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1999

1999 Journals

January 1999 February 1999 March/April 1999 May1999 June 1999 July 1999 August 1999 September 1999 October 1999 November 1999  
 

 

 Bromeliad it??? 1132.911
3 5 (\{c 1
Society of New Zealand Inc.
Bromeliad Hat Competition 190 1’
Tillandsia Portraits, Andrew Flower 191 l
Notes from the Bay of Plenty, Kevin Schollum 192 .
Uncooperative Bromeliads, Marjorie Lowe 192 “
Bromeliad Society of New Zealand (Inc.)
Affiliated with the Bromeliad Society International Inc.
The Society was formed on the 28th August, 1962.
The objects of the Society are to encourage the cultivation and study
of Bromeliads grown indoors or outdoors, and in particular:
(a) To promote discussion and arrange instruction on cultiva-
tion, propagation and control of diseases.
(b) To provide a Library for members.
(c) To assist members to identify plants.
(d) To make awards for outstanding new bromeliads.
(e) To hold Shows or public exhibitions of bromeliads.
(f) To promote the distribution of bromeliads amongst mem-
bers by exchange, purchase and sale, and to encourage the
importation of new plants.
(g) To affiliate with any Society or other body, and to do such
things as may be deemed necessary or desirable in the fur-
therance of these objects.
(h) To accept affiliation from other Societies having similar
objects.
All general correspondence should be sent to the Secretary,
Bromeliad Society of New Zealand, 33 Marsden Avenue, Mt. Eden,
Auckland 4, New Zealand.
Back issues of the Bulletin (since September 1994) are available
from the Editor for $2 post paid.
The opinions expressed in letters or articles in this magazine are the
author’s own views and do not necessarily express the policy of the
Bromeliad Society of New Zealand.
Please send articles & advertisements to the Editor, PO. Box 11-375,
Wellington, New Zealand. E-mail to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
PI‘GSWBM’S Page
Well. It was wind—up time for the year of 98, and monthly
winners were added up, announced, and prizes given out with Len
Trotman scooping the pool - congratulations Len.
With the upcoming changes in the monthly competition, we
will have a different competition each month instead of having tilland-
sia flowering and tillandsia foliage (these tillandsia sections will be
combined.) The changes take place from April 1999.
How are your show plants coming along? With the humid
summer and your personal care we’ll see some excellent specimens at
the Show February 27/28. Looking forward to seeing you all there.
Reminder help will be required at the show. Please offer some help for
a few hours especially mornings from 10.00am and afternoons.
With the Annual General Meeting on March 23rd, some
thought will be required as to who you want on the committee. If you
want change, become involved as the rewards are well worth it. You can
see the results for your own achievements.
Become involved !!
Don’t forget- plants for sale at the monthly meeting. there are
always plenty of people to buy well grown plants
Hope everone is over the Christmas New Year break and
making 1999 a year to remember
Thought: It is through the stories we weave in our minds that all great
things happen in the world. In order to create, we first have to work out
the story in our imagination.
Ganna Walska
Always Room at the Top
Front cover: Orthophytum lemei, photo by Andrew Flower. The plant
shown was grown from seed supplied by the B81 in 1992. Orthophy-
tums are terrestrial plants, requiring nutrient uptake through their roots.
Many are native to the rocky-soiled grasslands of the Serra do Espin-
haco mountain range stretching 1,100 km. from Minas Gerais to Bahia
(Brazil) at 900 meters altitude. Orthophytums are succulents, and
experience 3 to 4 months of drought thru winter. So water sparingly in
the colder weather. I use a cacti/succulent mix for them—Ed.
183
NOVEMBER Meeting NEWS
50 members came along to our last meeting of the year and enjoy the
start of the festive season. It was nice to catch up with one of our long
standing members, Avon Ryan, who was down for the meeting from
Whangarei.
There was a BROMELIADS X conference flyer update for those
going to Cairns 26th - 30th August 1999. As from March 1999 there will only
‘be one table of Tillandsias in the monthly competition and a new table will be
introduced of plants nominated in advance (a different variety each month).
The prize giving for the year followed see list below.
Lester Ching lead the discussion on the Show and Tell plants. First up
was a plant named Neoregelia Brilliant Guy which was brought in because
when it was displayed last month and I had doubted that the plant was in NZ. I
was wrong, sorry about that, as Len had imported it some time ago but there
was still no confirmation as to whether this was the same plant or not. Second
was a plant named Witlrockia amazonica which it certainly wasn't but was
more likely to be Neoregelia compacla or one of its hybrids - see photo in
Baench‘s book. Also wanting a name was a flower head - Quesnelia arvensis.
Gerry Standsfield displayed a bygeneric cross he had made with “NidI/larium
lubbersii ”, (an old name not registered as either a species or hybrid - probably
N. procerz/m or a hybrid of it), and Neoregelia pineliana. Laurie Dephoff had
fruited Anam/S cosmosus var. variegatus for the second time in 30 years and
had only brought the fiuit in as the plant was too large. Aechmea cylindrata in
full flower was also to be named ~ see the article by Chet Blackburn and the
front of the BSI journal Vol. 45 No. 2. [outoof-towners could look at the cover
of our Bulletin: November 1997 Vol. 37 No. 10 - Ed]
Peter Waters gave a very interesting talk on the discussion plant of
the month Neoregelia Fireball and its hybrids. It is a species [Fireball is not a
species - Ed] from Brazil although it has not been rediscovered in its natural
environment since it was first sent to the USA some 25 years or so ago. It is a
small stoleniferous plant which makes great hybrids with its very shiny dark red
leaves. Peter and Len had brought in a wide range of the many numerous
beautifiil hybrids.
The special raffle prize this month was by June Sly with the door
prizes going to June Sly, Len Trotman, and Pearl Trotman.
i
COMPETITIONS
Open Flowering: First Lester Ching with Aechmea Pink Rocket and second
184
was Len Trotman with a Vriesea Christiane. Also in the competition were
Aechmeas lriemgularis Red, and nm/ican/is; Billbergia Muriel Waterman;
Guzmaias Cherry, and Ruby; Neoregeliasjo/rmmis 'De Roli‘, Hybrid, and Pink
Sensation x Royal Burgundy; Nidulariums rege/ioides. and roll/ans x 7 (see
note above); Vrieseas Poelmanii, and Favorite.
()pen Foliage: Peter Waters was first with a Billlbergia hybrid made by Don
Beadle, and second was Len Trotman with (Ins/mime: Giesela Pink - (Giesela
Yellow variegata was 2nd last monthl). In the competition were ( hunts/rum
seide/icma; Neoregelias concentrica Red, and German Hybrid; Vriesea Red
Chestnut x plalynema.
Tillamlsia Flowering: Lester Ching was first with '/I tricolor with 14 flower
heads and second was Dave Anderson with ’1'. copa/re/I.s'i.s'. There were also
on the table T. brltzii, cactico/a, deppeana, pa/eacea, seleriana and
xerogmphica.
Tillrrnrlsio Foliage: First was Gerry Standstield's ’11 viric/[flora followed by
Wyn Shorrock's T. rolundata. In the competition were 'lijrmcea. recm'vlfiilia
var. subseczmdr’folia, and xerograp/rica.
Novice Flowering: First was Graham West with Ace/7mm lire/demo;min/m
and second Graham West with Vriesea incur-vain; along with; Neoregelias.
carolinae, and caro/inae var. tricolor; and Vrieseas sea/(Iris and bill/minom
x salmdersii.
Novice Foliage: First was Graham West with Vriesea pIa/ynema var
variegata and second was Graham West with Neoregelia Maggies Pride.
The Greenhough Trophy went to Lester Ching with A echmea Pink Rocket.
Xmas Decoration: First was Gill Keesing and a close second was Heather
Cooke.
Annual Trophy winners were :
Dephot’f~ Trophy, Bishop and Dawson
Bea Hanson Trophy, G. McDonald
Greenhough Trophy. L. Dephoff/L. Trotman
Centennial Cup, L. Trotman
Congratulations to all the winners.
NEXT MEETING: Tuesday 26th January.
The annual competitive show will be at the Mt. Albert Memorial Hall on 27th
185
Annual Romnetitinn Winners
Open flowering
Open foliage
Tillandsia flowering
Tillandsia foliage
Novice flowering
Novice foliage
Novice overall
Overall Open
N N I — I W N M N r — I
L. Trotman
P. Waters
L. Dephofi‘
P. Waters
L. Trotman
J. Murray
L. Trotman
J. Murray
W. Shorrock
L. Trotman
J. Murray
P. Waters
G. McDonald
G. West
Bishop & Dawson
Bishop & Dawson
G. McDonald
G. West
Bishop & Dawson
G. McDonald
G. West
L. Trotman
P. Waters
J. Murray
186
52
37
3o
54
42
30
39
35
33
53
35
35
39
37
33
4s
43
3o
83
so
69
Announcements
New members: Welcome to more new members - hope you enjoy your
membership:
Raewyn Adams, Box 2234, Tauranga
Mark Cappell, 26 Maungatawa Lane, Mt. Maunganui
Mrs C. Mazciritis, 77 East Street, Pukekohe
David McConachie, 15 Battersea Place, Palmerston North.
Bromeliatls X. We understand feaured speaker Don Beadle has been
replaced by Pamela Koide of Bird Rock Tropicals. Bad news for
billbergia fanciers, good news for tillandsia persons.
Monthly discussion plants.-
January: Aechmea faséiata and like species and hybrids. Len Trotman
to lead.
February: Neoregelia carolinae and its hybrids. Dave Anderson in the
hot seat.
March: winning plants fi‘om the Show.
April: guzmanias.
May: green-leafed tillandsias.
Annual General Meeting: to be held at Greyfriars Church Hall on 23
March, 7.30pm.
Annual Show: Evening meal Saturday 27th. at Oceans Restaurant,
Manukau Road, Greenlane. 7 to 7.15pm, $23.95 per person. Let the
Secretary know.
Wellington Tillandsia Study Group meeting at Wayne and Ginny
Rastall’s in Paraparaumu Sunday 31 January 1.30pm. No excuse for
Levin member. Or other Paraparamnu member... remember guests are
to provide the afternoon tea.
187
Bromeliau Society of NZ , cnmnetitive Show
SCHEDULE OF CLASSES
1 Aechmea Blooming
2 Aechmea Foliage
3 Billbergia
4 Cryptanthus
5 Guzmania Blooming
6 Guzmania Foliage
7 Neoregelia Blooming
8 Neoregelia Foliage *
9 Nidularium
10 Tillandsia Small Blooming
l l Tillandsia Small Foliage
12 Tillandsia Medium Blooming
l3 Tillandsia Medium Foliage
l4 Tillandsia Large Blooming
15 Tillandsia Large Foliage
16 Vriesea Blooming I
17 Vriesea Foliage
l8 Bigeneric or other genus not listed above
19 Miniature bromeliad
2O Variegated bromeliad
21 Novice Blooming
22 Novice Foliage
23 Dish or tray garden or novelty planting ‘
24 Bromeliad arrangement
25 Artistic or floral arrangement .
26 Decorative container
CONDITIONS OF ENTRY
1 Exhibitors must be financial members of the Bromeliad Society of
NZ.
2 A maximum of two plants may be entered in each class.
188 193
Plants must have been grown by exhibitor for at least three months
rior to show.
Plants must be clean and healthy, free from scale and insects and
drained of water. Pots must be clean and potting mix free of weeds
and other plant material. Each plant should be correctly labelled
where possible, with no abbreviations. Labelling not necessary in
Classes 23 to 26.
U1
Plants may be potted only in standard clay, terracotta, green or black
plastic or unadomed bonsai pots. Tillandsias may be mounted on
driftwood or similar.
No commercial leaf shine, cream or milk may be used to enhance the
appearance of the plant.
A pot may contain single or multiple plants provided they are attached
to a single rootstock.
A plant which has changed in shape or colour because of impending
blooming is permitted 1n blooming classes only i e. Neoregelias with
blushing centres
Tillandsias must be firmly attached to mounts and must look estab-
lished. They may be single or multiple plants within the stated mea~
Isurements. Fiji Trophy awarded for Best Tillandsia.
lO
Tillandsia sizes are:— Small, up to 15cm. (6”); Medium, 15 to 30cm.
6 to 12”); Large 30cm up (12” plus). These measurements exclude
inflorescence and mount.
11
Miniature bromeliad may be single or have multiple heads, no plant
more than 12.5cm high excluding inflorescence. Tillandsias are not
ermitted in this class.
12
Variegated bromeliad is a plant with white, pink or red longitudinal
stripes on leaves.
Novice classes are for members of less than three years standing and
who have not won a prize in a bromeliad show.
14
Olive AllanTrophy for Best of Show chosen from Classes 1 to 20
only.
15
Class 24 Bromeliad Arrangement has bromeliads only and must use
only natural materials. Plastic pots are not allowed. Ern Bailey Trophy
for Best Arrangement awarded to winner of this class.
16
Class 25 Artistic or floral arrangement may use other types of plant
but must include a significant amount of bromeliad material.
17
Class 26 Decorative Container may contain one bromeliad only but
may have multiple heads
18
Entries may not be removed from show until after 4pm on Sunday.
19
Unless mentidned above other rules as B.S.I. standard show. Final
. decision rests with Competition Stewards.
20
Entries will be accepted between 3pm and 6pm only on the Friday
before the Show.
189
This year the Editor will be running a competition to find the
champion Bromeliad Hat designer and model. Designer and model
must be one and the same person, and all entries will be adjudged by
Mrs Editor. Prize will be awarded in December 1999, and will be a
flowering-size plant of Werauhia nephrolepis (used to be vriesea)—a
Costa Rican species not previously available in New Zealand.
Color photos are to be sent to the Editor as soon as possible,
and no later than 30 November 1999. Beware, you may be published
in the Bulletin!
Tauranga member Audrey Hewson models her beautiful tillandsia
hat... will she be our winner? Who is game to challenge for that first
prize? Send your photos to the Editor, PO Box 11-375, Wellington.
190
Tlllamlsia Portraits
Andrew Flower.
Tillandsia hamaleana. An epiphytic species from Peru (around 2600 in
altitude). In cultivation it adapts readily to pot culture, and prefers a reasonably
shaded spot, with good humidity. Sometimes called T. nubis, but probably not
in New Zealand. As a reasonably high altitude plant, it prefers cooler tempera-
tures and for me it is a very reliable bloomer, and readily sets seed. Photo by
the author.
191
NDIBS from HIE Bay 0i Plenty
Kevin Schollum
Our first visit (in December) was to the gardens of Gladys
Fischer, then to Anne Connelly then to Johann Elder and how well all
three gar dens were kept and all three display an abundance of bromeli—
ads all looking in top order.
Our next meeting will be February 10th _:at the home of Julie
Carle, 3 May Street Mount Maunganui.
March 10th to Ann Stacy’s home, 7 Hastings Street, Te Puke at
11.00 or 11 30 and have lunch, then to Margaret Craig, 440 No. 2
Road, Te Puke.
Some nice plants were brought for the Show & Tell, of which
there were several tillandsias of which T
illandsia cacricola seemed to
be looking very well.
Earlier in the year Barry Jones handed out seedlings of Aech—
mea Iuddemanniana “Rubra” and this time seedlings of Neoregelia
caro/inae.
"HBO-OBGMIWB Bromeliaus
Marjorie Lowe
Struggling for some time with an attractive magenta Neoregelia
concentrica that simply refused to send out roots, and repacking it yet
again, Des Yeates lost his cool. He grabbed the offending plant, ripped
it from its container, and shoved it in a nearby groundcover that was
thick enough to keep it supported and upright.
But - the groundcover happened to be Heterocentron elegans
(Spanish Shawl) and its magenta buttercup-like flowers and bright green
foliage made it a perfect foil for the neoregelia.
PERFECT PLACEMENT!
192
8 Neoregelia Foliage *
23 Dish or tray garden or novelty planting ‘
25 Artistic or floral arrangement .
188 193
Bromeliaus: biodiversity amnlifiers
Carlos Frederico D. DaRocha, Luciana Cogliatti-Carvalho,
Danielle R. Almeidas & André Felippe Nunes De Freitas.
The authors work at the Ecology Sector, DBA V, Biology Institute, Rio de
Janiero State University, Brazil. Their paper is reproduced
from Bromélia'
Vol. 4 No. 4, December 1997, the journal of the Soctedade Brasilieira de
Bromélias - the Brazil Bromeliad Society.
In nature the presence of an organism in an ecosystem always
provides an opportunity for the survival of other species. For instance,
members of a certain species living in a given ecosystem allow their
predators to become established also. Many animals are hosts to
parasites that live inside (endoparasites) or outside (ectoparasites)
their bodies. Likewise, a plant species provides a microhabitat where
other species find shelter and feed on plant tissues (these are called
herbivores-those which feed on plant leaves or sap). Scientific studies
have shown that the more branches, twigs and leaves a plant has, the
greater is its “architectural complexity” and therefore the more organ-
isms that find shelter, food and mates there.
Thus we see that each organism in an ecosystem provides a
chance for other species to exist and that biodiversity will be greater
or smaller, depending on how many species that organism can sup-
port.
Accordingly we can conceive of the importance of bromeli-
ads as organisms that act as true amplifiers of biodiversity in an
ecosystem. Two characteristics of bromeliads are responsible for this:
the complex~ and heterogeneous architecture of the plant and the
ability of most species to collect water in the tank. The complex
architecture of bromeliads offers a wide range of microhabitats for
organisms to find the necessary conditions for their survival. these
organisms use the bromeliad in a variety of ways depending on their
needs. Many animals seek shelter in bromeliads from predators or
from the harsher weather outside the plant. Many invertebrate species
are part of the bromeliad fauna, and live their whole life cycle, or part
of it, inside these plants. Some vertebrates such as lizards and frogs
find refuge from predators. Of course, since bromeliads attract a large
194
number of organisms, many predators, like some snakes, aslo search
here for their prey.
Yhamnodynastes strigilis, a serpent in Neoregelia cruem‘a. Photo by C.F.D.
Rocha.
Furthermore, the water accumulated in the bromeliad tank is a
vital resource for many animal and plant species. Several invertebrates,
such as dragonflies and beetles, or even some vertebrates, such as frogs,
depend on the tank water as a place to lay eggs and where the larvae can
grow and complete their life cycle. Several other animals (small mam-
mals such as marsupials and rodents) depend on the water stored in
forest bromeliads to maintain a balanced metabolism.
The humidity foimd inside bromeliads is very important not oly
to animals but to some plants as well. Seeds that fall inside a bromeliad
during dispersal find more favorable conditions for germination and
development as seedlings than in the drier environment outside the
plant This happens quite fiequently, especially in habitats where the
bromeliads, as in some coastal plain environments (restingas). Here,
seed germination is rarer on the sandy soil than inside the bromeliads;
these soils are poor in nutrients and exposed to high temperatures
because of the sun shining on the sand. So its easy to find seedlings
growing inside many terrestrial bromeliads in forests and restingas.
195
The water stored in a bromeliad tank is an important resource, used by many
organisms in difierent ways. Here, water in the tank of a Neoregeliajohan—
nis plant. Photo by C.F.D. Rocha.
However, it is not only in the water of the bromeliad tank or
among its leaves that other organisms live or find resources.
Bromeliad flowers and their nectar draw a wide range of pollinators
that find nutrition here. So flowering bromeliads are an important
source of food for pollinators such as bees, wasps, moths, butterflies
and himmingbirds, among others. Organisms such as acarids also
complete their life cycle in these flowers. Bromeliad flowers are a
refuge for many acarid species that use the beak and nostrils of
pollinating hummingbirds as a means of transportation from one
flower to another in search of mates... This relationship is so special-
ized that the flowers of one bromeliad species have only one acarid
species. Although a hummingbird pollinates the flowers of many
different bromeliad species and therefore carries many acarid species
in its beak and nostrils, each acarid gets off at the appropriate
bromeliad species to find its mate and reproduce.
Of course, a relationship so specialized has taken thousands
of years to evolve, but all can be lost in a few days when bromeliads
196
are lost to forest destruction.
Recent estimates from scientific studies give an idea of how
important bromeliads are to the environment where they live. One of
these studies estimated that an impressive two million litres of water are
stored inside the tanks of just one bromeliad species (Vriesea neogluti-
nosa) in an 210 hectare (520 acres) area of restinga in the state of
Espirito Santo.... This estimate leads us to imagine how many other life
forms would be lost if this water were to vanish with the destruction of
bromeliads. Another study estimated that there are nearly 104,000
bromeliads in each hectare (2.4 acres) of Atlantic forest. If we estimate
conservatively that each bromeliad may hold some 50 organisms of
different species (disregarding those that are aquatic or microscopic)
then every hectare of forest would have at least 5,200,000 organisms
living inside bromeliads. Furthermore, if we consider the thousands of
microscopic beings that live in the water of the bromeliad tank and in its
flowers, this number would swell to hundreds of millions of organisms.
Suppose that we now add the animals that seek out bromeliads in search
of drinking water or as a thenno-regulatory site or to find prey. The
result would be that a considerable portion of ecosystem biodiversity
depends on bromeliads for survival, making bromeliads key players in
the ecosystem. .
Thus we can imagine the huge amount of life that is lost when
the bromeliads of a habitat are destroyed because they act as amplifiers
and multipliers of local biodiversity. Biodiversity is one of Brazil’s
greatest riches, but, at the same time, preservation of this ealth is one of
the biggest challenges we must face nowadays.
ADVERTISING RATES
Single issue Min. 6 per year
Full page 15.00 13.50
Half page 8.50 7.65
Quarter page 4.25 3.85
Eighth page 2.00 1.80
197
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45'
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43:13
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why (€- :45? St. 41.145131 .‘i'. r".. (it 15.23 $15}; 12' '3. 5.7
”$45.": . J a z ‘ h i fi t we. . 3 » J1f¥;._'r.
S E E D B A N K
Packets of seed 50c. each in NZ.
Overseas $1 US or $1 Aust.
., airmail postage free.
int} “r 31' fl“,
Aechmea aqui/egia
Ae. coeleslis
Ae. lindenii
Ae. luddemanniana v. rubra
Ae. nudicau/is v. cuspidata
Ae. setigera
Billbergia venezue/iana
Catopsis nutans
Dyckia hebdingii
Guzmania monostachia
Guz. osyana
Guz. sanguinea var. brevipedice/~
Iata
Pitcairnia cf atrorubens
P. xanthocalyx
WM 1"“: 1; F“. 4 "Vt-"S‘i‘i‘V‘? I"?‘1'7F‘-‘.’¥‘¥‘rfl’
Ronnbergia pelersii
Tillandsia brachycaulos
T. gardneri
T. guatema/ensis
T. incarnata ‘
T. nw/‘iantha
T. plagiotropica
T. schiedeana
Vriesea atra
Vr. gigantea
Vr. gullata
Vr. racineae
Orders (with S.A.E.) and spare seed to:
Andrew Flower
PO. Box 57-021
Mana
WELLINGTON 6230.
198
.15
A:-
PATRON & LIFE MEMBER
HISTORIAN & LIFE MEMBER
PRESIDENT
VICE PRESIDENTS
Mrs Bea Hanson
Laurie Dephoff
Lester Ching
Des Yeates
Graham West
Telephone
(09) 527-6830
(09) 527-7789
(09) 576-4595
(09) 83 8-6535
(09) 298-3479
SECRETARY Dave Anderson (09) 63 8-8671
TREASURER Peter Waters (09) 534-5616
22 Halfinoon Rise,
Bucklands Beach,
AUCKLAND
EDITOR Andrew Flower (04) 239-9659
LIBRARIAN Des Yeates (09) 83 8-6535
COMMITTEE Len Trotman (O9) 83 8—9356
Bev Ching (09) 576—4595
Glenys Guild (09) 810—9669
Marjorie Lowe (09) 376—6874
Brian Dawson
AUDITOR Dawn Persson
A.H.C DELEGATES
Patricia Sweeney and
Zena Poulgrain
LIFE MEMBERS Harry Martin
Patricia Perratt
Patricia Sweeney
SCIENTIFIC OFFICER Peter Waters (09) 534-5616
MEMBERSHIP SUBSCRIPTIONS
NZ NZ$ 14.00 Ordinary [1999, NZ$ 20]
NZ$ 4.00 Associate (same household) [1999, NZ$ 5]
Overseas NZ$ 20.00 airmail Australia [1999, NZ$ 25]
NZ$ 25.00 airmail USA & other overseas [1999, NZ$ 30]
MEETIIIES
FOURTH Tuesday of each month except December, at Greyfriars
Church Hall, cnr. Mt Eden and Windmill Roads, Auckland, at 7.30 pm.
Tillamlsia ionantha “Rubra” photo by Andrew Flower.
Contents
President’s Page 183
November Meeting News 184
Annual Competition Winners 186
Announcements 187
Competitive Show, Entry Conditions ' 188
Bromeliad Hat Competition 190 1’
Tillandsia Portraits, Andrew Flower 191 l
Notes from the Bay of Plenty, Kevin Schollum 192 .
Uncooperative Bromeliads, Marjorie Lowe 192 “
Bromeliads: biodiversity amplifiers; Da Rocha, 194
Cogliatti-Carvalho, Almeida & De Freitas 198
Seed Bank 199
Oflicers of the Society 199
Membership details, meetings - 199

 

 Bromeliad
Society of New Zealand Inc.
February 1999
Vol. 39 No. 1
Bromeliad Society of New Zealand (Inc.)
Affiliated with the Bromeliad Society International Inc.
The Society was formed on the 28th August, 1962.
The objects of the Society are to encourage the cultivation and study
of Bromeliads grown indoors or outdoors, and in particular:
(a) To promote discussion and arrange instruction on cultiva-
tion, propagation and control of diseases.
(b) To provide a Library for members.
(c) To assist members to identify plants.
(d) To make awards for outstanding new bromeliads.
(e) To hold Shows or public exhibitions of bromeliads.
(f) To promote the distribution of bromeliads amongst mem-
bers by exchange, purchase and sale, and to encourage the
importation of new plants.
(g) To affiliate with any Society or other body, and to do such
things as may be deemed necessary or desirable in the fur-
therance of these objects.
(h) To accept affiliation from other Societies having similar
objects.
All general correspondence should be sent to the Secretary,
Bromeliad Society of New Zealand, 33 Marsden Avenue, Mt. Eden,
Auckland 4, New Zealand.
Back issues of the Bulletin (since September 1994) are available
from the Editor for $2 post paid.
The opinions expressed in letters or articles in this magazine are the
author ’5 own views and do not necessarily express the policy of the
Bromeliad Society of New Zealand.
Please send articles & advertisements to the Editor, PO. Box 11-375,
Wellington, New Zealand. E—mail to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
President's Page
What a great start to 1999 with membership at its highest ever
in New Zealand at 252, enthusiasm visibly buzzing as we all look
forward to our annual bromeliad show.
One week to go and you should have your plants selected and
put aside for the Competition. Be careful to name them correctly and in
clean pots to enhance your chances.
The bromeliad dinner is on the 27th February. Bookings are
essential. Call Dave Anderson 6388671.
Good luck to you for the Show as we count down to another
successful event.
The last meeting was asked whether there was interest in a trip
to Tauranga in March for a bromeliad visit to the area. Be quick Book
Now!!
Thought: Participation is far more rewarding than winning at all costs.
Lester Ching.
Front cover: Neoregelia Marcon X concentrica used as a focal point
beside Mr & Mrs Editor’s pond. Photo by Andrew Flower, using a Fuji
MX-7OO digital camera. We use bromeliads sparingly in the garden, to
complement and enhance. Also, being in Wellington, we need to
restrict them to areas not exposed to cold winds which make their
leaves tatty (if they are not blown away). This doesn’t apply to the
tillandsias in the trees, of course...
Tillandsia Name Change
Anwyl Bromeliads advise that the tillandsia previously sold as T. andicola
(AF 91137) will now be labelled Tillandsia landbeckii subsp. andina.
Note that this population has white flowers, not the pale yellow normally as-
sociated with this species which grows in higher altitudes in central and south-
ern Peru..
January M891“!!! NEWS
The year got off to a lively start with over 50 people attending this first
meeting of 1999 on a warm January evening. The trading table was
well stocked with many colourful plants so here's hoping that this
continues through the coming months.
Peter Waters lead the discussion on the Show and Tell plants.
First up with its brown leaves and white markings was Orthophytum
gurkem'i; (for naming). The plant is closely related to Cryptanthus and
is easy to grow and needs bright light to keep the colour in the leaves.
Next was a Neo. hybrid with a purple centre for naming.
Unfortunately there are so many Neo. hybrids it is virtually impossible
to name them without using DNA. Two Ae. nudicaulis 'Silver Streak'
were brought in, one with green leaves the other with red leaves, both
with silver bands, which had been growing side by side, so I guess
there must be a green and red form of this cultivar. A Catopsis
subulata was all but out in flower with its green leaves and small
yellow bracts on a thin spike. Just to show what a difference light has
on the colour and size of a plant, Peter brought in three Vr. 'Red
Chestnut' x gigantea which had been growing from shade, through to
bright light under a plastic roof. The shade growing plant had longish
green leaves, whereas the one growing close to the roof had yellow]
pink and red leaves with this plant being much squatter. Lastly there
was a Neo. 'Brilliant Guy' with its light green leaves and red centre
which when in flower shows that it is carolinae hybrid.
Len Trotman gave a talk on Ae. fasciata, hybrids and related
species. Ae. fasciata has been in cultivation since 1826. Amongst the
plants on display were :
Ae. 'Morgana' cv. of fasciata - a spineless plant which needs good light.
Ae. fasciata v. sangrea - a plant similar to Ae. fasciata v. purpurea
except that it is much larger and is very attractive.
Ae. 'Morgana' (Silver King) cv. of fasciata - a spineless plant with
frosting but no banding.
Ae. fasciata (variegated)— fasciata with white stripes down the middle.
Ae. ’Kiwi' cv. of fasciata - fasciata with red stripes up the leaves.
Ae. 'Friederike' cv. of Fascini— the spineless form of this cross between
chantinii and fasciata.
Ae. flavorosea - the name referring to its yellow/red inflorescence.
The special raffle prizes this month were won by Bev Ching
and Pat Sweeney with the door prizes going to Pat Lawson, Jenny
Gallagher, and Bev Ching.
COMPETITIONS
Open Flowering: First Brian Dawson with Neo. carcharodon x
tricolor and second was Peter Waters with Neo. Dorothy a Skotak
hybrid. Also in the competition were Ae's. 'Morgana', pectinata, and
Orange Sherbert; Neo. Avilla; and Vr’s. Eva, and platynema.
Open Foliage: Jenny Gallagher was first with a Ae. 'By Golly', and
second was Peter Waters with Neo. johannis x - (wrongly named in
NZ as Neo cruenta). In the competition were Ae. 'Mirlo'; Billbergia
sten0petala; Neo's. Gold Fever, Extra Special, Orange Flush,Royal
Robe and Plutonis x Painted Lady.
Tillandsia Flowering: Len Trotman was first with T. streptophylla
and second was Dave Anderson with T. Wildfire. There were also on
the table T's. albertiana, dyeriana, ignesiae, leiboldiana, lorentziana,
paleacea, schiedeana, streptophylla, and tricolor.
Tillandsia Foliage: First was Brian Dawson's T. caput-medusae
followed by Bev Ching's T. cacticola. In the competition were T.
bulbosa, fasciculata, jalisco-monticola, and ionantha.
Novice Flowering: First was Rosemary Thomas with Ae. kertesziae x
and second was Carol Davies with a Neo. Geo Anderson hybrid.
Novice Foliage: First was Megan Thomas with Neo. Red concentrica
who alsowas second with Cryptathus Glad. Also in the competition
was an Ananus.
The Greenhough Trophy went to Brian Dawson with Neo.
carcharodon x tricolor.
Congratulations to all the winners.
NEXT MEETING
Tuesday 23rd February.
Dave Anderson
SAlE PLANTS FOR THE SHOW.
Members may offer bromeliads for sale at the show in any quantity.
Plants must be of reasonable quality (no rubbish) as we must keep
up a standard expected of a specialist society. The society reserves
the right to reject plants not up to this standard.
All plants must be labelled and correctly named where possible and
an ice cream stick with the sellers initials and price (round $5 only)
clearly marked on one end of the stick. Do not put this end of the
stick in the potting mix. If the plant is mounted then the stick can
be attached with a rubber band. Remember the society take 20%
commission.
Plants can be brought in anytime between 10am and 6pm on Friday
26th February or on Saturday or Sunday before the show opens.
For any further information contact Len Trotman.
BROMELIADS WANTED
Aechmeas tessmanii, nidularioides, correis-araujoi and cal-
lichroma. Cannistrum seidelianum, Vriesea malzenii,
Vriesea heliconioides.
Swap or buy:
Gerry Stansfield, 7 Noall Street
Te Atatu Penninsular, AUCKLAND.
AIIIIOIIIIGBIIIGIIIS
New members: Welcome to more new members - hope you enjoy
your membership:
Bev. Wade & Kathy Omeara, Wade Rd. RDl, Howick, Manukau City.
Monthly Competitions: Starting in March there will be only one
tillandsia table. Table of nominated plants:
March: billbergias
April: miniature plants.
May: Aechmea nudicaulis.
June: mounted plants.
Annual General Meeting: to be held at Greyfriars Church Hall on 23
March, 7.30pm.
Annual Show: Evening meal Saturday 27th. at Oceans Restaurant,
Manukau Road, Greenlane. 7 to 7.15pm, $23.95 per person. Let the
Secretary know.
Wellington Tillandsia Study Group meeting at Anwyl, Pukerua Bay,
Sunday 28 March 1.30pm.
Trip to Tauranga: $ 40 per person, Sunday 14th March. If you are
interested please contact the Secretary as soon as possible—there are
only 19 seats, first come first served.
Show trophies: must be returned to the February meeting, please.
Bay of Plenty Bromeliad Group: March 10th to Ann Stacey, 7
Hastings Street, Te Puke and later to Margaret Craig at 440 No.2 Road,
Te Puke where we will have our AGM. Members have been invited to
put on a display and sales at the Te Puke Orchid Show April 10-11.
Bromeliad $0018“ 01"! . comnetitive SIIIIW
SCHEDULE OF CLASSES
p—I
Aechmea Blooming
Aechmea Foliage
Billbergia
Cryptanthus
Guzmania Blooming
Guzmania Foliage
Neoregelia Blooming
Neoregelia Foliage
Nidularium
10 Tillandsia Small Blooming
11 Tillandsia Small Foliage
12 Tillandsia Medium Blooming
13 Tillandsia Medium Foliage
14 Tillandsia Large Blooming
15 Tillandsia Large Foliage
16 Vriesea Blooming
17 Vriesea Foliage
18 Bigeneric or other
genus not listed above
19 Miniature bromeliad
20 Variegated bromeliad
21 Novice Blooming
22 Novice Foliage
23 Dish or tray garden or novelty planting
24 Bromeliad arrangement
25 Artistic or floral arrangement
26 Decorative container
CONDITIONS OF ENTRY
1 Exhibitors must be financial members of the Bromeliad Society of
NZ.
2 A maximum of two plants may be entered in each class.
8
Plants must have been grown by exhibitor for at least three months
rior to show.
Plants must be clean and healthy, free from scale and insects and
drained of water. Pots must be clean and potting mix free of weeds
find other plant material. Each plant should be correctly labelled
here possible, with no abbreviations. Labelling not necessary in
Classes 23 to 26.
Plants may be potted only in standard clay, terracotta, green or black
plastic or unadorned bonsai pots. Tillandsias may be mounted on
driftwood or similar.
No commercial leaf shine, cream or milk may be used to enhance the
ppearance of the plant.
A pot may contain single or multiple plants provided they are at»
tached to a single rootstock.
A plant which has changed in shape or colour because of impending
blooming is permitted in blooming classes only. i.e. Neoregelias with
blushing centres.
Tillandsias must be firmly attached to mounts and must look estab-
lished. They may be single or multiple plants within the stated mea-
surements. Fiji Trophy awarded for Best Tillandsia.
lO Tillandsia sizes are:- Small, up to 15cm. (6”); Medium, 15 to 30cm.
(6 to 12” ); Large 300m up (12” plus). These measurements exclude
inflorescence and mount.
11 Miniature bromeliad may be single or have multiple heads, no plant
more than 12.5cm high excluding inflorescence. Tillandsias are not
ermitted in this class.
12 Variegated bromeliad is a plant with white, pink or red longitudinal
Stripes on leaves.
l3 Novice classes are for members of less than three years standing and
who have not won a prize in a bromeliad show.
14 Olive Allan Trophy for Best of Show chosen from Classes 1 to 20
only.
15 Class 24 Bromeliad Arrangement has bromeliads only and must use
only natural materials. Plastic pots are not allowed. Em Bailey Tro-
by for Best Arraggement awarded to winner of this class.
16 Class 25 Artistic or floral arrangement may use other types of plant
but must include a significant amount of bromeliad material.
17 Class 26 Decorative Container may contain one bromeliad only but
may have multiple heads
18 Entries may not be removed from show until after 4pm on Sunday.
19 Unless mentioned above other rules as B.S.I. standard show. Final
decision rests with Competition Stewards.
20 Entries will be accepted between 3pm and 6pm only on the Friday
before the Show.
Notes from the Northland Bromelian flroun
Colleen Frew
In June the group meeting was at the home of Maureen and
Keith Green at Maungakaramea, just south of Whangarei. It is always
a pleasure to wander about their colorful gardens and bromeliads,
especially as there are so many unusual and exotic plants as well.
Members of the group regard Maureen and Keith as their mentors and
their knowledge and assistance with bromeliad culture is always appre-
ciated.
Rosemary and Richard Morgan hosted the group at their Puriri
Park Road, Whangarei, home in July. Theirs is a subtropical garden
with an extensive collection of bromeliads and natural succulents.
Handsome Puriri trees dominate the outer limits of the garden which
contains attractive plantings of palms, native and exotic trees and
shrubs. It was a pleasant afternoon.
The meeting in August was at Oakura, approximately an hour
out on the east coast where Doug and Colleen Coulter were our hosts.
As usual sales of plants and raffles were popular, many of the plants
being donated by the Greens.
On September 27th, after it had been raining heavily all night
but cleared to be a lovely fine day, the group went to Dargaville to visit
new members Lorraine and Bruce Walden. They have many colorful
bromeliads, succulents and interesting plants and everyone enjoyed the
afternoon.
The Christmas meeting took place on December 16th starting
with a two-hour lunch at Revas on the Waterfront at the town basin in
Whangarei where a great variety of foods was served and enjoyed by
all. In the afternoon the group visited the Waimoana Garden and
Gallery of Rowena and Neville Reo. Waimoana is a one and a quarter
acre landscaped city section, sloping down to a stream. At all levels in
the garden a gentle trickling of water could be heard. The garden
features fascinating water sculptures, trees, shrubs and David Austin
roses. There are many seating alcoves and aviaries of spectacular and
unusual birds. It was a wonderful way to finish off the year.
(Continued on page 14)
10
‘ socian' or NEW ,
ANNUAL COMPETITIVE SHOW
: an.“ \ a - . . 1 -:§ . .t 4‘
MT ALBERT WAR MEMORIAL HALL
SATURDAY 8: SUNDAY 27th, 28th FEBRUARY
FROM 10am to 4pm
PLANT SALES REFRESHMENTS ENTRY $3.619 2'
ll
Wellington Tillanllsia Study limull
Phyllis Purdie & Andrew Flower
Held at Wayne and Ginny Rastall’s home in Paraparaumu. 13
members attended, coming from Palmerston North, Levin, Welling-
ton and the Hutt areas.
On display was a T. xiphioides grown outdoors in Levin with
large scented flowers. A note on the Internet says this is a hard plant
to flower. One member flowers it in a heated glasshouse, another in a .
polythene 35% shade greenhouse with frost cloth for cold nights. The
only consistency was all grow their plants very high, just under the
roof with strong light. A T. streptophylla had very limp leaves,
possibly from too much watering.
Three plants were shown with very similar leaf forms and
identical purple, scented flowers—labelled T. streptocarpa, T arhiza
Brazil and T. kurt-horstii. Decided they were all T. streptocarpa—
which is a bit of a bummer when you pay $20 or $30 for a plant you
think is a fancy new species! A T. streptocarpa “mini” was in bloom,
a more compact plant with a much shorter flower stalk and purple
flower in which some members claimed to be able to detect a scent.
A large monocarpic form of T. guatemalensis had a tall
inflorescence, much bigger than the small form which produces
offsets.
The Editor brought along a blooming “Pitcaimea species
nova” grown from BSI seed. David McConachie identified it as
probably P. flammea. Also T. tricholepis in flower grown from seed,
one of the small tillandsias with yellow flowers, and T. landbeckii
subsp. andina var. andina with tiny white flowers grown from seed
obtained from Karel Knize in Peru (labelled T. andicola at the
meeting, but subsequently identified by Dr. Walter Till in Vienna via.
the Internet).
Others were T. brachycaulos near flowering with the total
plant a beautiful red color, T. cyanea—narne queried as the flower
was a deep purple. Also flowering were T. rodrigeziana, a large plant
with a long flower spike, T. hondurensis, T. lorentziana, T. deppeana,
T. caput-medusae, Neoregelia Inferno and T. albida. The latter
refuses to flower in the owner’s heated greenhouse, but blooms in the
(Continued on page I 3)
12
NEEM TREES
Azadirachta indica Au Jus
First New Zealand release.
Six months old. Potted.
The Neern will repel biting insects. VERY effective against many
insects including mosquitos, midges and sandflies.
NOT harmful'to birds, bees, humans or other animals.
Loves full sun and free draining soil. Attractive leafy tree.
Reduce the use of insecticide and companion plant with your own
collection.
Potted the Neem can be contained to 1 to 2 meters.
Fruigseeds, oil, leaves, roots, flowers, and bark used for therapeutic
benefits.
Very limited stock—available now. $ 25 EACH
Ph/ fax 09 4241398 Hibiscus Coast - John Vevers.
(Continued
from page 12) Wellington nuandsia Study Group.
cool one.
Two plants of T. duratii had been pollinated 4 months ago, but no
seed had set. It seemed unlikely that pollination had occurred but the
members were advised to give them another month.
Two articles on tillandsias in The New Plantsman Journals
J
une/September 1995 were available.
13
AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAALAALAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA
S E E D B A N K .
Packets of seed 50¢. each in NZ.
Overseas $1 US or $1 Aust., airmail postage free.
VYYYVYYVVYVYYYYVYVY‘
LA
VYYYVYYYYVYYYYYVYVVVYVYYVYVVVYYVVYVYVVVV‘
Aechmea aquilegia Ronnbergia petersii
Ae. coelestis Tillandsia brachycaulos
Ae. lindenii T. gardnen'
Ae. luddemanniana v. rubra T. guatemalensis
Ae. nudicaulis v. cuspidata T. incarnata
Ae. setigera T. myriantha
Billbergia venezueliana T. plagiotropica
Catopsis nutans T. schiedeana
Dyckia hebdingii Vriesea atra
Guzmania monostachia Vr. gigantea
Guz. osyana Vr. guttata
Pitcaimia cf. atrorubens Vr. racineae
P. xanthocalyx Vr. Margaret Ruth.
Orders (with S.A.E.) and spare seed to:
Andrew Flower
PO. Box 57-021, Mana, WELLINGTON 6230.
( Continued
from page 10) Northland Bromeliad Group...
The first meeting in 1999 was at Jacqui O’Connell’s home in
Onerahi with three new members attending for the first time. Jacqui
has a large number of beautiful bromeliads, all strategically placed to
best advantage. Sales table and raffles were very well patrinized and
most people seemed to go home with a bromeliad (or two!)
Reviewing 1998, it’s been a very good year for the group——
numbers are up and interest is high. And everyone is looking forward
to the new millennium.
14
Telephone
PATRON & LIFE MEMBER Mrs Bea Hanson (09) 527-6830
HISTORIAN & LIFE MEMBER Laurie Dephoff (09) 527-7789
PRESIDENT Lester Ching (09) 576-4595
VICE PRESIDENTS Des Yeates (09) 83 8-6535
Graham West (09) 298-3479
SECRETARY Dave Anderson (09) 63 8-8671
TREASURER Peter Waters (09) 534-5616
22 Halfmoon Rise,
Bucklands Beach,
AUCKLAND
EDITOR Andrew Flower (04) 239-9659
LIBRARIAN Des Yeates (09) 838-6535
COMMITTEE Len Trotman (09) 838-9356
Bev Ching (09) 576-4595
Glenys Guild (09) 810-9669
Marjorie Lowe (09) 376-6874
_ Brian Dawson
AUDITOR Dawn Persson
A.H.C DELEGATES Patricia Sweeney and
Zena Poulgrain
LIFE MEMBERS Hany Martin
Patricia Perratt
Patricia Sweeney
SCIENTIFIC OFFICER Peter Waters (09) 534-5616
MEMBERSHIP SUBSCRIPTIONS
NZ NZ$ 14.00 Ordinary [1999, NZ$ 20]
NZ$ 4.00 Associate (same household) [1999, N23 5]
Overseas NZ$ 20.00 airmail Australia [1999, NZ$ 25]
NZ$ 25.00 airmail USA & other overseas [1999, N28 30]
FOURTH Tuesday of each month except December, at Greyfi'iars
Church Hall, cnr. Mt Eden and Windmill Roads, Auckland, at 7.30 pm.
Contents
President’s Page 3
January Meeting News 4
Sale Plants for the Show 6
Announcements 7
Competitive Show, Entry Conditions 8
Notes from the Northland Bromeliad Group,
Colleen Frew 10
Annual Show 11
Wellington Tillandsia Study Group, Phyllis
Purdie & Andrew Flower 12
Seed Bank 14
Officers of the Society 15
Membership details, meetings 15

 

. BROMEUAD WWW”
. Vol. 39 No.2
Society Of New Zealand Inc.
BROMELIAD SOCIETY OF NEW ZEALAND (INC.)
Affiliated with the Bromeliad Society International Inc.
The Society was formed on the 28th. August, 1962.
The objects of the Society are to'encourage the cultivation and
study of bromeliads grown indoors or outdoors and in particular -
(a) To promote discussion and arrange instruction on culti-
vation, propagation and control of diseases.
(b) To provide a library for members.
(c) To assist members to identify plants. _
(d) To make awards for outstanding new bromeliads.
(e) To hold shows or public exhibitions of bromeliads.
(f) To promote the distribution of bromeliads amongst
members by exchange, purchase and sale, and to
encourage the importation of new plants.
(9) To affiliate with any Society or other body, and to do
such things as may be deemed necessary or desirable
in the furtherence of these objects.
(h) , To accept affiliation from other Societies having similar
objects.
FRONT COVER.
Plant of the Show.
Peter Waters - Quesnaiia marmorata "l”irn Plowman'
This interesting cultivar was found at Marie Selby Gardens in
1968 and named for the discoverer. The attractive pink and blue
inflorescence is reminiscent of a Billbergia in more ways than
one. it is short lived, only lasting for one to two weeks. Easy to
grow, appreciating high light and good ventilation. Perfect for a
hanging basket or in a position in a tree. Quesnalia mannorata is
found in the coastal regions of central eastern Brazil where it
grows epiphytically.
Photo: Peter Waters.
FROM THE PRESIDENT.
With an active and interesting year behind us, we can now
only sum up and look forward to 1999/2000.
Firstly I would like to thank all the committee for their
diligence and committment during this year.
Thank you to Dave Anderson for all his time and support
during the year as secretary for the Bromeliad Society.
To Peter Waters our treasurer, I thank for his work and
support, making sure our bank balance does not deflate.
Andrew Flower, who is not standing for editor this year, we
all wish to thank you for your hard work. Andrew has been
editor since August 1994, (running the seed bank as well) and
we recognise a great effort.
The Bromeliad Show, February 1999, was the most
successful yet with a record number of people coming through
the door. The competition tables looked brilliant and the sales
table was also very successful with several thousand plants
being sold.
Thank you to all the participants and helpers who gave their
time and energy to make the show so successful. Many thanks
to Peter Brady and Kevin Kilsby for the display area they
created. It was outstanding. (overleaf)
CONTENTS.
3. From the President.
4. Neoregelia carolinae and hybrids. Dave Anderson.
5. February Meeting News.
7. Longwood Gardens. Brian Dawson.
8. 1999 Annual Show Awards.
10.Bay of Plenty March News. Kevin Schollum.
11.Show Judging Review 1999. Dave Anderson.
14.AGM, March Meeting News.
17.Annual Accounts.
19.Basics for Beginners. Len Trotman.
20.Announcements.
21 .Bay of Plenty April News. Kevin Schollum.
3
Continued
Also to Marjorie Lowe who spent a lot of time promoting and
obtaining those marvellous articles which did so much for
promoting bromeliads in New Zealand.
We look forward to this year with all the challenges it offers
and the many friends we make growing bromeliads. All the
very best for this coming year and many thanks to all who put
in all the effort and support.
This month's thought:
Do not let us make imaginery evils, when you know we have
so many real ones to encounter. Oliver Goldsmith
Lester Ching.
FEBRUARY TALK.
Neoregelia carolinae and hybrids.
Probably the best known and most popular Neoregelia, it
was named for Caroline Morren, wife of the editor of La
Belgique Horticole. Neo.carolinae was introduced into
horticulture in 1856 by Dr.Regel who sent it to Kew. He had
been attracted by the shiny green rosette with its brilliant
crimson heart. The species comes from the rainforests of
eastern Brazil, from sea level to 1100 metres, varying a lot in
size and coloration. The plant has a broadly spreading rosette
of twenty leaves, 40-60 centimetres in length, usually green to
a delicate bronze. When coming into flower, the centre is
vermilion-red to bright cerise (with little lavender flowers) and
lasts in colour for about a year. One of the most popular
varieties is Neoregelia carolinae var. tn'color with its lovely white
stripes shaded red in good light. There are over sixty cultivars
of Neorege/ia cam/inae listed in the BSI Cultivar Registry,
many of these being in New Zealand. Finally, Neoregelia
caro/inae 'Prlnceps‘ should not be confused with Neoregelia
princeps - a separate and quite different species.
Dave Anderson.
FEBRUARY MEETING NEWS.
February and another good number of members came
along to meeting night. By the number of plants on the trading
table. it was obvious that many people were holding their
plants back to take to the Annual Show at the weekend.
Peter Waters led the discussion on the Show and Tell
plants. First up was Nidulan'um rege/ioides with spotty pink
bracts to be named. This plant is a hybrid between Nidularium
regelioides and rosulatum which in the USA is known as
Nidularium Leprosa. Next was an Aechmea hybrid which was
most probably a cross between recurvata and gamosepala.
Following this was another Aechmea, which with its bulbous
base, was identified as species Aechmea bromeliifolia, then an
Aechmea gracilis x cylindrata or similar. Peter brought in three
different Billbergia amoenas to show the very large variations
within this species. Next followed several Neoregelia hybrids
which, as Peter has said before, are virtually impossible to
identify accurately.
The special raffle prize this month was won by Christine
Primrose, with the door prizes going to Joe Murray, Andy
Horrell and Graham West.
COMPETITIONS.
Open flowering: First Peter Waters with Neo.concentn‘ca x
'Marechalii', second Len Trotman with Guz.Scarlatina. Also in
the competition were Ae.fasciata 'Albomarginata' ; Bill. Bob;
Neotscarolinae tricolor, Sugar & Spice and Superball; and
Nid. billbergioides..
Open foliage: Peter Waters was first with a Vrtgigantea Nova
x Red Chestnut, and second also was Peter Waters with Neo.
Rosy Mom. In the competition were Ananas comosus
variegatus, Hohenbergia, Vn'esea fenestralis, Neo's. Short &
Sweet, Strawberry Roan, Aztec, Royal Burgundy, ampul/acea
and johannis cross.
5
Tlllandsia flowering: Len Trotman was first with Till. Creation
and second Bev Ching with Till.capitata 'Peach'. There were
also on the table Till. cacticola, mazatlanensis and selen’ana.
Tlllandsia foliage: First was Bev Ching's Till.streptophylla,
followed by Lester Ching's Til/filifolia. In the competition were
Til/.grazielae, lat/folia 'Ena no' and magnusiana.
Novice flowering: First was Letitia Thomson with Til/strepto-
phylla, and second was Peter Brady with a Neo. Pinky x
marmorata along with Ae. fasciata, Neo. ‘3 Pink Sensation and
Maggies Pride, Nid. 's RaRu and innocentii var. Iineatum.
Novice foliage: First was Peter Brady with Ae.
lueddemanniana 'Medio Picta' and second was Clive Miller
with W. Corralina together with Bill.vittata, Neamarmorata and
Vnplatynema.
Greenhough Trophy: Peter Waters with Neoregelia
concentrica x 'Marechalii'.
Congratulations to all the winners. Dave Anderson.
NEXT MEETING.
Tuesday, 23rd. /March.
ever 14:34,
, bromellnuls .?
LONGWOOD GARDENS.
from a talk by
Brian Dawson.
Longwood Gardens is on the eastern seaboard of the
United States in the Philadelphia area. This was the country
home of Pierre du Pont. The original planting was begun in
1798 with the first flower beds created in 1907. du Pont was so
pleased with the flowers, and the garden parties held there,
that he contemplated much larger facilities. He had a large
conservatory built, completed in 1921; it was 181 feet wide by
204 feet deep, shaped in a T with a 25 feet high colonnade
around the interior edge. He grew oranges in the main hall
with figs, grapes, melons, nectarines, peaches pineapples and
azaleas, roses and other flowers.
The gardens became world famous and today they are
visited by at least two million people a year. du Pont desired to
establish a "school" where students and others may receive
intruction in the arts of horticulture and floriculture. Today up to
5000 students a year attend classes for amateurs,
professional gardeners and nurserymen. There are 166
fulltime employees and 300 part time workers. By 2005, tens
of millions of dollars will have been spent on restoration as well
as the yearly operating expenses of more than US$
20,000,000. ‘
Of interest to bromeliad growers is the Cascade Garden in
the huge conservatory. It features water cascades splashing
into reflective, clear pools, and lush, rich, textured bromeliads
clinging to the walls and carpeting the ground. Treefern trunks
have been wired to the pillars and are covered in bromeliads
as is the door and roof of the pump and sound effects room.
Thunder can be heard every five minutes and raindrops fall
from the ceiling, which with the heating, creates a warm,
humid environment for the successful growth of the tropical
foliage. The ground under and between the larger plants is
carpeted with cryptanthus.
ANNUAL SHOW RESULTS 1999
1 Aechmea blooming
2 Aechmea foliage
3 Billbergia
4 Crypta nthus
5 Guzmania blooming
6 Guzmania foliage
7 Neoregelia blooming
8 Neoregelia foliage
9 Nidularium
10 Tillandsia sm blooming
11 Tillandsia sm foliage
12 Tillandsia med blooming
13 Tillandsia med foliage
14 Tillandsia lge blooming
15 Tillandsia lge foliage
1 Marie Healey
2 Marie Healey
3 Peter Waters
1 Joe Murray
2 Len Trotman
3 Len Trotman
1 Peter Waters
2 Peter Waters
3 Gill Kesing
1 Joe Murray
2 Joe Murray
. 3 Gill Keesing
1 Peter Waters
2 Len Trotman
3 Len Trotman
1 Peter Waters
2 Len Trotman
3 Peter Waters
1 Marie Henley
Z Len Trotman
3 Peter Waters
1= Graham Alderson
1= Len Trotman
1= Peter Waters
1 Laurie Dephoff
2 Gill Keesing
3 Gill Keesing
1 Jo Elder
2 Win Shorrock
3 Win Shorrock
1 Jo Elder
2 Win Shorrock
3 Win Shorrock
1 Win Shorrock
2 Marie Healey
3 H 81 G Cooke
1 Graham Alderson
2 Win Shorrock
3 Dave Anderson
1 Win Shorrock
2 Peter Waters
3 Dave Anderson
1 Peter Waters
Ae. fasciata 'Silver King'
Ae. fasciata
Ae.Bastantha
Ae. nudicaulis 'Silver Streak'
Ae. Coppertone
Ae. flavorosea
Bill. Ole
Bill. Arribella
Bill. 'Purpurea'
Crypt. Maggie
Crypt. Silver Lining
Crypt. Snakeskin
Guz. Brielle
Guz. Red Star
Guz. Mini Exodus
Guz. lingulata 'Superb'
Guz. Symphonic
Guz. Gisela 'Yellow'
Neo. carolinae tricolor
Neo. concentrica 'Bullis'
Neo. johannis ‘DeRolf'
Neo. Aussie Dream 'Lovely Lady'
Neo. Orange Flush
Neo. cruenta x marmorata
Nid. fulgens 'Orange Bract'
Nid. fulgens hybrid
Nid. hybrid
Till. streptophylla
Till. leiboldiana
Till. mallemontii
Till. tectorum
Till. magnusiana
Till fuchsii
Till. tectorum
Till. harrisii
Till. gymnobotrya
Till. Phoenix
Till. stricta
Till. xerographica
Till. fasciculata 'Hondurensis'
Till. Creation
Till. copanensis
Till. kruseana
16 Vriesea blooming
17 Vriesea foliage
18 Bigeneric or other genus
19 Miniature
20 Variegated
21 Novice blooming
22 Novice foliage
23 Dish or Tray or Novelty
Z4 Bromeliad arrangement
2 5 Artistic arrangement
26 Decorative container
Best Plant of Show
Best Tillandsia
Best Vriesea/Guzmania
Best Novice
Best Arrangement
Best Neoregelia
Most Points in Show
2 Win Shorrock
3 Dave Anderson
1 Jenny Gallagher
2 Len Trotman
3 Len Trotman
1 Peter Waters
2 Peter Waters
3 Graham Alderson
1 Peter Waters
2 Len Trotman
3 Win Shorrock
1 Joe Murray
2 Jenny Gallagher
3 Len Trotman
1 Peter Waters
2 Len Trotman
3 Peter Waters
1 Gay McDonald
2 Megan Thomas
3 Megan Thomas
1 Megan Thomas
2 Megan Thomas
3 Gay McDonald
1 Barbara Murray
2 Gill Keesing
3 Heather Cooke
1 Zena Poulgrain
2 Gill Keesing
3 Bev Ching
1 Barbara Murray
2 Jenny Gallagher
3 Peter Waters
1 Len Trotman
2 Lester Ching
3 Jenny Gallagher
Peter Waters
Peter Waters
Peter Waters
Megan Thomas
Zena Poulgrain
Graham Alderson
Len Trotman
Peter Waters
Peter Waters
Till. kalmbacheri
Till. jalisco-monticola
Vr. heterostachys 'Rubra'
Vr. Eva
Vr. June
Vr. Pahoa Beauty x fosteriana
Vr. King David Kalakaua
Vr. saundersii x bituminosa 'Var'
Ques. marmorata 'Tim Plowman'
Orthophytum gurkenii
X Neomea San Diego
Crypt. bivittatus 'Le Rey'
Dyckia platyphylla
Neo. Short and Sweet
Neo. Dorothy
Neo. (carol x Ptd Lady) x olens
Neo. Pemiento
Neo. concentrica hybrid
Neo. Furnace
Ae. fasciata 'Silver King'
Neo. Red Concentrica
Neo. Maggie's Pride
Neo. cruenta hybrid
Till. Creation
Neo. Peggy's Peach
Ae. Aztec Gold
Ques marmorata 'Tim Plowman'
Tillandsia kruseana
Guzmania Brielle
Neoregelia Red Concentrica
Neo Aussie Dream 'Lovely Lady'
Neoregelia Orange Flush
Neoregelia cruenta x marmorata
BAY OF PLENTY MARCH NEWS.
On March10th. we visited the great layout and presentation
of Anne Stacey and the home and garden of Margaret Craig in
Te Puke. Both places showed off bromeliads very well.
On to the AGM. Jo Elder was presented with a bouquet for
her services as spokesperson for the group since first starting
in 1995.
The officers for 1999 are as follows:
President: lsobelClotworthy .
Secretary: Barry Jones
Treasurer: Lynley Roy
Committee: Jo Elder
Bertha Schollum
Audrey Hewson
Alison Sears
Jo Elder spoke about the New Zealand Bromeliad Show
held in Auckland last month.
BERTIE BROMEL.
Success at last!!! My enquiries re problems with Vn‘esea hiero-
glyphica seed have been helped greatly. (February 1998
journal). On reviewing my methods and heading some of the
tips offered, seed was planted on 5.10.98. There were two lots,
one from Tauranga and the other from Levin, both through the
Seedbank.
As usual I planted them in different mixes. Great germination
occurred but the seedlings in the pelleted sphagnum moss are
growing at twice the speed of the others and are looking
strong. Thanks Bertie for the pellets. i tried dried moss and
even some green moss but the pellets were much better.
Thanks again.
Keith Kerr: Christchurch.
10
SHOW JUDGING REVIEW FEBRUARY 1999.
Congratulations to all those members who exhibited plants
in this year’s show. These were, by and large, up to a very high
standard. There was a record number of over three hundred
plants displayed in the twenty six classes.
The judging for this year‘s show was different from past
years, in that it was split into three sections namely, the
Trllandsias (six classes), Artistic and Floral Arrangements etc.
(four classes) and the remaining bromeliads (sixteen classes)
with different judges for each section.
Although most exhibits were well presented as stated
above, there were a number that were not. These exhibits
were in dirty pots with the plants themselves not cleaned. I can
only emphasize what has been said many times before, firstly,
any person intending to exhibit should read the conditions of
entry as there were mistakes such as plants that were in non-
standard pots etc.
Secondly, I quote from Don Woods excellent article 'A
GROWER‘S GUIDE TO BROMELIAD JUDGING‘ - 1993.
"A must for every serious bromeliad exhibitor is access to the
“HANDBOOK FOR JUDGES, EXHIBITORS & AFFILIATES' - a
Bromeliad Society Inc. publication."
Also do read Don Woods style judging form, in which he
says, "The judging style form is not intended to replace the
training and experience of a respected judge but is an effort on
my part to enable a competent grower to make a reasonable
assessment of which plant helshe should choose to enter in
the next competitive show."
Copies of the ‘Handbook for Judges, Exhibitors & Affiliates'
a Bromeliad Society Inc. publication , and Don Woods 'Style
Judging Form‘ are available in the library.
Dave Anderson.
11
» For the 1999 Annual Competitive Show a new trophy was commissioned to
be presented to the winner of the Best Neoregelia. The eminent New Zealand
artist/sculptor Christine Hellyar, whose work is in many public and private
collections, has created a coloured pati nated bronze of a stylized Neoregelia.
Christine, who is a member of the Bromeliad Society, is better known to
members as Christine Ensor.
The winner for the initial year turned out to be not one but three winners.
The judge, Dave Anderson, said that try as he might he could not separate
the three winning plants and so the trophy will be held in turn by Graham
Alderson of Rangiora, Len Trotrnan and Peter Waters of Auckland.
Photo Margaret Peart.
The Photos below show some of the prizewinning plants at the show. To the
left the winning entries in the Novice Blooming Class. To the light the winning
entries in the Guzmania Blooming Class.
Photos: Graham Alderson.
/ \
MARCH MEETING NEWS.
It was good to see the 56 or so members tum' out for the
AGM which preceded the monthly meeting.
After the Minutes of the last year‘s AGM, the Financial
Statement and the Correspondence were read, the following
officers were elected:
PATRON & LlFE MEMBER Mrs. Bea Hanson
HlSTORlAN & LIFE MEMBER Laurie Dephoff
' PRESIDENT Lester Ching
VICE-PRESIDENTS Des Yeates
Graham West
SECRETARY Dave Anderson
TREASURER Peter Waters
EDITOR Marjorie Lowe
LlBRARlAN Des Yeates
COMMITTEE Bev Ching
Brian Dawson
Glenys Guild
. Gerry Stansfield
AUDITOR D. Persson
AHC Delegates Patricia Sweeney
Bev Ching
The show trophies were then presented. The list of winners is
on pages eight and nine. Following on from the AGM the
General Meeting opened.
The monthly meeting started with a full table in the Show &
Tell section. Andrew Molloy had brought in a Pitcaimia species
which was certainly not Pflammea, as this one had a
Guzmania type flower spike with the typical Pitcaimia "corn"
foliage. Len Trotman had a Guzmania Neon in flower, which
the lighting in the hell did not do justice to, as in natural bright
light its centre is a high neon colour. Graham West had a
Billbergia pyramidal/is stn'ata, a plant that has
14
been .here for eons under this name which it certainly isn't as
its flower hangs down like Billbergia euphemiaell It has been
suggested that this is Bill. Violet Beauty. Graham also had a
Nidulan'um procerum, or a closely related hybrid, in for naming.
Marjorie Lowe and Gerry Stansfleld had also brought in Nid,
procerum (or closely related hybrid) similar to the one above.
Dick Endt had the flowerhead of a Canistrum cyathifonne, one
of a clump he now has out in flower but please note that this is
now Wittrockia cyathiformis. Then followed a succession of
unnamed plants - Aechmea onlandiana, Vriesea carinata and
Neo. Maggies Pride to mention a few.
Dave Anderson and Len Trotman led the discussion on the
plant of the month which this month was winning plants at the
1999 Annual Show.
The special raffle prize this month was the unusual bigeneric
Guzvriesea Jeannie which was won by Laura Gosse with the
door prizes going to Barbara Murray, Len Trotman and Louise
Joyce.
COMPETITIONS.
Open flowering: First was Peter Waters, with Bill. Night Side,
a hybrid made by Don Beadle, and second equal were Peter,
with a Neo.pendula x msea and Len Trotman with Guz.
Empire. Also in the competition were Vr.saundersii, Nid.
Chantrieri and a Neo. German hybrid.
Open foliage: Win Shorrock was first with an Ae.orlandiana
'Ensign' - a large clump of 7 plants in beautiful condition which
is all the more surprising as Win grows this plant in an
unheated plastic house. However she did say that she wraps it
in frostcloth through the winter with practically no water.
Second was Peter Waters' Hohenbergia pennae, a most
unusual bulbous shaped plant. (see illustration in Blooming
Bromeliads) In the competition were Neo’s. Extra Special,
Painted Lady, Memorium, Yang and Raphael.
15
Tillandsia: Peter Waters Till. Creation cyanea x platyrachis),
a recently made hybrid, was first with second being Win
Shorrock with Tillandsia multicaulis. There were also on the
table Till. secunda and multicaulis.
Plant of the month - Billbergia: First was Peter Waters Bill.
Strawberry followed by Win Shorrock Bill. Smokey Rose. In the
competition was Bill. Lilac Time.
Novice flowering: First was Rosemary Thomas with
Nidulan'um innocentii var. lineatum and second equal were
Brian Dawson and Kevin Kilsby. Also in the competition were
Neo/3 ampullacea and Maggies Pride, and Till. hondurensis.
Novlce foliage: First was Brian Dawson with Billvittata and
he was also second with Neo. Royal Robe. Together with Neo.
Aztec.
Greenhough Trophy: Win Shorrock with Ae.orlandiana
'Ensign'.
Congratulations to all the winners. Dave Anderson
NEXT MEETING: Tuesday, 27th. April.
TAURANGA VISIT.
On the 14th. March, a busload (and a car) of Auckland
members made a very comfortable and rapid trip down to
Tauranga. Greeted warmly with coffee and fresh muffins at the
Fishers. our first port of call, we prowled the garden in glorious
weather. So much to see, so little time! (see photo of one
corner on back cover). On to Lynley & Alec Roy where pottery,
succulents and orchids added spice. Then to the Forsyths'
where the view gave the bromeliads considerable competition.
Lunch on the deck at Johanna Elder's and more bromeliads (a
beautiful Nidulan'um Chantrieri in full flower) plus orchids and
~ colourful succulents.
With a second wind from the break, on to Anne Connolly
where there was the most beautifully arranged setting for
Tillandsias with a wonderful selection of complementary plants
16
BROMELIAD SOCIETY of NZ INC
RECEIPTS AND PAYMENTS FOR THE YEAR ENDING 28 FEBRUARY 1999
RECEIPTS:
Balance at Westpac 1/3/98
Subscriptions
Plant sales (nett)
Raffles (nett)
Supper takings (nett)
Sales table
Door
Show door takings
Show tea sales (nett)
Seed sales
Advertising
Interest
- Plant auction
Excess Receipts
$6,049.06
3,037.25
6,044.65
1,533.60
62.80
115.54
293.00
4,135.00
110.20
93.00
79.50
311.54
613.00.
$22,478.14
$5,527.18
Treas er:
PAYMENTS:
Bulletin
Bulletin postage
Book purchases (nett)
Hall hire
Stationery & petty cash
Honoraria
Auditor
88] subs
Advertising
AHC levy
Prizegiving
Show rentals
Show advertising
Show expenses
Show dinner expenses
Increase in Term Deposit
Cash on hand
Balance at Westpac 28/2/99
$4,009.51
1,160.19
852.98
550.00
244.76
675.00
70.00
128.00
148.50
53.10
184.87
1,100.00
688.93
911.06
125.00
1.1 67.77
12.1 18.25
-‘I ,709.78
522.478.14
both in colour and form. Small river pebbles were used as a
textured ground cover and the wall behind the mounted
Tillandsias was painted a soft celadon green making a lovely
contrast.
And of course there were bromeliads everywhere.
Our last call was on Kevin and Bertha Schollum. The smell of
ripe grapes and the ingenious use of an old clothes hoist
which had been turned into a plastic house complete with
ready made supports for hanging baskets, were easily
remembered. And of course more bromeliads.
The carriage was waiting, and so we all piled back on board for
the return trip, most with some souvenir. A great day for all.
17
BROMELIAD SOCIETY of NZ INC
FINANCIAL POSITION AS AT 28 FEBRUARY 1999
Accumulated Funds $20,345.94
This is represented by:
Current Assets Cash on hand 12,118.25
Current account —1 ,709.78
Term Deposits 5,175.53 15,584.00
Stock on hand Books 886.50
Spoons & badges 34.50
Pots 8: labels 15.04
Stock in transit Books 1,1 89.46 2,125.50
1 7,709.50
Less Current Liabilities
Subscriptions in advance 624.25
$17,085.25
Non-Current Assets less 10% depreciation
Trophies 427.50
Library and slides 255.28
Speaker and microphones 1,535.36
Calc/stapler/briefcases 71 .84
Projector 404.99
Show signs & carpet 565.72 3,260.69
$20,345.94
THE OPINIONS EXPRESSED IN LETTERS OR ARTICLES IN THIS
MAGAZINE ARE THE AUTHORS' OWN VIE\NS AND DO NOT
NECESSARILY EXPRESS THE POLICY OF THE BROMELIAD
SOCIETY OF NEW ZEALAND.
18
BASICS FOR BEGINN ERS.
Gathering and potting pups.
Len Trotman.
Bromeliads reproduce themselves in two ways; by seed
production and by offsets, or pups as they are commonly
called. Seed production is quite difficult in some cases and will
be dealt with later. Reproduction from offsets is the easier way
and can be accomplished successfully by following a few
simple rules.
Some believe that pups should only be taken off during the
spring when plants are in active growth. I always take them off
when they are large enough, usually about one third to one
half the size of the parent. Although, the longer they are left
the greater the chance that the pup will have started a root
system.
Most pups are quite easy to remove from the parent, but
others, such as vrieseas, Guzmania sanguinea, and some
tillandsias, tend to produce pups close to the inflorescence
and this requires the leaves to be stripped back to get at the
base of the pup.
Pups can be removed with a sharp knife, small saw or
secateurs. Cut the pup as close as possible to the parent. In
some cases they can be wrenched off, but make sure that
they are not cut or wrenched too short. The base of the pup
should be quite firm. If it is too soft, which is quite often the
case with vrieseas, put the pup in a dry clay pot until the base
has calloused.
Pot the pup in an appropriate sized container using a good,
open potting mix; deep enough to hold the pup firmly because
they tend not to make a root system if they wobble about.
Include a plant label in the pot with the CORRECT name
(some people also like to include the date) and place in a
warm, shady spot until it has rooted. Then treat as a mature
plant.
19
ANNOUNCEMENTS.
New members: Welcome to our new members, we hope that
you enjoy your time with the Society.
Bev. Wade & Kelly Omeara, Wade Rd.,RD1, Howick, Ak.
Jane Aro & Pat Theobold, 79 Edmund St, St.Heliers Bay, Ak.
Ruth Baird, 518 South Titirangi Roaad, Titirangi, Ak.
Mrs.J.Brown, 71 Watling Street, Epsom, Ak.
Patrick & Alex Callesen, 32 Pentland Ave., MtEden, Ak.
Maureen Cotter, Box 8113, Cherrywood, Tauranga.
Anne Davidson & Tony Ogle, 20 Tuarangi Rd.,Grey Lynn,Ak.
Anthony Davies & Andrea du Chatenier, 14 Alexander Street,
Kingsland, Ak.
Di Deutsch, 417 Riddeli Road, Glendowie, Ak.
Graeme Foden, 22 Cebalo Place, Mt.WeIlington, Ak.
Anne Gale, 5 Lynwood Place, Tauranga.
Gwynneth Glentworth, Glenmyst, RD5, Tauranga.
David and Betty Goss, 40a Duncansby Road, Whangaparoa.
Jude Hay, Box 117, Te Kopuru, Northland.
Jocelyn Hosie, 453 Pyes Pa Road,RD3, Tauranga.
Louise Joyce, 53 Selbourne Street, Grey Lynn, Ak.
Mary King, 30 Greenhithe Road, Greenhithe, Ak.
Luis Lachica & Jeff Saunders, 59 Edenvale Cres.Mt.Eden, Ak.
Shirley Litchfield, 2115 Main Road, RD7, Te Puke.
Murray & Connie Mathieson, 14 Matanui Street, Northcote, Ak.
Alan & Joan Oates, 5 Gargan Road, Tauriko,RD1, Tauranga.
Carrol Pearce, 30 Telstar Place, Beachhaven, Ak.
Margaret Peart, 140a Ireland Road, Mt.We|lington, Ak
Gloria Pointon, 83 Gledstane Road, Whangaparoa.
John Prince, 219 South Head Road, Parkhurst, RD1,
Helensville.
Dana Roberts, 330 Motutara Road, Muriwai Beach, Ak.
Don Semple, 49 Union Street, Howick, Ak.
Simon Stiles & David Tippett, 134 Williamson Avenue, Grey
Lynn, Ak.
20
Letitia Thomson, 2/40 Pakuranga Rd.,Pakuranga, Ak.
Val Warren, 40 Fairview Rd.,Papatoetoe,Ak. (rejoining)
Ruth Webb, 190 Mellons Bay Rd., Howick,Ak.
K.Whitbread-Edwards, 5 Harold Lane. Rifle Range Rd..
Hamilton.
Anne White, 338 Church Rd, Taradale.
MEMBERSHIP RENEWALS.
These are now overdue. Please remit to the Treasurer,
Peter Waters, 22 Halfmoon Rise, Bucklands Beach, Auck.
BAY OF PLENTY APRIL NEWS.
On April 14th. we first looked at the new setup of Margaret
Mangos. it was previously an unused glasshouse 45it.x 15ft.
and now she has had 3/4 of it shaded and 1/4" glass installed.
With a meandering boardwalk from end to end, the plants are
mostly in pots and planted in bark on top of weedoloth.
Altogether a very nice presentation of bromeliads.
Then to Jill Forsyth for our meeting which went according to
order, as we now have an executive committee in place.
The Show & Tell produced some exciting plants.
Johanna Elder - Guzmania sanguinea, Neo. 'Meyendorffii'
Spineless, Neo.meladonta, Til/.multicau/is. Bertha Schollum -
Neoregelia kautskyi. Audrey Hewson - Till. matudae. Isobel
Clotworthy - Till. fuchsii. Kevin Schollum - Neo. Peppermint
Stick and pauciflora (more like ampul/acea) but made
interesting growth in 16 months.
Raffle plants won by Jill Forsyth and Bertha Schollum.
Next meeting: On May 12th. 1pm. at Shirley Lichfleld‘s, 2115
Main Road, TePuke and then to Barry Jones, 11 Norrie Street,
TePuke.
Kevin Schollum.
21
MEETINGS.
Held on the FOURTH Tuesday of each month except
December, at Greyfriars Church Hall, 544 Mt.Eden Road,
Auckland, at 7:30 pm.
MEMBERSHIP SUBSCRIPTIONS.
New Zealand NZ$20.00 Ordinary
NZ$ 5.00 Associate (same household)
Overseas NZ$25.00 Airmail Australia
NZ$30.00 Airmail USA & other overseas
Send all payments to the Treasurer, Peter Waters, 22
Halfmoon Rise, Bucklands Beach, AUCKLAND.
CORRESPONDENCE.
All general correspondence should be sent to the Secretary,
Bromeliad Society of New Zealand, 33 Marsden Avenue,
Mt.Eden, AUCKLAND 4.
Please send articles, photographs and advertisements to the
Editor, PO Box 91-728, AUCKLAND. Phone/Fax (09)376-6874
Deadline for copy is the SECOND Tuesday in each month.
ADVERTISING RATES.
Full page $15.00 ($13.50)
Half page $ 8.50 ($ 7.65)
Quarter page $ 4.25 ($ 3.85)
Eighth page $ 2.00 ($ 1.80)
Prices in brackets are for a minimum of six issues per year.
22
OFFICERS.
PATRON AND
LIFE MEMBER -Mrs.Bea Hanson (09)527-6830
HISTORIAN AND
LIFE MEMBER Laurie Dephoff (09)527-7789
PRESIDENT Lester Ching (09)576-4595
VICE-PRESIDENTS Des Yeates (09)838-6535
Graham West (09)298-3479
SECRETARY Dave Anderson (09)638-8671
TREASURER Peter Waters (09)534-5616
EDITOR Marjorie Lowe (09)376-6874
LIBRARIAN Des Yeates (09)838-6535
COMMITTEE Bev Ching (09)576-4595
Glenys Guild (09)810-9669
Brian Dawson (09)837-4598
Gerry Stansfield (09)834-7178
AUDITOR Dawn Persson ,
AHC DELEGATES Patricia Sweeney, Bev Ching.
LIFE MEMBERS
Harry Martin,
Patricia Perratt
Patricia Sweeney
SCIENTIFIC
OFFICER Peter Waters
JOURNAL Dave Anderson (club news)
Bev Ching (distribution)
Peter Waters (technical)
BACK COVER.
In a shady corner of Gladys and Harry Fisher's
Tauranga garden, bromeliads are integrated with native,
subtropical and tropical plants. lmmaculately groomed,
healthy and lush the entire garden is a fascinating place
to explore with interesting finds around every corner.
Photo: Margaret Peart

 

BROMELIAD s:::g9::.4
Society of New Zealand Inc.
BROMELIAD SOCIETY OF NEW ZEALAND (INC).
Affiliated with the Bromeliad Society International.
The Society was formed on the 28th. August, 1962.
The objects of the society are to encourage the cultivation and
study of bromeliads grown indoors or outdoors and in particular -
(a) To promote discussion and arrange instruction on cultiv-
vation, propagation and control of diseases.
(b) To provide a library for members.
(c) To assist members to identify plants.
(d) To make awards for outstanding new bromeliads.
(e) To hold shows or public exhibitions.
(f) To promote the distribution of bromeliads amongst
members by exchange, purchase and sale, and to
encourage the importation of new plants.
(9) To affiliate with any Society or other body,and to do
such things as may be deemed necessary or desirable
in the furtherence of these objects.
(h) To accept affiliation from other Societies having similar
objects.
FRONT COVER
Ananas comosus var. variegatus
This plant was originally purchased as an offset in 1967 from a
Paris nurseryman, Marcel le Couffle. It was then called Ananas
sativus variegata.
It was planted in a ponga pot until 1971, then in
the ground inside the glasshouse. It first flowered and fruited in
1985 when a large plant with leaves 1200mm.(4ft.) long. Fruit
ripened in February 1986 with plantlets top and bottom. The
stump of the plant, with large offset, was left in the ground. The
stem grew longer, lying on the surface, until 1998 when it flowered
again. The fruit only had leaves at the top - cut off top now
growing again - and one large offset below the fruit also growing
well. Very cool growing conditions ( a few frosts most years) are
the cause of slow fruiting. Full sun, more warmth = faster fruiting.
Photo/text: Laurie Dephoff
CONTENTS
4 President's Report Lester Ching
5,6 May meeting news Dave Anderson
7—9 May talk - Soft green leafed tillandsias Marjorie Lowe
10-13 Solving the Fireball mystery Nat de Leon
12 Fireball up to date Peter Waters
14 Andrew Flower - tribute Keith & Maureen Green
15 Bay of Plenty news Kevin Schollum
16 Whangarei Bromeliad Group Jacqui O'Connell
17 Wellington Tillandsia Group Phyl Purdie
18 Meetings, membership, correspondence
and advertising
19 Officers
COMING EVENTS
JUNE 22nd Auckland meeting 7:30pm. Talk- Vrieseas in
flower Monthly plant com petition- mounted
plants.
JUNE 27th. Whangarei Bromeliad Group at Colin & Iris
Simmonds, 4 Crawford Crescent, Kamo.
JULY 14th. Bay of Plenty meet at 1:30pm at the Tauranga
Yacht Club.
' JULY 25th. Wellington Tillandsia Group meet at 1:30pm. at
Myra & Maurice Tarr, 32 Plunket Ave., Petone.
M Whangarei Bromeliad Group at Allan & Bev
Baxter's new home in Mains Avenue.
JULY 27th. Auckland meeting 7:30pm. Talk- pollination &
hybridization Monthly plant competition-
Nidulariums.
AUGUST 11th.
Bay of Plenty meet at 1:30pm at the Tauranga
Yacht Club.
AUGUST
26th - 30th. Bromeliads X Cairns
PRESIDENT'S REPORT
Another excellent month with 64 members attending (two
months in a row). Fantastic support and congratulations to
everyone.
Next month there will be a large range of pots at excellent
' prices for sale. Take advantage of these deals that your Society
can obtain.
The Novice competition tables need an injection of
enthusiasm. Someone is going to win this section each month and
it could be you, so bring along your best plants.
Don't forget - if cups of tea during the break are to continue.
assistance is needed to serve and clean up.
An excellent array of plants for sale at the May meeting. We
are looking fonivard to maintaining this standard.
it was good to see members arriving early and having their
competition plants on the tables. Well done, please keep it up.
This month's thought:
What is a weed? A plant whose virtues have not yet been
discovered.
Lester Ching
Plant loss deVastates
THAMES. Zoe De’Ath was devas-
tated to find 40 valuable bromeliad
plants and a stag horn fern had
been stolen from her garden on
Thursday night. .
It was the fourth time plants had
been taken from her Parawai prop-
erty in 21/2 years. The plants were
worth over $1000 and the culprit
obviously has plant knowledge, she
says.
“It’s somebody that knows some-
thing about them because they are
4
picking out the dearest and best
ones. I was very sad.”
She believes it is the same person '
each time and has stepped up her
security measures.
The keen gardener spends most of
her time in her prized garden.
“If you have a neighbour or friend
that is gradually accumulating a
good collection of beautifully grown
tropical bromeliad plants contact
the Thames Police.”
MAY MEETING NEWS
Another large number of members attended our monthly
meeting with quite a few new members coming along. Everyone
seemed to enjoy the proceedings with some participating in a cup
of tea at the break - thanks to those who organised it. We hope it
will be ongoing during the winter months.
Peter Waters led the discussion on the Show & Tell plants.
This started with an Aechmea coe/estis albomarginata, a plant
that Des Yeates had wanted a name for. Next up, a Neoregelia
hybrid with brown marks on the leaves that could have been
caused by cold or drips from tanalised timber. It is unlikely to be
the cold, as the weather in Auckland so far this winter has been
temperate. A word of warning for people with tanalised timber
pergolas etc. is that they still drip lethal fluids (for bromeliads),
even if they are painted. A Tillandsia ponderosa in full flower was
brought in for display. The plant had been growing outdoors in
Auckland and showed some signs of cold damage but still looked
magnificent with its one metre high spike. Peter Waters had
brought in two bigenerics, Guzvn'esea Marian Oppenheimer
(Guzmania lingulata x Vriesea Viminalis-Rex) and Neomea
Sandra Jean Antle (Neoregelia 'Red Devil' x Aechmea
'Pickaninny'), both quite unusual. A member tabled an Aechmea
hybrid which appeared to be Aechmea caudata x calyculata. A
very small Tillandsia, which had hardly grown over the last two
years, was brought in by Brian Dawson. This plant is Tillandsia
xiphioides being 8—10mm overall in its adult form. Finally there
were two Aechmea nudicaulis which are easily identified with the
kink part way down the leaf.
Marjorie Lowe gave a very interesting talk on green leafed
tillandsias.
The special raffle prize this month was won by Sue
Schatzdorfer with the door prizes going to Barbara Murray, Glenys
Guild and Tony Bishop.
The opinions expressed in letters or articles in this magazine are
the authors' own views and do not necessarily express the policy
of the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand.
16 5
COMPETITIONS
Open flowering: First Len Trotman with Guz. Fireworks and
second was Lester Ching with Guz. Orangeade. Also in the
competition were Aechmeas pumurea-rosea & recurvata var.
benrathii, Guzmania Iingulata 'Superb Variegata', Neo’s. olens x
compacta and Inferno, and Vriesea saundersii x Grande.
Open foliage: Peter Waters was first with a Neo. Royal Hawaiian,
and 2nd. equal were Peter Waters with an Alcantarea imperialis
and Len Trotman with Neo. Tangerine. In the competition were '
Neo’.s Burbank x carolinae x chlorosticta, hybrid and Picolo, '
Vn'esea ospinae 'Gruberi'.
Tillandsia flowering: Win Shorrock's Till. stn'cta with 4 flowers
was first, with second going to Joe Murray's Till. punctulata with
six flower heads. Also on the table were Tillandsias - capitata
'Guatemala’, cyanea, duratii, gardneri, orogenes, pueblensis,
tectorum and streptophy/la.
Plant of the month - Aechmea nudicaulis: First was Dave
Anderson's cv. 'Silver Streak' followed by Win Shorrock's var.
cuspidata. In the competition were about a dozen varied entries of
Aechmea nudicaulis.
Novice flowering: First was Kevin Kilsby with a Tillandsia
velutina and Tony Bishop's Aechmea recurvata was second. Also
in the competition were Ae. recurvata, Neo. olens Vulcan x
cruenta, Neomea Strawberry and Nid. amazonica.
Novice foliage: First was Brian Dawson with Neo. Sharlock, who
was also second with a Neo. Laebee, together with Ae. nudicaulis
and Vriesea hieroglyphica.
Greenhough Trophy: Len Trotman with Guzmania Fireworks.
Congratulations to all the winners. Dave Anderson
Monthly competition table
June: mounted plants
July: Nidulariums
August: Aechmea recurvata & hybrids
September: hanging baskets
NEXT MEETING Tuesday, 22nd. June.
MAY TALK
Soft green leafed Tillandsias
Marjorie Lowe
Just as there are grey leafed vrieseas that look like tillandsias
so there are soft green leafed tillandsias that look like vrieseas.
What attracted me, a lifelong grower of natives, subtropical and
tropical plants, was lush(ish) foliage, the striking inflorescences
and/or longlasting colour of some plants.
Most of the ones available here seem to come mainly from
Central America. Tillandsia dyeriana, from Ecuador at 100 metres
and Tillandsia wagnen'ana from Amazonian Peru obviously need
the warmth of a glasshouse to flourish. The following can however
be grown outside if frost free and sheltered from cold winds.
Tillandsia complanata: an epiphyte from the Antilles, Costa
Rica to Bolivia, Northern Brazil in forests at 800-3500 metres.
Needs semi-shade, moisture. Does not send out offshoots easily
(one clone has pups) but keeps growing, flowering most of the
year. Highly variable in size, colour and number of flowering
spikes from the leaf axils, which flowers year after year. Not
showy, but appealing over a very long period.
Tillandsia deppeana: from Mexico, West Indies to Colombia
and Ecuador in rain forests, open woodland and grasslands at 400
- 3300 metres. Needs fast drainage, light but not continuous sun,
summer shade. The tall much branched inflorescence has large
bright red bracts that form all the way up the spike with bright
violet blue petals. Very striking and longlasting, when the red
fades the spike turns a yellowish green attractive in its own right.
Takes 3—4 years to flower from a good pup. Good hybrids and
cultivars are available.
Tillandsia imperialis: from Mexico, epiphytic in oak forests at
1300-2700 metres. Needs semi-shade, very moist with cool
nights. The rosette has many leaves, about 600m. across, lovely
form. The red inflorescence stands about 200m. above the foliage
and has bright purple petals. Flowering time is about
five years from a good, healthy pup or seven to eight from a small
one. These are traditional Christmas gifts in Mexico as they look
rather like giant red candles. However they are available in the
markets in spring and autumn so the blooming season is long and
variable. Photograph top opposite.
Tillandsia Ieiboldiana: from southern Mexico to Costa Rica,
epiphytic in forests from near sea level up to 2600 metres. Needs
moisture and semishade, and very good in baskets. It is a small
plant, not much more than 200m. in diameter with bright, light
green leaves often blotched with red. Scarlet bracts, purple petals
to 600m. high. One year to flowering, and effective if well grown.
There are 4-5 different kinds.
Tillandsia multicaulis: from southern Mexico to Panama,
epiphytic in dark, humid mist forests, at 1500 to 2500 metres.
Needs shade, moisture and cool nights. The unusual thing about
multicaulis that it has in common with complanata, is that there
are several lateral infiorescences from the leaf axils and there can
be as many as eight. Flowering stops growth in the centre of the
plant. The flower spikes come in both red and orange and look not
unlike goldfish (similar to some vrieseas). When the colour fades,
like deppeana, the spike slowly turns yellowish green to gold and
remains looking good for a long time. Pups usually flower in a
year and at about the same time, autumn, with bright blue petals.
The photograph opposite, bottom, shows it growing in lowish light
on the ground under palms in Gordon Waddell's garden.
Tillandsia guatemalensis: see page 19 and back cover.
WANTED TO BUY
Plants or pups
Nidularium fulgens, Canistropsis (Nidularium) billbergioides
Vriesea hieroglyphica and fosteriana
Aechmea gamosepala and nudicaulis variegata, Mary Hyde
Neoregelias...carolinae, compacta and concentrica plus
Fireball
COLIN FERGUSON (09) 445-8686
8
a n . “ - .
SOLVING THE FIREBALL MYSTERY
Nat de Leon
In 1959, I wrote to a Mr.Walter Doering of Sao Vicente Brazil, 7
in the state of Sao Paulo. Mr.Doering was primarily an orchid
collector who had earlier written an article on the bromeliads of his
area for The Bromeliad Society Bulletin, the forerunner of the
Journal of the Bromeliad Society.
During that time, I wrote to whoever I could in the hope of being
able to purchase or trade for new bromeliads not already in
cultivation. In this instance, I was primarily interested in buying at
least half-grown plants of Vriesea gigantea and Vn’esea hiero-
glyphica. He had several other species I was interested in as well.
Once Mr.Doering had confirmed that he would sell me the plants, I
enquired about the possibilty of buying other species as well, even
if he had only a few plants of each. He replied that yes, he did
have others but that they were unidentified. I then suggested that
all such un—identified plants be numbered so that we had a
common reference point to refer to on any specific plant in the
future. I would grow the plants to flowering, have them identified
and, should they prove ornamental enough, I would order
additional plants by name and number. Mr. Doering was agreeable
to this.
Correspondence was slow and Mr.Doering needed time to
collect and prepare the plants for shipment. This was no small
order. In March, 1960, almost a year after my initial enquiry, the
plants arrived. There were more than two hundred plants in the
shipment. Losses were heavy, particularly of Vnhieroglyphica.
Only eight out of some fifty large plants survived. Losses of other
species occurred also but were far less severe.
This shipment proved to be very important, for it represented
the first bromeliad introduction into American horticulture of the
following species: aituminosa, the large form of Vrtincurvata
then Vnrostmm-aquilae, Vnensifonnis, Vnflammea, Vr.erythro-
dactilon, Vnphillipocoburgii, Vnscalaris, Vr. vagans, Nidulan'um
msulatum, Nid.mbens, Nid.mtilans, Neoregelia doeringiana, a
new species to be named Neo.maculata and our mystery plant,
Neo. 'Fireball.’ 10
Only one of the four plants, later to be called Neo. 'Fireball'
survived. As I remember it, the smallish plant was almost all
green, with a faint hint of red, when received. Mr. Doering
remarked about the plant in the brief note he sent with the 7
unidentified plants. "Neoregelia or Aechmea, small plant, all
mahogany colored. Flowers not yet seen." After the plant started
to grow, exposed to the great Florida light, the mahogany color
continued to intensify. Before long it sent out its first offset,
revealing its stoloniferous habit.
The late Ralph Davis and l were rather close bromeliad
buddies. As long as either of us had more than one of any given
plant, his plants were my plants and vice-versa. We lent one
another plants for hybridizing or selfing. We also collaborated on
several importation ventures. Ralph visited me one day and
almost swallowed his cigar but when he first saw my mystery
plant. Of course Ralph had to have one and since by that time the
plant already had two offsets, the first vegetative propagation took
place. Since I was concerned about confusion in plant names
even in those days, I made Ralph promise he would not part with
any plants until it flowered and I could have it identified.
Several years passed and the stocks of the mystery plant were
getting quite large but there was still no sign of flowering. In the
meantime, many people were starting to pester Ralph for a plant,
which made it great 'trade bait'. I didn't have that problem since at
that time I grew most of my bromeliads at the Parrot Jungle, away
from public view. Ralph wanted to start letting some plants go and
I agreed, provided we gave the plant a temporary name. Ralph
told me that every time he referred to the plant, he called it Neo.
'Fireball‘ and I told him "That's a great name, let's call it tha The
rest is history.
During the latter part of 1966, l was getting ready to treat some
Neo.carolinae plants with calcium carbide to induce flowering.
Just for the hell of it, I decided to treat a single mature plant of
'Fireball' as well. In February of 1967, I saw my first 'Fireball'
flower ever. I had waited eight years to see this. By contrast, I had
flowered and had identified all of the other unidentified plants in
the importation group.
During those eight years, I wrote to Mr. Doering several times,
hoping to be able to order more 'Fireballs' and other
11
FIREBALL
Neoregelia Fireball is now widely cultivated and is one of the favourite basket
or clumping specimen plants. It grows well in New Zealand and if given high
light will reward the grower with many plants on stolons of 75-100mm. (3-4")
in length and of a glowing dark red colour. ‘Fireball’ has the characteristic of
very shiny leaves and bestows this trait on all of its hybrids. It has been
demonstrated that seed sown from Fireball produces identical plants and it
is widely accepted that it is a specimen, even though not officially described.
It has not yet been rediscovered in the wild and it is possible that the
populations have been destroyed in the clearing of the forest for farmland.
Peter Waters
The photograph shows a large clump of Fireball covering a very big treefem
trunk. Photo: Avon Ryan
12
"
a n . “ - .
species as well. I had also hoped to obtain information for Dr.
Lyman Smith on collection sites for the various species being
identified, but I never heard from Mr. Doering again.
My records show that on February 28, 1967 I sent the first
flowering 'Fireball' plant to Dr. Smith for identification. lt bore my
number P.130. I have a letter of confirmation of that specimen,
saying that it needed further study. Years later, I have yet to
receive any word of its status. I was told by several people that the
National Herbarium does not have a speciman of 'Fireball'. I can
only assume it somehow got misplaced or perhaps included in the
file of some other neoregelia.
During the last decade or so, Neo. 'Fireball' has been a point of
much confusion. It has been assumed to be a hybrid. This is
understandable as many people in horticulture assume a plant is
a hybrid if it does not have a latinized name. Yet there is nothing
wrong with giving an unidentified species a temporary name. I
have sometimes used the name of the town or area a plant was
collected from as a reference point. One of the plants from this
collection l called Nid. saopaulo. It was later identified as Nid.
rutilans. Yet I still see plants around labeled Nid. Sao Paulo and it
is usually referred to as a hybrid, which it is not.
Bob Wilson also used this method of identification. Plants he
sold as Neo. Tingua were later identified as Neo. carolinae. Plants
he sold as Aechmea Tingua turned out to be Ae. lingulata. The
name Tingua referred to the town in Brazil near which he collected
the plants.
A few years ago, the name Neo. schultziana was being applied
to 'Fireball'. How this started I don't know. The name is not listed
in Dr. Smith's monograph.
While I am still hopeful that Neo. 'Fireball' will someday be
properly named, l have not pursued the matter. After twenty six
years, it would be difficult to refer to Neo. 'Fireball‘ by any other
name.
Reprinted from the Florida Council of Bromeliad Societies
1987 newsletter.
Reprinted in 1998 by the Florida Council of Bromeliad Societies.
Editor's comment-"It is now 38 years and the mystery remains.”
13
ANDREW FLOWER
15.5.99
The Secretary,
Bromeliad Society of New Zealand
Auckland.
Dear Dave,
We would like to pay tribute to Andrew Flower who
recently finished being editor of the Bulletin. He certainly made a
great contribution as editor and set a high standard by making the
magazine more attractive, informative and interesting. He is of
course very knowledgeable regarding bromeliads having grown
them for many years and was probably the first to sell bromeliads
by mail order at the beginning of the 19805. His setting up of the
New Zealand seed bank a few years ago was certainly
appreciated by many people.
Best regards,
Keith & Maureen Green
PDC, Maungakaramea,
Whangarei.
TILLANDSIA SEEDLINGS
butzii, fuchsii f.gracilis, geminiflora,lepidosepala*,plumosa*, seideliana“,
schiedeana, streptocarpa, stricta Brazil, velickiana, xiphioides*. Those
marked * very few. Minimum height or spread 24mm. however some are
more than 50mm except xiphioides 15mm. Unmounted - available on a
first come first served basis. All @ $2.50 each - plus $5.00 for postage.
I grow over 100 different species and have divisions of quite a few
available. These are at $6.00 to $7.50 each unmounted. Send a want
list and stamped addressed envelope and I'll let you know what i can
provide.
NORMAN SMITH, 26 RUGBY STREET, LEVIN. (06) 367-9160
14
BAY OF PLENTY JUNE NEWS
The meeting began with a visit to Alec and Lynley Roys'
garden where the bromeliads nestled among the ferns, and
pottery glistened after the rain and looked marvellous.
Our new winter venue at the Tauranga Yacht Club proved ideal
, and what a magnificent view.
The display table was full to overflowing, and at future
meetings, we plan to have a competition as well.
Jo Elder gave a short talk on bigeneric bromeliads and brought
along a most attractive selection of her own plants to illustrate her
talk -
Neotanthus - Firefoam and Waffle
Neomea - Strawberry and Magenta Star
Neophytum - Firecracker and Ralph Davis
Neo/arium - Souvenir de Casmir Morobe
Next meeting: 1:30pm.14th. July at Tauranga Yacht Club rooms.
Please bring plants for display.
WANTED TO BUY
Mature bromeliads
NEOREGELIAS
large concentrica varieties
Fireball varieties
princeps and varieties
VRlESEAS
fosteriana and varieties
Red Chestnut and varieties
hieroglyphica and varieties
fenestralis and varieties
CASH BUYERS
Bev and Lester Ching
Phone (09) 576-4595 Auckland.
15
WHANGAREI BROMELIAD GROUP
Thirteen members and one visitor attended the May meeting
of the Whangarei Bromeliad Group who travelled over to
Arapohue, a couple of kilometres south of Dargaville, on an
absolutely beautiful autumn day. We visited Rosy and Gordon
Speedy's garden at their dairy farm. Rosi is an avid collector of
rare and interesting plants as well as having a rather good
collection of bromeliads. The Speedy farm has been in the family
for many, many years and has a large garden which Rosie tells us
has changed considerably over the years. Gone are the annuals,
perennials and roses favoured by her mother-in-law. The soil is
very fast draining and water is a problem in the summer months
so cacti, succulents and bromeliads thrive out in the open under
the shelter of established trees.
The Speedys have spent some time collecting pieces of old
puriri branches and roots which are stunning for mounting
bromeliads, especially tillandsias. Many of these pieces are
twisted and gnarled into fantastic shapes and look great in the
garden. Puriri, for those of you further south, is an extremely hard
wood which has often been attacked by the native puriri moth,
whose larvae burrow in the wood leaving holes and tunnels. All
our cars went home loaded with branches which will be put to
good use.
The Whangarei group is extremely lucky to have Maureen and
Keith Green as members, so if we need information about growing
or identifying plants, we have our experts on hand to lead the
discussion. Jacqui O'Connell
Next meetimg: June 27th. at Colin & Iris Simmonds, 4 Crawford
Crescent, Kamo.
BIG POTS FOR BIG BROMS
l have about two dozen used clay and fluted concrete pots
approximately 18-30cm. (7-12") in diameter surplus to
requirements. If anyone is interested please contact
LAURIE DEPHOFF (09) 527-7789 or 1/22 Lunn Ave.
Mt.Wellington.
16 5
WELLINGTON TILLANDSIA GROUP
Nine members met on the afternoon of the 25th. May at Phyllis
and Bruce Purdie's home.
Plants shown and discussed were:
Till. cacticola: the growing top had been broken off and offsets
had developed from this point. One of these had been dislodged.
Although small, it was recommended mounting it on wood and
watering more than usual.
Till. comarataensis: two plants were compared. One was tinged
red on the leaves and flower bracts. It was grown in sunshine in a
plastic greenhouse. The second plant was a grey/green hue and
had been grown under shadecloth over summer. Both were
flowering.
Till. punctulata: shown last meeting, this now had the flower open
- tubular, purple and white, produced on a Vriesea-like green floral
bract above a red stem bract. The total colouring was very
attractive. The grower was trying Magamp on the soil.
A Vriesea elata had its three centre leaves completely fused
together into a cylinder which had coiled. Although its appearance
was attractive, no reason could be found for this occurrence and
the following leaf showed signs of being normal.
A second Vriesea had pale brown blotches, edged with darker
colour, on the leaves. The cause was possibly waterdrops from
condensation acting as lenses in the sunshine.
Till. tectorum displaying soft pink flower bracts should be kept high
up in good light.
Till. leiboldiana var. guttata: potted, in flower. Most noticeable
were the bright red flower bracts and the leaves blotched wine on
green. This Tillandsia may be placed in another genus.
Till. lotteae from Bolivia is now extinct in the wild. it had a Vriesea
type yellow flower bract producing yellow flowers which opened
out with recurved petals.
Till. Iatifolia var. divaricata, 2.7m.(9ft)!! in length to the end of the
inflorescence, had produced its first flowers. A variable species.
pups can be produced either along the stem or at the end.
Phyl Purdie (continued next month)
17
MEETINGS.
Held on the FOURTH Tuesday of each month except
December, at Greyfriars Church Hall, 544 Mt.Eden Road,
Auckland, at 7:30 pm.
MEMBERSHIP SUBSCRIPTIONS
New Zealand NZ$20.00 Ordinary
NZ$ 5. 00 Associate (same household)
Overseas NZ$25. 00 Airmail Australia
NZ$30. 00 Airmail USA & other overseas
Send all payments to the Treasurer, Peter Waters, 22 Halfmoon
Rise, Bucklands Beach, AUCKLAND.
CORRESPONDENCE
All general correspondence should be sent to the Secretary,
Bromeliad Society of New Zealand, 33 Marsden Avenue,
Mt.Eden, AUCKLAND 4.
Please send articles, photographs and advertisements to the
Editor, PO Box 91-728, AUCKLAND. Phone/Fax (09)376-6874
Deadline for copy is the SECOND Tuesday in each month.
ADVERTISING RATES
Full page $15.00 ($13.50)
Half page $ 8.50 ($ 7.65)
Quarter page $ 4.25 ($ 3.85)
Eighth page $ 2.00 ($ 1.80)
Prices in brackets are for a minimum of six issues per year.
Advertisements must be bromeliad related.
18
OFFICERS
PATRON & LIFE MEMBER Mrs. Bea Hanson (09)527-6830
HISTORIAN & LIFE MEMBER Laurie Dephoff (09)527-7789
PRESIDENT Lester Ching (09)576-4595
VICE-PRESIDENTS Des Yeates (09)838—6535
Graham West (053)298-3479
SECRETARY Dave Anderson (09)638-8671
TREASURER Peter Waters (09)534-5616
EDITOR Marjorie Lowe (09)376-6874
LIBRARIAN Des Yeates (09)838—6535
COMMITTEE Bev Ching (09)576—4595
Glenys Guild (09)810-9669
Brian Dawson (09)837—4598
Gerry Stansfield (09)834-7178
AUDITOR Dawn Persson
AHC DELEGATES Patricia Sweeney, Bev Ching
LIFE MEMBERS Harry Martin
Patricia Perratt
Patricia Sweeney
SCIENTIFIC OFFICER Peter Waters
JOURNAL Dave Anderson (club news)
Bev Ching (distribution)
Peter Waters (technical)
BACK COVER
Tillandsia guatemalensis
From Mexico to Costa Rica, including Guatemela, Honduras and
El Salvador. From 1100 to 2600 metres in mountain forests,
shady, moist and cool. Epiphytic.
The large form, shown on the back cover, is reputed not to pup.
(Baensch - rarely produces offshoots) However, the large form, 2-
3 years to flower, shown during the talk and belonging to Dave
Anderson, does pup. This form was imported some years ago by
John Scott. Dave has just taken four good size pups from his. The
small form pups and sets seed, taking about one year to flower.
Leaves bright red in good light, tall, to 1m. in flower, loosely
branched inflorescence, blue flowers, 5/6 months colour. Photo:
Gordon Waddell
19
n . . .
K - .

 

BROMELIAD 333331.903
Society of New Zealand Inc.
BROMELIAD SOCIETY OF NEW ZEALAND (INC).
Affiliated with the Bromeliad Society International.
The Society was formed on the 28th. August, 1962.
The objects of the Society are to encourage the cultivation and
study of bromeliads grown indoors or outdoors and in particular -
(a) To promote discussion and arrange instruction on culti-
vation, propagation and control of diseases.
(b) To provide a library for members.
(0) To assist members to identify plants.
(d) To make awards for outstanding new bromeliads.
(e) .To hold shows or public exhibitions of bromeliads.
(f) To promote the distribution of bromeliads amongst
members by exchange, purchase and sale, and to
encourage the importation of new plants.
(9) To affiliate with any Society or other body, and to do
such things as may be deemed necessary or desirable
in the furtherence of these objects.
(h) To accept affiliation from other Societies having similar
objects.
FRONT COVER
Tillandsia Creation
A stunning hybrid of Til/andsia cyanea and Tiliandsia platy-
rhachis from the nursery of Cornelius Bak in Holland and
introduced to the market in 1994 at the San Diego World
Conference. It was named by Pamela Koide of Bird Rock
Tropicals. Til/andsia platyrhachis is a large. spectacular plant of
the Andes in Peru and Ecuador but rather difficult to grow in
cultivation. Til/andsia Creation is a lot more forgiving and can
even be grown outside if shady and sheltered. The purple
fragrant flowers keep on appearing over a period of nearly two
months and the bright pink bracts last for many more months.
Photo: Peter Waters 2
CONTENTS
4 From the President
4 Bromeliad Society International
5,6 April Meeting News Dave Anderson
7 New Members
8-10 Bromeliads as theatre Pat Lawson, Mary Colquhoun
10 Winter
11-13 April talk - Guzmania Glenys Guild
14-15 A different seed raising medium John Higgins
16 Bay of Plenty News Kevin Schollum
17 Wellington Tillandsia Group Phyl Purdie
18 Meetings, membership, correspondence
and advertising.
19 Officers
COMING EVENTS
MAY 23rd. Wellington Tillandsia Group meet at Phyllis &
Bruce Purdie, 5 Rochester Street, Wilton. Ph.475-328‘l
MAY 23rd. Northland Bromeliad Group meet at Rosie
Speedy, Arapohi, Dargaville at 1:30pm.
MAY 25th. Auckland meeting 7:30pm.Talk- Soft green leafed
tillandsias Monthly plant competitlon - Aechmea nudicaulis.
JUNE 9th. Bay of Plenty meet at Alec & Lynley Roy at 12
noon, then 1:30pm at the Tauranga Yacht Club.
JUNE 27th. Northland Bromeliad Group.
AUGUST 26th - 30th. Bromeliads X Cairns.
The opinions expressed in letters or articles in this
magazine are the authors' own views and do not
necessarily express the policy of the Bromeliad Society of
New Zealand.
3
FROM THE PRESIDENT
With the advent of winter upon us it is time to be‘ aware of
damage to plants from frost, hall and wind. Keep an eye on the
weather forecasts and move plants that are susceptible to
damage under cover.
it is good to hear members voicing appreciation of the earlier
delivery of the journal and the changes made. We look forward
to future issues.
The sales table looked a little bare last month. Please bring
any plants for sale to the next meeting. There are plenty of
members looking for plants to buy.
Do we require more garden visits? if so let us know so that
they can be organised.
All the best for growing during the winter as it is a good time
to catch up with all the work around bromeiiads.
This month‘s thought:
If you see someone without a smile, give them one of yours and
make their day.
Lester Ching
THE BROMELIAD SOCIETY INTERNATIONAL
Peter Waters, Treasurer and Scientific Officer of the Bromeliad
Society of New Zealand, has recently been appointed a Director
of the Bromeliad Society International. Peter is the first New
Zealander to become a Director. Congratulations!
STOP PRESS - STOP PRESS - STOP PRESS
OVERDUE SUBSCRIPTIONS
For those whose subscript-
ions are now overdue, this will be the final issue of the
journal (marked with a red spot). To remain on the mailing
list please remit to the Treasurer, 22 Halfmoon Rise,
Bucklands Beach, Auckland. Ignore if already paid.
4
APRIL MEETING NEWS
The number of members joining the Society seems to be
ever increasing and this is reflected in the record number of
people attending our monthly meetings. This happened again at
this month's meeting with 65 people present. It also shows the
increasing appreciation of bromeliads by the public.
First, Brian Dawson gave a five minute talk on 'Bromeliads
outdoors in Auckland'.
Peter Waters led the discussion on Show & Tell plants. This
started with a Billbergia pyramidalis Kyoto, in flower, a plant that
Gerry Stansfield had bought in Tauranga as Neoregelia
'Meyendorffli' (albomarginated), which it certainly was not. A
second plant purchased as Bil/bergia pyramidalis Kyoto looked
quite different so it will be interesting to see it in flower, as this is *
certainly the only positive way of identifying a plant. Next up was
a Nidu/arium Molenaar hybrid, one of the many nidularium
crosses made by John Molenaar in Auckland during the 1980‘s.
A member tabled a Nidularium Lubbersii and was seeking
information on it. This plant is an old one, named in the United
States, and is probably Nidularium procerum or a hybrid of it. A
plant, probably a Fosters/la, required a name. Although this
genus is very easy to grow, they are very plain with
inconspicuous white flowers borne on a thin branched
inflorescence and do not have a wide appeal. A Tillandsia
purchased from Mr.Smith in Levin had lost its label and was
probably Tillandsia stn'cta or one of its hybrids, one of the many
made by Peter Johnson. Peter Waters displayed two unusual
Nidularfums,scheremetiewii and altimontanum. The former a
lovely plant illustrated in Rauh's book whilst the second comes
from the mountains of eastern Brazil. Next was a x Neotanthus
Firefoam, a bigeneric plant with the owner requesting cultivation
information. Hummel made this cv. of unknown parentage
before 1973 and it is a cross of Neoregelia and Cryptanthus. By
its appearance it may have Neo.spectabilis as a parent and
having Cryptanthus as the other parent, it will certainly require
some warmth through winter. Peter Waters had a further two
most unusual plants: Neoregelia Rien's Pride, a pup with flowers
coming out of all the leaf axils and Aechmea brassicoides in
5
which the inner leaves fold in, giving the appearance of a
cabbage. This second plant is from Surinam and relies on
remaining dry so that ants will nest inside it and provide it with
nutrients.
The discussion plant was guzmanias - see page 11.
The special raffle prize this month was a Neoregelia Pink
Sensation that was won by Bev Ching with the door prizes going
to Kelly Omeara, Owen Bird and Tony Bishop.
COMPETITIONS
Open flowering: First Len Trotman with a Vnelata and second
was Lester Ching with Edmundoa(Canistrum)lindenii vanroseum.
Also in the competition were Ae.chantinii 'Samurai' and
flavorosea, Canistrum seidelianum, Neo. carolinae x concentrica
and W. Rosa Morena.
Open foliage: Joe Murray was first with a Vitfosteriana cv.
'Rubra Broadleaf', and second was Gay McDonald with a
aostertana hybrid. in the competition were Bill. Poquito Mas.
Hohenbergia correia-aiaujoi, Neo. Orange Flame and Raphael,
Vnguttata hybrid and ‘Red Chestnut' x gigantea.
Tillandsia flowering: Len Trotman's Till.capitata of Guatemala
was first, with second going to Joe Murray's Til/.cyanea. Also on
the table were Tillboliviensis, cacticola #1 compressa, jalisco-
monticola, streptophylla and Emilie.
Plant of the month - miniatures: First was Lester Ching's
Cryptanthus Ruby, followed by Bev Ching‘s Neo. Fireball. In the
competition were Neo. Annick, Glossy Print, Chiquita Linda,
Pepper variegata and Short & Sweet.
Novice flowering: First was Chris Patterson with a Neo. hybrid
and second Brian Dawson's Vr. Little Chief. Also in the
competition were Ae. recun/ata, Neo. Noble Descent (o/ens
Vulcan x cruenta), Neomea Strawberry and Wittrcckia
(Nidularium) amazonica.
Novice foliage: First was Peter Brady with Neo. Fosperior
Perfection and second was Brian Dawson with Cryptanthus
Dusk together with Ae.nudicau/is and Vr. hieroglyphica.
Greenhough Trophy: Len Trotman with Vriesea elata.
Congratulations to all the winners. Dave Anderson
6
NEW MEMBERS
Lisa Forbes, 52 Huia Road, Otahuhu, Ak.
Lyn Johnston, Box 161, Morrinsville.
Anna Long, 338 Grammer Road, RD1, Katikati.
Ulrike McLachlan, 29 Summer Street, Devonport, Ak.
Fiona Moir & Mickie Chapman,51a Kervil Avenue, Te Atatu, Ak.
Lynette Nash, 11 Westbury Crescent, Remuera, Ak.
Annette Piggin, 2 Morvern Road, Mt. Eden, Ak.
Carol Skinner, 1 Horopito Street, Mt. Eden, Ak.
Bruce Turner, Highway 56, RD7, Palmerston North.
Associate member:
Rosemary Paterson, Box 24-456, Royal Oak, Ak.
New Address:
Joyce Stewart, 48a Hoteo Avenue, Papatoetoe, Ak.
Correction:
Christine Primrose, 92 Garfield Road, Helensville.
o a A ,
According to what I hear, neoregelias need very bright light
to look their best. Does this mean full sun?
No, in many cases full sun will bleach the leaves of neoregelias.
Most need some protection from midday sun either in the form
of shade cloth or overhead leaf canopy. in summer, the best
colour will usually be found under shadecloth giving 30-50%
shade. Some very hardy types such as Neoregelia cruenta are
very happy in full sun but even they will often need a period of
acclimatisation. While many species grow in full sun in their
natural habitat, the New Zealand sunshine is recognised as
being more damaging than in other countries because of the
sparse ozone layer.
BROMELIADS AS THEATRE.
To the dramatic background music of a South African choir, a
spotlit trolley appeared on a darkened stage. Dominating the
trolley was a large V shaped petrified driftwood trunk of South -
Island totara.
From the 25 bromeliads provided, two large neoregelias
were chosen to sit atop the V shape - Neoregelia Rose Flush
and a Neoregelia concentrica hybrid with a violet centre. They
.were anchored to the trunk with wooden skewers and
surrounded by puka leaves, scarlet celosia, heliconia blooms,
liatris and bull kelp. The flamboyant finishing touch was
provided with hot pink and purple ostrich feathers.
Then the spotlights switched to the main bromeliad
installation when it appeared from off-stage. A great deal of work
was evident in this almost 4 metre high arrangement, complete
with the remaining 23 bromeliads - these included highly
coloured Neoregelias - carolinae, marmorata, French Marcon,
Sheer Joy, johannis 'Rubra', Nidulan‘ums fulgens, procerum and
Canistropsis (Nidularium) billbergioides.
Pat Lawson
"Onward and upwards" was the theme of a floral theatre held
recently at Waipuna Lodge to raise funds for the Mangere
Franklyne Garden Club to send our floral artists to the National
Floral Art Exhibition held every 5 years. At the two sessions over
700 visitors were delighted by the seven designs, created by
Margaret Wilkins. Design 6 , about 4m. high, was created in two
parts. On stage the focal part of the design was assembled,
consisting of Protasparagus densiflorum Myers Lime-green,
purple spikes of liatris , crested red celosia, large red blooms of
Leucodendron Safari Sunset plus red and purple bromeliads.
The background, was constructed in advance and wheeled
into place. Black kelp and Black Lace coral covered the base.
Now the colour - helico’nias, leucodendron, celosia etc etc. To
the surprise of everyone, red, purple and orange ostrich feathers
were added, also glistening shells from Durban.
Photo: John Daley
Then unobtrusively, snakelights were added when the stage
was darkened. Slowly, accompanied by music from a South
African choir, the snakelights twinkled to complete a dramatic
design. The feathers swayed in an artificial breeze, depicting the
movement of the Sea Anenomes under water in the lndian
Ocean. Floral art members from far and near were ecstatic at
the wonderful display and gave Margaret Wilkins a standing ‘
ovation. Mary Colquhoun ‘
Margaret Wilkins (Margaret Wilkin's Flowers of Giverny) had
just returned from Durban. where she represented New Zealand
at the World Association of Floral Artists held every three years.
At the World Show she was invited, along with three other
international members. to demonstrate on stage. She turns
demonstrating into a performance art. Photo - John Daley
WINTER
Even in the "winterless" north, by the time you receive this
issue, winter will have arrived. Last year was especially mild - in
Freemans Bay the average minimum temperature for both June
andJuly was 12.1C. For those who are frost free or nearly so,
this is not a dormant period. More than 120 genera flower at this
time, not to mention colourful berries, fruit and foliage. A lemon
or orange tree is a cheerful sight in the rain, and the stunners
like Pyrostegia venusta (Brazilian Flame Vine) and Euphorbia
pulchem'ma (Poinsettia) from Mexico, flower right through
winter.There is no excuse for a dull garden at this time of year.
Bromeliads , are to the forefront. Aechmeas
wei/bachii,recurvata, Canistropsis (Nidu/afium)billbergioides and
Vn'esea carinata are winter flowering and plants like Aechmea
fasciata which flowers February/March, still has a colourful
inflorescence almost to Christmas. In the rain this becomes
iridescent. .
The August issue will have an article on this subject, so how
about members keeping a note ‘of what is in colour this winter
and dropping a line, sending a fax with details of their winter
beauties. August issue deadline is 10.8.99. Box 91-728, Auck.
10 ‘
|I1II'
|I1II'
APRIL TALK
Guzmania
Glenys Guild
Guzmanias are amongst the most beautiful and colourful
bromeliads grown in cultivation. The genus Guzmania was
established in 1802 and named alter a Spanish pharmacist,
Guzman. Most guzmanias originate from northwestern South
America where they occur in the tropical rainforest belt of the
Andes in Colombia and Ecuador. Their distribution however,
extends from Florida through the West Indies, down to western
’ Brazil, including Costa Rica and Panama.
Guzmanias are not as numerous as tillandsias or vrieseas, to
which they are closely related. They belong to the subfamily
Tillandsioideae and have entire (spineless) leaves. Guzmanias
grow in moist, cool, shady habitats in the lower echelons of the
jungle where they are found growing on trees andbushes,
although larger species grow as terrestrials in leaf mould. Like
vrieseas, guzmanias grow at altitudes between sea-level and
3000 metres. '
They need to be snugly potted, with the pot just a little larger
than the root area, allowing for about a year's growth before
potting onto the next size pot and fresh compost. A major factor ‘
for successful culture is an open potting mix that provides a
continually acid environment. A cymbidium orchid .mix is
suitable, or one which contains peat moss. A mix that allows
excess water to drain away is essential as guzmanias hate wet
feet. Water quality is very important as they are extremely
intolerant of hard, alkaline or salty water. Alkaline water causes
burning in the central leaves of the cup and the ideal is to use
rainwater if possible. Being a greenleafed plant they can be fed
. with diluted foliar food or slow release fertilizer added to the
potting mix. Feeding is best avoided during winter and
commenced once they are in rapid growth in spring.
Guzmanias can be grown outside successfully in Auckland in .
a shady, sheltered place out of the frost. Wherever ferns will
grow, guzmanias will also. However, they are ideal houseplants
' 11
and are grown extensively in the United States for this purpose.
Most of the propagation is done through tissue culture in
Europe (Belgium, Germany and the Netherlands), from where
they are sent to the United States to be grown on for the
houseplant trade.
There is a wide variety of shapes in the inflorescence
(flowers, sepals, primary bracts, flower bracts), from straight
spear to globular shape. Most typical is the inflorescence that
comes up and spreads out to a large head, some up to 26cm
across. The exception to the rule is Guz. sanguinea, of which
there are two varieties, large and small. They have flowers that
come up out of the centre cup where the leaves turn bright red
and/or yellow, looking more like a neoregelia than a guzmania.
These are not prolific puppers, producing one or two at most,
which grow right at the top of the plant and are very difficult to
get off. They are best left on the parent as long as possible, as
to get them off requires stripping the leaves and almost
destroying the plant.
Currently there are 183 species, the commonly available in
New Zealand being: Iingulata (the first available here) musaica,
sanguinea, zahnii, monostachia, patula, wittmackii and
squarrosa.There are now many fine hybrids available which are
stronger growers than the species, with brilliant colouring that
lasts for many months. Truly, a bromeliad to be coveted and
included in the collection of any fancier.
13
A DIFFERENT SEED RAISING MEDIUM
John Higgins.
My shadehouse is a haven for all sorts of living organisms
from plants of various families to insects, birds and spiders.
Native doves have taken up building their nests in hanging pots
of the common Birds Nest fern Asp/enium aust/a/asicum (nidus)
very appropriately named! This has in turn raised the level of
interest of our cat who is now making more frequent visits to the
shadehouse in the hope of a free meal.
But this is not to do with the birds or the cat, it is about
spiders and plants.
A frequent visitor is the St.Andrews' Cross Spider, Argiope
aetherea, and it is a constant job to keep the spider webs from
completely covering the pathways in the shadehouse.‘There are
no poisons used in the shadehouse forthe reason that i prefer a
natural process of insect control which includes the spiders as a
natural element. Periodically the webs become a worry for
visitors and I am obliged to at least reduce the numbers. This is
accomplished very simply by taking one of the stiff branches that
fall from the eucalypt trees outside and using it with a winding
motion to remove the webs. A branch with a fork provides a
useful tool for this purpose, making it easy to gather up the web
and sometimes the spider with it. The stick, with web (and
spider), is disposed of by throwing it into the undergrowth below
the eucalypts to become part of the general bush litter. As soon
as the stick lands, the spiders disentangle themselves and run
straight back into the shadehouse to begin the process all over
again. This tends to make the whole activity more of a holding
action and not a permanent cure.
One day, while doing this job, i noticed that the web provided
a light, gossamer film with a good latticework of the web
surrounding the open space between the branches. Growing
nearby was an unnamed tillandsia which had flowered and
produced seed. The pods were beginning to open and release
the seed to the air so I took some of the seed and placed it on
14
the wound web. The sticky web and the plumes of the seed
were instantly united upon contact and when it was watered, this
completed the process of adhesion. The stick was hung up with
the seed and web at the lower end. The shadehouse is watered
automatically with timer controlled sprays which operate for ten
minutes in the morning and a further ten minutes in the early
evening on each alternate day. No other watering was provided
to the seeds and they were left to this process and forgotten
until a few days ago. An inspection of the branch showed that
most of the seeds had germinated and a large number of very
healthy seedlings are attached firmly to the gossamer mat
provided by the web. The web has taken on the texture of a light
dry silk layer and removal of the seedlings based on a
preliminary trial will present no problem when they are a little
bigger.
I am pleased that the industry of spiders can be put to good
use in this way and l won't feel so guilty when l have to destroy
their webs in future.
Reprinted from Bromeliaceae, Volume 28, No.3 (May/June
1995), the bulletin of the Bmmeliad Society of Queensland.
BROMELIAD GREETING CARDS
Blank inside - Air mail weight
Includes - Aechmea caudata var. variegata
Aechmea miniata var. discolor
Neoregelia carolinae var.albomarginata
Neoregelia concentrica hybrid
Vriesea carinata
$10.00 for packet of five cards postpaid
Box 91-728, Auckland.
15
BAY OF PLENTY MAY NEWS
The May meeting was held in Te Puke at Shirley Litchfield's
and then on to Barry Jones. Their collections of bromeliads were
a pleasure to see. The display and discussion plants were as
follows:
Neo.Meyendorffii Albomarginata, Vr.Snow King - Kevin Schollum
Hohenbergia correia-araujoi, Till. stn‘cta - Audrey Hewson.
Canistropsis (Nidulan'um) billbergioides - Cliff Taucher.
Tills.filifolia, brachyphyllagardnen‘, secunda - Jo Elder.
Tillandsia balbisiana - Lynley Roy.
Guzmania sanguinea - Owen Bird.
Aechmea gamosepala 'Lucky Stripe' - Anna Long.
Neoregelia concentrica - Anne Stacey.
Tillandsia Iindenii - Bertha Schollum.
Because the Bay of Plenty group has grown so rapidly, it is
no longer suitable to use private homes for the meetings. The
venue for the June meeting will now be at the Tauranga Yacht
Club at the end of Sulphur Point. .
Next meeting: 12noon, 9th.June at Alec and Lynley Roy, 251
Levers Road, Matua. 1:30pm. to Tauranga Yacht Club. Go to
Keith Allen Drive and continue past the marina to the last
building on the right. There is a big carpark.
WANTED TO BUY
Mature bromeliads
NEOREGELIAS
Large concentrica varieties
Fireball varieties
Princeps and varieties
VRIESEAS
Fosteriana and varieties
Red Chestnut and varieties
Hieroglyphica and varieties
Fenestralis and varieties
CASH BUYERS...Bev and Lester Ching (09)576-4595 Ak.
16
WELLINGTON TILLAN DSIA GROUP
Twelve members and one visitor attended the March meeting
at the home of Andrew Flower at Pukerua Bay. Plants shown
and discussed were:
Till. tricolor: grown in a pot showing two flower stalks. This plant
had been grown in the shade. Other members reported plants
grown in strong light had also flowered. Another plant only
flowered when grown inside, not outdoors, and tricolor seemed
to grow as well on wood as in pots.
Till. punctulata was grown in a pot where it seemed to do better
than on wood. Members were advised not to depup this plant if
~ they wanted flowers.
Till. guatemalensis: following last meeting's discussion, it was
explained that the small form produces pups @351 seeds. but the
large form has 19 pups.
Till. lampropoda had an inflorescence like a vriesea, but the lips
of the flowers turn back. Taxonomists may soon be transferring
this plant to another genus.
Till. duratii: the two discussed at the last meeting had both
produced a seedpod after six months so the extra wait was
worthwhile. One seedpod was much fatter than the other. It was
suggested that sometimes not all three ovaries were pollinated,
resulting in a slimmer pod.
A group of miniatures was shown: Til/andsias tricholepis,
bandenensis. loliacea, and the smallest one, bryoldes.
Till. dodsonii (potted), and narthecoides both produced a white
flower. Other plants shown were - Till. festucoides, mallemontii,
stricta (hard leaf) and lindenii Anita.
Members were able to enjoy Andrew/s large collection and
look longingly at the healthy seedlings hanging in rows.
PhylPurdie
Next meeting: 23rd. May at Phyl and Bruce Purdie, 5
Rochester street, Wilton.
1 7
MEETINGS.
Held on the FOURTH Tuesday of each month except
December, at Greyfriars Church Hall, 544 Mt.Eden Road,
Auckland, at 7:30 pm.
MEMBERSHIP SUBSCRIPTIONS
New Zealand NZ$20.00 Ordinary
NZ$ 5.00 Associate (same household)
Overseas NZ$25.00 Airmail Australia
NZ$30.00 Airmail USA & other overseas
Send all payments to the Treasurer, Peter Waters, 22
Halfmoon Rise, Bucklands Beach, AUCKLAND.
CORRESPONDENCE
All general correspondence should be sent to the Secretary,
Bromeliad Society of New Zealand. 33 Marsden Avenue,
Mt. Eden, AUCKLAND 4.
Please send articles, photographs and advertisements to the
Editor, PO Box 91-728, AUCKLAND. Phone/Fax (09)376—6874
Deadline for copy is the SECOND Tuesday in each month.
ADVERTISING RATES
Full page $15.00 ($13.50)
Half page $ 8.50 ($ 7.65)
Quarter page $ 4.25 (S 3.85)
Eighth page $ 2.00 ($ 1.80)
Prices in brackets are for a minimum of six issues per year.
Advertisements must be bromeliad related.
18
OFFICERS
PATRON & LIFE MEMBER Mrs.Bea Hanson (09)527-6830
HISTORIAN & LIFE MEMBER Laurie Dephoff (09)527-7789
PRESIDENT Lester Ching (09)576-4595
VICE-PRESIDENTS Des Yeates (09)838-6535
Graham West (09)298-3479
SECRETARY Dave Anderson (09)638-8671
TREASURER Peter Waters (09)534-561 6
EDITOR Marjorie Lowe (09)376-6874
LIBRARIAN Des Yeates (O9)838-6535
COMMrrTEE Bev Ching (09)576-4595
Glenys Guild (09)810-966_9
Brian Dawson (O9)837-4598
Gerry Stansfield (09)834—7178
AUDrr0R Dawn Persson
AHC DELEGATES Patricia Sweeney, Bev Ching
LIFE MEMBERS Harry Martin
Patricia Perratt
Patricia Sweeney
SCIENTIFIC OFFICER Peter Waters
. JOURNAL Dave Anderson (club news)
Bev Ching (distribution)
Peter Waters (technical)
BACK COVER
Not Brazil but the Henderson Valley facing west to the
Waitakere Ranges. Ten kilometres away, on the far side of the
Waitakeres, the Tasman Sea pounds in on the West Coast surf
beaches. Despite the protection the bush clad Ranges give,
when the westerlies sweep in from the Southern Ocean every-
thing endures the onslaught
The clumps of Vriesea phillipocoburgii are supported by a '
young pohutukawa (Metrosideros excelsa) and are thriving. The
property is a large one, so that as well as the wind, they must
survive without additional food or water.
Photo: Gordon Waddell 19

 

BROMELIAD s:::g9::.4
Society of New Zealand Inc.
BROMELIAD SOCIETY OF NEW ZEALAND (INC).
Affiliated with the Bromeliad Society International.
The Society was formed on the 28th. August, 1962.
The objects of the society are to encourage the cultivation and
study of bromeliads grown indoors or outdoors and in particular -
(a) To promote discussion and arrange instruction on cultiv-
vation, propagation and control of diseases.
(b) To provide a library for members.
(c) To assist members to identify plants.
(d) To make awards for outstanding new bromeliads.
(e) To hold shows or public exhibitions.
(f) To promote the distribution of bromeliads amongst
members by exchange, purchase and sale, and to
encourage the importation of new plants.
(9) To affiliate with any Society or other body,and to do
such things as may be deemed necessary or desirable
in the furtherence of these objects.
(h) To accept affiliation from other Societies having similar
objects.
FRONT COVER
Ananas comosus var. variegatus
This plant was originally purchased as an offset in 1967 from a
Paris nurseryman, Marcel le Couffle. It was then called Ananas
sativus variegata.
It was planted in a ponga pot until 1971, then in
the ground inside the glasshouse. It first flowered and fruited in
1985 when a large plant with leaves 1200mm.(4ft.) long. Fruit
ripened in February 1986 with plantlets top and bottom. The
stump of the plant, with large offset, was left in the ground. The
stem grew longer, lying on the surface, until 1998 when it flowered
again. The fruit only had leaves at the top - cut off top now
growing again - and one large offset below the fruit also growing
well. Very cool growing conditions ( a few frosts most years) are
the cause of slow fruiting. Full sun, more warmth = faster fruiting.
Photo/text: Laurie Dephoff
CONTENTS
4 President's Report Lester Ching
5,6 May meeting news Dave Anderson
7—9 May talk - Soft green leafed tillandsias Marjorie Lowe
10-13 Solving the Fireball mystery Nat de Leon
12 Fireball up to date Peter Waters
14 Andrew Flower - tribute Keith & Maureen Green
15 Bay of Plenty news Kevin Schollum
16 Whangarei Bromeliad Group Jacqui O'Connell
17 Wellington Tillandsia Group Phyl Purdie
18 Meetings, membership, correspondence
and advertising
19 Officers
COMING EVENTS
JUNE 22nd Auckland meeting 7:30pm. Talk- Vrieseas in
flower Monthly plant com petition- mounted
plants.
JUNE 27th. Whangarei Bromeliad Group at Colin & Iris
Simmonds, 4 Crawford Crescent, Kamo.
JULY 14th. Bay of Plenty meet at 1:30pm at the Tauranga
Yacht Club.
' JULY 25th. Wellington Tillandsia Group meet at 1:30pm. at
Myra & Maurice Tarr, 32 Plunket Ave., Petone.
M Whangarei Bromeliad Group at Allan & Bev
Baxter's new home in Mains Avenue.
JULY 27th. Auckland meeting 7:30pm. Talk- pollination &
hybridization Monthly plant competition-
Nidulariums.
AUGUST 11th.
Bay of Plenty meet at 1:30pm at the Tauranga
Yacht Club.
AUGUST
26th - 30th. Bromeliads X Cairns
PRESIDENT'S REPORT
Another excellent month with 64 members attending (two
months in a row). Fantastic support and congratulations to
everyone.
Next month there will be a large range of pots at excellent
' prices for sale. Take advantage of these deals that your Society
can obtain.
The Novice competition tables need an injection of
enthusiasm. Someone is going to win this section each month and
it could be you, so bring along your best plants.
Don't forget - if cups of tea during the break are to continue.
assistance is needed to serve and clean up.
An excellent array of plants for sale at the May meeting. We
are looking fonivard to maintaining this standard.
it was good to see members arriving early and having their
competition plants on the tables. Well done, please keep it up.
This month's thought:
What is a weed? A plant whose virtues have not yet been
discovered.
Lester Ching
Plant loss deVastates
THAMES. Zoe De’Ath was devas-
tated to find 40 valuable bromeliad
plants and a stag horn fern had
been stolen from her garden on
Thursday night. .
It was the fourth time plants had
been taken from her Parawai prop-
erty in 21/2 years. The plants were
worth over $1000 and the culprit
obviously has plant knowledge, she
says.
“It’s somebody that knows some-
thing about them because they are
4
picking out the dearest and best
ones. I was very sad.”
She believes it is the same person '
each time and has stepped up her
security measures.
The keen gardener spends most of
her time in her prized garden.
“If you have a neighbour or friend
that is gradually accumulating a
good collection of beautifully grown
tropical bromeliad plants contact
the Thames Police.”
MAY MEETING NEWS
Another large number of members attended our monthly
meeting with quite a few new members coming along. Everyone
seemed to enjoy the proceedings with some participating in a cup
of tea at the break - thanks to those who organised it. We hope it
will be ongoing during the winter months.
Peter Waters led the discussion on the Show & Tell plants.
This started with an Aechmea coe/estis albomarginata, a plant
that Des Yeates had wanted a name for. Next up, a Neoregelia
hybrid with brown marks on the leaves that could have been
caused by cold or drips from tanalised timber. It is unlikely to be
the cold, as the weather in Auckland so far this winter has been
temperate. A word of warning for people with tanalised timber
pergolas etc. is that they still drip lethal fluids (for bromeliads),
even if they are painted. A Tillandsia ponderosa in full flower was
brought in for display. The plant had been growing outdoors in
Auckland and showed some signs of cold damage but still looked
magnificent with its one metre high spike. Peter Waters had
brought in two bigenerics, Guzvn'esea Marian Oppenheimer
(Guzmania lingulata x Vriesea Viminalis-Rex) and Neomea
Sandra Jean Antle (Neoregelia 'Red Devil' x Aechmea
'Pickaninny'), both quite unusual. A member tabled an Aechmea
hybrid which appeared to be Aechmea caudata x calyculata. A
very small Tillandsia, which had hardly grown over the last two
years, was brought in by Brian Dawson. This plant is Tillandsia
xiphioides being 8—10mm overall in its adult form. Finally there
were two Aechmea nudicaulis which are easily identified with the
kink part way down the leaf.
Marjorie Lowe gave a very interesting talk on green leafed
tillandsias.
The special raffle prize this month was won by Sue
Schatzdorfer with the door prizes going to Barbara Murray, Glenys
Guild and Tony Bishop.
The opinions expressed in letters or articles in this magazine are
the authors' own views and do not necessarily express the policy
of the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand.
16 5
COMPETITIONS
Open flowering: First Len Trotman with Guz. Fireworks and
second was Lester Ching with Guz. Orangeade. Also in the
competition were Aechmeas pumurea-rosea & recurvata var.
benrathii, Guzmania Iingulata 'Superb Variegata', Neo’s. olens x
compacta and Inferno, and Vriesea saundersii x Grande.
Open foliage: Peter Waters was first with a Neo. Royal Hawaiian,
and 2nd. equal were Peter Waters with an Alcantarea imperialis
and Len Trotman with Neo. Tangerine. In the competition were '
Neo’.s Burbank x carolinae x chlorosticta, hybrid and Picolo, '
Vn'esea ospinae 'Gruberi'.
Tillandsia flowering: Win Shorrock's Till. stn'cta with 4 flowers
was first, with second going to Joe Murray's Till. punctulata with
six flower heads. Also on the table were Tillandsias - capitata
'Guatemala’, cyanea, duratii, gardneri, orogenes, pueblensis,
tectorum and streptophy/la.
Plant of the month - Aechmea nudicaulis: First was Dave
Anderson's cv. 'Silver Streak' followed by Win Shorrock's var.
cuspidata. In the competition were about a dozen varied entries of
Aechmea nudicaulis.
Novice flowering: First was Kevin Kilsby with a Tillandsia
velutina and Tony Bishop's Aechmea recurvata was second. Also
in the competition were Ae. recurvata, Neo. olens Vulcan x
cruenta, Neomea Strawberry and Nid. amazonica.
Novice foliage: First was Brian Dawson with Neo. Sharlock, who
was also second with a Neo. Laebee, together with Ae. nudicaulis
and Vriesea hieroglyphica.
Greenhough Trophy: Len Trotman with Guzmania Fireworks.
Congratulations to all the winners. Dave Anderson
Monthly competition table
June: mounted plants
July: Nidulariums
August: Aechmea recurvata & hybrids
September: hanging baskets
NEXT MEETING Tuesday, 22nd. June.
MAY TALK
Soft green leafed Tillandsias
Marjorie Lowe
Just as there are grey leafed vrieseas that look like tillandsias
so there are soft green leafed tillandsias that look like vrieseas.
What attracted me, a lifelong grower of natives, subtropical and
tropical plants, was lush(ish) foliage, the striking inflorescences
and/or longlasting colour of some plants.
Most of the ones available here seem to come mainly from
Central America. Tillandsia dyeriana, from Ecuador at 100 metres
and Tillandsia wagnen'ana from Amazonian Peru obviously need
the warmth of a glasshouse to flourish. The following can however
be grown outside if frost free and sheltered from cold winds.
Tillandsia complanata: an epiphyte from the Antilles, Costa
Rica to Bolivia, Northern Brazil in forests at 800-3500 metres.
Needs semi-shade, moisture. Does not send out offshoots easily
(one clone has pups) but keeps growing, flowering most of the
year. Highly variable in size, colour and number of flowering
spikes from the leaf axils, which flowers year after year. Not
showy, but appealing over a very long period.
Tillandsia deppeana: from Mexico, West Indies to Colombia
and Ecuador in rain forests, open woodland and grasslands at 400
- 3300 metres. Needs fast drainage, light but not continuous sun,
summer shade. The tall much branched inflorescence has large
bright red bracts that form all the way up the spike with bright
violet blue petals. Very striking and longlasting, when the red
fades the spike turns a yellowish green attractive in its own right.
Takes 3—4 years to flower from a good pup. Good hybrids and
cultivars are available.
Tillandsia imperialis: from Mexico, epiphytic in oak forests at
1300-2700 metres. Needs semi-shade, very moist with cool
nights. The rosette has many leaves, about 600m. across, lovely
form. The red inflorescence stands about 200m. above the foliage
and has bright purple petals. Flowering time is about
five years from a good, healthy pup or seven to eight from a small
one. These are traditional Christmas gifts in Mexico as they look
rather like giant red candles. However they are available in the
markets in spring and autumn so the blooming season is long and
variable. Photograph top opposite.
Tillandsia Ieiboldiana: from southern Mexico to Costa Rica,
epiphytic in forests from near sea level up to 2600 metres. Needs
moisture and semishade, and very good in baskets. It is a small
plant, not much more than 200m. in diameter with bright, light
green leaves often blotched with red. Scarlet bracts, purple petals
to 600m. high. One year to flowering, and effective if well grown.
There are 4-5 different kinds.
Tillandsia multicaulis: from southern Mexico to Panama,
epiphytic in dark, humid mist forests, at 1500 to 2500 metres.
Needs shade, moisture and cool nights. The unusual thing about
multicaulis that it has in common with complanata, is that there
are several lateral infiorescences from the leaf axils and there can
be as many as eight. Flowering stops growth in the centre of the
plant. The flower spikes come in both red and orange and look not
unlike goldfish (similar to some vrieseas). When the colour fades,
like deppeana, the spike slowly turns yellowish green to gold and
remains looking good for a long time. Pups usually flower in a
year and at about the same time, autumn, with bright blue petals.
The photograph opposite, bottom, shows it growing in lowish light
on the ground under palms in Gordon Waddell's garden.
Tillandsia guatemalensis: see page 19 and back cover.
WANTED TO BUY
Plants or pups
Nidularium fulgens, Canistropsis (Nidularium) billbergioides
Vriesea hieroglyphica and fosteriana
Aechmea gamosepala and nudicaulis variegata, Mary Hyde
Neoregelias...carolinae, compacta and concentrica plus
Fireball
COLIN FERGUSON (09) 445-8686
8
a n . “ - .
SOLVING THE FIREBALL MYSTERY
Nat de Leon
In 1959, I wrote to a Mr.Walter Doering of Sao Vicente Brazil, 7
in the state of Sao Paulo. Mr.Doering was primarily an orchid
collector who had earlier written an article on the bromeliads of his
area for The Bromeliad Society Bulletin, the forerunner of the
Journal of the Bromeliad Society.
During that time, I wrote to whoever I could in the hope of being
able to purchase or trade for new bromeliads not already in
cultivation. In this instance, I was primarily interested in buying at
least half-grown plants of Vriesea gigantea and Vn’esea hiero-
glyphica. He had several other species I was interested in as well.
Once Mr.Doering had confirmed that he would sell me the plants, I
enquired about the possibilty of buying other species as well, even
if he had only a few plants of each. He replied that yes, he did
have others but that they were unidentified. I then suggested that
all such un—identified plants be numbered so that we had a
common reference point to refer to on any specific plant in the
future. I would grow the plants to flowering, have them identified
and, should they prove ornamental enough, I would order
additional plants by name and number. Mr. Doering was agreeable
to this.
Correspondence was slow and Mr.Doering needed time to
collect and prepare the plants for shipment. This was no small
order. In March, 1960, almost a year after my initial enquiry, the
plants arrived. There were more than two hundred plants in the
shipment. Losses were heavy, particularly of Vnhieroglyphica.
Only eight out of some fifty large plants survived. Losses of other
species occurred also but were far less severe.
This shipment proved to be very important, for it represented
the first bromeliad introduction into American horticulture of the
following species: aituminosa, the large form of Vrtincurvata
then Vnrostmm-aquilae, Vnensifonnis, Vnflammea, Vr.erythro-
dactilon, Vnphillipocoburgii, Vnscalaris, Vr. vagans, Nidulan'um
msulatum, Nid.mbens, Nid.mtilans, Neoregelia doeringiana, a
new species to be named Neo.maculata and our mystery plant,
Neo. 'Fireball.’ 10
Only one of the four plants, later to be called Neo. 'Fireball'
survived. As I remember it, the smallish plant was almost all
green, with a faint hint of red, when received. Mr. Doering
remarked about the plant in the brief note he sent with the 7
unidentified plants. "Neoregelia or Aechmea, small plant, all
mahogany colored. Flowers not yet seen." After the plant started
to grow, exposed to the great Florida light, the mahogany color
continued to intensify. Before long it sent out its first offset,
revealing its stoloniferous habit.
The late Ralph Davis and l were rather close bromeliad
buddies. As long as either of us had more than one of any given
plant, his plants were my plants and vice-versa. We lent one
another plants for hybridizing or selfing. We also collaborated on
several importation ventures. Ralph visited me one day and
almost swallowed his cigar but when he first saw my mystery
plant. Of course Ralph had to have one and since by that time the
plant already had two offsets, the first vegetative propagation took
place. Since I was concerned about confusion in plant names
even in those days, I made Ralph promise he would not part with
any plants until it flowered and I could have it identified.
Several years passed and the stocks of the mystery plant were
getting quite large but there was still no sign of flowering. In the
meantime, many people were starting to pester Ralph for a plant,
which made it great 'trade bait'. I didn't have that problem since at
that time I grew most of my bromeliads at the Parrot Jungle, away
from public view. Ralph wanted to start letting some plants go and
I agreed, provided we gave the plant a temporary name. Ralph
told me that every time he referred to the plant, he called it Neo.
'Fireball‘ and I told him "That's a great name, let's call it tha The
rest is history.
During the latter part of 1966, l was getting ready to treat some
Neo.carolinae plants with calcium carbide to induce flowering.
Just for the hell of it, I decided to treat a single mature plant of
'Fireball' as well. In February of 1967, I saw my first 'Fireball'
flower ever. I had waited eight years to see this. By contrast, I had
flowered and had identified all of the other unidentified plants in
the importation group.
During those eight years, I wrote to Mr. Doering several times,
hoping to be able to order more 'Fireballs' and other
11
FIREBALL
Neoregelia Fireball is now widely cultivated and is one of the favourite basket
or clumping specimen plants. It grows well in New Zealand and if given high
light will reward the grower with many plants on stolons of 75-100mm. (3-4")
in length and of a glowing dark red colour. ‘Fireball’ has the characteristic of
very shiny leaves and bestows this trait on all of its hybrids. It has been
demonstrated that seed sown from Fireball produces identical plants and it
is widely accepted that it is a specimen, even though not officially described.
It has not yet been rediscovered in the wild and it is possible that the
populations have been destroyed in the clearing of the forest for farmland.
Peter Waters
The photograph shows a large clump of Fireball covering a very big treefem
trunk. Photo: Avon Ryan
12
"
a n . “ - .
species as well. I had also hoped to obtain information for Dr.
Lyman Smith on collection sites for the various species being
identified, but I never heard from Mr. Doering again.
My records show that on February 28, 1967 I sent the first
flowering 'Fireball' plant to Dr. Smith for identification. lt bore my
number P.130. I have a letter of confirmation of that specimen,
saying that it needed further study. Years later, I have yet to
receive any word of its status. I was told by several people that the
National Herbarium does not have a speciman of 'Fireball'. I can
only assume it somehow got misplaced or perhaps included in the
file of some other neoregelia.
During the last decade or so, Neo. 'Fireball' has been a point of
much confusion. It has been assumed to be a hybrid. This is
understandable as many people in horticulture assume a plant is
a hybrid if it does not have a latinized name. Yet there is nothing
wrong with giving an unidentified species a temporary name. I
have sometimes used the name of the town or area a plant was
collected from as a reference point. One of the plants from this
collection l called Nid. saopaulo. It was later identified as Nid.
rutilans. Yet I still see plants around labeled Nid. Sao Paulo and it
is usually referred to as a hybrid, which it is not.
Bob Wilson also used this method of identification. Plants he
sold as Neo. Tingua were later identified as Neo. carolinae. Plants
he sold as Aechmea Tingua turned out to be Ae. lingulata. The
name Tingua referred to the town in Brazil near which he collected
the plants.
A few years ago, the name Neo. schultziana was being applied
to 'Fireball'. How this started I don't know. The name is not listed
in Dr. Smith's monograph.
While I am still hopeful that Neo. 'Fireball' will someday be
properly named, l have not pursued the matter. After twenty six
years, it would be difficult to refer to Neo. 'Fireball‘ by any other
name.
Reprinted from the Florida Council of Bromeliad Societies
1987 newsletter.
Reprinted in 1998 by the Florida Council of Bromeliad Societies.
Editor's comment-"It is now 38 years and the mystery remains.”
13
ANDREW FLOWER
15.5.99
The Secretary,
Bromeliad Society of New Zealand
Auckland.
Dear Dave,
We would like to pay tribute to Andrew Flower who
recently finished being editor of the Bulletin. He certainly made a
great contribution as editor and set a high standard by making the
magazine more attractive, informative and interesting. He is of
course very knowledgeable regarding bromeliads having grown
them for many years and was probably the first to sell bromeliads
by mail order at the beginning of the 19805. His setting up of the
New Zealand seed bank a few years ago was certainly
appreciated by many people.
Best regards,
Keith & Maureen Green
PDC, Maungakaramea,
Whangarei.
TILLANDSIA SEEDLINGS
butzii, fuchsii f.gracilis, geminiflora,lepidosepala*,plumosa*, seideliana“,
schiedeana, streptocarpa, stricta Brazil, velickiana, xiphioides*. Those
marked * very few. Minimum height or spread 24mm. however some are
more than 50mm except xiphioides 15mm. Unmounted - available on a
first come first served basis. All @ $2.50 each - plus $5.00 for postage.
I grow over 100 different species and have divisions of quite a few
available. These are at $6.00 to $7.50 each unmounted. Send a want
list and stamped addressed envelope and I'll let you know what i can
provide.
NORMAN SMITH, 26 RUGBY STREET, LEVIN. (06) 367-9160
14
BAY OF PLENTY JUNE NEWS
The meeting began with a visit to Alec and Lynley Roys'
garden where the bromeliads nestled among the ferns, and
pottery glistened after the rain and looked marvellous.
Our new winter venue at the Tauranga Yacht Club proved ideal
, and what a magnificent view.
The display table was full to overflowing, and at future
meetings, we plan to have a competition as well.
Jo Elder gave a short talk on bigeneric bromeliads and brought
along a most attractive selection of her own plants to illustrate her
talk -
Neotanthus - Firefoam and Waffle
Neomea - Strawberry and Magenta Star
Neophytum - Firecracker and Ralph Davis
Neo/arium - Souvenir de Casmir Morobe
Next meeting: 1:30pm.14th. July at Tauranga Yacht Club rooms.
Please bring plants for display.
WANTED TO BUY
Mature bromeliads
NEOREGELIAS
large concentrica varieties
Fireball varieties
princeps and varieties
VRlESEAS
fosteriana and varieties
Red Chestnut and varieties
hieroglyphica and varieties
fenestralis and varieties
CASH BUYERS
Bev and Lester Ching
Phone (09) 576-4595 Auckland.
15
WHANGAREI BROMELIAD GROUP
Thirteen members and one visitor attended the May meeting
of the Whangarei Bromeliad Group who travelled over to
Arapohue, a couple of kilometres south of Dargaville, on an
absolutely beautiful autumn day. We visited Rosy and Gordon
Speedy's garden at their dairy farm. Rosi is an avid collector of
rare and interesting plants as well as having a rather good
collection of bromeliads. The Speedy farm has been in the family
for many, many years and has a large garden which Rosie tells us
has changed considerably over the years. Gone are the annuals,
perennials and roses favoured by her mother-in-law. The soil is
very fast draining and water is a problem in the summer months
so cacti, succulents and bromeliads thrive out in the open under
the shelter of established trees.
The Speedys have spent some time collecting pieces of old
puriri branches and roots which are stunning for mounting
bromeliads, especially tillandsias. Many of these pieces are
twisted and gnarled into fantastic shapes and look great in the
garden. Puriri, for those of you further south, is an extremely hard
wood which has often been attacked by the native puriri moth,
whose larvae burrow in the wood leaving holes and tunnels. All
our cars went home loaded with branches which will be put to
good use.
The Whangarei group is extremely lucky to have Maureen and
Keith Green as members, so if we need information about growing
or identifying plants, we have our experts on hand to lead the
discussion. Jacqui O'Connell
Next meetimg: June 27th. at Colin & Iris Simmonds, 4 Crawford
Crescent, Kamo.
BIG POTS FOR BIG BROMS
l have about two dozen used clay and fluted concrete pots
approximately 18-30cm. (7-12") in diameter surplus to
requirements. If anyone is interested please contact
LAURIE DEPHOFF (09) 527-7789 or 1/22 Lunn Ave.
Mt.Wellington.
16 5
WELLINGTON TILLANDSIA GROUP
Nine members met on the afternoon of the 25th. May at Phyllis
and Bruce Purdie's home.
Plants shown and discussed were:
Till. cacticola: the growing top had been broken off and offsets
had developed from this point. One of these had been dislodged.
Although small, it was recommended mounting it on wood and
watering more than usual.
Till. comarataensis: two plants were compared. One was tinged
red on the leaves and flower bracts. It was grown in sunshine in a
plastic greenhouse. The second plant was a grey/green hue and
had been grown under shadecloth over summer. Both were
flowering.
Till. punctulata: shown last meeting, this now had the flower open
- tubular, purple and white, produced on a Vriesea-like green floral
bract above a red stem bract. The total colouring was very
attractive. The grower was trying Magamp on the soil.
A Vriesea elata had its three centre leaves completely fused
together into a cylinder which had coiled. Although its appearance
was attractive, no reason could be found for this occurrence and
the following leaf showed signs of being normal.
A second Vriesea had pale brown blotches, edged with darker
colour, on the leaves. The cause was possibly waterdrops from
condensation acting as lenses in the sunshine.
Till. tectorum displaying soft pink flower bracts should be kept high
up in good light.
Till. leiboldiana var. guttata: potted, in flower. Most noticeable
were the bright red flower bracts and the leaves blotched wine on
green. This Tillandsia may be placed in another genus.
Till. lotteae from Bolivia is now extinct in the wild. it had a Vriesea
type yellow flower bract producing yellow flowers which opened
out with recurved petals.
Till. Iatifolia var. divaricata, 2.7m.(9ft)!! in length to the end of the
inflorescence, had produced its first flowers. A variable species.
pups can be produced either along the stem or at the end.
Phyl Purdie (continued next month)
17
MEETINGS.
Held on the FOURTH Tuesday of each month except
December, at Greyfriars Church Hall, 544 Mt.Eden Road,
Auckland, at 7:30 pm.
MEMBERSHIP SUBSCRIPTIONS
New Zealand NZ$20.00 Ordinary
NZ$ 5. 00 Associate (same household)
Overseas NZ$25. 00 Airmail Australia
NZ$30. 00 Airmail USA & other overseas
Send all payments to the Treasurer, Peter Waters, 22 Halfmoon
Rise, Bucklands Beach, AUCKLAND.
CORRESPONDENCE
All general correspondence should be sent to the Secretary,
Bromeliad Society of New Zealand, 33 Marsden Avenue,
Mt.Eden, AUCKLAND 4.
Please send articles, photographs and advertisements to the
Editor, PO Box 91-728, AUCKLAND. Phone/Fax (09)376-6874
Deadline for copy is the SECOND Tuesday in each month.
ADVERTISING RATES
Full page $15.00 ($13.50)
Half page $ 8.50 ($ 7.65)
Quarter page $ 4.25 ($ 3.85)
Eighth page $ 2.00 ($ 1.80)
Prices in brackets are for a minimum of six issues per year.
Advertisements must be bromeliad related.
18
OFFICERS
PATRON & LIFE MEMBER Mrs. Bea Hanson (09)527-6830
HISTORIAN & LIFE MEMBER Laurie Dephoff (09)527-7789
PRESIDENT Lester Ching (09)576-4595
VICE-PRESIDENTS Des Yeates (09)838—6535
Graham West (053)298-3479
SECRETARY Dave Anderson (09)638-8671
TREASURER Peter Waters (09)534-5616
EDITOR Marjorie Lowe (09)376-6874
LIBRARIAN Des Yeates (09)838—6535
COMMITTEE Bev Ching (09)576—4595
Glenys Guild (09)810-9669
Brian Dawson (09)837—4598
Gerry Stansfield (09)834-7178
AUDITOR Dawn Persson
AHC DELEGATES Patricia Sweeney, Bev Ching
LIFE MEMBERS Harry Martin
Patricia Perratt
Patricia Sweeney
SCIENTIFIC OFFICER Peter Waters
JOURNAL Dave Anderson (club news)
Bev Ching (distribution)
Peter Waters (technical)
BACK COVER
Tillandsia guatemalensis
From Mexico to Costa Rica, including Guatemela, Honduras and
El Salvador. From 1100 to 2600 metres in mountain forests,
shady, moist and cool. Epiphytic.
The large form, shown on the back cover, is reputed not to pup.
(Baensch - rarely produces offshoots) However, the large form, 2-
3 years to flower, shown during the talk and belonging to Dave
Anderson, does pup. This form was imported some years ago by
John Scott. Dave has just taken four good size pups from his. The
small form pups and sets seed, taking about one year to flower.
Leaves bright red in good light, tall, to 1m. in flower, loosely
branched inflorescence, blue flowers, 5/6 months colour. Photo:
Gordon Waddell
19
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