching lead the discussion on the Show and Tell plants.
Peter Waters had brought in some rare, (in NZ), Aechmeas namely: Ae.
orlandz‘ana v. belloi - a plain green plant of this highly marked species
which was only found in its Brazilian habitat 10 years ago; Ae.
macrochlamys which although only of medium size now will grow to a
metre high with a beautiful flower spike; Ae. maculata with its lovely
silver banding being a parent of Ae. Red Bands; and Ae. bromeliifolia
which is quite a varied in size and colour. Plants of Till. incarnata,
guatemalensis and Vr. rodigasiana had been brought in for naming.
Len’s mini talk was on how to mount Bromeliads. He gave a
most informative talk on the use of various materials etc. required for
displaying bromeliads.
The discussion plants this month were Billbergias. Peter
Waters, who has alarge collection of this genera gave us a most
interesting talk on them. They mainly come from Brazil although their
habitat range is from Mexico to Argentina and were named in 1815
after the Swedish botanist Gustav Billberg. Although their flowers are
quite stunning but short lived, the plants themselves are very colourful
and look superb when grown as a clump preferably in an elevated
situation. They prefer to be kept warmer than many of the other genera
with the colour of their foliage reflecting the extra attention and do not
like fertiliser as it makes for long greenleaves. Aechmeas are their
closest relative especially Ae. nudicaulis with the difference being that
the sepals of Aechmeas have a sharp spine whereas Billbergias don’t.
As well as the many hybrids shown the following is a list of the
species: Bill. pyramidalis, brasiliensis, amoena, rosea, and
sanderz'ana.
The door prizes going to Noeline Ritson, Faye Lees, and Pearl Trotman
72
COMPETITIONS
Open Flowering: First Len Trotman with a Guz. Indian and he was
also second with Vr.sandersii x Poelmanii. Also in the competition
were Neo’s. olens x compacta, and concentrica; Nid. procerum
‘Oddball’with lovely red coloured leaves; and Vr. barillettii with its
dark red spike and rodigasiana.
Open Foliage: Pat Lawson was first with a Guz. zahnii variegata, and
second equal was Peter Waters with Vr. David Kalaaua and Jenny
Gallagher with Neo. Fostperior Perfection. In the competition were
Neo’s. Joy (purple form), carolinae tricolor, Peggy Peach,
punctatissima, and ‘Martin’- similar to Maggies Pride; Vrieseas
fosteriana Red Chestnut; Ae’s. ‘Fosters Favorite Favorite’, chantinii
Ebony - absolutely stunning, ‘Ensign’ - always lovely, nudicaulis
Mary Hyde; Cryptanthus Chocolate Snow and Hohenbergia
correia-araujoi.
Tillandsia Flowering: Len Trotman’s T. duratii v. saxatilis was first,
with second going to Joe Murray’s T. punctulata. There were also on
the table: T. stricta, latifolia v. leucophylla, araujei, imperialis and
latifolia v. major.
Tillandsia Foliage: First was Joe Murray’s T. tectorum silver
followed by Laurie Dephoff ‘s T. tectorum. In the competition were
T. harrisii, streptophylla, viridiflora, arhiza, jalisco-montecola,
capitata Marron and fasciculata.
Novice Flowering: First was Brian Dawson’s Ae. Royal Wine and
second Gay McDonald Bill. amoena.
Novice Foliage: First was Peter Brady with Ae. Fosters Favorite
Favorite and second equal was Gay McDonald with Neo. Hybrid, &
olens vulcan x cruenta and Brian Dawson’s Ae. Mirlo.
The Greenhough Trophy went to 3 people - Len Trotman’s T.
duratii v. saxatilis, Pat Lawson’s Guz. zahnii variegata and Peter
Waters’ Vr. David Kalaaua. Congratulations to all the winners.
NEXT MEETING
Tuesday 23rd June. Discussion plants: nidulariums.
Dave Anderson
73
MOUNTING BBDMELIAIIS
Len Trotman, Auckland
Nothing replicates the natural look of bromeliads better than
growing them mounted. Mounting allows your plants to take on their
natural shapes while giving optimum growing conditions, up off the
bench and into better light and air circulation. Often the plants will
surprise you by becoming more compact and brighter coloured than
those'in the pots. Tillandsias for the most part thrive best as mounted
specimens. Having a holdfast for their roots gives them stability and
allows them to grow in their preferred direction. Often plants kept bare
- root and unmounted will grow into a curved and unnatural shape.
Mounting your own plants is fun and easy. Almost any
substrate can be used, from driftwood to cork bark rock bone and
manmade objects. Empty wooden hanging baskets are well suited to
this purpose. A rough or porous surface is best but not essential. The
object should be portable if your climate is not suitable for year round
outdoor culture. Attaching bromeliads to living trees is popular in
some areas where frosts are not a problem but not so practical in cold
areas.
In choosing a mount, the main criteria should be in size,
making sure the mount is large enough to hold the plant upright when
mature. Many tillandsias are caulescent [ie., they form stems - Ed] and
hang down off the mount therefore the mount need only be big enough
to hold the root system of the original plant. Clumping plants need
either a larger mount or a slender limb to allow the plants to form their
natural shape. Select mounts with interesting shapes and take into
account if the object would look better standing or hanging. Any wire
hangers should be attached before mounting your plants.
Methods for attaching bromeliads vary from grower to grower,
but variations of several basic techniques are most commonly used. A
combination of wire and glue is recommended. Use plastic coated wire
or nylon line (never copper as it is toxic) and glue preferably with
“Liquid Nails” [the general class of building panel\wallboard adhe—
sives work well - I use Fuller’s “max bond” -Ed] and tie the plant
firmly but not tight enough to cut the plant, and this will prevent it
from moving and will hasten the rooting process. Smaller plants such
74
as some of the tillandsias can be attached with glue only, or a
combination of glue and a rubber band. Other methods include using a
hole bored into the substrate large enough to accommodate the base the
plant and nested in with glue. This method is especially handy when
using rock, as fastening wire to rock can be rather challenging. It is not
recommended that any medium such as Sphagnum moss be used
around the base of the plant as this could cause rot if it remains wet.
Bromeliad trees can be made by setting any interesting piece of
driftwood into a pot of concrete. Arrangements can utilise the full
range of bromeliad shapes, textures and colours, to make interesting
and highly decorative displays.
Care for your mounted specimens by watering frequently,
especially if they are kept in a dry area, where they can be misted two
or three times daily. If they are kept indoors, it is a good idea to put
them outside occasionally. Fertilise at least once a month with a dilute
liquid fertiliser and keep them in a well lit area. You will find that
mounting will give an added dimension and interest to your hobby.
The vast majority of bromeliads are epiphytic or saxicolous
meaning that they grow on other plant life or on rock faces. These
growing conditions can be replicated in cultivation by attaching
bromeliads to various mediums. Virtually anything except treated
timber and copper products can be used.
The above article is taken from the Tropiflora Cargo Report Volume3
#2 Summer 1993.
ADVERTISING RATES
Single issue Min. 6 per year
Full page 15.00 13.50
Half page 8.50 7.65
Quarter page 4.25 3.85
Eighth page 2.00 1.80
75
Announcements
New members: Welcome to the following, we hope you enjoy your
time with the Society:
Ed Doherty, 3533 Milton, Dallas, Texas 75205.
Bernadette Carter, 36B Miltonia Avenue, Glendene, Waitakere City.
Mary Colquhoun, 89 Takutai Avenue, Bucklands Beach, Manukau.
Linda Malcolm, 39 Am Drive, Bucklands Beach, Manukau City.
Wendy Hickmott, 1/43 Argo Drive, Bucklands Beach, Manukau City.
Lorraine & Bruce Walden, Box 161, Dargaville, Northland.
George Wells, 22 Parklands Drive, Huntsbury, Christchurch
Mr V. Tynan, 8 Ellery Street East, Ngaruawahia
Overdue subscriptions: If you have a red dot on your address label,
it means that the treasurer has not received your 1998 sub. yet. Please
check, and pay now - otherwise we will stop sending you bulletins.
Bromeliads: A Cultural Manual: is for sale by the Society for $6.
Published by the International Bromeliad Society, this is an excellent
guide to growing bromeliads. Available from Peter Waters or Dave
Anderson.
Auckland meetings: a note from the Secretary:
PLEASE NOTE IF YOU ARE SELLING PLANTS ON THE SALES
TABLE, YOU ARE ONLY PERMITTED TO SELL 20 PLANTS AT
A MEETING AND YOU MUST FILL IN AN A4 SALES SHEET -
NO SHEET NO PAYOUT! !!
Bromeliads X, (that’s a ten) the next Australian national bromeliad
conference, is being held in Cairns 26 to 30th August 1999. This will
probably be the last one this century, so its a MUST GO! Hosted by
the Cairns Bromeliad Study Group, the keynote speaker is renowned
billbergia man Don Beadle of Florida. More soon!
76
landsendt... Valley of The Palms.
Marjorie Lowe, Auckland.
Landsendt is the eight hectare property belonging to Dick
(horticulturalist) and Annemarie (foodwriter) Endt—gardners both.
They bought it in 1962, complete with the original 1860’s kauri
cOttage, but both continued working and started developing the land
in their free (?) time. For fifteen years they grew tamarillos but, when
disease struck, they changed to feijoas. Dick then developed grafted
kiwifruit for trade and nursery.
Wanting to extend into more exotic food plants, in 1974 Dick
set off for Ecuador. He hoped to find plants suitable for sub-tropical
and warm temperate areas in the high altitude regions. A bonus was
bringing back some bromeliads. More trips to Ecuador added arrow-
root, babaco, cherimoya, inga beans, naranjilla, mountain coconut and
sub-tropical walnuts. Sourced from Samoa were edible taro and the
misi luki banana.
The visit of friends from Florida brought encouragement to
diversify into palms. These days bananas and palms as omamentals
are the mainstay with the addition of agaves, aloes, aroids, bromeliads
and a wide variety of tropical and sub-tropical foliage plants.
Society members who visited Landsendt early in May com-
mented that they found especially interesting the way Dick and
Annemarie had introduced bromeliads into the garden. Great care has
been taken to contrast the basic rosette and sword-leafed bromeliad
forms with native, sub-tropical and tropical plants with leaves that
vary in size, shape, color, texture and pattern. The planting is gived
scale by the variations in height - from groundcovers to trees and
climbers.
Some unexpected combinations occur, like the beautifully
colored Vriesea imperialis with a ground cover of blue forget-me—nots
to one side, a large rock and a mixed planting of impatiens and small
ferns to the other. An elegant Vriesea hieroglyphica is placed below
tall-stemmed'shrubs, sitting by itself in a small sea of brown-curled
leaf litter. , '
Retaining walls of moss coated half-rounds and timber, worn
and grooved with age, allow plants like Aechmea warasii “rubra” and
77
" \ ~ .» . .o .. — 1'
Neoregelia carolinae nestling in corner of retaining walls. ‘ Aechmea caudata ‘firariegata”
78 79
" \ ~ .» . .o .. — 1'
Neoregelia carolinae nestling in corner of retaining walls. ‘ Aechmea caudata ‘firariegata”
78 79
its companion the ferny Fuchsia minutiflora to spill over, enhancing
and softening the wall. Vriesea guttata inflorescences hang down a
raised bed of mossy rocks covemed with the native fem Blechnum
penna-marina. A climbing philodendrum and a feathery cycad back-
ground the aechmeas, neoregelias and nidulariums giving a lush look.
The orange flowers of Nidularium billbergioides and the red of the
neoregelias warm up an early winter’s day.
Lower down the garden a stand of giant bamboo is under-
' planted with alocasia and banana. Bromeliads are on, in and beside
rocks and the ground is carpeted with bamboo leaves. Hundreds of
species of plants in endless variety make this a wonderful setting for
bromeliads. '
"Aechmea caudata “variegata” i
From Sao Paulo, Brazil. ,‘Epiphytic to 900m, undemanding
(Baensch and Baensch). '
Easy to grow, very happy as a garden subject in medium to
bright filtered light (Bromeliad Society of Australia).
Excellent plant for the garden, striking, will grow where other
plants are difficult to grow (Bea Hanson).
Bold green and yellow striped foliage to 80cm. Very long lived
yellow inflorescences, flowers orange. Flowering time tends to be in
March/April. Hardy and will stand occasional light frost. The photo-
graph on page 79, taken at Landsendt, shows a large 4 to 5 year old
clump at least a meter across, growing in full sun. The inflorescences
are two years old - how much longer will they last? Although it is an
epiphyte, Aechmea caudata grows well in the ground. At Landsendt
some are growing in raw clay on a north facing bank to consolidate the
slepe. Other than initial watering when planted in spring, they are left
to fend for themselves.
Photos on pages 78 and 79 by Margaret Peart.
8O
We have the following items in Stock
Tillandsia by Paul T Isley Ill
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4 copies of this book are available They are NEW —
still in the shrink wrap Never to be repeated —
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81
Notes from the Bay of Plenty
Kevin Schollum
The May meeting was held at Elizabeth Bailey’s place, which
was the first of the monthly meetings which are now accepted as the
format for the year.
June 10th we met at Owen Bird, 27 Lindley Terrace, for an
enjoyable meeting with a lot of business to attend to. Owen started
quite recently with a tunnel house but this was surpassed by a 30ft x
9ft. tunnel house and his placement of plants and their appearance
was a credit to him. Twenty members present and seven apologies.
Some very interesting plants Were brought forward for the
show and tell which makes us all keen to see other plants.
July 8th meeting to be held at lsobel Clotworthy residence at
223 Range Road Papamoa.
August 12th meeting at John Kenyon’ s nursery, Te Puna, at
1.00pm followed by afternoon tea at Decor nursery at 2.30pm.
Dear Bromeliad Enthusiasts
We are looking forward to the Winter months, we hope no one
has been caught out with the odd frosts we have been receiving.
1 see our bromeliads are lookng a lot better with the hot summer
behind us. 97/98 summer was a real scorcher and some finer
tillandsias were lost.
It was good to see so many members at the Auckland
May meeting looking for information on bromeliads and taking
the opportunity of extending their range of plants from the sales
table. The sales table has been well stocked and sales have been
very healthy. We are now looking forward to next month’s
discussion plants which will be nidulariums.
Oops, sorry we forgot the special raffle, we will make
up for it in the June meeting.
Lester Ching.
82
Auckland Outing June 1th
1998
Pat Sweeney, Auckland.
Over twenty members, plus one all the way from Thames,
braved the very damp but not too cold day for our visit to the Chings’
garden. Bev and Lester have lived here less than a year - judging by
the number of broms around, I would say they have stamped their
mark good and proper.
An unusual shaped section down a long drive, the house
placed across one comer leaving space for various buildings and plant
beds. A bark covered, curved garden on the right hand side of the
drive filled with natives and ferns plus one rhodendron which had
flowered very well judging by the number of spent flower heads.
Continuing to the left, gardens curved gently around to the front door
with various clusters of everyday plants: roses, lavender, camilleas
etc. Up the front steps a large copper container with a darl burgandy
colored brom - beautiful!
Past the front steps, to the glasshouse, quite a sizeable one,
filled with all types of brioms. Aechmea recurvata varieties and
nidulariums under the benches looking fine and healthy. A group of
cryptanthus appear to be doing well for this time of the year, a
quantity of Vriesea guttata with flower heads, Vriesea corcovadensis,
Aechmea orlandiana var. nigricans, Portea petropolitana, large Ae.
fulgens discolor very beautiful. One clump labelled Deuterocohnia
brevifolia (I have one labelled Abromeitell brevifolia) attracted a lot
of interest. [all the Abromeitella have been re-classified as Deutero-
cohnia - Ed] '.
On a shelf erected'above the centre bench were a lot of
tillandsias mounted on wood showing signs of winter. There was one
in particlar, a beautifiil T
illandsie ehlersiana, sporting a 7cm. pup
mounted on a really large clump of old tree: this is the largest plant of
this type I have seen. A shade house filled to overflowing with
billbergias, aechmeas etc., all looked healthy. A gazebo had been
converted to an aviary with one lonely green budgie - perhaps Mrs B.
was on the nest!
Down the side of the house past cordylines, variegated flcus,
paw-paws, a pointsettia with its bright red bracts standing out against
83
its lime green foliage, also lemon, grapefruit and other citris. Another
house filled with plants, this with shadecloth sides, clear novaroof,
lots of light. Under bench a number of large Vriesea platynema
looking good, Aechmea ganosepala, Ae. Tam Star in flower, Neo-
regelia Blushing Bride brightly colored, a clump of Neo. pauciflora
growing well.
Outside a large pot of Aechmea pectinata still well colored.
Down the utility side of the section a two meter japanese maple with
golden leaves about to fall, a Radermachera sinica “China Doll” with
its dark green foliage, ivy spilling over-trees in places, making a very
attractive picture. .
Outside to a sumptious aftemoon tea, with a lovely speciman
Vriesea Mariae and Aechmea fulgens in flower gracing the side
tables. There is too much more to mention here, but I think this time
next year there will be roses covering a new structure on the front
lawn. Such energy! ;
Thanks Bev and Lester for an enjoyable afternoon.
Aechmea pimentii—velosoi. B = flower, C = sepals, D = petals and stamens
84
IIiSGIlSSiflII fllll'llfll‘
Bertie Bromel.
Winter light: Bertie was out in his plastic-covered greenhouse last
week, and he felt troubled by the amount of gunge apparent on the
inside layer of skin. Apart from looking awful, he wondered about
the effect on the light. So he got out his trusty lux meter and took
some measurements (it was a dull, overcast day) which averaged out
at 4,500 lux. Then he got to and washed off the gunge with a wet
sponge, and measured again. 5,500 lux this time - an increase of 22%.
He fells this is a timely warning to those of you with greenhouses -
check for deposits building up on the covering. Light is at a premium
this time of the year - broms generally need a minimum of 20,000 lux
to remain healthy. Of course they tolerate lower levels for quite long
periods, but we should be aiming to give them as much as possible
this time of the year. That’s what Bertie says, anyway!
Uncle Derek has been rearing up again lately. In our May bulletin
(page 57) we reported an “Aechmeapimenti-velosoi variegata” on the
April competition table. Derek is never shy to put forward a comment
on the Emperor’s clothing, and he reckons there is a good chance the
plant was, in fact, not a “true” Ae. pimenti-velosoi, see page 84, and
our Scientific Officer should be called on to adjudicate (are you
there, Peter?). Quoting from D. Butcher in Bromeletter J
an/Feb 1996
page 13: '
“Yes there is an Aechmea pimenti-velosoi var. variegata
being grown in Australia... It is not an inspiring plant... petals are
yellow but have a violetish tip.
“Yes there is an Aechmea pimenti-velosoi var. variegata
being grown in Australia which wins prizes on the show bench. It is
strongly variegated, its leaves are rounded at the tip and the inflores-
cence well exceeds the leaf rosette. The petals are wholly yellow. So
it is not Ae. pimenti-velosoi let alone a variegated form. It seems
much closer to a dwarf Ae. comata but is probably of hybrid origin...
(Continued on page 86)
85
Mi“‘3‘-4*MAAAA‘54AA‘flé‘é‘éfi-AMAAAMAAM
‘ r
4 i;
g S E E D B A N K .
g;
<4 E»
4 a»
>
<( y

“ )-
4 v
4 a»
1 _ :
l: Packets of seed 50c. each in NZ. ;
1 Overseas $1 US or $1 Aust., airmail postage free. i;
i rvvvvvfrvvvvWVYYYYWVWVWV'VV‘WW'WVYVVVV{
Aechmea kertesziae Tillcindsiajuncea
Ae. luddemanniana T. mbgnusiana
Billbergia brasiiensis Vrieis'ea duvaliana
B. viridiflora Vr.fosteriana
Puya mirabilis Vr. scalaris
Pitcairnea cf. atrorubens Dyckia species.
Pit. xanthocalyx
Tillandsia hamaleana '
Orders (with S.A.E.) and spare seed to:
Andrew Flower
PO. Box 11-375, Manners Street PO.
WELLINGTON.
(C
ominued
from page 85)
“... it is difficult to write a label “NOT PIMENTI VELOSOI
VAR VARIEGATA” and it takes a long time too & thus is forgotten.
To show my interest in cryptic crosswords or odd sense of humour I
believe we should call this imposter “PIE IN THE SKY”.
This will clear the way for the true Aechmea pimenti-velosoi
to win prizes on the show bench, although I doubt it!”
86
IIEEIBEBS
Telephone
PATRON & LIFE MEMBER Mrs Bea Hanson (09) 527-6830
HISTORIAN & LIFE MEMBER Laurie Dephoff (09) 527-7789
PRESIDENT Lester Ching (09) 576-4595
VICE PRESIDENTS Des Yeates (09) 838-6535
Graham West (09) 298-3479
SECRETARY Dave Anderson (09) 63 8-8671
TREASURER Peter Waters (09) 534-5616
22 Halfmoon Rise,
Bucklands Beach,
AUCKLAND
EDITOR Andrew Flower (04) 239-9659
LIBRARIAN Des Yeates (09) 83 8-6535
COMMITTEE Len Trotman (09) 83 8-9356
Bev Ching (09) 576-4595
Glenys Guild (09) 810-9669
Marjorie Lowe (09) 376-6874
Brian Dawson
AUDITOR Dawn Persson
A.H.C DELEGATES Patricia Sweeney and
Zena Poulgrain
LIFE MEMBERS Harry Martin
Patricia Perratt
Patricia Sweeney
SCIENTIFIC OFFICER Peter Waters (09) 534—5616
MEMBERSHIP SIIBSGBII'TIIIHS
NZ NZ$ 14.00 Ordinary [1999, NZ$ 20]
NZ$ 4.00 Associate (same household) [1999, NZ$ 5]
Overseas NZ$ 20.00 airmail Australia [1999, NZ$ 25]
NZ$ 25.00 airmail USA & other overseas [1999, NZ$ 30]
MEETINGS
FOURTH Tuesday of each month except December, at Greyfriars
Church Hall, cnr. Mt Eden and Windmill Roads, Auckland, at 7.30 pm.
Aechmea “Pie In The Sky’? [nomen illegitimum - Ed] photo sent to us by
Derek Butcher. Photographer unknown, probably because photo is a
wee bit optically challenged... See Bertie Bromel discussion on page '
85. Is this What your “Ae. pimenti-velosoi v'ar vaiiegata” looks like?
Contents
President’s Page 71 .,
May Meeting News 72 3
Mounting Bromeliads, Len Trotman 74
Announcements 76 .5
Landsendt... Valley of The Palms, Marjorie
Lowe 77
NeWs fiom The Bay of Plenty, Kevin Scholluni 82
Auckland Outing, Pat Sweeney ' ' 83
Discussion Comer, Bertie Bromel 85
Seed Bank 86
Officers of the Society 87
Membership details, meetings 37

 

Bromeliad
Society of New Zealand Inc.
August 1998
Vol. 38 No. 7
Bromeliad Society of New Zealand (Inc.)
Affiliated with the Bromeliad Society International Inc.
The Society was formed on the 28th August, 1962.
The objects of the Society are to encourage the cultivation and study
of Bromeliads grown indoors or outdoors, and in particular:
(a) To promote discussion and arrange instruction on cultiva-
tion, propagation and control of diseases.
(b) To provide a Library for members.
(c) To assist members to identify plants.
(d) To make awards for outstanding new bromeliads.
(e) To hold Shows or public exhibitions of bromeliads.
(i) To promote the distribution of bromeliads amongst mem-
bers by exchange, purchase and sale, and to encourage the
importation of new plants.
(0) To affiliate with any Society or other body, and to do such
things as may be deemed necessary or desirable in the fur—
therance of these objects.
(h) To accept affiliation from other Societies having similar
objects.
All general correspondence should be sent to the Secretary,
Bromeliad Society of New Zealand, 33 Marsden Avenue, Mt. Eden,
Auckland 4, New Zealand.
Back issues of the Bulletin (since September 1994) are available
from the Editor for $2 post paid.
The opinions expressed in letters or articles in this magazine are the
author’s own views and do not necessarily express the policy of the
Bromeliad Society of New Zealand.
Please send articles & advertisements to the Editor, PO. Box 11-375,
Wellington, New Zealand. E-mail to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Presidents P398
Another good meeting providing lively debate on different
issues brought up.
An excellent variety of plants for sale giving plenty to choose
from for the newer members as well as the experienced grower.
Novice members are looking for plants in flower so they can
see what their plant will produce. I notice after each meeting there are
no flowering plants left as they are always in demand.
We are looking forward to the next meeting—a mini-talk on
cutting pups and potting followed by discussion plants Vriesea fosteri-
ana and hybrids.
Welcome to Owen from Tauranga, hope you enjoyed your day
in Auckland visiting members’ gardens and our meeting.
Thought:
Two things are bad for the heart...
Running upstairs and running down people.
Front cover: T
illandsia demissa, in habitat. Photo by Jose Man-
zanares, reproduced fiom the Journal of The Bromeliad Society Inc,
May-June 1998 p. 115. One might reflect on the amount of dead and
tatty leaves on the plant, and relate to hobby growers’ attempts to
provide “ideal conditions” and “duplicate the plant’s natural environ—
ment” in order to grow perfect specimens....?
The photographer found populations of Tillandsia demissa in
Ecuador, near Saraguro and Ofia in a hot semi-desert valley at 2,300
meters above sea level. They were growing on vertical rocky walls, as
were T
illandsia humilis and J". tectorum, Pitcairnia pungens and Puya
westii.
APOLOGY:
The Editor bought a new printer to try and improve the color
pictures... Oh! dear! He printed all the inside pages and 168 of the
covers before he realised he was using the wrong color settings!
Apologies to those of you who get dud covers this month.
107
.llllll meeting News
Another good turnout with fifty four members attending our monthly
meeting including Owen Bird from Tauranga. The highlight of the
evening was seeing the World Conference Bromeliad slides by Peter
Waters; making many of us envious of his recent trip.
Lester Ching lead the discussion on the Show and Tell plants. Plants of
a Tillandsia species from Equador (similar to T. guatemalensis) was
brought in by Dick Endt, who also had a T. viridiflora- a night
flowering species and Ae. Popcorn. Peter brought in to show Bill.
elegans (green form) in flower with a red spike and blue petals, Bill. X
guttatta which has been out in full flower for some weeks,and Neo.
princeps, (the true one). T. flexuosa- a viviparous plant, T. vernicosa,
T. araujei, and Guz. wittmackii. were also on display.
Marjorie Lowe then gave a mini-talk on growmg bromeliads outdooors-
see article in this bulletin.
Instead of having a plant of the month Peter gave a very interesting talk
on his trip to the World Conference as mentioned above. Well,
descriptions cannot do justice to the truly beautiful bromeliad slides
taken by Peter at the recent Houston Conference. It was certainly no
coincidence that Peter is now erecting another' shade house.
The door prizes going to John Vivers, Marjorie Lowe, & Olive Ray
with Gill Keesing winning the special raffle.
COMPETITIONS
Open Flowering: First Peter Waters with Neo. Sister Grace and second
was Len Trotman with a Guz. Indian. Also in the competition were
Neo. X (a clump); Nid. procerum; Vriesea ‘Red Rock’, Vr. ‘Little
Chief”, and Vr. reflexa max.
Open Foliage: Dave Anderson was first with 3 Ac. nudicaulis ‘Silver
Streak’, and second was Peter Waters with Neo. carcharodon x
carolinae tricolor. In the competition were Neo’s. Painted” Lady, and an
108
unnamed hybrid; Vr’s. Intermedia, Nissa, racinae x Red Chesmut, and
gigantea x platynema; Ae’s. pineliana var pineliana, and omata var
nationalis.
Tillandsia Flowering: Laurie Dephoff’s T. lindenii was first equal
with Peter Waters T. alfiedo laui. There were also on the table T’s.
bulbosa, butzii, duratii var saxitilis, gymnobotrya, latifolia, ponderosa
"and punctulata
Tillandsia Foliage: ‘First was Laurie Dephoffs T. Tectorum - a 3
plant clump followed by Len Trotman’s single T. tectorum. In the
competition were T. arhiza major with giant 250mm long leaves,
arhiza (large) - but with significantly smaller leaves than major,
chapuensis, roezlii, and rotundata.
Novice Flowering: First was Gordon Waddell with T. guatemalensis
and second Gay McDonald’s Nid. Fulgens along with Neo’s. Dr Carl,
and carolinae; Nid. fiilgens orange, and regelioides; Ae. Black Jack.
Novice Foliage: First was Gay McDonald with Ae. pineliana var.
minuta and second was Gay McDonald’s Neo. Hybrid together wih
Vr. platynema and Neo. Sharlock x carolinae.
The Greenhough Trophy went to Gordon Waddell with T.
guatemalensis.
Congratulations to all the winners.
Dave Anderson
NEXT MEETING
Tuesday 25th August.
109
changes [0 names I" Some Bromelialls
Peter Waters, Auckland.
Brazilian botanist Elton Leme has spent many years studying the
Nidularioid complex of genera, which include Nidularium, Canistrum, Wit-
trockia and part of Neoregelia. He is presenting his findings in three vol-
umes, two of which have already been published. As might be expected there
are some name changes as two new genera have been put forward. The fol-
lowing is a partial list of the changes which apply to plants already in New
Zealand.
Old name is now...
Canistrum lindenii Edmundoa lindenii
Canistrum cyanthiforme Wittrockia cyathiformis
Canistrum giganteum Wittrockia gigantea
Neoregelia aculeatosepala Aechmea aculeatosepala
Neoregelia marceloi Canistrum marceloi
Neoregelia albiflora Canistropsis albiflora
Nidularium burchellii Canistropsis burchellii
Nidularium microps Canistropsis microps
Nidularium pulcherrimum Canistropsis
pulchen‘ima
Nia'ularium seidelii Canstropsis seidelii
Nidularium bilbergioides Canistropsis billbergioia'es
Nia'ularium terminale Canistropsis billbergioidesfazurea
Nearegelia hatschbachii Neoregelia bahiana
Neoregelia pabstiana Neoregelia bahiana
Wittrockia leucophaea Neoregelia leucophaea
Wittrockia amazonica Nidularium amazonicum
Wittrockia campos-portoi Nidularium campos-portoi
Nidularium regelioides Nidularium rutilans
Regarding Canistrum Leopardinum, Elton says that contrary to
popular opinion this is not a hybrid but a species now known as Wittrockia
gigantea.
110
New members: Welcome, we hope you enjoy your time with the
Society.
Mrs S. Goulton, 14a Henry Street, Avondale, Auckland
Ngaire Christie, 2/54 Vivian Wilson Drive, Bucklands Beach, Manukau
Gordon Waddell, 70 Opanuku Road, Henderson Valley, Waitakere
Gerry Stansfield, 7 Noall Street, Te Atatu, Waitakere City
Shirley & Adrian Yates, 95 Taipari Street, Maungatapu, Tauranga.
Forthcoming Auckland Meeting Activities:
August 1998 (Tuesday 25th) Vriesea fosteriana and hybrids, mini-talk
on cutting pups and potting.
October 1998 (Tuesday 27th) Auction of superior plants.
For Sale - Society has more of Benschs’ Blooming Bromeliads, contact
Peter Waters
New Edition
The very popular Tillandsia Hand—
book by Hideo Shimizu has been
expanded in this new edition - now
it has 134 pages and 380 color
photos - many in habitat
Stocks now aVailable - $ 62 incl. GST, post free in NZ.
Order with payment to Anwyl Bromeliads
P.
O. Box 57-021,Mana, Wellington 6230.
Phone 04 2399-659, email aflower@iceps co.
nz
lll
We have the following items in Stock
Tillandsia by Paul T Isley III 1021?], 1010 ”I?
Genus Tillandsia by Paul T Isley ‘III
$15
Theee colour booklete contain 22 pagee of informative
text and stunning colour photographe
All booklete plue poet and packaging $1.50
£00K ll!
Special for this Month
T. Bergerii with pupa _ $7.00 + F849
Plants Plants Plants
Numeroue varietiee of high quality apecimene to
choose from all at very competitive pricee.
For a priceliet eend a 5.A.E. to:
C (3; M Cato
20 Woodhouee Street
North Linwood
CHKISTCHUKH 8006
or FAX we on (05) 581 0064
112
Bromelialls in me landscane
Marjorie Lowe, Auckland
This subject is an extensive one so I will concentrate on one
aspect only—an aspect in which bromeliads are far superior to most
other plants. ‘
I suspect that most of you read gardening articles, and watch
and/or listen to gardening programs. Sooner or later the subject crops
up—what to plant under trees and tall shrubs and how to go about it.
The usual advice given is, firstly, dig over the area to be planted (no
mention or whether to use a spade or a fork, what kind of rooting
system is present and the damage that can be done if there are surface
roots). Secondly, dig in lots of compost and plant food and, thirdly,
usually suggestions (some quite extraordinary) for suitable plants to
use. Ofien no reference is made as to whether the canopy is evergreen
or deciduous or has a flowering season. In short a recipe for hard work
and fiequent failure.
What is needed here is some lateral thinking. Logic suggests
using plants that do nor require nourishment from the soil (if any), that
will appreciate the fast drainage provided by the existing rooting
systems (eSpecially fibrous roots) and that have species and cultivars
that will take the varying conditions of sun and shade.
The obvious contenders are epiphytic plants such as bromeli-
ads, orchids, fems, rainforest cacti, vireya rhododendrons etc.
Bromeliads, with their wide range of colorful and patterned foliage
and their striking and bright inflorescences that can be available at any
time of the year, provide by far the greatest range and impact.
Most are easy to grow if placed correctly. Protection from
excessive winter rain in mild areas and/or frost in cooler districts will
be provided by the canopy if it is evergreen.
What to check for:
9 Density of the canopy—this can be lightened by careful pruning.
9 Height of the canopy—~is it high enough to clear the flowering
spike or to allow the sun to penetrate under the branches. _
6 Size of leaves—do they decompose easily, do they constitute a
grooming problem.
6 Ifcanopy is deciduous—that the bromeliads underneath can stand
full winter sun. There is an exception here in that trees and shrubs
described as fully deciduous do not necessarily drop their leaves in
winter. Most of these exceptions are tropical or sub-tropical plants
and shed their leaves before flowering. In the case of Chorisia
speciosa, flowering time is usually autumn, so it sheds its leaves
late summer. The Jacaranda flowers late spring, early summer and
is in leaf all winter. Others in this category are Bauhinia, Brachy-
chiton, some Cassias, Kowhai and Poinciana All are showy so
that the bromeliads below should complement not compete during
the flowering perod.
o Moisture—extra moisture will usually be needed in summer be-
cause of the umbrella effect of the canopy. A good hose down will
also put fresh. water in the reservoirs.
9 Maintenance grooming—is usually just removing old and dying
leaves and dead parent plant, to allow room for the pups to expand
and clump up.
0 When choosing plants—are they to be seen fiom above or below.
Are they suitable for sun, shade, dappled shade, morning sun,
afternoon sun. Is there enough space to accomodate a mature,
well-developed clump.
o If only bromeliads are being planted, consider using rocks to
define the clumps and add a change of texture to the design. Scoria
is light, cheap, and weathers very quickly with a little help. Ponga
can be used in a similar fashion and treefem stumps can be
stunning. Another use for pieces of ponga is for planting both in
and on making a light and portable perch.
For collectors, hybridists and enthusiasts it is “The plant is the
thing” For keen gardeners the plants are components in the total
design and it is “The garden is the thing.”
Nidularium fulgens
Most nidulariums nwd moist shade but Nidulariumfirlgens is
one of the few that will take bright light (but not direct sun). There are
both red and orange forms. The commoner form is bright red that
eventually changes to cerise. From the first coloring up of the centre to
114
the last, can be as much as twelve months.
Nidulan'umfidgens. Photo by Marjorie Lowe.
Nidularium firlgens makes very attractive low-growing
clumps of shiny light green leaves, mottled with darker green and with
soft spiny margins. With good drainage, it grows well in the ground
and it will stand fairly low temperatures if no frost is present Moist,
light shade is probably best as too much light can turn the leaves
yellow.
According to Victoria Padilla ( Bromeliads, Crown Publishers, 1973)
“ [it] Grows on branches of high trees in southern Brazil, where it is
also used as a garden plant, at altitudes of [ 350 to 1100 meters]”
115
Brumeliatl Bllllllll-llll Wlll'lll conference
Peter Waters, Auckland.
The Bromeliad World Conference in Houston was the main
destination of our recent holiday in USA, but we decided to take
another cruise beforehand and to see a little more of the Caribbean
Islands and hopefully more bromeliads in their natural habitat. Jeanette
and I embarked on the same ship that we sailed on prior to the Orlando
conference two" years before, but this time 'we went eastwards to St
' Kitts, St. Thomas and the Bahamas. On St. Kitts we went on a trip to the
rainforest. Here there was; plenty of ' Tillandria urriculata but little else,
until a local guide managed to‘find us one other bromeliad: this time a
Pitcaiinea, probably ’P. anguslifo/ia. On the island of St. John in the US
Virgin Islands we found more T. utriculqta and that was it.
When we returned ,to Fort Lauderdale we flew to New Orleans
where we spent five days... This ”is a great city to holiday in and some
friends who liveiithere took us into the bayous, the surrounding swamp-
land where we saw T. usneoides and lots of wildlife, including alliga-
tors. We picked up a rental and-drove the 350 miles to Houston, much
of it through more swampland and all of it flat as a pancake.
Houston is an enormous city (3.5 million) with little to attract
the tourist and the Conference was held in Greenspoint, about 15 miles
nerth of Downtown. There were about 350 attendees I think and
although . it was well organised there were some differences from
previous occasions. There were no commercial displays this time,
probably because most large nurseries are in Florida or California, and
there were not very many private gardens available to visit. Rather
surprising as there are many 881 members in this area
The competition was of a good standard and the plant sales area
was great with huge amounts of bromeliads but at a price, particularly
when we had to double all the prices because of our exchange rate.
However 1 did manage to fill a couple of cartons nevertheless. The
formal dinner was a success and l was able to catch up with many
acquaintances from previous occasions.
The major attraction for me was the seminar program, which
took place hourly from 10 until 4 each day and gave us the opportunity
116
to listen to experts in various fields of bromeliad knowledge. Seminars
I attended included Elton Leme on nidulan'ums and also new discover-
ies in Brazil, Jose Manzanares on Ecuadorian broms, Bruce Holst on
the Bromeliaceae of Venezuela, John Arden on hybridizing, Francis
Oliva also on Venezuelan bromeliads, John Anderson on Aechmea
collecting, Dennis Cathcart on the bromeliads of Hounduras, and Don
Beadle on Billbergias. They were all excellent and accompanied by
slides. These seminars are the main reason I like attending the Confer-
ences as this information is of great value to the bromeliad enthusiast.
When the Conference was over there were a couple of days to
visit local growers. Odean Head who was the Conference Chairman
has a large collection including many of his own hybrods and it was
interesting to see how he coped with the rather difficult climate. It can,
be 40 degrees in summer and fieezing in winter. His bromeliads were
mainly under shadecloth which had completely taken over the back-
yard Don and Betty Garrison had a large section on the outskirts of
the city with a large plastic house complete with heating. The only
commercial grower in Houston is David Meade who has five or six
timnel houses and a very interesting collection of many different
species.
We flew ofi‘ to Los Vegas for one night on the way homes and ‘
found that my boxes of bromeliads were still in Houston. A rather
nerve-wracking time until they arrived about midnight but then in Los
Vegas time doesn’t matter. The next afiemoon we were on the way
home. -
The next World Conference will be held in San Francisco in
June or July 2000.
WSIIIE BATES
Single issue Min. 6 per year
Full page 15.00 13.50
Halfpage 8.50 7.65
Quarter page 4.25 3.85
Eighth page 2.00 1.80
117
letters
Bay of Plenty Bromeliad Group
Tauranga.
Dear Editor,
The Bay of Plenty Bromeliad Group wish to offer our support
to yoy as Editor of the NZ Bromeliad Society Bulletin
We appreciate the many hours that you spend on gathering,
collating, editing and printing the monthly bulletin.
Our members find it informative, stimulating and an invalu-
able aid to learning and understanding more about these fascinating
plants.
Sure there may be a few inaccuracies, perhaps Derek Moon
should have contacted you with an offer to proof-read.
Please continue to share your expert knowledge with us even
though it may be an arduous labour-of-love.
Yours sincerely,
Johanna Elder
on behalf of Bay of Plenty Bromeliad Group.
Editor notes: And again this month, due to printing problems
(excuse!) I didn’t have time to get Mrs Editor to proof read... thanks
for your kind words.
Barry Jones from Te Puke has written, kindly enclosing some seed for
the seed bank, and asking for an article on seed-raising. I’ll write one
for the next bulletin, and thanks for the seed. Sorry I didn’t have time
to update the Seed Bank this month, either.
118
Klaus Sasse
Last month Lois Buchanan asked about this. It took a while, but I
finally found a long article in the Journal of the Bromeliad Society
International, running over a number of issues in 1985/86, which was
translated from an article in Die Bromelie, the Journal of the German
Bromeliad Society. I have just printed excerpts to give readers the
general idea. If anyone wants a full copy, I can mail you a photocopy
- Ed.
If you look at the currently available {1985/86} and saleable
plants grown hydroponically, you will note a lack of blooming plants.
Except for Afiican violets and a few Araceae such as anthuriums and
dieffenbachias (more important as foliage plants than as blooming
plants) one finds hydroponically grown blooming plants very rarely in
shops. This is partly explainable by the fact that commercial nurseries
produce many short—lived flowering plants that would be dispropor—
tionately more expensive in hydroponics. It must also be recognized
that a great many blooming plants cannot tolerate having their roots
submerged in water. This, however, is not the case with the vase-
shaped bromeliads, and it is a mystery that commercial nurseries have
not discovered the possibility of growing these popular plants hydro-
ponically. '
In addition to the vase shaped bromeliads, it has also been my
experience that the xerophytic terrestrial bromeliads are also ideal
subjects for hydroponics. For this group of plants, however, there is a
variation in the technique; the nutrient solution should be on the roots
only for a short time and then drained. Cactus growers will recognize
this process as the pumice technique or as cultivation in a mineral
medium.
Hydroponics, or soiless cultivation of plants, is the raising of
plants in media that are (almost) without nutrition and that show no
notable change through decay or decomposition. The necessary nutri-
tion is suppplied to the plants in aqueous solution either constantly (the
standing-water process) or periodically (the flooding process). The
latter is used even with succulent plants observing specific growth and
119
rest periods...
For xerophytic plants, cultivation in pumice, lava, or exploded
clay using the flooding process comes closer to the natural conditions
than does growing them in conglomerate media with leaf mold, peat, or
compost.
[it seems that for vase-shaped broms, the standing-water pro-
cess is used, however - Ed] In the standing-water process, nutrition is
always present. The height of the water level varies from 0 to 30 or
50mm according to the rate of absorbtion by the plants and the amount
of attention the caretaker can give. High water levels are tolerated by
only a few plants... To grow plants in standing water assumes that their
roots can tolerate being submerged. With the vase-shaped bromeliads
this is generally the case... the level of nutrient solution should gener-
ally not exceed 20mm. Since these plants demand very little water,
replenishing of the water supply may be postponed to two to four
weeks.
In the flooding process, the nutrient solution is introduced at
intervals... then it is drained ofi‘ afier 15 to 30 minutes... Because of the
better aeration of the root system (the roots absorb oxygen from the air)
the flooding system is far better than the standing-water system for most
plant species
Containers may be individual pots and tubs. Individual pots are
useful only with the standing-water system; flooding would require
additional work... For vase-shaped bromeliads... pot with a 150m
diameter is usually appropriate. Even large plants with leaves 500m.
long or more have enough room in these, even if they have increased for
several generations into three or four rosettes.
The following points should be observed carefully in designing
and constructing your own apparatus;
- The height of the medium should be 10 to 15 cm, depending
on the size of the plant; very tall plants need 20 cm.
- Do not use corrosive metals.
- Containers made of materials that can be corroded by the
nutrient solution and emit elements dangerous to the plants must be
coated inside with material suitable for food containers.
It makes no difference basically, whether the plants are put into
pots and then into the tub or are simply planted directly into the tub. The
120
uSe of pots may make it easier to exchange plants even if the pots are
surrounded by medium. Surrounding them with medium is especially
advisable with the standing-water method, so that the nutrient solution
will be protected from the light and alga growth can be prevented.
Small plastic pots turned upside down can be set in the planting area to
displace some of the planting medium; the possible supply of nutrients
is thereby considerably increased...
[planting media]... hobbyists have settled primarily on ex-
ploded clay because of its very basic advantages... Pumice is more
porous than expolded clay and can hold more nutririon in its pores. In a
tset I found that a sample of grade 8/16 absorbed almost twice as much
water as exploded clay and was hardly wetter on the surface. In the
flooding system this can be an advantage...
The changeover from soil to hydroponic culture is done best in
the spring. It is also possible in summer, but not recommended in fall -
and winter nor shortly before or during bloom. The plants to be
switched over should be healthy and in good condition... Vase-shaped
bromeliads are transferred “wet.” After the plants are removed from the
pots, the roots are washed in lukewarm water. Severly matted parts are
best cut away with sharp scissors...they must be shortened enough that
they never dip into the nutrient solution... After careful washing [all soil
must be removed] the roots are disinfected for 15 to 20 minutes in a 0.5
to 1.0 percent solution of Chinosol [available from BASF Ph. (09)
633.0200 - Ed]. At first I add only clear water to the surrounding
container and add nutrients only after one to two months...
Among the nearly 20 vase-shaped bromeliads that I have grown
hydroponically are... Aechmea fasciata, Billbergia nutans, Tillandsia
cyanea, T. flabellata, Nidulan'um and Guzmania hybrids, as well as
Aechmea chantinii, A. calyculata, Vriesea fenestralis and Wittrockia
amazonica... All of these have bloomed in hydroponic culture.
Editor’s notes: The nutrient solution is, as usual, a “grey area” - at
least to me. Bromeliads do not need very much, particularly not too
much nitrogen. .{f you want to try hydroponic nutrients (I use them)
suggest you get a standard mix and add 1 ml of each “A ” and “B ” per
litre. Or, add Peters Blossom Booster at 2 ml per litre. If you can (not
compulsory!) bring pH down to about 6.5 with
phosphoric acid
121
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:3: Overseas $1 US or $1 Aust., airmail postage free. i2:
#4.! :3»
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Please save your spare seed and send it to us: in return you will
receive a flee packet of seed and the undying gratitude of those patient
souls who grow these fascinating plants fiom seed. Money raised fi'om
the sale of seeds will be used to import rare and exciting new varieties
from overseas. One day this may be the only practical way to obtain
new broms—so buy some seed now and start practising!
Orders (with S.A.E.) and spare seed to:
Andrew Flower
PO. Box 11-375, Manners Street PO.
WELLINGTON.
122
PATRON & LIFE MEMBER
HISTORIAN & LIFE MEMBER
PRESIDENT
VICE PRESIDENTS
DEEIBEIIS
Mrs Bea Hanson
Laurie Dephoff
Lester Ching
Des Yeates
Graham West
Telephone
(09) 527-6830
(09) 527-7789
(09) 576-4595
(09) 838-6535
(09) 298-3479
SECRETARY Dave Anderson (09) 63 8-8671
TREASURER Peter Waters (09) 534-5616
22 Halfmoon Rise,
Bucklands Beach,
AUCKLAND
EDITOR Andrew Flower (04) 239-9659
LIBRARIAN Des Yeates (09) 838-6535
COMMITTEE Len Trotman (09) 83 8—9356
Bev Ching (09) 576—4595
Glenys Guild (09) 810-9669
Marjorie Lowe (09) 376-6874
Brian Dawson
AUDITOR Dawn Persson
A.H.C DELEGATES Patricia Sweeney and
Zena Poulgrain
LIFE MEMBERS Harry Martin
Patricia Perratt
Patricia Sweeney
SCIENTIFIC OFFICER Peter Waters (09) 534-5616
MEMBERSHIP SUBSCRIPTIONS
NZ NZ$ 14.00 Ordinary [1999, NZ$ 20]
NZ$ 4.00 Associate (same household) [1999, NZ$ 5]
Overseas NZ$ 20.00 airmail Australia [1999, NZ$ 25]
NZ$ 25.00 airmail USA & other overseas [1999, NZ$ 30]
MEE'I'IIISS
FOURTH Tuesday of each month except December, at Greyfriars
Church Hall, cnr. Mt Eden and Windmill Roads, Auckland, at 7.30 pm.
Neoregelia eleutheropetala x pendula. Photo by Graham Alderson.
Graham says both the parents are species with very sharp spines and
hard recurved leaves. The pups grow out on stolons and the plants
color up bright pink when flowering and have stayed in color for
twelve months. Excellent plant for hanging basket.
Contents
President’s Page 107
July Meeting News 108
Changes to Name of Some Bromeliads, Peter
Waters 1
10
Announcements 111
Bromeliads in the Landscape, Marjorie Lowe 113
Bromeliad Round-up World Conference, Peter
Waters 116
Letters 118
Hydroponic Growing of Bromeliads, Klaus Sasse 119
Seed Bank 122
Oflicers of the Society 123
Membership details, meetings 123

 

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