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2001

2001 Journals

January 2001 OCR February 2001 March 2001 April 2001 May 2001 June 2001 July 2001 August 2001 September 2001 October 2001 November 2001

BROMELIAD
Society of New Zealand
BROMELIAD SOCIETY OF NEW ZEALAND (INC).
Affiliated with the Bromeliad Society international.
The Society was officially formed on the 28th. August, 1962.
The objects of the society are to encourage the cultivation and study of bromeliads
grown indoors or outdoors and in particular -
(a) To promote discussion and arrange instruction on cultivation,
propagation and control of diseases.
(b) To provide a library for members.
(c) To assist members to identify plants.
(d) To make awards for outstanding new bromeliads.
(e) To hold shows or public exhibitions.
(f) To promote the distribution of bromeliads amongst
members by exchange, purchase and sale, and to
encourage the importation of new plants.
(9) To affiliate with any Society or other body, and to do
such things as may be deemed necessary or desirable
in the furtherance of these objects.
(h) To accept affiliation from other Societies having similar
objects.
MEETINGS
Held on the FOURTH Tuesday of each month except December, 'at
Greyfriars Church Hall, 544 Mt. Eden Road, Auckland at 7:30pm.
MEMBERSHIP SUBSCRIPTIONS
New Zealand NZ$20.00 Ordinary
NZ$ 5.00 Associate (same household)
Overseas A$30.00 Australia
US$20.00 United States and other overseas
Send all payments to the Treasurer, Peter Waters, 22 Halfmoon Rise,
Bucklands Beach, AUCKLAND.
CORRESPONDENCE
All general correspondence should be sent to the Secretary, Bromeliad
Society of New Zealand, 33 Marsden Avenue, Mt. Eden, AUCKLAND. 4.
FRONT COVER Aechmea flavorosea
A very upright plant, with leaves 60cm long, 6-7cm wide and black
spines 4-5mm long. The lower layer of leaves spread. A deep crinkle
appears half way up the leaves. The scape, floccose, with serrulate
pale pink bracts tightly against the scape, horizontal serrulate pink
bracts under the inflorescence, which is 15cm above the leaves in a
dense ovoid, branched 12cm panicle, 12cm tall, yellow petals. The
flower spike is in colour for up to six months.
Native to Brazil, Graham Alderson grew this plant in a heated
glasshouse in Rangiora.
Photo/text: Graham Alderson

CONTENTS
4
5,6
From the President
May meeting news
Graham West
Dave Anderson
Grace Goode
Kevin Schollum
Christine Borlase
7,8 The shy bloomers
8 Bay of Plenty Bromeliad Group
9 Eastern Bay of Plenty Group
10 Vriesea Eden Glade Gerry Stansfield
10 From Derek Butcher
12,13 Propagation of bromeliads Len Trotman
15 In the glasshouse Graham Alderson
16 Seedbank Gerry Stansfield
19 Northland Bromeliad Group
20-22 An Auckland rainforest
23 Officers, journal and advertising
COMING EVENTS
JUNE
24"1 Northland Bromeliad Group - Trip to Exotica Tropica Gardens
at Point Wells.
26th Auckland meeting, Greyfriars Hall at 7:30pm.
Talk: Neoregelia carolinae and hybrids.
Monthly plant competition: Nidulariums & canistropsis.
Jacqui O’Connell
Louise Joyce
JULY
3" Deadline for copy for the July Journal.
11th Bay of Plenty Bromeliad Group — meeting at 1pm.
Plant of the month: Any seedling bought at the club.
24th Auckland meeting, Greyfriars Hall at 7:30pm.
Slides: Peter Waters - taken at Graham/Judith Alderson’s.
Brian Dawson — taken at Huntington Gardens.
Monthly plant competition: Guzmanias
28‘" Bay of Plenty Bromeliad Group — return visit from the Eastern
Bay of Plenty bromeliad & Orchid Group.
FLOCCOSE: composed of or bearing tufts of woolly, or long, soft
hairs: flocculent
SERRULATE: having small, sharp marginal teeth, as a leaf

FROM THE PRESIDENT
It was pleasing to have so many members and visitors along at our
last meeting, although it was a real winters evening. It is disappointing
that some of our older members are not feeling up to coming out
these nights. We do hope to see them all back in the summer.
We have had so much rain lately, in the Auckland area that it has
created problems and now frosts where I am, straight on top.
Remember that some bromeliads are tropical plants. We need to
keep them as warm as possible. All my outside plants are covered
with frostcloth. In my glasshouses, which are 4metres long, I light a
sixty-cent candle each night. In the mornings when I open them up, it
is 28°C. The candle lasts 10.5 hours.
At the May meeting, bidding on the Silent Auction was not as keen.
Perhaps there were plenty of good plants on the Trading tables.
Graham
' BROM — A — WARRA
11TH — 15TH October 2001
THE 11TH AUSTRALIAN BROMELIAD
CONFERENCE
IT’S NOT TOO LATE!
‘ THE WEATHER SHOULD BE GREAT!
THE PEOPLE WILL BE GREAT!
YOU NEED A CHANGE OF SCENERY!
THE PLANTS WILL BE DIFFERENT!
THE PEOPLE WILL BE DIFFERENT!
Interesting _
Informative _ _ _
Innovative
Invigorating
For further information about registration and accommodation
costs or anything else:
Phone Dave Anderson, Secretary, (09) 638-8671

MAY MEETING NEWS
With over 100 members regularly attending our monthly meetings,
the hall is now getting very crowded. Even so it is great to see so
many keen people interested in growing these spectacular plants. At
the meeting the question was asked as to whether members would be
interested in having weekend seminars. Although this question is
probably more pertinent to those members who cannot attend the
evening meetings, 30—40 people said yes, so the committee will
proceed with this suggestion. Another matter that came up was library
books. Members who have recently joined must get a senior or
committee member to vouch for them when borrowing expensive,
nonreplaceable books. Recently a new member borrowed the
Baensch book/Bromagic video. After six months, the librarian was
forced to visit her home in order to retrieve them.
Peter Waters led the discussion on the Show & Tell plants.
Neoregelia Sheer Joy was first with the owner wanting to know if this
plant with red/purplish lightly speckled leaves was named correctly.
This cultivar varies quite a bit and yes it was correct. Next was
Neoregelia Orange Glow - commonly called this incorrectly. The true
Neo. Orange Glow is strongly variegated whereas this plant had a
plain light orange colour to the leaves. A person with Tillandsia
punctulata wanted to know where to grow it. in Auckland it grows well
outside in sun or shade. There were two Aechmea recurvata hybrids
that had lanky deep green leaves — obviously growing in too much
shade. Charles Allan, thirty or more years ago in Auckland, made
quite a few of these unnamed hybrids that should be grown in full sun.
Neo. Royal Hawaiian with broad, dark red/purple leaves and silver
bands on the underside also wanted a name. The plant was growing
as an epiphyte but would probably do much better growing in a pot.
Peter had brought along two nidularium species — the small
scheremetiewii with 15cm long leaves and also in full flower,
Nidularium meeanum, with its beautifully coloured bright red and
green bracts and blue petals. The latter was at least double the size
of the former. Gerry Stansfield brought in a most unusual Aechmea
fasciata albomarginata. The parent plant had flowered and he had
then taken off a large single pup. After this, the plant had gone
berserk, producing 23 small pups all around the base of the plant with
pups growing on pups. Len Trotman had a large guzmania that he
had grown from seed brought in from Ecuador by Dick Endt in 1993.
The plant had a green flowerspike and was about the Size of a Guz.
squarrosa. On dissecting the flower the next day, Peter has classed
it as Guzmania gloriosa
The distinctive Canistropsis (Nidularium) billbergioides ‘Citron’, a
pup of the lethally pointed leafed Aechmea distichantha and Aechmea
racinae, known in the US as Christmas Jewels, were all identified.
Further plants to be named were Neoregelias Charm or Freckle Face
and a Catherine Wilson that had been growing in too low a light and
was quite green. Next, a Billbergia distachia or a hybrid from it, and a
large Neoregelia johannis or a hybrid from it.
Again we had the plant that is named in New Zealand as
Nidulan'um antoineanum that has as yet not been finally identified.
Lastly, Aechmea fosteriana variegata, with Des Yeates wanting to
know if this was the hybrid Bert. It was certainly brought into NZ some
years ago as Ae. fosteriana variegata but the true fosteriana has
black tips to its leaves that this one doesn’t have.
COMPETITIONS
Open flowering: 1St Andrew Steens (Guzmania sanguinea) and 2""
Chris Paterson (Guz. Mini Exodus). Also in competition were
Billbergia Bobtail, Guzmania Marjan, Neoregelias Aussie Dream ‘Little
Ol’, Spotted Delight, Royal Robe x concentrica, correia-araujoi,
(carolinae x compacta) x macwilliamsii, Vn‘eseas corcovadensis and
Bobbie.
Open foliage: 1St Glenys Guild (Vriesea Snow King) and 2"d Gerry
Stansfield (Neo. Orange Crush). Plus Neo.’s carolinae tricolor, Aussie
Dream ‘Pink Delight', Kahala Dawn, Kahala Dawn Reverse, Roseo
Lineata, Yin and a Bill. hybrid.
Tillandsiaz1St Andrew Steens (T. stricta) 2"d Len Trotman (T.
erubescens). Also shown- cyanea, Iatifolia major, ionantha, Iindenii,
parryi, punctulata and Emilie.
Plant of the month - Miniatures:1St Peter Waters (Neo. Small World
No.1), also 2"d (Neo. punctatissima). Also shown — Neo.’s Glossy
Print, Sugar & Spice, Sweetheart, ampullacea x zonata, Fireball x,
sarmentosa x chlorosticta, Cryptanthus Marian Oppenheimer and
Guzmania Mini
Novice flowering: 1St Betty Goss (Nidularium Something Special)
and 2“d Graham Foden (Til/andsia stand/eyl).
Novice foliage: 1St David Goss (Aechmea oriandiana), 2"d Gay
McDonald (Canistrum Leopardinum)
Best plant of the month: Glenys Guild (Vriesea Snow King)
Congratulations to all the winners. . Dave Anderson

THE SHY BLOOMERS
Grace Goode ‘ ‘ Queensland
The shy bloomers and those which don't flower at all! First and
foremost - Aechmea ornata. I have grown it for fifteen years and not
once has it rewarded me With a flower. The only one I have seen in
bloom was grown by an East Brisbane member of the society. A
rather spectacular flower and on the strength of its beauty, I
persevered in the hope I, too, would be similarly rewarded. A
formidable plant with dagger-like leaves, so to escape its barbs, I put
it in a corner of the garden. atop a double brick wall, which divides a
large block of units from my land. I thought it would deter dogs from
walking along this wall, enjoying a feast of bromeliads. Aechmea
ornata was most successful in this regard, but over the years grew to
gargantuan size, spilling over the wall and upsetting the caretaker of
the units. One day I found it had disappeared, pot, roots, plant and all.
I can’t say I mourned its loss.
Aechmea man'ae-reginae is another prickly monsterslts serrated
leaves are more effective on human skin than any surgeon’s scalpel,
and painless too. One becomes aware of the ondonIy when the
blood flows! The point on the end of each leaf would do credit to any
sharp-pointed instrument of torture. It does flower every four to five
years, but alas, at our hottest time of the year. The heat burns the
delicate pink bracts, so after a couple of days of glory, the beauty
vanishes. After waiting years, it is an anticlimax. In my opinion it
compares most unfavourably with Ae. pectinata. Perhaps Ae. mariae-
reginae would withstand the high temperatures if grown in a shade or
glasshouse with humidity, but mine have to grow in the open garden.
Another big aechmea, which I have never flowered, is Ae. gigantea (in
some collections as sphaerocephala). I am fond of this plant. Unlike
Ae. mariae—reginae it does not spread out and take up a lot of
valuable space but has an upright growth. In favourable light it is a
handsome plant with coloured leaves. Its thick, leathery leaves are
susceptible to cold burn and heat burn. For me it grows best in
dappled light under the protection of a tree. In spite of its reluctance to
bloom, I will always keep it in my collection.
Aechmea distichantha is another plant I have disposed of. It was
Comparatively easy to flower, but the dagger-like spines inflicted
themselves in my flesh, tried my patience and I was not sufficiently
enamoured by its flower to forgive the flesh wounds. Quesnelia
arvensis and Q. testudo no longer grace my garden. They were not
difficult to grow but the flowering time was too short. After waiting two
or three years the inflorescence should last longer than two or three
weeks. Undoubtedly they evoke much admiration, with bright, crepe-
like flower heads, but needs must! I have retained Q. marmorata and
Q. lateralis in my collection, considering them well worth a place. Q.
marmorata for its shape and colour, and Q. lateralis for the incredible
blue of the inflorescence. Pon‘ea petropolitana var. extensa now
resides out on the footpath. It is a showy plant, but it grows too big for
the confines of the garden. Ae. aquilega keeps it company, as it too,
took up more than its fair share of room.
Reprinted in part from Bromeletter, the Bromeliad Society of
Australia Inc.
BAY OF PLENTY BROMELIAD GROUP
On May 20th on a fine but windy day approximately 22 people
visited Trevor and Pam Signal’s place at Kawerau where they have
several large houses of bromeliads and orchids. Pam seems to have
gathered quite a collection now (thanks for the morning tea). Then on
to Ross Ferguson in Whakatane wherte we saw a display of
bromeliads in amongst his water features, followed by Sue and Ken
Laurent’s garden where the steep paths leading down into the bush
are lined with choice bromeliads. Lunch was followed by the Eastern
BOP meeting which we sat in on. Altogether, it was a very enjoyable
day. .
The June 13th meeting was held on a cold wintry day with about
thirty people present. There were quite a few items to be discussed re
bus trips etc. On Saturday, July 28‘“, we are expecting a return visit
from the Eastern BOP group.
Show & Tell had a great many plants on display. Amongst them
were: Neorege/ia olens ‘Vulcan’ x cruenta, Neo. Meyendorffii
(variegata), Neo. Sweetheart, Aechmea Aztec Gold, Tillandsias
neglecta and purpurea ‘Desert Star’.
Plant of the Month (Aechmea nudicaulis) had many plants on show.
Competition: 15‘: Isabel Clotworthy — Cryptanthus bivittatus minor and
15‘: Johanna Elder — Neoregelia Riens Pride
3rd Elizabeth Bailey — Billbergia Spotted Wren
Raffles were won by Grace Christie (Vriesea Hoelscheriana —
incorrectly known as Vr. kitteliana) and Gay Bambery (Hohenbergia
correia-araujoi)
Kevin Schollum -

EASTERN BAY OF PLENTY
BROMELIAD & ORCHID GROUP
Our last meeting was held at the Laurent’s home on May 20th and
what a meeting it was, We were joined by 22 members from the Bay
of Plenty Group who were having a day trip to our area. Combined
numbers were 61. We were warmly welcomed by Sue Laurent and
Isabel Clotworthy introduced the Bay of Plenty group and thanked
their hosts for the day.
.Barry Jones, one of our visitors, was the guest speaker and spoke
on, and displayed, several types of seed. Barry collects his own seed
and starts it on palm fibre. The plants he passed around looked lovely
and healthy but many of us newly hooked on bromeliads thought with
trepidation of handling such tiny plants. He also spoke on cryptanthus,
obviously a favourite plant of his and showed us a diverse range of
these. The name, he told us, was a combination of two words
meaning ‘hidden’ and ‘stars', very apt. He gave us much information
on growing these plants in an easy to follow way — most appreciated.
A range of display plants, from small flowered Australian
dendrobiums through oncidium to laelia illustrated the diverse flower
fonhs of orchids available at this time of year. But even these
beauties can’t outdo the many colours and forms of the bromeliads.
Aechmea Pink Rocket, Vriesea Splendriet and a lovely Neo. hybrid
were amongst those displayed and much admired.
Sue Laurent asked that any people who were not on our address
list, leave their names for future contact, as it is hoped to make a
garden visit to BOP soon. We broke for refreshments and for the four
raffles to be drawn, concluding the afternoon with the well supplied
sales table and a walk around the garden.
The Laurent’s garden would do justice to an article of its own.‘ it
falls away at the back of the house to a steep gully with native trees at
the bottom. From the house, the view of the garden, looking down, is
superb and letting the eye wander upward over the bush to the distant
peak of Mt. Edgecumbe makes one think that this is surely the best
way to view the plants. Until one ventures down.
Behind a small level area with a water feature surrounded by
bromeliads, paths lead backwards and forwards, down the hillside
enticing the visitorjust a little further. Succulents and bromeliads of all
descriptions abound and many other choice plants delight,
conveniently at eye level.
Christine Borlase.

Vriesea Eden Glade
Gerry Stansfield
This plant was found as a sport, attached to the parent plant of the
well—known Vriesea platynema var. variegata in 1992 by Laurie
Dephoff (who had originally donated and planted the parent), and
Peter Waters. Laurie decided to call it Eden Glade but did not do
anything about registration.
it was growing in the Bromeliad Garden, planted by the Bromeliad
Society of New Zealand in the grounds of Eden Gardens. Formerly a
disused quarry, Eden Gardens is a small botanical garden in the heart
of Auckland, bequeathed for the use of horticultural groups who have
planted it with specialist plant material.
Vn‘esea Eden Glade is considered to be one of the most beautiful
yellow striped vrieseas known. Derek Butcher, the BSI Cultivar
Registrar, considers it to be more imposing than the normal Vriesea
platynema var. variegata and so worthy of a cultivar name.
And from Derek Butcher
Here is my plan
1. Get your own computer and get access to the World Wide Web.
2. if you cannot afford this, then book time at your local library. This
is what Geoff Lawn does in Perth.
3. Let us say that you have access to the Web and you are sitting at
the computer.
4. At the space marked “Location" enter http://fcbsorg and press
enter.
You can now spend hours learning about bromeliads using the
index on the left-hand side.
You don’t have time to browse because you want to see photos!
Click onto Photo Index.
Decide what genus you want from the list.
Decide you want cultivars.
0. Decide the first letter and scroll to the photo required.
This sounds easy, which it is with a bit of practice. Plans are afoot
for a different sort of search, where for example, you can ask for
photos of Grace Goode’s hybrids or either or both of the parents of
the hybrid you want to know the name of. There are about 1500
photos of cultivars and growing. February 2000

PROPAGATION OF BROMELIADS
Len Trotman May talk.
When the parent plant has flowered, and occasionally before
flowering, the plant will produce pups or offsets. Notice here that there
is no mention of a partner in the reproduction of these offsets. This is
known as vegetative or asexual reproduction as opposed to sexual
reproduction where it is necessary to bring the male and female parts
of the plant together in order to produce seed. This is a different
process and will be dealt with at another time.
Pups usually grow from a node around the base of the plant and
can quite easily be detached from the parent plant. But in some cases;
the pups will grow near the top of the plant, quite close to the
inflorescence, making them very difficult to remove. Some of the
plants that do this are:
Guzmania sanguinea, Tillandsia latifolia, Tillandsia secunda,
Tillandsia somnians, Vriesea elata and Vriesea ospinae.
These all produce their offsets on the flower stem.
Some bromeliads, such as the Alcantareas, Tillandsia imperialis
and Vriesea glutinosa, produce what are known as grass pups. These
are small grassy type pups, which appear around the base of the
plant, usually while the plant is quite young. These can be taken off
and grown on but are terribly slow and will quite often die.
When the normal pups are large enough, they can be removed
from the parent plant. For this operation you will need either a sharp
knife, a pair of secateurs or a small saw. Cut the pup off as close to
the parent stem as possible, after first stripping away any foliage so
that you can get at the base of the pup. In the case of the plants that
have their pups near the inflorescence, this is essential because
these pups are very soft and you will need to take a small section of
the parent stem to ensure that you have a firm base on the pup.
At this stage it pays to put the pups aside for a few days to harden
off or callous before potting up. Don’t forget to write out a label for the
new plant.
The pups can be taken off from about one third the size of the
parent, but of course, the larger they are the better start they are
going to get in life. Put the old plant aside and you will invariably get
another pup or two. The number of pups that a plant produces will
‘ depend on the plant but it will range from one or two to up to a dozen
or more — but these are exceptions and l have heard of plants giving
tip to two dozen pups!
If you are very keen you can induce the plant to produce pups by
destroying the meristem. To do this you screw the middle of the plant
out with a small screwdriver. This of course prohibits the plant from
flowering and can sometimes lead to the plant’s demise.
When potting up, a small pot is usually alright for a start — anything
from a 5cm pot for very small pups (I like to start with a 12cm pot).
Bear in mind the size of the plant when it is mature. Some of the large
vrieseas will eventually need a 50cm pot and the large alcantareas
will eventually need something like a half barrel for optimum growth. I
am of the opinion that the pot and the plant should be in balance and
the plant should not be constricted.
Not all pups are exact clones of their parents and, when this
happens, the pups are known as sports. For instance, a green leafed
plant will produce a pup with some form of variegation or different leaf
colour. But to be sure that these markings are stable, the plant must
be grown on for at least another generation, as plants will very often
revert back to the original. When stability is assured, then this plant
can be registered as a new cultivar with a different name. This is
particularly the case when plants are grown from seed, hence the
large number of plants with different names but which are closely
related.
' I hope that this has shed some light on the intricacies of
propagation from one amateur to another. Good luck with your
growing.
i! MERISTEM...The growing tissue made up of actively dividing cells,
particularly at the tips of roots and at the apex of vegetable or floral
shoots.
it- SPORT...A spontaneous deviation from the typical appearance.
The opinions expressed in letters or articles in this magazine are the
authors’ own views and do not necessarily express the policy of the
Bromeliad Society of New Zealand.
IN THE GLASSHOUSE
Aechmea biflora (formerly Streptocalyx biflorus)
Graham Alderson
This attractive plant has many leaves, 60cm long, narrow, stiff and
brittle with sharp spines to the edges.
The plant if grown in bright light, grows very upright and is usually
light green to yellow. When flowering comes, the plant produces
bright red colouration to the centre and starts to lie flat. A bright yellow
inflorescence, red tipped to the lower bracts and approximately 10cm
in diameter protrudes 60cm. The lilac/purple flowers are short lasting,
turning black.
The whole plant stays this colour for around eight weeks.
Like all the streptocalyx species, it requires hot, humid conditions to
grow well.
Aechmea biflora is native to Ecuadorian rainforest.
Grown and photographed by Graham Alderson
TILLAN DSIAS
New Seasons Imports
PORTUGAL CORK
Direct Import. Ideal for displaying
tillandsias and other epiphytes
2001 Colour Catalogue $2 - cost refunded with order
Anwyl Bromeliads, P.0. Box 57021, Mana 6230
or visit our website www.anwy|.com
Bottom photo:
Another view of the Paterson garden, showing the blue and white
checked pool raised above the surrounding plants.
Photo: Louise Joyce
SEED BANK —
Aechmea — coelestis v. coelestis, coelestis (from albomarginata),
lueddemanniana (from medio-picta), nudicaulis v. cuspidata,
spectabilis, williamsii
Billbergia - vittata
Dyckia - altissima, brevifolia, platyphylla, rariflora, remotiflora var.
montevidensis
Edmundoa — lindenii v. rosea
Fosterella - penduliflora
Guzmania — Iingulata v. Iingulata
Neoregelia — pascoaliana
Nidularium -— amazonicum
Orthophytum - foliosum
Puya — coerulea v. violacea, grafii, mirabilis, venusta
Racinaea — fraseri
Tillandsia — bartramii, beI/oensis, balbisiana, capillaris, fasciculata,
flabe/lata, gardneri, hotteana, ionantha, juncea (large form), Iimbata,
multicaulis, myosura, paucifolia, polystachia, pseudobaileyi, pohliana,
schiedeana (small form), stricta (green leaf), tricolor, viridiflora
Ursulaea — macvaughii (ten seeds while stocks last).
Vriesea — fosteriana (rubra), hieroglyphica, platynema, scalaris,
schwackeana
Werauhia — gigantea
New seed received from Bob Hudson, Paul Robertson, Pat
Sweeney, Gerry Stansfield, Laurie Dephoff and Raewyn Adams.
0 The seedbank will exchange two packets of 20 seeds for one (1)
large packet of your seed. Make sure it is labelled correctly.
Please send in a large stamped envelope.
Packets (of at least 20 seeds) are 50 cents.
. Limited to one packet of seed per kind per member.
ORDERS:
with large, stamped, addressed envelope and spare seed to:
Gerry Stansfield, 7 Noall Street, Te Atatu Peninsula, Auckland.
Telephone (09) 834-7178
NEXT MEETING: July 11"1 at 1pm. Plant of the month: Any seedling
bought at the cIL_i_lL
POTTERING ABOUT
The Garden Centre on the Grow
BROMELIADS
FROM SEEDLING TO FLOWERING SIZE
AND MUCH, MUCH MORE
........
Orchids &
orchid flasks
Palms
Succulents
and all kinds of subtropical plants
If you are in the Whakatane area please call in
and visit us
Situated 250m along Military Road (S.H.34)
from its junction with (S.H.30)
Te Teko end
Jim and Sharon Gilchrist
Phone/Fax (07) 322-820_1__ l

EXOTICA
TROPICAL DISPLAY GARDENS
NEW ZEALANDS LARGEST
BROMELIAD NURSERY
Our thanks to all those members who made the journey to
Exotica over the Easter weekend. It was great to see you.
We sold more plants than ever before but our production is
increasing and we have lots more plants for you.
We have committed ourselves to having at least one hundred
(100) types of bromeliad (usually more than 120) on the sales
tables at all times. With over 350 species and hybrids in stock,
the selection is always changing.
As each variety comes into the main flowering season, it is
often discounted heavily.
At the moment, many Aechmea and Canistropsis varieties are
on sale at up to 50% off list price.
Of course you can also visit just to lie in the hammock and
bask in the warmth of the tropical area while you look at the
display of flowering bromeliads!
Our open hours are now 7 days 10am — 5pm
11 1 Point Wells Road, Matakana
Warkworth
(Take the Leigh Road to the Omaha Beach Turnoff
then head into Point Wells Village).
Phone (09) 422-9646
. Fax (09) 422-9647
email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
.
NORTHLAND BROMELIAD GROUP
The May meeting was held at the new Russell Road Quarry
Garden, which is going to be a fabulous facility for the city of
Whangarei in years to come. We could all appreciate how much work
has already gone into developing the garden and how much work has
yet to be done. The Trust has already planted a Camellia Walk. Their
collection includes Jim Finlay’s collection of scented camellias.
After our meeting, Jack Tucker from the Quarry Trust gave some
of our members a guided tour up to the lake and around some of the
paths. Where the water will spill out of the lake, we have selected an
area nearby to plant with bromeliads, but we cannot begin planting
before spring when the lake is filled and some work involving
machinery is completed in that area.
There was much discussion at our meeting regarding meeting
format and where meetings will be held. Our group is getting too large
to hold meetings in private homes and yet most members favoured
that option over a venue such as a local hall. It was decided that, if we
did continue to meet in homes, we would forgo afternoon tea. Anyone
who wanted a “cuppa” could bring their own flask etc.
Maureen Green gave us a demonstration on how to remove a pup
from a neoregelia and pot it up. Some discussion was had on how to
remove more difficult pups from some types of guzmanias and
vrieseas.
Jacqui O’Connell
NEXT MEETING: will be a trip to Exotica Tropical Gardens at Point
Wells on Sunday June 24‘".
NEW MEMBERS
Evetts, Shirley, 8 Alpha Avenue, Whakatane.
Flanagan, R & M, Box 193, Drury.
Going, Lois, RD3, Whangarei.
Major, Betty, 1A Kotuku Street, Te Atatu North, Ak.
Menzies, Annette, 79 Boyd Road, Poraiti, RDZ, Napier.
Palethorpe, Jill, RD7, Palmerston North. (rejoined)
Perry, Lois, 95 Jervois Road, Herne Bay, Ak.
Reilly, Robert, 66 Agnes Street, Auchenflower, Queensland, 4066.
Shearer, Auriel, 27 Ring Terrace, St. Marys Bay, Ak.
Tumer, Bill & Debbie, Smiths Road, RD 2, Waiuku.
Williams, Suzanne, 15 Blossom Lane, Manurewa, Ak.
AN AUCKLAND RAINFOREST - the garden of
Chris and Rosemary Paterson
Louise Joyce
Seven years ago, Chris and Rosemary packed up their
possessions, including children, animals, birds and plants and moved
to a large, sheltered, sloping section in Hillsborough, which had the
potential for a great garden. They liked the lay of the land, which
faces north and tracks east to west, as well as its size. At just under
an acre, it would give them the opportunity to carry out their vision of
a large subtropical garden, inspired by reading several books on the
topic (especially The Subtropical Garden — Gil Henley/Jacqueline
Walker). The land had been used as a market garden and contained
several greenhouses, a spacious house, which allowed Chris to run
his curtain and blindmaking business from home, but not much else.
The first task was to establish the infrastructure by building tiers of
solid retaining walls down the eastern slope below the driveway and
house entrance. Rosemary's brother, Paul Sheehan, contributed
much heavy labour and inspiration.
“it all gradually unfolded. The ornamental garden went in and we
planted palms — Bangalows (Archontophoenix cunninghamiana)
Queens (Syagrus romanzoffiana) and Washingtonias. As the paths
were pushed out eastward, we put in tropical fruit trees, including Inga
Bean, avocado (Persea), banana (there are seven types in the
garden), cherimoya/custard apple (Annona cherimola), coffee,
pawpaw (Carica), loquat (Eriobotrya), tamarillo (Cyphomandra) and a
tropical guava, which didn't survive"
in keeping with the “jungle” theme, they added jungle fowl
(bantams) to forage around, while at the bottom of the slope, the
raised garden beds were removed to create a stretch of open lawn
where the kids could play. It took a couple of years to finish, and as
the canopy grew, they started underplanting and this is where the
bromeliad collection was used.
Chris’s introduction to bromeliads began when a flatmate brought
home a strange but impressive plant she called a “brom-ee—lid” and
described as “a sort of orchidy thing”. It was in fact an Aechmea
fasciata. Much later, when the interest in subtropicals developed, they
were exposed to the “full glory” of bromeliads with a visit to ‘Plants
Galore’ which was then a giant bromeliad conservatory. They bought
a collection of them and started growing them on ponga logs, in pots
and in the garden among the palms. However, not long aftenrvards
they bought the Hillsborough property and moved the lot with them.
Those bromeliads, mainly neoregelias, were used as under
plantings and at that stage they were very much a small part of the
garden -— Chris was more focused on the palms of which there are
now at least six varieties including the unusual Caryota (Fish Tail
Palm). When the bromeliads pupped, they were cut off, potted up and
plonked into a quiet area of the greenhouse and forgotten about.
A few months later Chris discovered “these fantastic things in the
corner". A friend mentioned that he had joined the Bromeliad Society
and another of Rosemary’s brothers (Simon) said he was also joining.
The end result was that all three fronted up at a September meeting in
1998. Since then, bromeliads have become an important part of their
garden and life (Chris has just been elected to the committee).
Rosemary, who has formed an eye-catching succulent garden along
the top of the section, is fortunately also keen on bromeliads. She has
made a special contribution to the garden by creating beautiful pots,
covered with small bright tiles, which provide a blaze of colour in this
predominantly green garden. Other colour comes from stands of
Cordyline terminalis (Ti) with its tropical leaves, as well as orange
abutilon, red iresine, clivias, cannas in orange, red and yellow and
crucifix (Epidendrum radicans) orchids. Impatiens is also used as a
filler to provide colour.
There is constant ebb and flow of bromeliads as Chris replaces
spent ones with fresh plants from the greenhouse. Others, such as
Neoregelias Dr. Oesers Red and marmorata are permanent fixtures
growing on rock walls, wood and ponga logs. They have been used to
form a beautiful surround and backdrop to the water feature, which
Chris created after several hard months of digging, hand-mixing
metres of concrete and moving rocks (he managed to avoid a hernia).
The tile covered (Rosemary) pond was finished and immediately filled
with rocks so his small children wouldn’t drown, but thanks to certain
fittings on a charming sandstone statue, the sound of splashing water
can be heard from the office.
It was a chilly, grey day when we wandered around the property,
accompanied by the fiercely protective Australian Blue Heeler (ginger-
red) Other Australian influences were apparent with a yellow Banksia
flowering high above and Firewheel trees (Sterculia sinuatus)
flowering red. An lllawarra Flame Tree (Brachychiton acerifolius),
along with a Brazilian Fern Tree (Schizolobium parahybum) are now
towering above the top deck of the three storied house. Natives
include variegated karaka, lancewood, Great Barrier Island nikau,
cabbage trees, “Silver Fern (Cyathea dealbata) and the Wheki-Ponga
(Dickson/a fibrosa). But the garden is changing. Chris is considering
planting more nidulariums because the denser canopy is reducing the
light available to the neoregelias.
There are still a couple of large projects ahead. The major one is
to the west of the property where recently much money was spent,
taking out a giant forty-five year old pine tree on the slope beside the
house. lts felling had opened up the entire area that Chris and
Rosemary now plan to landscape.
There will also be a swimming pool (if the bank manager allows) to
keep the three children happy while Mum and Dad wander around the
garden and ponder the next stage.
Then there is a large vacant patch where an unwanted
greenhouse once stood and which Chris intends turning into a
vegetable garden while below, rows of Dracaena draco and Nolina
(Beaucarnea) recurvata that he grew from seed await planting. The
greenhouse is currently being revamped, with plastic sheeting being
rolled around the treated wood areas and experimenting with layers of
shadecloth for certain times of the year and for certain bromeliads he
is growing. Neoregelias, he says, need high light while variegated
ones don't need as much. He’s working on getting that balance. The
thing that still impresses about bromeliads is their user-friendliness,
their hardiness and their ability to grow with very little effort for a very
big reward.
Describing themselves as collectors of things, they reckon
bromeliads help sate that passion. “The beauty of them is that you
can quench your thirst for something new and it is not going to cost a
fortune to so".
WANTED
Neoregelia Royal Hawaiian
Vriesea platynema x gigantea
Vriesea Red Chestnut x gigantea
DAPHNE SANFT...please phone or fax (09) 299-9002 if you have
any to sell.
OFFICERS
PATRON & LIFE MEMBER Mrs. Bea Hanson (09)527-6830
HISTORIAN & LIFE MEMBER Laurie Dephoff (09)527-—7789
PRESIDENT Graham West (09)298—3479
VICE-PRESIDENTS Lester Ching (09)576—4595
Marjorie Lowe (09)376-6874
SECRETARY Dave Anderson (09)638-8671
TREASURER Peter Waters (09)534-5616
EDITOR Marjorie Lowe (09)376~6874
LIBRARIAN Des Yeates (09)838—6535
COMMITTEE Owen Bird (07)576-2766
Bev Ching (09)576—4595
Brian Dawson (09)837—4598
VWlma Fitzgibbons (09)624-6469
Murray Mathieson (09)418—0366
Chris Paterson (09)625-6007
Noelene Ritson (09)625-8114
AUDITOR Colin Gosse
LIFE MEMBERS Harry Martin
Patricia Perratt
Patricia Sweeney
SCIENTIFIC OFFICER Peter Waters
CULTIVAR REGISTRAR Gerry Stansfield
JOURNAL
Please send articles, photographs and advertisements to the Editor, PO.
Box 91-728, AUCKLAND. Phone/ Fax (09) 376-6874.
Deadline for copy is the FIRST Tuesday of each month.
ADVERTISING RATES
One third page (12 — 13 lines) $8.00
BACK COVER
Two views of Chris and Rosemary Paterson’s garden, showing the
extensive range of plant material — palms, bananas, treeferns,
cordylines, alocasias, ferns, impatiens and of course, bromeliads.
In seven years the growth is amazing and the palms are already
well advanced. While not as rapid as in the tropics, our climate lends
itself to a growth rate that can make a young garden look mature.
Photos: Louise Joyce
* Printed by Balmoral Office Systems Ph (09)631-5693 Fax (09)623-7440



August 2001
Vol.41 No.8
Ie ty of New Zealand Inc.
BROMELIAD
Soc
BROMELIAD SOCIETY OF NEW ZEALAND (INC).
Affiliated with the Bromeliad Society International.
The Society was officially formed on the 28th. August, 1962.
The objects of the society are to encourage the cultivation and study of bromeliads
grown indoors or outdoors and in particular -
(a) To promote discussion and arrange instruction on cultivation,
propagation and control of diseases.
(b) To provide a library for members.
(c) To assist members to identify plants.
(d) To make awards for outstanding new bromeliads.
(e) To hold shows or public exhibitions.
(f) To promote the distribution of bromeliads amongst
members by exchange, purchase and sale, and to
encourage the importation of new plants.
(9) To affiliate with any Society or other body, and to do
such things as may be deemed necessary or desirable
in the furtherance of these objects.
(h) To accept affiliation from other Societies having similar
objects.
MEETINGS
Held on the FOURTH Tuesday of each month except December, at
Greyfriars Church Hall, 544 Mt. Eden Road, Auckland at 7:30pm.
MEMBERSHIP SUBSCRIPTIONS
New Zealand NZ$20.00 Ordinary
NZ$ 500 Associate (same household)
Overseas A$30.00 Australia
US$20.00 United States and other overseas
Send all payments to the Treasurer, Peter Waters, 22 Halfmoon Rise,
Bucklands Beach, AUCKLAND.
CORRESPONDENCE
All general correspondence should be sent to the Secretary, Bromeliad
Societv of New Zealand. 33 Marsden Avenue. Mt. Eden. AUCKLAND. 4.
FRONT COVER Aechmea tessmannii
This is a large impressive species, having spiny leaves 70-90cm in
length and spreading to 50-7OCm.The inflorescence is 25-30cm high,
spreading to 20cm and is bright red and yellow. lt maintains its colour-
for many weeks. Two species are grown here: one green and the
other maroon. Both are the same size, the green species being the
more difficult and slower growing. The inflorescence shown is from
the maroon plant. This is a species from the Amazon region and looks
extremely tough. It can inflict a lot of injury. This is a glasshouse
subject as it does not like the cold.
Text, photographed & grown by Graham Alderson
CONTENTS

From the President
July meeting news
Surprise flowering
Graham & Judith Alderson - slides
Neoregelia carolinae f. tricolor
and other variegated bromeliads
Bay of Plenty Bromeliad Group
Early spring in south Florida
Easter Bay of Plenty Bromeliad Group
Northland Bromeliad Group
Huntington Gardens — slides
Wellington Tillandsia Study Group
Seedbank
Officers, journal and advertising
COMING EVENTS
AUGUST
Graham West
Dave Anderson
Olwen Ferris
Peter Waters
Gerry Stansfield
Lynley Breeze
Ergo l Gonzales
Christine Borlase
Jacqui O’Connell
Brian Dawson
Phyllis Purdie
Andrew Flower
Gerry Stansfield
26th Northland Bromeliad Group at Rainbow Falls Nurseries at
Rainbow Falls Road, Kerikeri.
28th Auckland Meeting, Greyfriars Hall at 7:30pm.
Talk: Bromeliads and cold (Dave Anderson)
Monthly plant competition: Billbergias
SEPTEMBER
4th Deadline for copy for the September Journal.
12th Bay of Plenty Bromeliad Group — meeting at 11:45am at the
Tauranga Yacht Clubrooms. Guest speaker — Peter Waters.
Potluck finger food lunch
14/ 16th Tauranga Orchid Society — display, sales & demonstration.
Wellington Tillandsia Study Group at the home of Myra &
Morris Tarr, 32 Plunket Avenue, Petone at 1:30pm.
Auckland meeting, Greyfriars Hall at 7:30pm.
23rd
2 5th
Talk: Importing plants (Len Trotman)
Talk: Seeds — the basics (Gerry Stansfield)
Monthly plant competition: Aechmea recurvata — varieties
and cultivars
OCTOBER
2nd Deadline for copy for the October Journal.
FROM THE PRESIDENT
Due to Graham West’s recent stay in hospital, we wish him the
best as he recovers from a major operation.
One hundred and nineteen people, members plus visitors,
attended the July meeting — another record. With these numbers
continuing, more plants are badly needed for the trading table.
The committee has received the resignation of Marjorie Lowe as
the Editor of the Journal. She will finish with the November issue,
which completes volume 41. We are all sorry to hear the news.
Anyone with experience in this field or who wishes to become
involved, should contact the Secretary, Dave Anderson, (telephone
638-8671) for further information. The Society supplies a computer,
printer and fax machine. A small honorarium is paid.
Decisions are being finalised by the committee of the Bromeliad
Society of New Zealand for the 2003 Bromeliad Conference.
1...The date of the Conference is the 7th to the 10th of March,
2003.
2...The venue will be the Waipuna Hotel and Conference
Centre, Mt Wellington, Auckland.
Lester Ching
Vice President
the July front cover. The insert in this month’s Journal will, if pasted in,
ERROR — The wrong photograph (Aechmea tessmannil) was used on
give the correct text for the photograph.
BROM — A - WARRA
BROMELIAD CONFERENCE - 11TH —15TH October 2001
IT’S NOT TOO LATE!
THE WEATHER SHOULD BE GREAT!
THE PEOPLE WILL BE WELCOMING! .
YOU NEED A CHANGE OF SCENERY!
THE PLANTS WILL BE DIFFERENT!
THE PEOPLE WILL BE DIFFERENT!
For further information about registration and accommodation
costs or anything else:
Phone Dave Anderson, Secretary, (09) 638-8671
4
JUNE MEETING NEWS
Late winter and the meeting had 119 members in attendance!!
Lester Ching chaired the meeting in the absence of Graham West
who was recuperating from surgery. We wish him all the best for a
speedy recovery.
The discussion on the Show & Tell plants was chaired by Peter
Waters. The first plant was Vriesea ospinae with leaves turning a
yellow/brown, the plant having flowered some months ago. The
yellow/brown leaves would have been caused by the colder winter
temperatures that we have had this year. Certainly far colder than the
last 4 or 5 years in Auckland and, I dare say, around New Zealand
generally. I have found that this species thrives in warmer
temperatures to form clumps of thirty plus plants in a few years. The
owner wanted to know if the brown flower spike had been fertilised.
Although some bromeliads self-fertilise with the aid of insects etc.
there were no seedpods on this spike. If you want a plant to set seed
it pays to wipe over all the flowers with a small paintbrush or similar
when the flowers are fully open
Peter had brought in a rare plant from Panama — Ronnbergia
petersii. It is a very plain plant that has very few redeeming features to
admire. Next was a small Tillandsia secunda that had a lot of brown
leaves and was not looking very well at all. The owner wanted to
know where it should be grown. This is a very easy plant to grow as,
in its native habitat, it grows in full sun on rocks at an altitude of
2800m. This is where l have seen them growing on the Inca Trail.
An Aechmea gamosepala ‘Mardi Gras’ was displayed to show
what this variegated plant looks like compared with the marginated
form (Lucky Stripes) that was displayed last month. Peter Waters had
brought in another unusual plant with blue flowers — Nidularium
atalaiaense. Andrew Steens had two plants that he had grown from
seed as Aechmea Iueddemanniana. They were quite different from
each other so it was probable that they may have come from
Aechmea Iueddemanniana but had been crossed with another plant.
We had two slide shows this month — the first by Brian Dawson
with slides from the Huntington Gardens in Los Angeles. The second
was by Peter Waters with a beautiful collection of slides from Graham
and Judith Alderson’s fabulous collection of bromeliads in their plastic
houses at Rangiora. .
The door prizes this month were won by Murray Mathieson, Ulrike
McLachlan and Roy Morton. The special raffle was won by Len
Trotman who, having brought the plant in, donated it to next month’s
raffle. Kieran Whelan won the Conference 2003 raffle.
COMPETITIONS
Open flowering: 1St Jenny Gallagher (Vriesea saundersii x
bituminosa variegata and 2nd Andrew Steens (Aechmea Burgundy.
Also in the competition were Neo.’s carolinae tricolor, Remember Me
and Kahala Dawn, Guzmania wittmackii and Vriesea Red Chestnut x
platynema.
Open foliage: 19‘t Len Trotman (Guzmania Gisela — variegated
yellow) and he was also 2"d (Neo. Inferno). In the competition were
Neorgelias Brazilian #3 and #4, Break of Day, Barbarian, Mercury and
carolinae x marmorata hybrid, Vriesea hieroglyphica and fosteriana
(rubra).
Tillandsia:1St Len Trotman (T. chiapensis) and also 2nd Len Trotman
(T. ionantha ‘Hand Grenade’. Also on the table were T.’s bulbosa and
ehlersiana.
Plant of the month - Guzmanias:1St Gerry Stansfield (Guz.
sanguinea and 2nd Gay McDonald (Guz. Fireworks). As well there
were Giesela, Mandarin, Orangeade, Fiesta and Symphony.
Novice flowering: 1St Kelly Omeara (Neo. Fosperior Perfection) and
2nd David Goss (Canistropsis billbergioides).
Novice foliage: 1St Betty Goss (Neoregelia Orange Crush) and 2"d
David Goss (Neo. Marcon).
Best plant of the month: Equal — Gerry Stansfield (Guzmania
sanguinea) and Gay McDonald (Guzmania Fireworks).
Congratulations to all the winners.
Dave Anderson
NEW MEMBERS
Beals, Colleen & Tom, 210 Alexander Street, Papakura.
Shea, Doris, 15 Cedar Grove, Tauranga.
Sherman, Bryan, 122 Avondale Road, Avondale, Ak.
Smith, Eunice, Box 36, Waiuku.
Sutherland, Pauline & Grant, SH 10, R02, Kerikeri.
Swan, Estelle, 2/43 Atkin Avenue, Mission Bay, Ak.
Van der Coer, Margaret, 8 Coronation Avenue, Pukekohe.
Wardlaw, Diana & William, Hodges Road, Box 58, Waimana.
6
SURPRISE FLOWERING
Olwen Ferris Queensland
While we still had our nursery in Sydney, a man came looking for a
bromeliad capable of flowering at the time of the annual Royal Easter
Show. I had one billbergia that flowered at that time of the year and
was able to find a flowered plant of Billbergia Charles Webb with five
offsets attached. I advised my customer to cut the parent away,
leaving the offsets on the old rootstock and to repot the clump into a
larger pot. He asked me to show him how and l demonstrated with the
help of a serrated knife. As he left, I offered him the parent plant
saying that it would produce more offsets, but he said to keep it to
make up for the time I had spent helping him. l took the old plant out
into the garden and stood it upright at the base of an azalea and
promptly forgot it.
The following year, with the Easter Show and the judging of the
plants in the Horticultural Pavilion, l got a most excited phone call
from the same man. He had won not only Grand Champion in the
bromeliad section, but Grand Champion Potted Plant of the whole
show. All five attached tubes of that Billbergia Charles Webb had
flowered at one time — a very fitting memorial to Mr. Webb who was
one of the early members of The Bromeliad Society.
I suddenly remembered the old mother plant in the azalea bed.
There it was with several offsets and another inflorescence. l lifted it
from the garden to make sure, but it was no mistake, the scape came
from the old vase. This was the first time I could say for sure that a
plant flowered for the second time.
The second such happening was with Billbergia Fantasia. Most of
my plants were cut back for our move from Sydney to Queensland,
but noticing signs of flowering low down in the tube, I left one Bill.
Fantasia in its pot untouched. lt duly rewarded us with flowers and
later an offset. When the flower stem had dried off I gave it a twist and
pulled it out. Since the parent kept its fresh appearance the mother
and daughter looked like identical twins. Twelve months later I
happened to look into the daughter, which was still attached to the
mother plant, and remarked that it was going to flower. Shortly
aftenivards, my husband took the pot down for a better look and called
out that both plants were going to flower. They both had perfect
inflorescences. In both cases, I remembered that I had removed the
old flower spikes soon after their petals had shrivelled. Did this trigger
7
the second flowering? Both plants were hybrids. Was there something
in their makeup to cause this happening?
I have since had a third plant, Aechmea caudata var. variegata
flower with a normal central inflorescence for a second time. A fourth,
Nidulan'um procerum, flowered normally the first year, but the
following year produced one bract and a tiny bunch of flowers from
four of the bottom leaves. I found the flowers when removing leaves
to get at three offsets higher up the stern. After putting those offsets
aside for stock, I removed the old flowerspike, dried off the base of
the plant and then placed it upright in an eight-inch pot half filled with
mix. It produced two offsets this time and while removing them, I
noticed another spike starting. After the second flowering, there were
three more offsets. I again removed the old flower spike. It is now
winter, over three years since the first flowering and three more
offsets will be ready for removal in the spring.
The plant is still a lovely twelve-leaved rosette with no leaf tip
dieback. I wonder — might it flower three times?
Reprinted from the 38/ Journal, Volume34 Number 6 (1984)
JOURNAL EDITOR REQUIRED
Due to the resignation of our present Editor, we require someone
to take over this position by the end of November.
A computer, printer and a fax machine are supplied by the Society.
An honorarium plus expenses will be paid.
Extra help is available if required.
It is not necessary for the Editor to reside in Auckland.
For further information, contact:
Graham West (President) Dave Anderson (Secretary)
1 Cameron Street 33 Marsden Avenue
Papakura 1703 Mt Eden, Auckland 4
Ptax (09) 298-3479 (09) 638-8671
The opinions expressed in letters or articles in this magazine are the
authors’ own views and do not necessarily express the policy of the
Bromeliad Society of New Zealand.
8
L.
exotica
TROPICAL DISPLAY GARDENS
NEW ZEALANDS LARGEST
BROMELIAD NURSERY
We have had many Bromeliad Society members
come and visit over the past months, but a special
thank you to the Whangarei Bromeliad Group who
were a delight to have here. We hope to see you
again soon!
Some of the more unusual plants in flower this
month include Bromelia balansae, Aechmea
spectabilis, Aechmea Little Harv and yes, we have
limited numbers of smaller plants for each of these.
New this month are many of our Brazilian hybrid
neoregelias, several of which we are selling for
the first time. Over forty varieties of neoregelia
are on offer at present from $8.00 to $28.00, with
more to come with spring.
Our open hours are 7 days — 10am to 5pm.
111 Point Wells Road, Matakana,
Warkworth
(Take the Leigh Road to the Omaha Beach
Turnoff, then head into Point Wells Village).
Phone (09) 422-9646 Fax (09) 422-9647
email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
0800 111BROM (2766)
GRAHAM AND JUDITH ALDERSON
Peter Waters July - Slides
In May Jeanette and I took off for Christchurch for a few days. The
main purpose of the visit was a cooking seminar that my wife wanted
to attend and l tagged along with the thought that I could catch up
with Graham and Judith Alderson.
The Aldersons live at Rangiora, about 40km north of Christchurch,
on a 15 acre block. They joined the Bromeliad Society in 1993, soon
after they became interested in bromeliads and in the intervening
period have built up an extensive collection. Because of their climate,
which can be much colder and also much hotter than Christchurch,
they have had to build an ever-expanding set of twin-skinned plastic
houses, which need heating in winter and a variety of cooling systems
in the heat of summer.
The water supply is from a bore and is a problem in winter when it
is too cold to put directly on the plants and has to be warmed up.
Top photo:
(1) Neoregelia The Rose
(2) Neoregelia (carolinae x Painted Lady) x (Takemura princeps x
Meyendorffii)
(3) Neoregelia Manoa Beauty
(4) Neoregelia melanodonta
(5) Neoregelia Empress
(6) Neoregelia Break of Day
(7) Neoregelia (carolinae x Painted Lady) x (Meyendorffii x Royal
Burgundy)
(8) Aechmea Friederike
Bottom:
(1) Billbergia Ya Yee
(2) TiIIandsia prodigiosa
(3) TiIIandsia xerographica
(4) TiIIandsia Eric Knobloch
(5) TiIIandsia Creation
(6) Vriesea phillipocoburgii
(7) Aechmea Fascini
Photos: Peter Waters
10
During the summer the plants are misted according to electronic
readings of humidity and temperature. These readings also dictate the
opening and closing of vents to prevent the build-up of too much heat.
As Graham is a builder by trade and has a great knowledge of
electronics, everything is automated and they can go off on holiday
knowing that all the systems will continue to operate.
The latest plastic house is being doubled in size and Graham had
laid the concrete floor and was ready to put up the framing. Under the
floor he had dug an extensive cavern and filled it with large boulders,
which abound on the farm. During the day the hot air from inside the
ceiling will be pumped into the cavern and at night the boulders will
give out the heat to warm the concrete floor.
As we were staying with Graham and Judith, and because
Jeanette was away all day at her seminar, I was able to spend about
eight hours a day studying, photographing, discussing names and
histories of plants and generally enjoying myself doing what I like
best.
As the winter had just started it was quite pleasant inside the
houses, unlike summer where the temperature can reach 40°C and it
is really too hot to be in for any length of time.
Even in winter the colour of the neoregelias is still very good,
obviously assisted by the warmth, and the overall health of the plants
is excellent. I particularly noticed the faster rate of growth than we
have in Auckland. For instance, miniature neoregelias, which I have
had for several years (and are now forming small clumps), have
become basketfuls after only one year. Some plants that I have had
for three or four years without pupping, have produced countless
offspring. This can only be attributed to the extra warmth, as the
Aldersons do not fertilise to any great extent. One of the houses has a
large collection of frogs, which inhabit the plants and at this time of
year are in hibernation. It can be quite disconcerting to awaken
accidentally one of these and have it leap out at you.
One of Graham’s other interests is his computer. He has a great
collection of photographs taken with a digital camera and kept on
discs. In one of the houses, he has set up a mini studio with plant
holder and backings of two different colours to make the picture taking
quick and foolproof. Obviously he spends a great deal of time with
their collection but the results are well worth it and I was sorry to leave
at the end of the weekend.
I look fonlvard to the next time in anticipation of the continuing
changes I know he will make.
12
“ I ”
ENEOREGELIA CAROLINAE FORMA TRICOLOR
AND OTHER VARIEGATED BROMELIADS
Gerry Stansfield
(This is the second part of my talk that I gave at the Auckland June
meeting).
No doubt many of you have experienced that your Neoregelia
carolinae f. tn'color can in fact revert and send up plain green pups
and also that perhaps your most precious other variegated plant has
sent up plain (non variegated) pups. We will briefly look at the
reasons why this happens. I say briefly because it is a technical
subject that, although extremely interesting, would take too long
tonight but could be the subject of a talk on another evening.
Cmnecfionalficwofahahuebmefiadsm.
The above illustration shows, or is meant to show, the base of your
neoregelia if you were to cut it off at the base of the leaves like a
cabbage. You can see that a small auxiliary bud has been added to
represent a new pup about to form. The outside of the base is called
the epidermis and the centre is called the vascular core (this is where
the green comes from). In a new bud or pup it is here that the shoot
meristem is taken for tissue culture in clonal multiplication.
In the case of variegates e.g. Neoregelia carolinae f. tn'color and
others, there is another ring called the albinistic tissue ring that is
either white or cream and surrounds the stem perimeter or epidermis.
This ring can be fixed or unstable. It can be temporary or permanent.
13
1 2 . ' 3
Types of variegation in cross-section.
You can see from the illustration above that l have darkened the
outside wall to represent the albinistic tissue ring.
In picture (1) we can see that the albinistic tissue ring completely
surrounds the base, so that pups coming from this plant would
duplicate the parent plant — all the pups would be variegated. i might
add that this type is extremely rare and that some forms of this type
can produce a very high proportion of variegated seedlings.
in picture (2) there are small segments of albinistic tissue around
the epidermis, which means that both green and variegated pups will
occur.
In picture (3) the albinistic tissue is confined to only one area and
the plant will produce mostly wholly green pups. Any variegated ones
are likely to be very unstable and very often revert to plain green.
I would repeat that this has been a very brief overview of the
causes of variegation in bromeliads. Type two and type three are the
most common but if you have a variegated plant that consistently
(even to the bitter end) has variegated pups then it is possible that
you have type one.
Top: Neoregelia Sheer Delight x carolinae f. tricolor. As yet
unnamed, this hybrid has been bred by Avon Ryan of Whangarei.
Bottom: Neoregelia Sheer Delight x Meyendorffii variegata. Also
bred by Avon Ryan and as yet unnamed.
Both these hybrids are growing into outstanding new plants.
Photos: Gerry Stansfield
15
At the meeting I produced a number of examples of all three types
and especially of type three where the pups had started out as
tricolor but the variegations had gradually got weaker until the plants
had reverted. There are a few lessons for us all here. They are NOT
to pass on plants that show a weakness in the variegation. It is better
to keep the plant or destroy it, rather than pass it on to the
disappointment of a fellow grower. It is not only Neoregelia carolinae
f. tricolor that has this problem. Some neoregelias are very prone to it
such as Neoregelia Spots and Dots (tristis x Fosperior Perfection).
Neo. Burbank x Dark Delight is another one. Even the beautiful Neo.
Fosperior ‘Perfection’ is not averse to sending up a plain red pup at
times. I know someone who found this out to his horror after spending
quite a lot of money to get the plant. One of the reasons for this could
be that type one plants were not used in the hybridisation process and
therefore some instability in the albinistic tissue ring was present - not
always easy to detect. With DNA it will be easy but only large
nurseries carrying out hybridisation will be in a position to do this.
So if you are swapping or selling your variegated plant, please do
make sure that the variegations are well established. Otherwise we
are only passing on the problem and let’s face it, there are enough
problems out there now in the bromeliad world.
iii June issue, page 9...|n discussing the possibility of Neoregelia
carolinae f. tricolor being developed from seed, the article should
have said “we know that if we grow Neoregelia carolinae in quantity
from seed, there is a high possibility that you will get a variegated
plant”.
BAY OF PLENTY BROMELIAD GROUP
The Annual General Meeting was held on the 8th August 2001.
Isabel Clotworthy presented her report and noted the growth in
membership of the group over the last year, the excellent venue, the
expansion of the library, the healthy financial state and the number of
special displays held throughout the year. The president thanked the
many members of the group whose steady contribution ensured that
the group ran so well. It was agreed that the subscription would
remain at $15.00, or at $20.00 per household, payable now to Lynley
Roy. The following officers were elected:
President Gay Bambery
Secretary Johanna Elder
Treasurer Lynley Roy
16
Librarian Anna Long A new committee was elected.
The Bromeliad Group thanked Isabel and the outgoing committee
for their services over the past year.
Plant of the month (Aechmea) —' There were some fine
specimens on display including fulgens, pine/iana (2), orlandiana
‘Ensign’ (two at different stages which was interesting), flavorosea,
distichantha, fasciata ‘Kiwi’ and Burgundy. Some plants were notable
for their fine foliage and some had colourful bracts.
The Group enjoyed hosting a visit from 27 members of the Eastern
Bay of Plenty Group to a number of members’ gardens during August.
Thank you to all those, whose gardens were viewed.
A spotted plant showing the effects of a bad scale infestation was
shown. It was agreed that plants should be checked regularly for
scale and a number of suggestions were made for the control of this
pest. Cleaning the plant with a toothbrush, wiping with methylated
spirits, orthene or rose spray were among the suggestions, but it was
emphasised that oil based products must be avoided.
There was some discussion about whether the Group should
continue to adjourn part way through the meeting for the raffle, sales
table, competition voting and a cup of tea, or whether in the future we
might defer these to the end so that those who wished to get away
earlier may do so. It was left for members to consider and discuss this
issue at a future meeting.
Competition: 1St = Audrey Hewson (Vriesea fosteriana v.seideliana)
15‘: Isabel Clotworthy (Neoregelia Crimson Nest)
Raffle: Barry Foster and Pat Smith
Plant of the month — September: Any plants beginning with the
letter C.
The Tauranga Orchid Society will be having their annual display at
the Racecourse on 14‘“, 15th and 16th September and we have offered
to do a display, have a sales table and hold a demonstration. Help will
be needed with arranging the display and the supply of plants so
please volunteer and contact Lynley Roy to offer assistance. Susan
Tustain-Harrison will lend some of her art prints as the background for
the display.
Peter Waters will be the guest speaker at the September meeting
on the 12‘“. The meeting will begin earlier than usual with a potluck,
finger food lunch commencing at 11:45am. The Eastern BOP Group
may also attend.
, Lynley Breeze
17
EARLY SPRING IN SOUTH FLORIDA
Ergo I. Gonzalez Miami
Spring comes early to south Florida. it is a treat that is more
appreciated by those who have lived a long time in colder places like
New England. Somehow it seems logical to me now, that spring
should start right at the beginning of a new year. No sooner do I put
away the Christmas lights and decorations, as I walk throughout the
garden, than there are signs everywhere that a new season has
arrived. It’s also time to get ready for the annual bromeliad showll
However, nothing says spring to me more than the early buds on
the African tulip tree (Spathodea campanulata) I gave my father when
we first moved to our new home. Little did we know then that the little
sapling we planted was going to be the most dominant tree on our
block. My neighbours just adore the fact that they can enjoy the
massive groups of red — orange flowers while we are responsible for
picking up all the fallen leaves. My father, on the other hand, is about
ready to take this tree back to Fairchild Tropical Garden where I
purchased it for a Father’s Day present.
But there is also something very special about this tree. From its
branches I hang many bromeliads in all kinds of baskets and pots. It
is the perfect place to protect them from the summer sun. if I bring
new bromeliads home, it is around this tree that I feel most
comfortable placing these plants until I find a more permanent place.
It is like my comfort zone. Here l grow Spanish moss, several kinds of
aechmeas, hanging tillandsias, neoregelias and some attached
orchids that refused to flower in their original pots, no matter how
much I attended to their demanding care.
There is another story about this tree. Because this is a new
neighbourhood there are not many established trees; therefore, my
father's African tulip tree, with its hanging bromeliad baskets, has also
become the meeting place for mourning doves to compete each
spring for a choice of protected nests. The doves and I used to fight
over where they should nest — definitely not on my prize-winning
Tillandsia funkiana, never, ever on any of my cleaned and almost
ready for show potted bromeliads. Well, why fight them on weekends
if I work all week when they have the house to themselves? Solution?
Hang all my empty baskets around my house for them to use as they
please.
Reprinted from the Bromeliadvisory — March, 2001. The Bromeliad
Society of South Florida.
18
EASTERN BAY OF PLENTY
BROMELIAD & ORCHID GROUP
Fortunate for the reader that this newsletter does not come
equipped with sound, for the best description of our trip to visit the
Bay of Plenty group would be in the words of the old song:
“Oh, didn’t we have a Iuverly day, the day we went to .......... Tauranga”
Visits to five gardens all so different, and a genuine warm welcome
combined to make this day one out of the bag. An early start caused
me to miss the first garden, Shirley Litchfield’s at Te Puke, but we
caught up at the second, Isabel Clotworthy’s. Isabel’s plants and
housing were much admired and morning tea was very welcome.
Anne Connolly’s garden with all the plants outside was a joy to behold
and we were envious of her plantings of numbers of the same plant.
The massed effect having an impact we rarely see.
Lunch at Johanna Elder’s gave us lots of time to admire, wander
on and go back for a second look. We mustn’t forget Gladys Fisher’s
— bromeliads, birds, orchids and an array of housing (mostly built by
Gladys) proved we don’t need a builder expert husband, just the
energy and drive. A garden that shows many years of enthusiasm and
love, as did all the gardens visited. Thank you to our hostesses and
the Bay of Plenty Group for making us feel so welcome.
Christine Borlase.
NORTHLAND BROMELIAD GROUP
The July meeting consisted of a ‘Garden Ramble’ through three of
our members’ gardens, starting at Jan Waldren. Jan has an
interesting collection of bromeliads, which was admired by all,
displayed on a pebbled bank. We then moved on to Robyn Armstrong
and Greg Chisnall. A beautiful garden on the shores of Whangarei
harbour, Robyn has a large collection of vireya rhododendrons and
many different palms, an ideal setting for bromeliads. The final garden
was Colleen Waite’s, just up the road from Robyn. Colleen has a very
steep section and in the very wet July conditions not everyone was
brave enough to venture down to the bottom. Colleen has not been
working on this garden very long but it is starting to take shape, with
lots of subtropicals and an ever—growing collection of bromeliads.
Lovely to look down on from the deck above. The meeting was held at
Colleen & John Frew’s and John gave a very interesting talk and
display, showing us how he raises bromeliads from seed.
Jacqui O’Connell
19
THE HUNTINGTON LIBRARY, ART COLLECTIONS
AND BOTANICAL GARDENS
Brian Dawson July-Slides
The Huntington is one of America’s great cultural and educational
centres. It includes a library collection of four million items, spanning
one thousand years of British and American history and literature; an
art collection consisting of 18th and 19th century British, French and
American paintings, sculpture and furniture; and of course the
gardens, covering 150 acres, with fifteen theme areas and at least
15,000 varieties of plants from around the world.
Henry Edwards Huntington was a very successful businessman
and visionary, but most of all he was a collector. Recognising the
potential of the Los Angeles basin, he bought the six hundred acre
ranch, San Marino, 1903.
Apart from laying the foundations for the light rail and electricity
systems of the city, he created a magnificent site to house his
collections. In 1919 he founded a research institution to serve
scholars. The deed of trust establishing guidelines for the Huntington
Institution allowed for growth and flexibility to meet changing
conditions.
William Hertrich was hired to help design and build the extensive
botanical gardens, which became the repository of many rare
specimens. The Desert Garden was started in 1907 and covered 25
acres. By 1927 half the area had been developed. In the late 1930’s,
Dr. T.H. Goodspeed, of the Department of Botany at the University of
California, collected seeds of terrestrial bromeliads on field trips to the
Andes. Plants raised from these seeds formed the basis of the huge
groups of puyas and pitcairnias seen today.
The founder of the Bromeliad Society, Joseph Schneider, started
working for the Huntington Botanical Gardens in April 1949. During
his seventeen years there he planted and nurtured many more
species of terrestrial, xerophytic bromeliads, including hechtias,
dyckias, bromelias, acanthostachys and deuterocohnias, not to forget
ananas.
The gardens are free to visit and are situated at 1151 Oxford
Road, near Pasadena. Phone 626—405-2100 and the web site is
www.huntington.org They are a ‘must see’ for plant enthusiasts
visiting Los Angeles and there are blossoms throughout the year. I
have yet to visit the Jungle Garden, which has epiphytic bromeliads.
Maybe next time!
20
WELLINGTON TILLANDSIA STUDY GROUP
At the meeting held at Beryl McKellar’s home on July 19‘h at
1:30pm, 11 members were present. Apologies were received from
Ann and Neville Goble.
Plants displayed were:
T. floribunda — a hardy species but frost had taken the flowers
overnight.
T. stricta v. albifolia — with pale pink bracts, was grown and flowered
in cold conditions. Other members whose plants were grown warmer
had not had flowers yet.
T. juncea — in bud, was growing indoors and watered with tepid water
under the shower. There was gas heating in the room where it was
hung. Another plant grown in a cool shadehouse was not looking as
good. T. magnusiana seed was ripe and harvested although the
seedpod was still green. T. plumosa and T. pohliana are two other
species, which need to be harvested before they are brown.
Most plant seeds ripen and then sit and can be stored until the
right conditions for sowing and germination are present. Tillandsias
don’t do this — they keep maturing and growing. If germination
conditions are not present when they have matured, they die. Hence
the lack of germination experienced by some members. Most
tillandsias in their natural habitat usually ripen and are ready for
germination at the end of winter, but here this can be at any time
during the year due to our heated growing conditions.
Billbergia vittata hybrid - looked very attractive with its bright red
bracts and purple flowers.
T. tricolor and T. tricolor v. tricolor— were both in bud but the leaves
and inflorescences did not appear similar. These would be compared
again when in flower.
T. Iindenii - this was mounted on wood and grown high in the
glasshouse but hadn’t the usual colouring of good pink bracts on a
plant grown in good light. There was sooty mould present, probably
caused by dampness. It should be dusted by flowers of sulphur.
T. Iotteae x punctulata — was considered to be only T. punctulata.
Sometimes when crosses are made, the introduced pollen triggers the
parent plant to become self fertile, hence there is no cross made. This
was probably the case here as there was no sign of the Iotteae
present.
Phyllis Purdie, Andrew Flower (Continued next month)
Next meeting: on September 23ml at 1:30pm at the home of Myra and
Morris Tarr, 32 Plunket Avenue, Petone.
21
Aechmea — bracteata, caesia, coelestis v. coelestis, coelestis (from
albomarginata), lueddemanniana (from medio-picta), mexicana, nudicaulis v.
cuspidata, recurvata, spectabilis, williamsii
Billbergia — brasiliensis, decora, vittata, zebrina
Dyckia — altissima, brevifolia, platyphylla, rariflora, remotiflora var.
montevidensis
Edmundoa — Iindenii (variegated), Iindenii v. rosea
Fosterella - penduliflora
Guzmania — Iingu/ata v. lingulata
Neoregelia — pascoaliana, punctatissima
Nidularium — amazonicum
Pitcairnia — flammea var. roezlii, heterophylla
Puya — coerulea v. vio/acea, grafii, mirabilis, venusta
Racinaea — fraseri
Tillandsia — bartramii, belloensis, balbisiana, capillaris, fasciculata, gardneri,
guatema/ensis, hotteana, juncea (large form), Iimbata, myosura, paucifolia,
plagiotropica, polystachia, pseudobaileyi, pohliana, schiedeana (small form),
stricta (green leaf), tricolor, viridiflora
Ursulaea — macvaughii (ten seeds while stocks last).
Vriesea - Corralina, fosteriana (rubra), hieroglyphica, platynema,
schwackeana
Werauhia — gigantea
New seed received from Len Trotman, Gerry Stansfield, Andrew Steens,
Jim Gilchrist and Ken Woods.
0 The seedbank will exchange two packets of 20 seeds for one (1) large
packet of your seed. Make sure it is labelled correctly.
. Please send in a large stamped envelope.
0 Packets (of at least 20 seeds) are 50 cents.
0 Limited to one packet of seed per kind per address.
0 Remember to consult the current seed list when ordering.
ORDERS:
with large, stamped, addressed envelope and spare seed to:
Gerry Stansfield, 7 Noall Street, Te Atatu Peninsula, Auckland.
Telephone (09) 834-7178
22
OFFICERS
PATRON & LIFE MEMBER Mrs. Bea Hanson (09)527-6830
HISTORIAN & LIFE MEMBER Laurie Dephoff (09)527-7789
PRESIDENT Graham West (09)298—3479
VICE-PRESIDENTS Lester Ching (09)576—4595
Marjorie Lowe (093)376-6874
SECRETARY Dave Anderson (09)638-8671
TREASURER Peter Waters (09)534-5616
EDITOR Marjorie Lowe (09)376-6874
LIBRARIAN Des Yeates (09)838-6535
COMMITTEE Owen Bird (07)576—2766
Bev Ching (09)576-4595
Brian Dawson (09)837-4598
Wilma Fitzgibbons (09)624-6469
Murray Mathieson (09)418—0366
Chris Paterson (09)625-6007
Noelene Ritson (09)625-8114
AUDITOR Colin Gosse
LIFE MEMBERS Harry Martin
Patricia Perratt
Patricia Sweeney
SCIENTIFIC OFFICER Peter Waters
CULTIVAR REGISTRAR Gerry Stansfield
JOURNAL
Please send articles, photographs and advertisements to the Editor, PO.
Box 91-728, AUCKLAND. Phone/ Fax (09) 376-6874.
Deadline for copy is the FIRST Tuesday of each month.
ADVERTISING RATES
One third page (12 — 13 lines) $10.00
BACK COVER
Top:
Neoregelia Orange Crush
Photo: Gerry Stansfield
Bottom:
A view of the interior of one of the Aldersons’ plastic houses. From the
left a hanging basket of Aechmea orfandiana ‘Mend’. To the right a
group of Vn‘esea hieroglyphica, with behind a Vr. gigantea (tall flower
spike). Alongside the W. hieroglyphica is an Aechmea Shining Light
with another one at the extreme right. (See back cover May 2000).
Photo: Peter Waters
Printed by Balmoral Office Systems Ph (09)631-5693 Fax (09)623-7440
23



September 2001
Vol.41 No.9
Society of New Zealand Inc.
BROMELIAD
BROMELIAD SOCIETY OF NEW ZEALAND (INC).
Affiliated with the Bromeliad Society International.
The Society was officially formed on the 28th. August, 1962.
The objects of the society are to encourage the cultivation and study of bromeliads
grown indoors or outdoors and in particular -
(a) To promote discussion and arrange instrudion on cultivation,
propagation and control of diseases.
(b) To provide a library for members.
(c) To assist members to identify plants.
(d) To make awards for outstanding new bromeliads.
(e) To hold shows or public exhibitions.
(f) To promote the distribution of bromeliads amongst
members by exchange, purchase and sale, and to
encourage the importation of new plants.
(9) To affiliate with any Society or other body, and to do
such things as may be deemed necessary or desirable
in the furtherance of these objects.
(h) To accept affiliation from other Societies having similar
objects.
MEETINGS
Held on the FOURTH Tuesday of each month except December, at
Greyfriars Church Hall, 544 Mt. Eden Road, Auckland at 7:30pm.
MEMBERSHIP SUBSCRIPTIONS
New Zealand NZ$20.00 Ordinary
NZ$ 5.00 Associate (same household)
Overseas A$30.00 Australia
US$20.00 United States and other overseas
Send all payments to the Treasurer, Peter Waters, 22 Halfmoon Rise,
Bucklands Beach, AUCKLAND.
CORRESPONDENCE
All general correspondence should be sent to the Secretary, Bromeliad
Society of New Zealand, 33 Marsden Avenue, Mt. Eden, AUCKLAND. 4.
FRONT COVER Vriesea Ro-Ro
(Vriesea saundersii x Vriesea platynema)
Photographed in David and Joan Anderson’s garden, surrounded
by the foliage of philodendron, cycad and palm, this Vriesea Ro-Ro
inflorescence is just opening up its blooms.
It needs high humidity and ample bright light, which turns the
underside of the leaves a reddish tone.
We cheated - it is in a pot, which is very handy for display.
Photo: Marjorie Lowe
2
CONTENTS
4 From the President Graham West
5,6 August meeting news Dave Anderson
7 Journal, Newsletter etc. — positions vacant
8,9 Bromeliads and cold Dave Anderson
10 Cold damaged plants
Fascicularia bicolor
12,13 Caring for tillandsia clumps Len Colgan
15 A bouquet of bromeliads Gill Keesing
Tillandsia benthamiana Johanna Elder
16,17 Bay of Plenty Bromeliad Group Anna Long
17,18 Looking back Bea Hanson
19 Eastern Bay of Plenty Bromeliad Group Christine Borlase
20 Why bromeliads? Lyman B. Smith
21 Wellington Tillandsia Study Group Phyllis Purdie .
Andrew Flower
22 Seedbank Gerry Stansfield
23 Officers, journal and advertising
COMING EVENTS
SEPTEMBER
23'“ Wellington Tillandsia Study Group at the home of Myra &
Morris Tarr, 32 Plunket Avenue, Petone at 1:30pm.
25”1 Auckland meeting, Greyfriars Hall at 7:30pm.
Talk: Importing plants (Len Trotman)
Monthly plant competition: Aechmea recurvata — varieties
and cultivars
OCTOBER
2"“ Deadline for copy fer the October Journal.
10th Bay of Plenty Bromeliad Group at the Tauranga Yacht
Clubrooms.
21St Eastern Bay of Plenty Bromeliad & Orchid Group — 1pm at
Pam & Trevor Signal, 11 Lambert Road, Onepu and then on to
Jean Richardson, 1040 Braemar Road, Onepu at 2:15pm.
23'‘1 Auckland meeting, Greyfriars Hall at 7:30pm.
Talk: Landscaping with bromeliads
Monthly plant competition: Neoregelia marmorata types (red
& green spotted)
3
FROM THE PRESIDENT
I started writing this on the 1St of September. it is a very welcome
spring day — the sun is out and it is quite warm. It makes one feel
good after one of the coldest winters I have experienced since
growing bromeliads. There has been anything up to seven frosts on
end, and when they ceased, it began raining.
There was another good attendance at the August meeting
including visitors and new members.
if you have any surplus plants please bring them along — if you are
not sure of the name please ask a committee member or a long-terrn
member to identify them for you. Correct identification is very
important. And if the plant(s) has some colour so much the better.
With increasing numbers attending the meetings we urgently require
more variety and plant numbers on the trading tables.
Since I have been president, I have endeavoured to start the
meetings at 7:30pm sharp. Due to the large queue at the door of
latish comers at the last meeting, we were ten minutes late starting.
As a result we had to cancel the Plant Spotting that follows the
announcement of Competition results, in order to finish on time.
Please try to avoid arriving at the last moment!
Graham
WORKSHOPS
WEST
It is time for the yearly look at the potting and mounting of
bromeliads. Just bring your plant(s) to the workshop on Sunday
7th October at 1 pm at 158A Henderson Valley Road, Henderson.
...we can talk and share some ideas.
DES YEATES Phone (09) 838-6535
EAST
Learn how to take pups off, potting up, mounting tillandsias.
Bring your plants (with pups on) and share ideas.
Sunday 30th September at 1:30pm - wet or fine, we have cover.
BEV & LESTER CHING Phone (09) 576-4595
32 Pandora Place, Pakuranga.
AUGUST MEETING NEWS
The hall was pretty well filled for the last meeting of winter. No
doubt all of the members are looking ahead to the warmer months of
spring that lie ahead.
Peter Waters once again took us through the Show & Tell plants.
First up for naming was a vriesea — probably the species vagans — a
small stoloniferous plant with black bases to the leaves. This would be
confirmed when the plant flowers. Next was a clump of Deuterocohnia
Iorentziana — one out in flower with green petals. Rauh states that this
species is up to 15cm long, which this plant certainly wasn’t, so
perhaps it was misnamed. The plants do have limited appeal, being
green, very small and thorny, but do grow into large clumps.
Peter had brought in a plant — Neoregelia hoehneana — a species
that produces its pups at the ends of long stolons. A neoregelia with
broad leaves and a red centre needed naming. This squat plant, like
so many neoregelias, could not be identified. Aechmea ramosa
(green form) was in for naming. This very prickly plant could not be
definitely identified. It was also showing signs of cold damage as are
a lot of aechmeas this past winter.
Pat Lawson had brought in a Neoregelia Tiger Balm that had had
its leaves split from a hailstorm but was othen/vise unmarked. No one
had heard of the name of this plant but Pat said that she had got it
from Bea Hanson many years ago. it was a very attractive plant with
similarities to Neoregelia Amazing Grace and Dark Delight x Burbank.
Looking it up in Don Beadle’s Registry, i see that it is a cultivar of
Purple Rain.
Next was a Vriesea guttata. Although not out in flower, it is easily
identified by its black spotted green leaves. Lastly, an Aechmea
recurvata hybrid with lovely dark red leaves. There are a lot of
recurvata hybrids about — many going back some thirty years or more.
Charles Allen bred them from unknown parents.
The special raffle prize this month was won by Estelle Swan. The
Conference 2003 raffle was won by Vicki Gray. The door prizes went
to Jill Porter, Judy Small and Paul Heron.
OBITUARY
Con Sweeney died on the 20th of August. We wish to extend our
sincere sympathies to his wife Pat.
Pat Sweeney is a Foundation and Life Member of the Society and is
still a regular at our monthly meetings. Con attended meetings and
garden visits with her over the years. Graham West
5
COMPETITIONS
Open flowering: 1St Andrew Steens (Quesnelia arvensis x) and 2"d
Win Shorrock (Nidularium fulgens). Also in the competition were
Neo. ’3 olens and marmorata x, Aechmea victoriana discolor, carolinae
tricolor and Vriesea Rosa Morena.
Open foliage: 1St Marie Healey with Vriesea saundersii x bituminosa
(variegated) and 2"" Peter Waters with Vriesea fosteriana ‘Speckles’.
In the competition were Can/strum Leopardinum, Aechmea Mend,
Neo. ’3 Purple Star and chlorosticta x Fairy Paint.
Tillandsia: 1St Win Shorrock (T. kirchhoffiana, out in flower with three
spikes) and 2nd Bev Ching (T. Iatifolia). Also on the table was T.
aeranthos.
Plant of the month — Billbergia: 1St Peter Waters with Bill. Baton
Rouge and 2"d Gerry Stansfield with Bill. Othello As well there were
Billbergias De Nada, Mulberry Pie and porteana.
Novice flowering: 1St Erik Wetting with Billbergia nutans and 2nd
Peter Brady with Vriesea barilletii.
Novice foliage: 1St Megan Thomas with Vriesea fosteriana (rubra).
Best plant of the month: Marie Healey (Vriesea saundersii x
bituminosa — variegated). Grown in her unheated glasshouse in
Hamilton, protected by frostcloth at this time of year. A beautiful plant.
Congratulations to all the winners.
Dave Anderson
NEW MEMBERS
Choi, Felix, 46 Lansell Drive, Dannemora, Ak.
Holmes, Susan, 20 Ranch Avenue, Beachhaven, Ak.
Kerr, Mrs. E, Railway Road, RD3, Whakatane.
Morrison, Tim & Sue HorreII, 2450 Inlet Road, Kerikeri.
Nicholls, Joan, 702A Rolleston Street, Thames.
Shirtcliffe, Alan, 2/14 Manuwai Road, Torbay, Ak.
Summers, Diana, 46 Platypus Ave, Isle of Sorrento, Queensland 4217
Thwaites, Julie, 36B Oban Road, Browns Bay, Ak.
The opinions expressed in letters or articles in this magazine are the
authors’ own views and do not necessarily express the policy of the
Bromeliad Society of New Zealand.
6
JOURNAL, NEWSLETTER ETC.- positions vacant.
Since March/April 1999, when the editorship moved to Auckland,
membership of the Society has almost doubled (current membership
499 plus 11 overseas). At the same time the size and content of the
Journal has increased. In order to spread the workload, the following
suggestions have been made:
NEWSLETTER EDITOR
A newsletter to be sent out each month, February to November,
containing - From the President; Coming Events; the monthly news
from Auckland, Bay of Plenty, Eastern Bay of Plenty, Northland and
the Wellington Tillandsia Study Group; the Seedbank; Members
Corner (plants for sale, swap or buy), plus seasonal inclusions -—
Annual Show competition classes and rules, Annual Show
competition results and the Annual Accounts. And of course any
urgent matters of interest to members.
This is just straightforward typing with the copy already coming in
regularly from the different correspondents, many of whom would
send it on floppy disk if required. Not too arduous a task but vitally
necessary to the Society.
JOURNAL EDITOR
A journal in the same format as present but double the size and
colour to be sent out each quarter — February, May, August and
November. Contents will include articles based on the monthly
Auckland meeting talks, appropriate articles from overseas bromeliad
publications and (wait for it!) contributions from members in the form
of photographs, articles, paragraphs (successes/failures), questions,
letters, snippets, even quotes — anything and everything is needed to
make a worthwhile magazine.
Vitally necessary to the Society.
DISTRIBUTION EDITOR
Responsible for — the membership mailing list (new members,
changes of address etc) in liaison with the Treasurer.
Printing out labels, attaching same, backstamping envelopes with
return address, inserting Journal and /or Newsletter and posting same
by (approximately) the third Tuesday of the month.
Several members have offered to do this job but it will not
exist if the above two positions are not filled.
If the members of the Bromeliad Society continue to fail to
contribute to the Journal (more than 95% of members have no input -—
not even a photograph!) then the Journal will SELF-DESTRUCT!!!
YOUR COMMENTS AND HELP ARE REQUIRED URGENTLY!!!
BROMELIADS AND COLD
David Anderson August talk
With one exception, all bromeliads come from the Americas. They
grow over a latitude range of 80° (north and south of the equator),
from sea level to 4000 metres, with the majority found in the warmer
tropical climates. Many of the plants that grow at altitudes above 3000
metres come from localities that do not have frosts or freezing rain.
Paradoxically, there are a number of the warmer growing plants that
can grow quite happily in the cooler subtropical climates.
Despite being in the subtropics, Auckland (and for that matter
many other places in the northern parts of New Zealand) has a
climate that allows the growing of a large number of bromeliads
outside all year round. Of course, additional protection needs to be
given to those species that cannot withstand the occasional freezing
nighttime temperatures through the five to six weeks of mid winter.
The last three (98, 99 & 00) winters in Auckland have lulled a
number of members into a false sense of security, with the
assumption that global warming is already taking place. Especially so
in the winter of 1998 when the average minimum temperature for
June and July in Freemans Bay and other mild areas was 12.1°C.
This year, winter has reverted back to one of the colder and wetter
ones, with cooler nightly temperatures starting in late April, a drier
than usual June with (for some) many ground frosts, followed by a
cold and wet July and August. As a consequence, plants that have
fared well growing outside for the last few years, have suffered badly
and many have even succumbed this year. The northern New
Zealand climate with winters usually cool and wet and summers warm
and dryish are the opposite of the bromeliad’s habitat, which is mainly
cool and dry winters and hot and wet summers.
Bromeliad plants, when subjected to frosts (dry cold) where the
leaves have actually frozen, will suffer badly with the leaves spotting
and turning brown over the following days. More tender bromeliad
species will just rot out in the centre. Smaller pups attached to the
parent plant are quite often protected from being frozen by the parent
plant’s foliage and will keep growing, particularly when the weather
turns warmer.
Plants that have been subjected to cold rain and wind will initially
appear to be growing satisfactorily. However, after a couple of months
of the cold, wet weather, plants become debilitated and rot out in the
centre. The leaves may show no signs of cold marking but when the
middle ones are pulled, they come away from the rotten centre. It
could be, as one member pointed out to me, that the plant's roots
have died, leaving it vulnerable to infection.
There are several ways of minimising the damage from cold, wet
and sometimes frosty winters as set out below:
1. Location -— if possible have a growing area facing north to north-
east, on sloping land that is frost draining.
2. Shift the plants into a glasshouse (preferably heated) in the late
autumn.
3. Make use of solar sinks such as large rocks, brick and concrete
walls that are able to warm up from the sun’s energy during the
day and release the energy to keep the plant warmer at night.
4. Cover the plants with frostcloth (keeping it clear of the foliage) in
the early evening if a frost is expected. There are various grades
of frostcloth —— the heavier the better. Where heavy frosts are likely
to occur, cover the plants with corrugated cardboard before
placing the frostcloth.
5. Canopy — use the foliage of taller plants to ward off frost. One of
the founder members of the Society grows many of his plants very
successfully under citrus trees (hardy to -6°C) through the winter
months.
6. Grow the plants as epiphytes, suspended high off the ground
where the temperatures on frosty nights do not drop below
freezing.
7. Be very careful fertilising plants. Do not give them nitrogen
fertilisers from midsummer onwards, as they tend to produce lush
growth that is damaged in cold weather.
On a more positive note, we are able to grow supposedly difficult
plants such as Tillandsia imperialis and Tillandsia somnians outside
the year round as long as they are given protection from frost.
For a list of the hardier bromeliad plants and other articles on
growing bromeliads in colder temperatures, please refer to the
Bromeliad Society of NZ journals — Volume 40, numbers 3,5,6 & 7
and Volume 41, numbers 5 & 7.
For the talk, quite a few damaged plants were displayed including
the two in the photograph opposite. Both these bromeliads are
Neoregelia chlorosticta, taken as pups from the same parent plant.
They were brought in by Win Shorrock who said that they had been
growing side by side in the garden and had suffered the same
weather conditions.
There is a striking difference in the way each plant has been
damaged. The plant on the left looks completely dead but when
looking into the centre, just above the water level, live leaf material
can be seen. This plant will survive to pup - it may not flower but as a
neoregelia this is no great loss. If you look closely you can see a new
leaf emerging on the left. The plant was not photographed until about
ten days after the meeting, at which none of this new growth was
visible. Admittedly it is in a warmer position at the moment but this is
fast recovery.
The plant to the right suffered only damage to some of the leaves,
which can easily be trimmed. More to the point, its pup seems to have
suffered no damage at all, presumably due to the protection given by
the leaves of the parent plant. With overhead protection perhaps
neither plant would be showing cold damage.
Fascicularia bicolor
This genus was originally made up of five species but there is now
only one species - Fascicularia bicolor. The genus is endemic to
Chile and is closely allied to Bromelia and Cryptanthus.
It is a most attractive plant when in flower and when clumping may
display several inflorescences at the same time (another photograph
shows three). It grows both in the ground (shown) and saxicolously
(on rocks) in strong sunlight and windy postions - so hardy that it will
survive outdoors in southern Britain
Great coastal plants, they even grow on vertical rocky cliffs by the
sea. The leaves are very spiny, terminating in a prickled tip and rather
succulent looking — great for the dry garden.
Photo: Opanuku Subtropicals
SALE PLANTS
Over the last few months, a number of unsold plants have
been left behind on the trading tables. A committee member has
to take them home. PLEASE check the table before you leave!!!
CARING FOR TILLANDSIA CLUMPS
Len Colgan South Australia
(This could be subtitled...”Do what I say, not what I did!”)
In the common parlance of Tillandsia taxonomists, there are the
‘Iumpers’ and the ‘splitters’. By these terms, it is meant to distinguish
those who always look for similarities between two plants under
investigation (hoping to prove they are the same species or
subspecies or linked varieties) from those who always look for
differences, in the belief or hope that one of them is new. However, in
a different context, the language of mere collectors like myself
involves the ‘clumpers’ and ‘dividers’.
The first term is commonly used to distinguish those tillandsia (and
other genera) collectors who prefer to have their plants form large
clumps rather than dividing up on a regular basis. Those who have
inspected my collection will definitely agree that I am a ‘clumper’.
However, there are inherent risks in such an approach.
At the Bromeliads X Conference in Cairns, Andrew Flower quipped
about written and verbal comments I frequently make concerning
tillandsia propagation. When asked what are the most important ,
aspects in successfully growing mounted tillandsias, | always respond
with the following five necessities:
Good fresh air movement
Good light
Good fresh air movement
Regular watering
Good fresh air movement
I am not sure his presentation debunked that list. Anyway, there
are a number of species that I encourage to form large clumps. These
include the common T. aeranthos, T. bergeri, T. crocata, T. ionantha,
T. ixioides, T. jucunda, T. juncea, T. magnusiana, T. paleacea, T.
recurvifolia (including var. subsecundifolia), T. stricta, T. tenuifolia and
T. x floridana etc. These are invariably attached to natural cork bark
and hung from mesh inside shadecloth covered frames. In one
situation however, tillandsias are hung from both sided of a common
shadecloth support and it is here that problems have arisen.
At the end of the last wet winter, the back one third of many large
tillandsia clumps in this situation was found to be dead. I had to
remove large dead sections of T. aeranthos, T. bergeri, T. stricta etc.
12
Although one of the above necessities, namely regular watering,
had been available, it proved that adversely, good light and (most
importantly) good fresh air movement were missing. Clearly, all of the
plants at the back part of the clumps — facing the shadecloth with
plants on the other side — were deprived of vital natural light and air
and so rotted. No such problems existed for individual plants or
sparsely growing specimens.
What should we do to avoid this? Assuming you still‘wish to create
large tillandsia clumps, I recommend:
1. Before the wet season arrives, carefully remove old' plants and
leaves, especially near the centre of the clump.
2. Place the clump in a situation that maximises the light and air
movement from all directions. For example, a spectacularly large
clump of T. aeranthos with numerous flower spikes was brought
into a recent Society meeting. It was held in a well-aerated wicker
basket and hung clear from side encumbrances.
3. Attempt to mount the clumps on something like gnarled, holey
mallee roots, thereby allowing all of the necessities (air, water,
light) good access to the plants.
In future, all my clumps will be prepared for the wet season.
Reprinted from Bromeletter, Volume‘ 38, Number 4 — the Bromeliad
Society of Australia Inc.
QUESTION
My Aechmea Red Wine produced two flower spikes and six pups
last year. l have allowed it to clump up, but this year it has produced
only one spike.
What reasons could there be for this?
ANSWER
I wonder if this plant is Aechmea Red Wine. This is a Hummel
hybrid and is not so common. The inflorescence is pendent and the
leaves narrow and purplish top and bottom.
If the inflorescence is upright or leaning to one side, then you
probably have Ae. Royal Wine. This has wider leaves, shiny green on
top and purple/wine underneath.
Not all bromeliads flower annually. It is not unusual for some pups
to flower and others not, and very common to take two years or even
more. They seem to have to reach a stage of maturity rather than be
controlled by seasonal changes in some cases. PW
13
A BOUQUET 0F BROMELIADS
From Gill Keesing, a group of interesting and well-grown bromeliads
photographed together on the terrace.
From top centre clockwise:
Vriesea Splenreit
Neoregelia Grace
Neoregelia hybrid
Neoregelia Crimson Nest pup
Neoregelia Red Centre
Neoregelia Gold Fever
Neoregelia Orange Glow
Centre:
Neoregelia Meyendorffii (albomarginata)
Photo: Gill Keesing
Tillandsia benthamiana
A hardy species in frost free areas, coming as it does from the
mountainous regions of central Mexico where it is both epiphytic and
saxicolous at elevations of 1700—2700 metres.
Narrow silvery, velvet like leaves, 15cm to 20cm long.
Lax infl0rescence 7.5 to 15cm in length retains its bright pink
bract colouration for a considerable length of time.
The tubular flowers are greenish white.
Grow in bright and sunny places with little watering.
Text & photo: Johanna Elder
WANTED TO BUY
Vriesea Nova
Vriesea Rube
Vriesea Splendid...one each
Neoregelia fosteriana ‘Perfection’...two plants
GRAHAM WEST
1 Cameron Street
Papakura. ‘ Phone (09) 298-3479
BAY OF PLENTY BROMELIAD GROUP
On Wednesday the 12th of September, over forty members and
visitors met at the Tauranga Yacht Club for a light lunch and a slide
show and talk from our guest speaker, Peter Waters. He showed us
fantastic photos (slides) of his recent visit to Graham and Judith
Aiderson at Rangiora, near Christchurch. We saw inside their
interesting and colourful hothouses. All were envious of their amazing
collection despite the constant fight with very cold winter night
temperatures. Peter Waters also showed slides of some of Grace
Goode’s garden on the Sunshine Coast, Queensland. WOW!
We were also treated to slides of some lovely new vrieseas (bred
from seed in Hawaii) shown at the last World Conference. We were all
oohing and aahing at this stage and wished we could buy them
ourselves...maybe one day!!!
Next month our garden visits are returning.
October 17‘“: Starting at 10am at Owen Bird, 27 Linley Terrace,
Brookfield. He advises to park on the road, as his driveway is steep
and will only take about three cars. Then to Cliff Toucher at 53
Queens Road, Otumoetai.
Plant of the month — October: Any plant beginning with ‘C’.
The Show & Tell table had many interesting plants (members
mostly wanting to ask advice or help in finding a name from Peter
Waters). Brian Chudleigh showed an Aechmea pimenti—velosoi
(variegated) and Peter told us it is now re-named Ae. Pie in the Sky.
lsabel Clotworthy showed a Vriesea guttata but as the petals opened
to white and not yellow, Peter identified it as Vn'esea pardalina. Lorna
Grey’s Neoregelia Scarlet Fever was in fact correctly named. Bertha
Schollum brought in a few plants for identification. Many other plants
were discussed
Peter also gave a short talk on billbergias. The main points were -
they don’t like fertiliser or cold and prefer not to be over-watered.
They also do better in more light as many people try to grow them in
the shade.
Competition plants were few this month — 1St Anne Stacey
(Neoregelia carolinae) 2nd = Bertha Schollum (Neoregelia Blood Red)
& lsabel Clotworthy 3rd Brian Chudleigh (Aechmea ?).
Raffles - 1St Ngaire Thomas (Neoregelia carolinae xjohannis) and
2nd Gwyneth Glentworth (Aechmea nudicaulis).
A HUGE THANK YOU to Peter Waters for being our guest
speaker. We all went home full of new knowledge and inspiration.
Anna Long
16
LOOKING BACK
Do you grow Billbergia Muriel Waterman?
Bea Hanson
I am sure there are many bromeliad fanciers who do grow Billbergia
Muriel Waterman as it is one of the loveliest there is. Many of us
admire the plant, but i wonder how many know it was named after a
bromeliad grower in New Zealand?
i came into contact with Muriel Waterman through an
advertisement she placed in one of our newspapers. She asked if
anyone interested in cacti and succulents would like to contact her. As
l had just developed a burning enthusiasm for these plants, I at once
sent off a letter. Back came a reply inviting me to visit her and telling
me she had no telephone, as she couldn’t bear the things.
In those days it was a major task to get to her place. I had to take
one bus, then change into another to reach her district. After getting
off the bus there was then a walk of about ten minutes.
The house was old; the garden crammed with beautiful plants and
Muriel Waterman a charming lady. She had a great sense of humour
and a beautiful smile and one felt as if one had known her for years.
I saw both cacti and succulents that I had only seen pictured in
books. I asked her if she sold any and she said she did. She showed
me where they were and said all were priced and that she hated
taking money from friends so I was to total them up and leave the
money on the shelf.
Our association continued and not long after the bromeliad bug
struck. Soon the garden was more bromeliads than cacti and
succulents. l saw my first Ochagavia Iindleyana in flower, my first
Bromelia balansae and was enchanted with the brilliant red of the
heart when it was about to flower. All sorts of wonderful bromeliads
were being imported by Muriel Waterman now and it was a great thrill
to visit her and see her latest additions.
She had many failures and many successes but she loved to try
the plants in different places outside. Her glasshouse housed the
better plants and it was indeed a thrill to go and browse in it.
As well as working with the plants, she looked after a large number
of bantams and these little golden and brown pets were a minor
trouble as they tended to get out and do some damage from time to
time.
17
With the same enthusiasm as she grew and added more plants to
her collection, she worked to get members for The Bromeliad Society
(now the BSI). She was extremely successful and gathered in quite a
number. One day I saw my first Aechmea Foster’s Favorite and
immediately wanted one. She said she couldn’t let me have it as it
was only for the members but if I joined I would be able to have one. I
told her it was sheer blackmail, but she won. As her collection grew,
she was able to send out pricelists to the members and I offered to
type them for her. By the name of each plant she put a short
description such as...”beautiful”; “this is just wonderful” etc. Even in
the pricelists her enthusiasm overflowed. When going anywhere by
bus, she always took a Bromeliad Journal and sat with it open at a
picture and if anyone mentioned it, she was able to tell them all about
bromeliads.
She hated having to go and buy new clothes and always said she
was much happier in a store that sold tools. In the winter, her
favourite dress was an old quilted dressing gown, which she said was
the warmest thing you could wear! The first time l saw her in it, I
thought she had been ill and asked her what had been the matter.
It was a great pity she was such a shy person as, when our society
was formed, it would have been wonderful to have her give us a talk
and pass on some of her great knowledge. She was happy only when
, she was talking to two or three people — no more. Her greatest joy
was to get a card from Customs to say there was a parcel of plants
waiting for her. She would rush over on the next bus, and to quote
“bring them home clasped lovingly to my bosom”. Then would come a
letter telling me all about the new bromeliads — such excitement.
It was a sad day when we heard that she was ill. She died shortly
after from a stroke. She was greatly missed by her many friends, both
here and overseas. Most of us had Muriel Waterman stories and
many are the times we have exchanged them. A lovely lady.
She was born in the United States but spent most of her life here.
Her books were all sold and those who bought them were ever
reminded of her by the remarks she had left in the margins — always
in green ink. There would be a plant underlined and in the margin,
remarks such as: “I must have this”, this died”, “got this in the last
parcel”, etc. So typical of her great enthusiasm which bubbled always.
There are many more happy thoughts about her, but I hope that
these few will make your billbergia just a little more interesting.
Billbergia Muriel Waterman (B. horrida var. tigrina x B.
euphemiae var. purpurea) bred by Mulford B. Foster in 1946.
18
EASTERN BAY OF PLENTY
BROMELIAD & ORCHID GROUP
The August meeting was held at the home of Brian & Pam Yardley
on the 19th and although cool, the weather was fine. A good turnout,
with several new faces, enjoyed the views out to sea from the deck,
although I’m sure many didn’t enjoy quite so much the tramp up the
steep road to the house.
Sue Laurent welcomed us, and talked about the excellent
response our corner had at the Whakatane Camellia Show. Where to
obtain plants was discussed and several catalogues were passed
around. The display plants were admired and, in some cases,
commiserated over as one member had brought the results of
several, unexpected June frosts to show us. He was unfortunately
away when we were blitzed by a week of frosts far earlier than we
usually get. The difference between Aechmea Little Harv in frosted
and unfrosted state being obvious to a child.
Reminders were given about the Bay of Plenty Group’s meeting on
September 12th when Peter Waters is the guest speaker and about
the Tauranga Orchid Show on 14—16th September.
The raffle prizes this month saw some keen attention, both
beautiful plants. The bromeliad was Aechmea Little Harv, very kindly
donated by Laurie Dephoff, Auckland and won by Brian Yardley. A
plant of Cymbidium May Hopcroft x mastersii (a beautiful clear yellow
and showing the influence of one species parent). This was donated
by Trevor Signal and won by Avis Barnard. Two other plants from the
same cross didn’t last long on the sales table, which as usual was
well patronised.
Afternoon tea and a walk around Bryan and Pam’s garden
followed by a walk around their neighbours, Bubbles and Jim Rivett,
completed the afternoon. Many of us braved the steep tracks in the
bush section of the Rivett garden to listen to the unique sounds of
NZ. native birds and to admire the plantings of both natives and
exotics in a garden that has been many years in the same family. A
relaxing way to end an enjoyable afternoon.
Christine Borlase.
19
WHY BROMELIAD? Lyman B Smith
Obviously “Bromeliad” is simply a shortening of the scientific name
“Bromeliaceae” to indicate any member of the Pineapple family. We
might call them all pineapples since they are members of that family,
and not bother to find a new term. However, it would cause confusion
to associate such diverse forms as the giant Puya and the Spanish
moss under a name for which we have already a sharp and narrow
concept. As the Bromeliaceae were unknown before the discovery of
America, we did not have any such ancient general term for the family
as there was in the case of grasses, sedges, lilies or orchids, and one
had to be manufactured.
It is not possible to say now who first coined the word “Bromeliad”
but it was probably some fairly recent botanist or horticulturist who
was tired of having to use the phrase “species of Bromeliaceae” after
the cumbrous and stately fashion of the old school. French and
German botanists of the nineteenth century regularly used such single
words for members of one family, has a standard way of making
them, and seemed to find nothing undignified in the process.
The second step in tracing our genealogy is to find the origin of
“Bromeliaceae” and this is very clear. With few exceptions, the
scientific name of a plant family is derived by combining the name of
one of its genera with the ending “aceae”. Thus in 1805 the French
botanist, Jaume Saint-Hilaire, defined the Bromeliaceae and formed
the family name from the genus Bromelia.
Our next step takes us back to Linnaeus, the father of systematic
botany for it was he who established the genus Bromelia in 1754
according to the rules we now follow in making scientific names. The
name was taken from the family name of Olof Bromelius, a Swedish
botanist. Since Linnaeus also was Swedish, we might at first suppose
that he had named the genus for a friend, but Bromelius died before
Linnaeus was born. .
Actually it was Plumier, the early French explorer of the West
Indies, who first had the idea of renaming for Mr. Bromelius the genus
that previously had gone by the lndian name of Karatas, and
Linnaeus so credited it. Plumier was on familiar terms the genus
Bromelia in the West Indies. Bromelius, on the other hand, was
famous mainly for the fine Flora that he wrote for his hometown of
Goetheborg and it is by no means certain that he ever laid eyes on a
single plant of the great group that was to bear his name.
Reprinted from the Bromeliad Society Bulletin Volume 1.No. 2.
20
WELLINGTON TILLANDSIA STUDY GROUP
(Continued from last month)
T. tenuifolia was a clump with spikes of deep magenta bracts and
purple flowers. This made the plant more attractive than a single
flowering piece. T. capitata (rubra) still showed good red colour after
flowering had finished. Plants growing outside, and cooler, had less
colour. T. meridionalis, now named T. recurvifolia v. subsecundifolia,
was attractive with white flowers and peach bracts against the
silvered foliage. The name secunda describes the leaves which all
curve in the same direction. A large plant of T. ionantha (rubra) was
growing well but unlikely to flower although it could possibly pup.
Smaller growing plants of this species will usually flower. T. purpurea
‘Huacho’, which should be named T. Iatifolia v. Iatifolia had produced
an inflorescence which did not mature. A pup was now growing well.
T. pruinosa doesn’t like a concentration of salts in the water when
watering and didn’t look very happy. As T. seleriana hadn’t flowered
this year, it was suspected that this plant might have been affected
too. Any plants growing naturally in high altitudes should be watched
for the effects of watering with higher concentrations of salts in the
watering source.
T. brachyghzlla, a recent import, was very attractive with bright pink
bracts and purple flowers. This plant is not common and comes from
Brazil. Three plants of T. erubescens, all produced similar flowers, but
ranged from a large leafed cluster to a quite small plant. It was
possible that they had come from habitats in different countries.
T. argentina, a small plant, had delicate pink solitary flowers. Two L
matudaes were in flower with red flowers. The colour can range from
bright red to yellow.
Diane showed her frost damaged plants. She had experienced
several nights of very heavy frosts this winter, resulting in heavy
losses. We were told that if plants are still growing and watered late in
summer, they were more likely to be frost damaged. lf tillandsias are
grown outdoors or in shadehouses, they should be watered only four
times in December, five in January, twice in March, once in April &
May. June/July — nil. They will only absorb water from rain and hand
watering, not from humidity, which only stops them from releasing
moisture into the air and drying out in the heat. Frostcloth will give
some protection but this year’s frosts have been too heavy for that to
fully protect plants. Ice in the centre of bromeliads has not killed the
plants in the gardens.
Phyllis Purdie & Andrew Flower
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Aechmea — aquilega, caesia, coelestis v. coelestis, coelestis (from
albomarginata), Iueddemanniana (from medio-picta), mexicana, nudicaulis v.
cuspidata, recurvata, wi/Iiamsii
Billbergia - brasiliensis, decora, vittata, zebn'na
Dyckia — altissima, brevifo/ia, platyphylla, rariflora, remotiflora var.
montevidensis
Edmundoa — Iindenii (variegated), Iindenii v. rosea
Fosterella - penduliflora
Neoregelia - punctatissima
Nidularium - amazonicum
Pitcairnia — f/ammea var. roezlii, heterophylla
Puya — coerulea v. violacea, grafii, mirabilis, venusta
Racinaea — fraseri
Tillandsia — bartramii, belloensis, ba/bisiana, capillaris, capitata, deppeana,
gardneri, guatemalensis, hotteana, juncea (large form), limbata, myosura,
paucifolia, plagiotropica, polystachia, pseudobaileyi, pohliana, schiedeana,
tricholepis, tricolor, tricolor var. melanocrater, viridiflora, xiphioides
Ursulaea — macvaughii
Vriesea - agostiniana, guttata, hieroglyphica, platynema, platynema
(variegated) schwackeana
Werauhia - gigantea
New seed received from Bob & Lynn Hudson, Audrey Hewson,
Moyna Prince, Len Trotman and Ken Woods.
MORE SEED NEEDED TO REFRESH STOCKS!
o The seedbank will exchange two packets of 20 seeds for one (1) large
packet of your seed. Make sure it is labelled correctly.
0 Please send in a large stamged envelope.
Packets (of at least 20 seeds) are 50 cents.
Limited to one packet of seed per kind per address, maximum $5.00 per
month.
0 Remember to consult the current seed list when ordering.
ORDERS:
with large, stamped, addressed envelope and spare seed to:
Gerry Stansfield, 7 Noall Street, Te Atatu Peninsula, Auckland.
Telephone (09) 834-7178
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OFFICERS
PATRON & LIFE MEMBER Mrs. Bea Hanson (09)527—6830
HISTORIAN & LIFE MEMBER Laurie Dephoff (09)527—7789
PRESIDENT Graham West (09)298—3479
VICE-PRESIDENTS Lester Ching (09)576-4595
Marjorie Lowe (09)376—6874
SECRETARY Dave Anderson (09)638—8671
TREASURER Peter Waters (09)534-5616
EDITOR Marjorie Lowe (09)376—6874
LIBRARIAN Des Yeates (09)838—6535
COMMITTEE Owen Bird (07)576-2766
Bev Ching (09)576-4595
Brian Dawson (09)837-4598
Wilma Fitzgibbons (09)624—6469
Murray Mathieson (09)418-0366
Chris Paterson (09)625-6007
Noelene Ritson (09)625-8114
AUDn'OR Colin Gosse
LIFE MEMBERS Harry Martin
Patricia Perratt
Patricia Sweeney
SCIENTIFIC OFFICER Peter Waters
CULTIVAR REGISTRAR Gerry Stansfield
JOURNAL
Please send articles, photographs and advertisements to the Editor, PO.
Box 91-728, AUCKLAND. Phone/ Fax (09) 376-6874.
Deadline for copy is the FIRST Tuesday of each month.
ADVERTISING RATES
One third page (12 - 13 lines) $10.00
BACK COVER Vriesea hieroglyphica
Known as the “King of the Bromeliads”, this is probably the most
popular foliage bromeliad in cultivation. Over time it can reach a
spread of 1.5m. The shiny, yellowish-green leaves are marked with
irregular, broad crossbands of darker green or purplish black. This
photograph, taken in Vicki Carter’s Titirangi garden, shows her plant
in flower with yellow petals in yellowish green bracts and about 1.5m
high. It flowers at night. Flowering can take anything from 5—10 years.
Native to eastern and southern Brazil, it grows epiphytically under
shady and humid conditions, usually less than 6m from the ground at
up to 800m. Usual requirements are for light to medium shade,
moisture, air movement and fast drainage. Hardy to about 0°C.
Photo: Vicki Carter
Printed by Balmoral Office Systems Ph (09)631-5693 Fax (09)623-7440

 BROMELIAD
Society of New Zealand Inc.
October 2001 Vol.41 No.10
BROMELIAD SOCIETY OF NEW ZEALAND (INC).
Affiliated with the Bromeliad Society International.
The Society was officially formed on the 28th. August, 1962.
    The objects of the society are to encourage the cultivation and study of bromeliads grown indoors or outdoors and in particular -
(a) To promote discussion and arrange instruction on cultivation, propagation and control of diseases.
(b) To provide a library for members.
(c) To assist members to identify plants.
(d) To make awards for outstanding new bromeliads.
(e) To hold shows or public exhibitions.
(f) To promote the distribution of bromeliads amongst members by exchange, purchase and sale, and to encourage the importation of new plants.
(g) To affiliate with any Society or other body, and to do such things as may be deemed necessary or desirable in the furtherance of these objects.
(h) To accept affiliation from other Societies having similar objects.
MEETINGS
Held on the FOURTH Tuesday of each month except December, at Greyfriars Church Hall, 544 Mt. Eden Road, Auckland at 7:30pm.
MEMBERSHIP SUBSCRIPTIONS
New Zealand NZ$20.00 Ordinary
                     NZ$ 5.00 Associate (same household)
Overseas A$30.00 Australia
                      US$20.00 United States and other overseas Send all payments to the Treasurer, Peter Waters, 22 Halfmoon Rise, Bucklands Beach, AUCKLAND.
CORRESPONDENCE
All general correspondence should be sent to the Secretary, Bromeliad Society of New Zealand, 33 Marsden Avenue, Mt. Eden, AUCKLAND. 4.
FRONT COVER Guzmania squarrosa
   This striking plant was photographed in the garden of the late Noel Scotting. Originally known in NZ and Australia as Guzmania danielii, it is very variable in form and colour. Quite often the inflorescence is heavily marked with yellow and red (Baensch- p. 172, BSI Nov/Dec 2000). Reasonably hardy, it is easily grown outdoors.
   It can grow to 1m wide, with the inflorescence lasting in colour for at least 2-3 months. Some forms grow in dry open spaces, others in high altitude rainforests - both terrestrially and epiphytically. Native to Venezuela, Colombia, Guyana and Peru at 1100-2800 metres.
Photo: Laurie Dephoff_
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CONTENTS
4     From the President                         Graham West
5,6   September meeting news                   Dave Anderson
7-9   Do you have a spare?                          R.Smythe
10-13 Happy birthday Bea                        Louise Joyce
14,15 Importing bromeliads                       Len Trotman
16,17 Billbergia El Capitan                  Graham Alderson
16-18 Like Topsy- a garden just grows          Gwen McCallum
18    Northland Bromeliad Group             Jacqui O'Connell
20    Bay of Plenty Bromeliad Group            Lynley Breeze
21    Re-naming                                 Peter Waters
22    Bromeliad Registry                    Gerry Stansfield
23    Don't shoot them - Vicks Vaporub them   Harry Frakking
24    Wellington Tillandsia Study Group       Phyllis Purdie
25    Bromeliads, the other type of care    Mark E. Mishanie
26    Seedbank                              Gerry Stansfield
27    Officers, journal and advertising                     
COMING EVENTS                                               
OCTOBER                                                     
21 Eastern Bay of Plenty Bromeliad & Orchid Group - 1pm at
       Pam & Trevor Signal, 11 Lambert Road, Onepu and then on to Jean Richardson, 1040 Braemar Road, Onepu at 2:15pm.
23rd Auckland meeting, Greyfriars Hall at 7:30pm.
       Talk: Landscaping with bromeliads
       Monthly plant competition: Neoregelia marmorata types (red and green spotted).
28th Northland Bromeliad Group at the Quarry Garden in Russell Road at 1:30pm. Working Bee - see page 18.
NOVEMBER
6th Deadline for copy for the November Journal.
11th Bay of Plenty Bromeliad Group - garden visit bus trip to Auckland. See details on page 20.
11th Auckland garden visits - details page 23.
20th Bay of Plenty Bromeliad Group - 10am garden visits - see details on page 23.
27th Auckland meeting, Greyfriars Hall at 7:30pm.
       Annual plant auction.
       Monthly competition: Christmas bromeliad arrangement.
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FROM THE PRESIDENT
   We are well into spring - warm, sunny days and daylight saving. We are very fortunate to have such a hobby and to be out enjoying this weather.
   In early September I put a large Neoregelia Red Gold that I had growing in a ponga log outside. The cold nights were enough to damage all the leaves (there were no frosts).
  With another good attendance at the last meeting, there were barely enough sales plants. Please see what you can find to help fill the trading tables - good colour & reasonably priced plants will always sell.
   The Annual Competitive Show is only four months away. So if you wish to sell plants there, now is the time to pot them up - they really need three months for the root system to develop. Potted plants with no roots are not on. Sell them as bare rooted pups instead.
   I am pleased to announce that garden visits to Sue Schatzdorfer and Pat Lawson have been arranged. Details below.
Graham
GARDEN VISITS
              On Sunday 11th November at 1:30pm members are invited to visit the garden of Sue Schatzdorfer at 43 Fordyce Avenue, Pakuranga followed by a visit to Pat Lawson at 30 Swan Crescent, Pakuranga where (if you bring your own cup) tea and/or coffee will be served.
            Both Sue and Pat will have plants for sale.
           Just around the corner from Pat Lawson at 32 Pandora Place, Bev and Lester Ching invite members to carry on to their garden.
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SEPTEMBER MEETING NEWS
  Another lively evening with close to 100 members present. We certainly need a lot more plants on the trading table to satisfy all those enthusiastic members in attendance.
   Peter Waters once again took us through the Show & Tell plants. First up were some plants that Brian Dawson had acquired from Kaikohe in Northland where they had been growing since 1948! For naming was a neoregelia from a large clump that contained at least sixty plants. This small stoloniferous plant looked like the one that has been known in New Zealand as a Neoregel/a/German hybrid (being one of Dr. Oeser's hybrids - one of its parents probably being the species, Neoregelia Fireball. Next was an Aechmea recurvata that also dated back to the late 1940's. It did not seem to be var. recurvata as the old flowers looked to have yellow petals that are quite different from the deep rosy/purple petals of the species. Perhaps it is one of Charles Allan's unnamed hybrids.
   Len Trotman had brought in for display a 3-4 plant clump of Dyckia fosteriana 'Silver'. Although he had had this plant for many years, this was the first time it had flowered and now there were two plants in full flower.
  A small stoloniferous neoregelia with pointy leaves needed a name. It was probably Neo. Sugar & Spice, which gets its small pointed leaves from one of its parents, Neo. cyanea. The leaves were a little longer than usual for this plant but that could have been caused by where it was being grown. Graham West had a Billbergia distachia hybrid in for naming. It could be one of several different hybrids made from this species. The same applied to an Aechmea apocalyptica hybrid that was brought in for naming. Glenys Guild has a Tillandsia gardneri needing a name, its soft silver-green leaves had been damaged by snails. She also had what was either a Vriesea simplex or scalaris. Both these vrieseas have similar pendulous flower spikes with the species simplex having the floral bracts overlapping around the flower.
   Next an Aechmea pineliana - there was controversy as to whether it was var. pineliana or var. minuta. As Rauh says "var. minuta is smaller in all its parts than the type; the leaves turn rose-coloured and assume a beautiful silver sheen when subject to intense sunlight". Time will tell! Two aechmeas bought from a fleamarket needed naming. They were both similar in appearance and leaf colour and were most probably hybrids with dark bases to the leaves and one
5
flowers before being identified positively. Then a nidularium labelled 'Mrs. Brown'. Quite a few members have had a plant thus named, that Mrs. Brown had imported many years ago. It was still quite small but if it was that plant, its correct name is Nidularium rutilans. Last of all was a lovely green leafed tillandsia in full spike with the flowers not out yet. It had been grown from seed that had come from the BSI some years ago and no one could identify it.
   The special raffle prize was won by Marie Healey. The Conference 2003 raffles were won by Darynie Jones and Alan Shirtcliffe, and the door prizes by Eileen Murphy, Pat Monk and Kelly Omeara.
COMPETITIONS
Open flowering: 1st Len Trotman with Aechmea ornata var. nationalis in flower after many, many years. 2nd Dick Endt with Aechmea fendleri in full flower. Also in the competition were Ae.'s orlandiana 'Pickaniny' & Aztec Gold, Guzmanias Cherry, Orangeade & Cherry (variegated), Billbergia Highlight, Orthophytum Copper & Neoregelia Annick.
Open foliage: 1st Peter Waters (Vriesea Pahoa Beauty x fosteriana) & 2nd Jenny Gallagher (Ae. fasciata Sangria). In competition were Wittrockia Leopardinum, Neo.'s Anna # 19, cruenta x concentrica, Cherry Pie & Harmony F2, Vriesea Splenreit & Ae. Foster's Favorite Favorite.
Tillandsia: 1st Win Shorrock with T. stricta - out in flower with 15 spikes. 2nd Len Trotman with T. tomaseliii. Also on the table were T. kirchhoffiana, aeranthos, disticha and butzii.
Plant of the month - Aechmea recurvata & hybrids: 1st Graham West and 2nd equal Kirstie Bain and Win Shorrock.
Novice flowering: 1st Judy Graham (Tillandsia punctulata in flower) & 2nd Betty Goss (Guzmania sanguinea).
Novice foliage: 1st Dawn Ashton (Vriesea platynema) & 2nd David Goss (Vriesea fosteriana 'Red Chestnut').
Best plant of the month: Len Trotman with Aechmea ornata var. nationalis.
Congratulations to all the winners.
Dave Anderson_
   This month sees the joining of the Society's five hundredth New Zealand member, Avis Barnard of Ohope. Congratulations! Total NZ membership has now reached 507._
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DO YOU HAVE A SPARE?
R. Smythe Townsville
   Let us go for a wander around the garden. Just about everything you want you can be sure I have only one of, as living on a main road, you are probably the third lot of visitors off the street today.
What are the best bromeliads to grow you ask?
   Look around, my garden appears to be in flower all the year round but the colours come from plants not flowers. I favour neoregelias for that reason. You can't grow only these otherwise you would have a flat two-dimensional garden. Your garden needs height and the trees need epiphytes. For starters I would go for the genus aechmea for the backbone of your garden. I warn you they are prickly blighters so don't have them towards the front. Their spines catch leaves and their vases resist washing out so don't put them too far back.
   So you plant them in the middle! You got it.
What are the toughest neoregelias for planting outdoors?
   An easy question - anything using the following species, Neo.'s olens, cruenta, concentrica, Fireball and most of the small, creeping neoregelias. Neo. cruenta x olens is about the best edging neoregelia I have. It is bright yellow, standing erect with red spots and red tips. Most of these cruenta x olens type crosses look the same in the sun. They all look very much like Neo. Queen of Spots, no matter what variety of Neo. olens was used. The much larger Neo. cruenta x Neo. coriacea is a stunning plant in full sun. Yellowish and a larger upright plant with bright red stripes up the outside of the leaves when grown in filtered light but in the sun the stripes are visible on the upper surfaces as well. Still a rare plant I believe but one I can't wait to pup so I can put it up a tree so that I can look up into all the striping. From where I stand it is a much better bet than the relatively similar and expensive Neo. Maya, which is a challenge to grow well. Neo. Takemura 'Silverado' with its silvery leaf with dark ends to the leaves is easy to grow, attractive and distinctive in a sunny spot.
Are there any special features you like to have in your neoregelias?
   Yes, two - firstly they must be coloured all the year round or variegated, though it is good to have a few of the others like Neo. Blushing Bride, which are good for impact. Secondly they should be
7
reluctant to flower so that they can grow several years into a bulk with nice shape and size. The Neo. concentrica group is particularly good in this respect. Without this characteristic, the choice of pup size is so important. We like to leave them until two-thirds the size of the plant but they can be strap-like and flower shortly after removal if we do this. If we take them off too young they take too long to colour up. With the reluctant flowering plants you can leave the pup as long as you like.
What is your most popular neoregelia?
   The best is without doubt Neo. Enchantment but it is rare, so to answer your question, the one most often singled out by visitors to my collection is not an expected one. Not a Skotak or a Neo. Aussie Dream but a still fairly rare older import called Neo. Tossed Salad. Chocolate to crimson tips (third of the leaf), well shaped, green to yellow centre and colouring in the centre at flowering. It is a slow grower and slow to flower. Of the less rare plants, Neo. Lamberts Pride with its alternating orange and green bands is very popular. The red/purple strikingly striped Neo. Fosperior Perfection and the redder form of the more pinstriped Neo. Amazing Grace draw a lot of oohs and aahs.
Which are the best inexpensive ones?
   Neo.'s Fosperior Perfection, Lamberts Pride, Charm, Gold Fever and Amazing Grace are ones that should be first on a beginner's list.
What are Aussie Dreams?
   Variegated neoregelias - half of these are grown in filtered shade and have highly coloured striped leaves and the other half may grow out in full sun. The former look like the parent called Neo. Mother and have the Neo. Meyendorffii appearance and grow to their best with some shade. The others are much smaller, with erect leaves and take after the other parent, Neo. olens, and like that parent can grow in the sun. Interestingly, at least one Neo. Aussie Dream (Dream Time) grows like Neo. olens in the sun and like a Meyendorffii in the shade. Obviously different genes switch on and off under different conditions.
Some of your 'Aussie Dreams' look the same but have different names. Tell me about it.
   Unfortunately we can't avoid this with a parent like Neo. Mother. Look at it and what can you see? Every leaf is different from nearly pure white to green. This characteristic would also be evident in the pollen and the ovules so seedlings are very variable and offshoots are 8
often very similar to their adjoining leaf. It takes a long time to stabilise a clone. I have, in my limited experience with more stable plants, found that four generations is minimal. Not all growers have my patience. A plant can have a sport, which gets a name attached. This sport may progress into a different collection, have a sport, which may actually be the same as the first plant (unbeknown to the grower) and it also gets a new name so we have identical plants with different names. I can't detect any difference, for example, between Neo. Aussie Dream 'Red Pride' and Neo. Aussie Dream 'Glorious'. Another pair is Neo. Aussie Dream 'Midnight Express' and Neo. Aussie Dream 'Christmas Cheer'. This might even confuse some experienced readers.
   I quickly point out that with our abbreviated naming system, Neo. Christmas Cheer is a different plant completely from Neo. Xmas Cheer, You might suggest we change the name but people growing Neo. Van Dourme and Neo. Inferno in Brisbane may not be able to tell the difference, whereas in Townsville they grow very differently during our wet season. Fortunately, 90% or more of the bromeliad cultivars are relatively stable. I do worry about people giving different names to a plant when it changes from albomarginate to variegate over the whole leaf or vice versa as it happens so often. I have a slide showing both forms attached to the one parent. What do you call it?
What about in baskets? Do any look good?
   The Neo. Fireball crosses, especially with Neo. ampullacea, look great. Neo. Pepper, also a Neo. ampullacea cross, looks great but the following are exceptional. Neoregelia Empress and Neoregelia Empress (variegated) with their beautiful, indescribable, two toned pink leaves - that is another pair of names that bothers me, as Neo. Empress is itself variegated. How do we get a variegated variegate? Sorry, we always get back to talking about names.
   Hope you enjoyed the walk around my garden. See you next time you are in town. Next time I might have some spares.
   Reprinted in part from Bromeletter, Volume 39 Number 2 - The Bromeliad Society of Australia Inc.
* Neoregelia Empress is albomarginated.
Peter Waters
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HAPPY BIRTHDAY BEA
   Bea Hanson, the Society's patron, turned ninety-one this month. She was the person responsible for starting the Society by bringing together a group of people for an informal meeting. Later, on July 24, 1962, that inaugural group and others formed the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand. Bea talked to Louise Joyce about the early days.
  A couple of years ago, Bea had a huge clearance sale of a lifetime's collection of bromeliads. It was a reluctant sale but she felt that tending the huge number of plants was past her. However, such has been her passion for bromeliads, you would never guess from her garden today, which is still crowded with her favourite genus, the Neoregelia. Time has clouded her memory, age has sapped her energy but the vitality that earned her the nickname, "Speedy Gonzales", is still there and so is her sense of humour.
  Bea, like many of the Society's charter members, was a member of the Cactus & Succulent Society and, although she's not sure where she saw her first bromeliad, it was a case of instant fascination. Certainly her friendship with Muriel Waterman, who corresponded with Mulford Foster in the United States, contributed to Bea's interest.
   Encourage by the late Bill Rodgers, she decided to gather some people who shared her interest in bromeliads. The first meeting was held in the Wakefield Street office of John Davey. "We sat around the office, had a talk and each of us brought in the bromeliads we had and of course we only had about two each". In those days bromeliads were very rare. Not many people owned any, and those that did, only had a few plants.
   However, interest in the bromeliad group grew and meetings were shifted to a room in the Auckland Horticultural Council building. Eventually the group formed a committee, gave themselves a name and the Society came into being on July 24, 1962. Bea's first role in the new Society was editor of the Journal, a duty which was to last for twenty-three years.
  "We had meetings on the Tuesday and the following day was my bromeliad journal day. No one was allowed to ring and anyone who came into the house wasn't allowed to talk, because we never had enough to fill the journal and I had to sit there and think about what I could put in". She was heartily sick of the job after all those years but didn't stay idle for long.
  Long time friend and life member, Pat Sweeney, remembers how Bea was always on the go. She soon became President of the
Society and somehow, while tending to a family, managed to write a really helpful guide to growing and caring for bromeliads. The expanded second edition is still in print and is still the only bromeliad book written for New Zealand conditions.
   The old days, she says, were great. The excitement of getting new plants, especially when the early members began importing them (so much easier in those days) and the thrill of the Society's first show - a one day affair with Australian judges, Grace Goode and Marjorie MacNamara, held in the Greyfriars Hall. It was a big step up from just putting on displays at other floral shows.
  She also attended some Australian conferences and, thanks to members holding fund-raising ventures, she was able to go (as guest speaker) to a conference in the United States. She remembers how friendly people were but not much else.
   "My brain's had it", she tells me. "Don't forget I'm ninety-one". That she might be, but Bea (Trix to her close friends) still gets about, albeit on a limited basis. "Once I used to run down to the garden and now I waddle down with my walking stick. But I do a little bit and then come back for a rest and then do a bit more, although I seem to do a lot less than I did before".
   She had always loved plants and recalls when she was little how she used to get an empty jam jar and plant any pretty weed in it. She also remembers her family moving house a lot and not being allowed to take her collection of jam jars with her. Maybe that's why she's remained firmly entrenched in her Mt. Wellington home for more than fifty years, arriving when there was nothing around but paddocks.
   These days Bea suffers from arthritis in her back, which is very painful at times. She has also completely lost the use of her right thumb. Doctors say it has literally worn out, a condition Bea blames on her years of using that thumb while making pottery. Somehow she found time and energy to not only make and fire pots in her own kiln (some members still have bromeliads in their Bea Hanson pots) but also to teach pottery at classes in Panmure.
   Possibly one of her greatest embarrassments was the bromeliad named after her by some Australian visitors. (See photo on page 13, October Journal, 2000). "I grew it from seed but I didn't know what its parents were. The visitors saw it at its best and took pups. The next thing, I get a letter saying that they are going to call it "Bea Hanson".
I wrote back straight away and said I didn't want it to be called that because I had nothing to do with it".
   But the plant, a beautiful burgundy neoregelia with banded leaves
11
was called 'Bea Hanson' although its extremely modest namesake wouldn't talk about it for years as she thought it would look as though she was boasting.
   Bea regrets she is unable to attend Society meetings now but by eight-thirty at night she's ready for bed and has "no intention of falling asleep and snoring her way through a meeting!" She is, however, surprised at the recent growth of the Society.
"If we got one new member a month we thought we were doing well. But the lists of new members that appear each month in the Journal are amazing". However, she's cautious about the number of members. In earlier days she says meetings were more friendly because people knew each other. Now she believes they are too crowded and some people, she says, are very greedy over acquiring plants.
   She thinks that eventually, the current trend for bromeliads might wane, but they'll never completely fall from popularity.
   "There's something about bromeliads that gets you. Once you've had them you can't forget them. Many's the time I thought about giving them up for different reasons, but I couldn't do it".
  She doesn't have the thousands of plants she used to, but Bea and her three cats still have lots of bromeliads for company. She also has the gratitude of many members who owe it to her enthusiasm, vision and dedication nearly forty years ago that established the Society, thereby ensuring a lasting place for bromeliads in New Zealand gardens. Thanks Bea and many Happy Birthdays to come.
  In the photograph at right, Pat Sweeney, an original and Life Member and Bea Hanson share a laugh. There must be very few clubs or societies worldwide where the age of members ranges from our youngest, Tristan Melling, at eleven years old to our oldest, Bea Hanson, at ninety-one years.
Photo: Louise Joyce_
Neoregelia ampullacea hybrid
   Another original member, Laurie Dephoff (Life member & Society Historian), grew this Neoregelia ampullacea hybrid on the base of a rather old Nolina recurvata. The neoregelia hybrid, top left, sports a Monarch butterfly chrysalis.
  This bromeliad, and most of its hybrids, stands full sun. Stoloniferous, it is adaptable for growing in baskets or on branches and rocks. Photo: Laurie Dephoff
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IMPORTING BROMELIADS
Len Trotman September talk
  Some years ago, before the Bromeliad Society was officially started in 1962, bromeliads were being imported into New Zealand.
   The range of plants at that time was quite limited and some of the earliest imports were probably Billbergia nutans (Queen's Tears), Aechmea fasciata and Neoregelia carolinae. One of the first people that I know of to import bromeliads was the late Muriel Waterman (who subsequently had a billbergia named after her). She would bring them in from overseas, grow them on and sell the pups for one shilling and sixpence to two shillings and sixpence, or converted to today's currency - fifteen cents to twenty-five cents. In those days it was relatively easy to bring plants into the country, as there were few restrictions except for being able to buy foreign currency (overseas exchange) which was very limited. One would send away a postal order and the plants would arrive by parcel post.
  Around 1961 a group of people decided to form the Bromeliad Society. Among this group were Bea Hanson, the late Bill Rodgers, Gerry Stansfield, Laurie Dephoff, Pat Sweeney, Harry Martin and some others. Some of this early group of people began importing bromeliads for their own collections, and as their collections grew, they were able to distribute them among other members.
   As time went by, restrictions were imposed on the importation of plant material and it became necessary to obtain a permit from the Ministry of Agriculture (MAF). One was also required to retain any imported plants in quarantine for a period of time (a minimum of three months), during which time they would be inspected by a field officer from the Ministry of Agriculture.
   Anyone wanting to import bromeliads had to provide a quarantine house, separated from any other plant material. Several people at this time, including Bea Hansen, the late Andy Andrews and John Scott had quarantine houses and the Bromeliad Society maintained one on Laurie Dephoff's property. Around this time, tillandsias were very popular and these were always included in any shipment of bromeliads.
   I became interested in bromeliads in 1980 and at that time, plants
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       were still very hard to come by, even through the Society, so I decided to have a go at importing a few plants. I constructed a small quarantine house and made a few contacts overseas, mainly in the USA. Then I obtained a permit from the Ministry of Agriculture and started bringing in a few bromeliads.
           At that time, the Customs Department was quite difficult to deal with, particularly if all the documentation was not correctly filled
        out and it would sometimes require two or three trips to the airport to get things sorted out. The other thing was that, before foreign currency transactions were freed up, one could only purchase a limited amount of foreign exchange. Also in those days, the MAF hierarchy was situated in LEVIN! and any problem plants were sent there for diagnosis.
          Eventually the currency problems eased but new regulations were introduced and specifications for quarantine facilities were tightened up. My original quarantine house was condemned and I suspect, so too were many others, for not being up to standard. So I had to build a new one (which has to be registered each year) to MAF specifications. The cost of a permit increased and inspection charges were introduced, both at the point of entry and for each visit by the MAF inspector. These were in line with user pay charges, which were being introduced at the time.
          Anyone contemplating importing plants now, has quite a lot of planning to do and lots of paperwork to contend with (computers can be useful). The first thing is a quarantine facility approved by MAF. Then you will need to find a supplier (preferably someone with a knowledge of exporting plants), because each shipment requires a phytosanitary certificate from the appropriate authority in the country of export and the plants will be required to be treated prior to shipment. You will also need to be familiar with customs procedures. Keep in mind also that if any unwanted pests are found on the plants, the shipment may be returned or confiscated at the discretion of MAF.
I
           So all in all, the importation of plants can be a bit of a gamble and one must be prepared for losses.
        The opinions expressed in letters or articles in this magazine are the authors' own views and do not necessarily express the policy of the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand._
15
IN THE GLASSHOUSE
Billbergia El Capitan
(A cultivar of 'Manda's Othello' x zebrina, by Don Beadle.)
   Growing in a hanging basket, the plant is upright to 60cm with 5-6 broad leaves. The tube is flared slightly at the top. The colour is brown with lime green blotching to the inner leaves. The outer leaves have larger blotches of white and white spots, irregular silver banding, and black saw tooth spines. The inflorescence is large - green with bright red bracts.
   The residents, Litoria aurea (Golden Bell Frogs) are common to the North Island. These two, male and female, are two of the twenty in the hot house and have resided in this plant for 3 months. They leave their residence every day at the same time - 5.30-6.00pm, climbing down and disappearing into the other plants and always are back home next morning by 7.30am. Occasionally I would find one sneaking home late. During the day they sit towards the end of the leaves in the bright light. They are still around but have found a new home on the ground floor.
Text, photo and plant from Graham Alderson
LIKE TOPSY - a garden just grows! Gwen McCallum
  Gardening has always been a lifetime pastime and now bromeliads have come to the forefront.
   It all started when I visited Jo Elder's garden, which was an inspirational experience. I was told of another interesting garden so asked if I could visit and was made welcome by Anne Connolly. These two ladies have been most generous with plants and their knowledge, so I was smitten and then joined the group.
  My husband was apprehensive, but seeing my keenness, bought me a book and then waited and watched "The Change". I was most adamant that only one garden would be bromeliads, but in no time they had crossed the boundary! Of course I had an excuse - "Some bromeliads had to live in shade" - the orange tree was the "Provider". Each time I attended a meeting, I would come home with one or more "special" bromeliads, so another part of the garden was allocated!
17
The biggest surprise for me was when my husband suggested an overgrown patch, which we called "The Wilderness", could be cleared.
   No need to think long on that one, so now it is home to pongas, bromeliads and orchids - all enjoying the eastern aspect.
   The vegetable garden is definitely a permanent fixture!!!!
Photo: Gwen McCallum
NORTHLAND BROMELIAD GROUP
  The September meeting was held at the garden of Minnie Whitehead. The Whiteheads have a lovely spot on the Kaigoose Valley Road at Otaika, and are just developing a very large country garden from scratch. They have several large stands of mature totaras and a series of lovely, swampy pools with kahikatea trees standing with their feet in water. There are lots of beautiful rock formations, which are fabulous for landscaping. Minnie has a large array of bromeliads, which are ideally suited to the rocks and the shady places under the established trees. It will be interesting to watch this garden develop over the years.
   We were all very much saddened to learn of the untimely passing away of Jane Penney, one of our foundation members and a very keen, enthusiastic and knowledgeable gardener. Many of the travelling gardeners will know Jane from bus trips to her garden at Toetoe Road, just south of Whangarei.
   We had a nice display of popular vote plants - top vote went to a Vriesea Purple Cockatoo with three flower spikes. As well as the popular vote we have decided to ask members to bring along a plant from the same genus for display and discussion, starting of course with aechmea.
   Our next meeting will be held at the Quarry Garden in Russell Road on October 28th. We have undertaken to plant a section in bromeliads at the Quarry Garden, so the day will consist of our normal meeting as well as a working bee to start planting. Please bring any spare bromeliads, spades, trowels, suitable footwear etc. Some members will be at the Quarry ahead of our normal 1:30pm start time, so please feel welcome to come early if you can. The Quarry garden will be a magnificent feature in years to come, so hopefully we can get a stunning display of bromeliads established there.
Jacqui O'Connell 18
 exotica
TROPICAL DISPLAY GARDENS NEW ZEALANDS LARGEST BROMELIAD NURSERY
 Are you coming to our annual Labour Weekend Sale this year? If you are interested in bromeliads and other exotic plants, you won't want to miss it.
 => 30% off everything in store.
 =>more than 200 varieties of bromeliads available. =>First release of some more of our Brazilian Neoregelia hybrid.
 =>Heliconia, Musa, Gloriosa and other exotic plants available to purchase.
 =>Books, fertiliser, Sphagnum moss, ponga stumps, driftwood and everything else you might need for your bromeliads.
 =>Sumptuous displays of many different bromeliad species mixed with succulents, cacti, palms, ferns, heliconias etc.
 If that wasn't enough, just down the road from us is 'Art at the Point' - displaying indoor and garden art from the local area.
 Also the famous annual Morris & James pottery sale. And the Longwood Palms sale.
 The sale starts on Saturday the 20th and finishes Monday the 22nd of October from 10am to 5pm daily.
 We will be putting new plants in the sale area constantly so come any time to browse and buy.
 Our open hours are 7 days - 10am to 5pm 111 Point Wells Road, Matakana, Warkworth.
 (Take the Leigh Road to the Omaha Beach turnoff, then head into Point Wells Village)
      Phone(09) 422-9646, Fax (09) 422-9647 email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. _(0800) 111BROM (2766)_
19
BAY OF PLENTY BROMELIAD GROUP
  President Gay Bambery welcomed two visitors and thanked all those who assisted with the bromeliad display and sales table at the Orchid Show. Bromeliad sales were in excess of $1500 indicating the interest in these plants.
  Gay indicated a wish to do more for new members to the group and asked people to write down useful hints for an information sheet for beginners. She also read out an item on fertilising bromeliads by Dave Anderson in the August 2000 Journal. It was a timely reminder for us, as the warmer weather and better light promotes plant growth. Also, it is that time when many pups are being taken off and we should ensure that they be at least half the size of the parent so that they thrive and achieve their best potential. If taken when too small, they will be very slow to grow and are likely to disappoint.
  Johanna Elder spoke about her recent trip to Queensland and encouraged any visitors to the area to contact the local societies and, if possible, to attend their meetings. She was warmly welcomed, saw some wonderful gardens and was impressed by the better colour and growth achieved.
Competition results:
1st Johanna Elder (Dyckia fosteriana 'Silver King') 2nd Anne Gale (Vriesea Poelmanii) 3rd Audrey Hewson (Quesnelia humilis).
Garden visits: 20th November at 10am.
Ngaire Thomas, 127A Hinewa Road. Followed by Lynley & Alec Roy, 251 Levers Road, and then to Lynley Breeze, 46 Manuwai Drive.
Plant of the month (November) - Dyckia.
Auckland Bus Trip - 11th November.
  The bus will leave at 7:30am sharp (the departure site to be confirmed later by phone) to visit David Vazey and Opanuku Subtropicals in the Henderson Valley and then on to Peter Brady in Mt Eden. There is only a 25-seater bus so places are limited. The cost is $41, payable to Lynley Roy by 17.10.01. Bring suitable walking shoes, hats, lunch etc. Hot water will be available.
December Christmas Lunch - 12th December at 12 noon.
   There will be a potluck lunch at Johanna Elder's home at 4 Hinewa Road instead of a general meeting at the Yacht Club. There will be no formal meeting - just a social event and an opportunity to browse in her fascinating garden. Bring finger food to share for 12 noon.
Lynley Breeze
20
RE-NAMING
   The Tillandsia benthamiana illustrated in the September Journal requires a name change.
   In 1981, Wilhelm Weber, a botanist in East Germany, pointed out that Tillandsia benthamiana was the same plant as Tillandsia erubescens Schlechtendal, which was described in 1845.
   As Tillandsia benthamiana was not described until 1888 it must defer to the earlier naming.
   Therefore, please change any labels of Tillandsia benthamiana to Tillandsia erubescens.
Peter Waters
QUESTION
   My Aechmea racinae looked as if it was going to produce three pups, but only one has developed. If I remove this pup will the others start developing, or will they grow anyway after the first has got to a larger size?
ANSWER
   Pups are quite often slow to mature particularly second or third pups. These pups start off as small buds around the leaf axils and growth is triggered by a hormone within the plant.
   Taking off the largest of the pups should give the rest a better chance but don't be impatient and take this pup off too soon. Remember, the longer you leave it on the parent plant the better start it will get.
  Be patient and you will eventually be rewarded! LT
NEW MEMBERS
Adams, Tonia, 58 Tatariki Street, Papakura.
Barnard, Avis, 12 Bluett Road, Ohope.
Hawthorne, Mike & Kim Wallbridge, 80 Kelmarna Avenue, Herne Bay. Jones, Darynie, 55A Commissariat Road, Mt. Wellington, Ak. Laughland, Bryan, 20 Vic Butler Street, Mt. Roskill, Ak.
Morrison, Mrs M, 21 Keven Road, RD4, Pukekohe.
Waters, Jeanette, 22 Halfmoon Rise, Bucklands Beach, (Associate).
BROMELIAD REGISTRY
  There have been a number of changes in the naming of some bromeliads. The following are a few of those affected:
Wittrockia Leopardinum (CV of Wittrockia gigantea)
- formerly Canistrum Leopardinum (Can. giganteum x Can. lindenii var. roseum)
Nidularium Leprosa
- formerly Nidularium regelioides var. rosulatum or Nidularium Spotty Billbergia Gloria
- formerly Billbergia pyramidalis var. striata (yellow form)
NEW CULTIVARS:
Neoregelia Kiwi Magic Neo. Pink Champagne x (Neo. sarmentosa x chlorosticta)
Neoregelia Pink Champagne Neo. cruenta x Rosy Morn Neoregelia Sheer Delight Neo. carolinae x Neo. red form - unknown
Hybridiser - Avon Ryan of Whangarei.
Vriesea Maureen Vriesea hieroglyphica x Vriesea platynema var. variegata
Hybridiser - Maureen Green of Maungakaramea, Northland.
Neoregelia Charming Neo. carolinae x marmorata Neoregelia Fancy That Neo. carolinae x marmorata hybrid Neoregelia Nice Surprise Neo. carolinae x Neo. spectabilis Nidularium Something Special Nid. innocentii var. lineatum x Nid. regelioides
Hybridiser: Gerry Stansfield of Auckland.
   These changes and new cultivars will be described in more detail in later issues of the Journal.
Gerry Stansfield
New Zealand Registrar
22
DON'T SHOOT THEM - VICKS VAPORUB THEM
Harry Frakking Cairns
   "That dog has attacked the bromeliads again" I tell Kristy, my youngest daughter. I know full well she cannot help it that the mongrel is on the warpath again. Twelve this week! We have to find a solution or give him an eternal holiday. What can you do when the dog is a present from your daughter to you - bugger.
   We tried to find out what to do with the dog, no one knows. The story is, wait about eighteen months and then he won't be as playful anymore and maybe leave alone your plants, shoes anything loose. But at twelve a week, that is a lot of bromeliads and they are my pride and joy. Suddenly, maybe, there is relief. Through a friend we get to talk to a Filipino lady who told me "put Vicks on the pots and he won't be going after your broms anymore". We were very sceptical but we had to try it, we would try anything!
  I decided the dog would have to know what he should not be touching, so I gave him a good sniff and I even put it on his nose! He did not like it - good. We spent a day putting Vicks on the outside ring of the pots in the garden (ours are mainly in pots). Up to now it has worked! He has started on two more bromeliads but a touch of Vicks must have cured him - he left them lying on the ground unchewed. So now we can go forward again with a carton of Vicks Vaporub.
   Reprinted from the Cairns Bromeliad Study Group Inc. May/June, 2001.
ANNUAL PLANT AUCTION
OF
LARGE AND/OR UNUSUAL BROMELIADS
Plants that are rarely found on the trading tables usually attract very spirited bidding from members. Your chance to acquire that special bromeliad.
If you have an unusual plant to sell, please telephone Des Yeates, on (09) 838-6535. Only limited numbers accepted.
23
WELLINGTON TILLANDSIA STUDY GROUP
   At the meeting held at Myra & Morris Tarr, 32 Plunket Avenue on September 23rd, 12 members (including 2 new members) were present - apologies from Lois & Merv Dougherty.
Plants discussed were:
A large T. subteres (bought as an imported plant several years ago) had been grown in full sun in winter warmth. The branched inflorescence was almost out but pictures of plants in flower showed that the flowers would be small and probably white. The spikes on the two T. tricolor brought into the last meeting, had both flowered, the purple tubes on one being much larger than the other.
   T. scaposa (formerly kolbii) had several tubular flowers of pale purple. A large dump of T. bergeri was flowering well on the side facing the sun but had no buds on the shaded part of the plant. The lavender flowers of T. caerulea were small on a long stem and were perfumed. T. aeranthos, grown without shading during winter, had attractive deeper colouring on the foliage. A cross of T. aeranthos and tenuifolia produced similar flowers but the colours of the red bracts and purple flowers were much deeper.
   A rarer plant of T. ionantha 'Druid' was admired. Its silvered leaves turned yellow when near flowering and the tubular flowers nestling amongst the leaves were a pale cream colour. The two plants offered on the sales table were eagerly bought.
   A small plant of T. atroviridipetala had a clump of deep red bracts with bright green flowers arising from them. T. pamelae was shown with photos of the parent in flower. The seed, which had been harvested while the pods were still green, were the only ones that had germinated. Pods should not be left until they are brown as none of these seeds grew for the growers. One grower's seedlings, grown in pots, had green foliage and the others grown on bark were silvery. Pups removed from the base of the parent plant - perhaps adventitious pups - had not survived.
   The plant of T. ionantha (last meeting), which had never flowered, had in the last two months produced attractive silvery tinted leafed pups. T. tenuifolia 'Blue' had larger and deeper blue flowers than the var. vaginata. The plants do not need warmth. T. alfredo-laui was a large whitish leafed plant with a hanging stem of very pale green tubular flowers. T. erubescens had similar flowers but the foliage of this plant curved upwards and the flower stalk was firmer.
   T. purpurea 'Spiralifolia', a plant with silvery leaves, produced very attractive small white flowers edged with purple from purple bracts.
24
  The leaves of T. geminiflora were much softer than other tillandsias and it should not be grown in full sun.
   Other plants displayed were T. recurvifolia var. subsecundifolia (formerly leonamiana) with white flowers on orange bracts and T. stricta var.albifolia, the leaves of which were much whiter than the normal colouring.
   A large plant of Philodendron bipinnatifidum had been bought at the bargain price of fifty cents and looked to be growing well.
Phyllis Purdie
BROMELIADS, THE OTHER TYPE OF CARE Mark E. Mishanie New York
   How to make bromeliads grow, thrive and bloom their little heads off - that is the question. Good suggestions have been made at our meetings about watering, fertilising, potting and light requirements. Yet, you could add another ingredient to the stew, that is, good old stability.
What do I mean?
   I think a lot of us growers have the shaky hand syndrome - we can't help playing with our bromeliads - moving them around, fussing them from one window to the next, even packing them up and taking them on vacation. Wrong! Or at least, not so right.
   What do bromeliads really need? They are not so different from people. Bromeliads need stability. They like to be left alone and not played with much. I've had aechmeas, neoregelias, cryptanthus and guzmanias on a northeast exposure and they've thrived. I've left them to themselves, ignoring them except occasionally remembering to water them once in a while and they've prospered, grown and sometimes bloomed.
  With some other bromels I've had more involvement - standing over them, feeding them all the time, repotting them and moving them according to the light rays. What did I get for my trouble? Barely a surviving plant. My experience tells me that it sometimes takes many months for a bromeliad to adapt to a new environment, by which I mean not only a location but also a new pot or a new medium. Give them time to adjust.
  Reprinted from Bromeliana, Volume 23 No 4 - The New York Bromeliad Society Inc.
25
 albomarginata), lueddemanniana (from medio-picta), mexicana, nudicaulis v.
 cuspidata, recurvata, williamsii
 Alcantarea - edmundoi, imperialis
 Billbergia - brasiliensis, decora, vittata, zebrina
 Dyckia - altissima, brevifolia, platyphylla, rariflora, remotiflora var. montevidensis
 Edmundoa - lindenii (variegated), lindenii v. rosea
 Fosterella - penduliflora
 Guzmania - sanguinea var. brevipedicellata
 Neoregelia - punctatissima
 Nidularium - amazonicum
 Pitcairnia - flammea var. roezlii, heterophylla, maidifolia Puya - coerulea v. violacea, grafii, mirabilis, venusta Racinaea - fraseri
 Tillandsia - bartramii, belloensis, balbisiana, capillaris, capitata, deppeana, gardneri, guatemalensis, hotteana, juncea (large form), limbata, myosura, paucifolia, plagiotropica, polystachia, pseudobaileyi, pohliana, schiedeana, tricholepis, tricolor, tricolor var. melanocrater, viridiflora, xiphioides Ursulaea - macvaughii
 Vriesea - angostiniana, Corralina (rubra), ensiformis, erythrodactylon, gigantea, guttata, hieroglyphica, platynema, platynema var. variegata, saundersii, schwackeana, superba Werauhia - gigantea
     Donors -Pat Sweeney, Alison Jarrett, Harvey Beltz, Gerry Stansfield, Bob Reilly, & Len Trotman.
 • The seedbank will exchange two packets of 20 seeds for one (1) large packet of your seed. Make sure it is labelled correctly.
 • Please send in a large stamped envelope.
 • Packets (of at least 20 seeds) are 50 cents.
 • Limited to one packet of seed per kind per address, maximum $5.00 per month.
 • Remember to consult the current seed list when ordering.
 ORDERS:
 with large, stamped, addressed envelope and spare seed to:
 Gerry Stansfield, 7 Noall Street, Te Atatu Peninsula, Auckland. Telephone (09) 834-7178 26
OFFICERS
PATRON & LIFE MEMBER    Mrs. Bea Hanson   (09)527-6830
HISTORIAN & LIFE MEMBER Laurie Dephoff    (09)527-7789
PRESIDENT               Graham West       (09)298-3479
VICE-PRESIDENTS         Lester Ching      (09)576-4595
                        Marjorie Lowe     (09)376-6874
SECRETARY               Dave Anderson     (09)638-8671
TREASURER               Peter Waters      (09)534-5616
EDITOR                  Marjorie Lowe     (09)376-6874
LIBRARIAN               Des Yeates        (09)838-6535
COMMITTEE               Owen Bird         (07)576-2766
                        Bev Ching         (09)576-4595
                        Brian Dawson      (09)837-4598
                        Wilma Fitzgibbons (09)624-6469
                        Murray Mathieson  (09)418-0366
                        Chris Paterson    (09)625-6007
                        Noelene Ritson    (09)625-8114
AUDITOR                 Colin Gosse                   
LIFE MEMBERS            Harry Martin                  
                        Patricia Perratt              
                        Patricia Sweeney              
SCIENTIFIC OFFICER      Peter Waters                  
CULTIVAR REGISTRAR      Gerry Stansfield              
JOURNAL
Please send articles, photographs and advertisements to the Editor, P.O. Box 91-728, AUCKLAND. Phone/ Fax (09) 376-6874.
Deadline for copy is the FIRST Tuesday of each month.
ADVERTISING RATES
One third page (12-13 lines) $10.00
BACK COVER Aechmea fasciata var. purpurea 'Kiwi'
   From the seeds of Aechmea fasciata var. purpurea (obtained from the BSI Seed Fund, USA in the late 70's), Bea Hanson raised and grew the seedling(s) that became this striking plant. In good light, the purple leaves are striped with green with light silver crossbandings. The inflorescence is usually a rather pale pink. A rare feature is that this plant can be self-pollinating.
    Bea registered 'Kiwi' with the BSI in 1981.
Photo: Grant Bayley_Text: Gerry Stansfield
    Printed by Balmoral Office Systems Ph (09)631-5693 Fax (09)623-7440

 

November 2001

BROMELIAD

Vol.41 No.11

Society of New Zealand Inc.

B..OMELIAD SOCIETY OF NEW ZEALAND (INC)
.

The Society was officially formed on the 28th. August, 1962.

The objects of the society are to encourage the cultivation and study of bromeliads
_


grown mdoors or outdoors and in particular


(a) To promote discussion and arrange instruction on cultivation,
propagation and control of diseases.
(b)
To provide a library for members.
(c)
To assist members to identify plants.
(d)
To make awards for outstanding new bromeliads.
,.

(e)
To hold shows or public exhibitions.
(f)
To promote the distribution of bromeliads amongst
members by exchange, purchase and sale, and to
encourage the importation of new plants.
(g) To affiliate with any Society or other body, and to do
such things as may be deemed necessary or desirable
in the furtherance of these objects.

(h)
To accept affiliation from other Societies having similar
objects.

MEETINGS

Held on the FOURTH Tuesday of each month except December, at
Greyfriars Church Hall, 544 Mt. Eden Road, Auckland at 7:30pm.

MEMBERSHIP SUBSCRIPTIONS

New Zealand NZ$20.00 Ordinary

NZ$ 5.00 Associate (same household)

Overseas A$30.00 Australia

US$20.00 United States and other overseas

Send all payments to the Treasurer, Peter Waters, 22 Halfmoon Rise,
Bucklands Beach, AUCKLAND.

CORRESPONDENCE

All general correspondence should be sent to the Secretary, Bromeliad
of New Zealand, 33 Marsden Avenue, Mt. Eden, AUCKLAND. 4.

FRONT COVER
rneRJ'.ld' cbRfst:rnas

The November meeting is the last for 2001 and is, of course, our
Christmas meeting in Auckland. There will be no talk given, but
instead an auction of large and/or unusual plants will be held. This
usually results in some very spirited bidding.

The Monthly Plant Competition is a Christmas arrangement
using bromeliad material and anything festive. On the cover is last
year's winner, entered by Gill Keesing.

Not least but certainly last is the Christmas supper. Please bring a
plate (disposable/no cleanup) of something enticing, edible and if
possible, seasonal in appearance.

Photo: Gill Keesing


CONTENTS


4 From the President Graham West
5,6 October meeting news Dave Anderson
7,8 2002 Annual Competitive Show Gerry Stansfield
9,10 Show classes and rules
12-14 Creating something exquisite Louise Joyce
15 Bay of Plenty Bromeliad Group Lynley Breeze
16 Seed bank Gerry Stansfield
17 Eastern Bay of Plenty Group Christine Borlase
18 My dreams of Eden Gay Bambery
19 Easter Bay of Plenty Bromeliad Group Christine Borlase
19 Officers, journal and advertising
COMING EVENTS
NOVEMBER

25th North land Bromeliad Group 1:30 at Maureen & Keith Green,

-

Maungakaramea. Please bring a chair, competition seedling, a
billbergia for discussion, a Skite plant and a prize for the raffle.
2th Auckland meeting, Greyfriars Hall at 7:30pm.

Annual plant auction

Monthly competition: Christmas bromeliad arrangement.

DECEMBER

1 ih. Bay of Plenty Bromeliad Group 10:30am garden visit to

-

Alison Sear, 11 Roderick Street, on to Heather and Tom Slee,
6 Haniwa Road, then at 12 noon. Christmas Lunch-Potluck
lunch at Johanna Elder, 4 Hinewa Road -bring finger food to
share. (Christmas hats de rigeur)

JANUARY

1st Deadline for copy for the January journal.
22nd Auckland meeting, Greyfriars Hall at 7:30pm. (4th Tuesday)


Talk: Neoregelia caro/inae and hybrids

Monthly plant competition: Neorege/ia carolinae and hybrids
FEBRUARY

4th Deadline for copy for the February Journal.
14th Bay of Plenty Bromeliad Group at the Tauranga Yacht


Clubrooms.
20th Bay of Plenty -garden visits 10:30am at El Jakedo Nursery,

-

Station Road, Matapihi Peninsula, then the garden next door
and on to Gay Bambery at 19 Plateau Heights, Bayfair. Bring
lunch.


FROM THE PRESIDENT

Another year, is just about over, one wonders where 2001 has
gone to.

This is the last journal for this Year. I would like to take this
opp?rtunity, on behalf of the committie to wish you all, a very happy
Chnstmas, and a happy and healthy New year, also keep on enjoying
your Bromelaids, hoping there are plenty pups to pot up.

As this is the last journal Marjorie will be producing I would like to
thank her, for the excellent publication she has produced. Meeting
that deadline each month is not easy.

We are very fortunate, that Andrew Flower has volunteered, to
take over the Editorship of the journal once again. Welcome back
An drew.

Andrew would like, plenty of material to print, please Fax, or write
to him, anything you think would be of interest, including photos. We
would appriciate input from other branches, as well otherwise he will
find it difficult, to fill the journal each month.

The year 2001, has been a growth year, for the Society, with
memership reaching 511, also most nights of our general meetings,
having over 100 attending. We have been extremely lucky, to be able
to have enough seating for everybody

The trading table has been well patronised, with nice plants, there
is a few rules that must be followed.

No insects, clean pots, and no' water in the plants, bare
rooted plants are Welcome. Please take home any unsold plants.

Graham

NEW MEMBERS

Douglas, Neil, 34 Muir Avenue, Mangere Bridge, Ak.
Edgar, Jill, 33 Muir Avenue, Mangere Bridge, Ak.
Fuller, Poppy, Fuller Terrace, Kerikeri.
Gaudin, Cory, 75 Vincent Street, Howick, Ak.


Glentworth, Frederick, 'Gienmyst', RD5, Tauranga (Associate).
Helleur, Prue, Waimate North Road, RD3, Kerikeri.
Mickleburg,Tanya, 917 Peak Road, RD2, Helensville.


Smith, Mrs. M, 134 Durrant Drive, Whangamata.


This issue has been printed verbatim.

OCTOBER MEETING NEWS

Bulging at the seams, the general meeting had 106 members in
attendance.

Peter Waters hosted the Show & Tell plants. The first displayed
was Tillandsia erubescens v. erubescens and Til/andsia benthamiana
(see article in the October Journal). The latter was substantially larger
than Tillandsia erubescens v. erubescens but it has been misnamed
for years. Next was an Aechmea gamosepa/a 'Lucky Stripes'. This
small to medium plant with white margined leaves is one of those
more easily identifiable plants even when it is not in flower. A small
flowering vriesea, purchased from a local nursery also needed
naming. This was probably one of the many mericloned hybrids
brought in from Europe that have been grown on, then gassed to
make them flower early. These hybrid plants are practically
impossible to identify positively. Win Shorrock had brought in a large
plant named Neoregelia sarmentosa 'Large Leaf' that has large broad
leaves with purple dots. The plant was brought into New Zealand from
Australia twenty or more years ago and is incorrectly named. Neo.
sarmentosa is a small species with pointed leaves. Three vriesea
inflorescences, 1.2m high, were brought in with the owner wanting to
know if there would be any viable seed in them. No, the seed
capsules on the brown spikes had long since opened and the seed
dispersed. Next a neoregelia for naming -probably Neo. Aztec, a
nice spotted plant. lt has as parents Neo. macrosepa/a x Marcon
(Marcon's parents are -Neo. marmorata x spectabi/is). The
developer of Aztec was Mulford Foster and it was recorded in the BSI
Checklist of Bromeliad Hybrids 1979.

A plant known in New Zealand for many years as the species Neo.
marmorata was displayed. This plant has leaves with flat squared
ends and is a hybrid, ,not the species. Another Neo. hybrid for naming
was possibly a chlorosticta hybrid with its distinctive green spots.

And, talking of wrongly named plants, it is worth stating that, if a
plant cannot be positively identified, please do not put a plant
label with that name on it with the plant. Put a label with a
number on it and, with very little effort, write the number and
plant name in a notebook. Simple isn't it, and it certainly will help
in stopping incorrectly named plants appearing.

A Tillandsia geminiflora with its light green and spotted red leaves
was also in for naming. This plant is plain green when growing in
deep shade & shows the red spots on light green leaves when grown


in high light. Three Aechmea recurvata crosses needed names. There
are many different hybrids made with Aechmea recurvata that are
virtually impossible to identify. Of the plants shown, the first was
possibly a cross with apocalyptica, the second cross caudata (known
as Aechmea Mary Brett) and the last one was unidentifiable. Last
were two Vriesea guttata, one greener than the other, being grown
under different light conditions. One of the clumps had ten
inflorescences that had yet to open up.

The Conference 2003 raffle was won by Jeanette Tagoai, the
special raffle by Graham Foden and the door prizes by David
Anderson, Carolyne Scholes and Noelene Ritson.

COMPETITIONS

Open flowering: 1st Peter Waters -Neo. Rosy Morn growing in full
sun and looking a picture. 2nd Laurie Dephoff-Aechmea Ensign. Also
in the competition -Aechmea triangularis, By Golly, Neo. 's Orange
Flush, Scarlet Charlotte, Passion, Meyendorffii (Netherlands), Victoria
'Red', Neomea Magenta Star, & Vrieseas platynema variegata,
friburgensis v. padu/osa, Velma Wurtheima.
Open foliage: 1st Len Trotman -Vriesea David Kalakaua with its
striking colours, 2nd Gill Keesing -Aechmea Mirlo. In competition
were A e.'s Ensign, fasciata marginata, By Golly, Neo. 's Royal

Hawaiian, Marble Snow, Midnight Express and Brazilian No. 3,
Hohenbergia correia-araujii and Vriesea Zapita.

Tillandsia: 1st Len Trotman -T. parryi 2nd Harry Martin -T. se/eriana.
Also on the table, T. 's bergeri (15 flowerheads), recurvifolia v.
subsecundifolia, latifolia, butzii, fo/iosa and viridiflora with green
leaves and red tips in full flower.

Plant of the month -Neoregelia marmorata and hybrids : 1st Peter
Waters -Neo. Bobby Dazzler & No.2, 2nd Gill Keesing Neo. Gold

-

Fever. In competition were -a marmorata hybrid, Marcon, Bobby
Dazzler, Aztec and marmorata.

Novice flowering: 1st Audrey Caltaux -Neoregelia Meyendorffii
marginata & 2nd Pam Lang -Aechmea recurvata.

Novice foliage: 1st Carolyne Scholes -Aechmea fasciata 'Sangria',
2nd Judy Graham-Neo. concentrica 'Proserpine'.

Best plant of the month Trophy: Len Trotman -Vriesea David
Kalakaua.

Congratulations to all the winners. Dave Anderson

SHOW TIME 2002

November traditionally sees
the publicity launch for our show
in February, so, First a reminder
to our members, and their

·friends to make a note of the
dates, time and place. This years
show will again be held at the Mt

Albert War Memorial Hall

Auckland, in February on

23rd

Saturday and Sunday the
and 241h from 1 Oam to 4pm,
entry is $3.00 and refreshments
will be available. Remember the
Sale of Plants and those
members wishing to bring plants
for sale should be organising
them now.

As usual we will need plenty
of helpers to do a variety of
things, from making teas etc to
preparing the tables for show
exhibits.

So please offer, or better still put your name on the list at the
November & January meetings.

Again as usual we will need lots of nice plants for our main display,
so it would be a good idea now to have some picked out and groomed,
ready for the show, you will then know how many and what type, this is
always a big help to those setting up the display. Remember to let the
show committee know what you have in the way of display plants and
plants for sale, we will need a very large quantity of plants this year.

A special call to our Country members to make the effort to come to
the show, remember, this is your show as well, and we will look
forward to seeing you there, why not arrange some bus trips, it is a
good time for us all to meet and have a chat. If you wish to sell plants
also, let us know and it can be arranged. I will be sending out some
Publicity posters to your organisers, so make sure that you spread the
word.

I look forward to your help and cooperation.

Gerry Stansfield. Show Publicity Officer.


ANNUAL COMPETITIVE SHOW
Schedule of classes

1.
Aechmea blooming
2.
Aechmea foliage
3.
Billbergia
4.
Cryptanthus
5.
Guzmania blooming
6.
Guzmania foliage
7.
Neoregelia blooming
8.
Neoregelia foliage
9.
Nidularium
10.
Tillandsia -small blooming
11.
Tillandsia -small foliage
12.
Tillandsia -medium blooming
13.
Tillandsia -medium foliage
14.
Tillandsia -large blooming
15.
Tillandsia -large foliage
16.
Vriesea blooming
17.
Vriesea foliage
18.
Bigeneric or other genus not listed above
19.
Miniature bromeliad
20.
Variegated bromeliad
21.
Novice blooming
22.
Novice foliage
23.
Dish or tray garden or novelty planting
24.
Bromeliad arrangement
25.
Artistic or floral arrangement
26.
Decorative container
27.
Hanging container
Conditions of entry

1.
Exhibitors must be financial members of the Bromeliad Society of New
Zealand Inc.
2.
A maximum of two plants may be entered in each class.
3.
Plants must have been grown by the exhibitor for at least three months
prior to the show.
4.
Plants must be clean and healthy, free from scale and insects and
drained of water. Pots must be clean and the potting mix free of weeds
and other plant material. Each plant should be correctly labelled where
possible, with no abbreviations. Labelling is not necessary in Classes 2327.

t

'


'

5.
Plants may be potted only in standard clay, terracotta, green or black
plastic or unadorned bonsai pots. Tillandsias may be mounted on
driftwood or similar.
6.
No commercial leaf shine, cream or milk may be used to enhance the
appearance of the plant.
7.
A pot may contain single or multiple plants, provided they are attached to
a single rootstock.
8.
A plant which has changed in shape or colour because of impending
blooming is permitted in blooming classes only, i.e. neoregelias with
blushing centres.
9.
Tillandsias must be firmly attached to mounts and must look established.
They may be single or multiple plants within the stated measurements.
The Fiji Trophy is awarded for the Best Tillandsia.

10. Tillandsia sizes are:
SMALL -up to 15cm (6"), MEDIUM -15-30cm (612"),
LARGE-30cm up (12" plus). These measurements exclude the
inflorescence and mount.
11. Miniature bromeliads may be single or have multiple heads,
no plant to
be more than 12.5cm high, excluding the inflorescence. Tillandsias are
not permitted in this class.
12. A
variegated bromeliad is a plant with white, pink or red longitudinal
stripes on the leaves.
13.
Novice classes are for members of less than three years standing and
who have not won a prize in a bromeliad show.
14. The Olive Allan Trophy for Best of Show is chosen from Classes 1 to 20
only.
15. Class 24, Bromeliad Arrangement, has bromeliads only and must use
natural materials. Plastic pots are not allowed. The Ern Bailey
Trophy for Best Arrangement is awarded to the winner of this class.

16. Class 25, Artistic or Floral Arrangement, may use other types of plant but
must include a significant amount of bromeliad material.
17. Class 26, Decorative container, may contain one bromeliad only but may
have multiple heads.
18. Class 27, Hanging Container, may contain multiple plants but of one type
only.
19. Entries may not be removed from the Show until after 4pm on Sunday.
20. Unless
mentioned above, other rules as BSI standard show. Final
decision rests with the Competition Stewards.
21.
Entries will be accepted between 3pm and 6pm only, on the Friday
before the Show.
FOR SALE

Approximately 100 Large Bromelaids Mostly Neoregelias. They

are just starting to colour up. Price $10.00 each
Graham West, 1 Cameron Street, Papakura. PH.(09) 298-3479

NORTHLAND BROMELIAD GROUP

The October meeting was held at the Russell Road Quarry with a
much smaller turnout due to the very inclement weather. A couple of
hardy souls had gone up earlier and planted 20 or 30 plants, and
ended up wet through despite having their coats and boots on.
However, a change of clothes and they were ready for our meeting.

We had a lovely selection of aechmeas to discuss -a lovely glossy
Ae. Mirlo (variegated), a rather neat Ae. orlandiana 'Ensign Reverse'
that was growing in a very shallow dish and looked very much like an
exotic plant. Some discussion was had on an Ae. warasii, which
looked quite different from other Ae. warasii grown by other members.
We had a number of Ae. recurvata as well.

On the sick list was a very sad looking Neo. Amazing Grace -the
diagnosis was more shade and a repot, hopefully that will do the trick.
We also had some discussion on the effects of dripping from tanalised
timber and leaves getting burnt by the sun when they are wet.

John Frew had brought along his germinated seedlings of
Aechmea /ueddemanniana (Rubra), which had sprouted well and
needed pricking out.

Jacqui O'Connell with a very nice neoregelia won the 'Skite'
competition. Neo. carolinae x Painted Lady x concentrica, runners-up
were Iris & Colin Simons with Neo. Inferno followed by Susie Bliss
with a Tillandsia straminea in flower.

There was a break in the weather after the meeting, so all the
able-bodied members clambered around the rocks on the side of a hill
planting more bromeliads. Since our meeting Avon Ryan has donated
a trailerful of mainly neoregelias for this project and Freda Nash has
been climbing around 2 or 3 days a week to get them planted (she is
73)!!! We now have over 150 plants up there which look stunning and
will look even better once they start multiplying. We will have another
meeting and planting up there next year.

Our next meeting will be held at Maureen & Keith Greens at
Maungakaramea on November 251h at 1 :30. Please bring a chair, the
competition seedling given last year at Maureens, a billbergia for
discussion, a Skite plant if you have one and a prize for the raffle.

Jacqui O'Connell


The opinions expressed in letters or articles in this magazine are the
authors' own views and do not necessarily express the policy of the
Bromeliad Society of New Zealand.


exoLfca

TROPICAL DISPLAY GARDENS
NEW ZEALANDS LARGEST
BROMELIAD NURSERY


Our thanks to all those members who made the journey to
exotica over the Labour Weekend. lt was great to see you.

We have committed ourselves to having at least one hundred
{100) types of bromeliad {usually more than 120) on the sales
tables at all times. With over three hundred and fifty species and
hybrids in stock, the selection is always changing.

There has been much interest in the subtropical plants that we
are offering to complement our bromeliads -the heliconias,
musas {bananas) and gloriosa climbing lilies have all excited
comment {and purchases).

So come any time to browse and buy.

Our open hours are 7 days -1 Oam to Spm

111 Point Wells Road, Matakana, Warkworth.

{Take the Leigh Road to the Omaha Beach turnoff,
then head into Point Wells Village)

Phone {09) 422-9646

Fax {09) 422-9647

email


{0800) 111 BROM {2766)


CREATING SOMETHING EXQUISITE

Louise Joyce

Gerry Stansfield is the Society's keeper of seeds and his passion
is raising and hybridising bromeliads. He was one of about ten
enthusiasts who got together in 1960 to meet and talk about
bromeliads. That group laid the foundation for what became in 1962,
the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand Inc.

Forget about knocking on the front door of Gerry and Margaret's
house. Access is denied and the culprits are dozens and dozens of
pots of bromeliads. Plants of all colours and species have taken over
the house and garden of their west Auckland property -even the
basement has been invaded. For that is where Gerry carefully
nurtures his seeds and seedlings. An old soft drink display cabinet,
fitted out with lights and heaters, is a breeding ground for dozens of
pots of bromeliad seeds while opposite, a bed of young plants all
carefully labelled, are kept warm with their very own electric blanket
(used with a transformer). His particular interest is in achieving
variegation, which he says, is difficult. The standard variegated plant
growing from seed will only produce a very small percentage of
variegated offspring -one in a thousand plants if you're lucky -and
then it might not be stable (i.e. the variegation might eventually
disappear). lt can be trial and error but Gerry says much of that has
been reduced because others have already been down that road and
he has also had a lot of generous help from Society members. But it
is a hobby that requires a huge amount of patience.

"lt takes about five months for a seed pod to ripen, then another
three to four for a seed to get to any size to see what's happening and
then you might find all that effort has been wasted because the seeds
are albino and they'll probably die. So you have to start again. To
propagate you also need to have a number of the same plants to use
because bromeliads only flower once. If you've only got one pup,
you'll have to wait three or four years before it's big enough to try
hybridising."

lt is also exciting. Gerry says you might get nine or ten cultivars out
of a batch of seeds from a hybridised plant and what you're looking
for is the one that's really outstanding, and for the variegations as
they get bigger. So how many seedlings is he growing? This is a
question greeted with a great guffaw. He explains there are about
10,000 seedlings in a jar and he's got about 60 or 70 jars as well as
numerous ice-cream containers where the seedlings are being raised.


People have wanted to buy his seedlings but Gerry is not interested in
commercial gain. His interest is in hybridising, to pick out the best and
to create something exquisite.

Gerry's involvement with bromeliads started out with a chance visit
to a couple at Muriwai. The Mangan's showed Gerry and Margaret an
enormous Nidularium innocentii striatum and then the rest of the
collection. Gerry and Margaret were hooked. The Mangan's were
introduced to bromeliads by Muriel Waterman, the guru of bromeliads
in New Zealand and it's one of Gerry's greatest disappointments that
she died just a few days before he was to meet her. At that time,
Gerry and Margaret were members of the Houseplant Society and it
was there that Bea Hanson approached them to join a group
interested in bromeliads. As his knowledge grew, Gerry and a fellow
member, Charles Alien, decided to tackle hybridising.

Charles opted to work with Aechmea recurvata and Gerry says he
also did some outstanding work with Aechmeas calyculata and
caudata variegata. He also thinks some Neoregelia concentrica
Vulkan hybrids that are around were the work of Charles but
unfortunately he wasn't too diligent at keeping records!

Gerry chose nidulariums, neoregelias and billbergias to work on,
which initially wasn't easy, as there weren't many plants available to
experiment on. But the bromeliad collections gradually built up,
helped by the fact that in those days you could send money to an
overseas grower and the plants would arrive on the doorstep,
stamped by the country of origin's nursery, which was all MAF
required! lt was around this time that Gerry created Neorege/ia Nice
Surprise, which is Neo. spectabilis x carolinae. A little later he
produced Nidularium Something Special, which evolved from a Nidu-

BROMELIADS-FROM SEEDLING TO FLOWERING SIZE

SPECIALIST IN OUTDOOR GROWING ORCHIDS

-

& ALL KINDS OF SUBTROPICAL PLANTS.

POTTERING ABOUT

250m along Military Road (S.H.34) from its junction with (S.H.30)
Te Teko end.

Jim and Sharon Gilchrist
Phone/Fax (07) 322-8201


larium regelioides x innocentii. He also produced a lot of miniature
billbergias but the best of them was Bil/bergia Tinkerbell -(Billbergia
(leptopoda x distachia rubra) x Muriel Waterman.

In 1967, Gerry took up a time-consuming career in management,
which forced him to abandon bromeliads completely. He recalls giving
away tray loads of plants and putting hundreds out to grass. But about
seven years ago Gerry inherited his father's huge orchid collection, so
he decided to put bromeliads back on the agenda. "We gathered
thousands of bromeliads from all over the section -it just shows you
how hardy they are." They even found a Tillandsia viridiflora that had
managed to survive through the years. Gerry rejoined the Society and
the BSI and enjoys his retirement spending hours pottering about in
his three shadehouses and the basement.

He also manages the Society's seedbank and sends seed,
donated by members, to many parts of the country -and makes sure
to enclosed detailed instructions for raising them as they can't just be
plonked in the ground. Gerry is a strong advocate of seedbanks as
they help to ensure the survival of some bromeliad species. Many
bromeliads don't self-pollinate but there are dedicated growers, here
and overseas, who do the job and give the resulting seeds to their
seedbank, which, in turn, distributes them around the world. lt is also
a way of continuing the lifeline of hybridised plants. And, if you are
patient, (seeds can take up to five years to mature) it's an economical
way of increasing your collection!

NOVEMBER MEETING

ANNUAL PLANT AUCTION

OF

LARGE AND/OR UNUSUAL BROMELIADS

PLANTS THAT ARE RARELY FOUND ON THE TRADING TABLES
USUALLY ATTRACT VERY SPIRITED BIDDING FROM MEMBERS.
YOUR CHANCE TO ACQUIRE THAT SPECIAL BROMELIAD.


If you have an unusual plant to sell please phone

DES YEATES-(09) 838-6536

ONLY LIMITED NUMBERS ACCEPTED


BAY OF PLENTY BROMELIAD GROUP

We had a very full meeting on the 14th November, with many lovely
plants for the "Show & Tell", the competition table, the sales table and
a number of dyckias for the "Plant of the Month". We had information
on, and displays on how to divided pupping plants by Anne Connolly
and Alison Sears. Jo Elder also spoke about dealing with more
difficult vrieseas such as Vriesea fosteriana and the need to ensure
very free drainage and preferably straight into scoria to develop roots
before potting on. All recommended the use of flowers of sulphur and
to leave all pups at least 24 hours before potting up.
Corn petition:

1st Owen Bird (Neoregelia hybrid), 2nd An ne Stacy (Neoregelia
Empress) and 3rd= Audrey Hewson (Vriesea Poelmanii) and Jo Elder
( Guzmania Scarlettina).

In October the group visited Owen Bird's garden, which is a
profusion of bromeliads in tunnel houses and the garden -Owen has
over 700 bromeliads. Cliff Touchier has made very good use of a
former swimming pool with a sunken garden full of bromeliads shaded
by pongas.

There was a very pleasant bus trip to Auckland on the 11th and we
are grateful to David and Tami Vazey, Opanuku Subtropicals and
Peter Brady who allowed us to visit their gardens. Special thanks to
Jo Elder and Lynley Roy for perfect organisation of the trip.

Christmas lunch -12 noon on the 12th December.

Before lunch there will be garden visits at 10:30am -Alison Sear, 11
Roderick Street and then to Heather and Tom Slee, 6 Haniwa Road
next to Jo Elder. There will be a potluck lunch at Jo's (4 Hinewa
Road) instead of a general meeting at the Yacht Club-just a social
event and an opportunity to browse in her fascinating garden. Bring
finger food to share and wear a Christmas theme hat of your own
creation. (Any people, who require special diets, do come and just
bring your own requirement). There will be a sales table. Bring along
any special plants for Show & Tell that may not last until the February
meeting.

Plant of the month -February-beginning with the letters E F G
Garden visits -February 20th 10:30am. El Jakedo Nursery, (sells
subtropicals, cacti and succulents) at Station Road, Matapihi
Peninsula, then the garden next door and on to Gay Bambery, 19
Plateau Heights, Bayfair. Bring lunch.

Lynley Breeze.


SEED
BANK


Aechmea -aquilega, caesia, coelestis v. coelestis, coelestis (from

albomarginata), lueddemanniana (from medio-picta), mexicana, nudicau/is v.

cuspidata, recurvata, williamsii

Billbergia-brasiliensis, decora, vittata, zebrina

Dyckia a/tissima, brevifolia, platyphylla, rariflora, remotiflora var.

-

montevidensis

Edmundoa-lindenii v. variegata, lindenii v. rosea
Fosterella -pendu/iflora
Neoregelia -punctatissima


Nidularium -amazonicum

Pitcairnia-flammea var. roezlii, heterophylla

Puya -coerulea v. violacea, grafii, mirabi/is, venusta

Racinaea -fraseri

Tillandsia bartramii, bel/oensis, balbisiana, capillaris, capitata, deppeana,

-

gardneri, guatemalensis, hotteana, juncea (large form), limbata, myosura,

paucifolia, plagiotropica, polystachia, pseudobaileyi, poh/iana, schiedeana,

tricholepis, tricolor, tricolor var. melanocrater, viridiflora, xiphioides

Ursulaea-macvaughii (ten seeds while stocks last).

Vriesea -angostiniana, guttata, hieroglyphica, platynema, platynema
(variegated) schwackeana

Werauhia-gigantea

New seed received from Bob & Lynn Hudson, Audrey Hewson,

Moyna Prince, Len Trotman and Ken Woods.

MORE SEED NEEDED TO REFRESH STOCKS!

• The seedbank will exchange two packets of 20 seeds for one (1)
large packet of your seed. Make sure it is labelled correctly.

Please send in a envelope.

Packets (of at least 20 seeds) are 50 cents.

Limited to one packet of seed per kind per address, maximum $5.00 per
month.

Remember to consult the current seed list when ordering.

ORDERS:

with large, stamped, addressed envelope and spare seed to:

Gerry Stansfield, 7 Noall Street, Te Atatu Peninsula, Auckland.
Telephone (09) 834-7178


EASTERN BAY OF PLENTY
BROMELIAD AND ORCHID GROUP

Our October meeting was firstly at the home of Pam and Trevor
Signal for a leisurely wander through their tunnelhouses. Pam and
Trevor must have one of the largest orchid collections, for hobbyists,
in this part of the world. Three (or four?) large houses plus a couple of
small ones. Not only orchids but other tender plants co-habit here with
the warmer growing ones having the luxury of a twin skin house.

Fortunately, the Signals have several acres to indulge their
passion. The admiration of our members for the Signal's growing
skills was obvious, most of us being far from experts on the family
Orchidaceae, although many of us try, and in my case try not to
murder the poor things. Although I love them dearly, my ambition
often far exceeds my skills. However, I tell myself we learn by our
mistakes. A growing number of bromeliads were also admired, many
of them in pots because of the heavy frosts in that area.

Our next stop was at the Richardson's. Although just a couple of
kilometres up the road, the number and severity of frosts here differs
greatly from the Signals because of the location on a northeast-facing
hill. Jean's passion is her garden and I rarely go there without finding
something new. Her garden is constantly changing and her young
palm area, sited just below the bush area is doing well. Bromeliads
are under a high pruned conifer with another area taking shape
opposite the lounge window. Succulents abound and a roofer display
bench is loaded with orchids, more succulents and other treasures
that need protection. Add to this a more conventional garden area
with roses, perennials and camellias plus several tropical trees and it
is easy to see where Jean can usually be found. Fortunately, Duncan,
her husband, enjoys the garden too.

We had our meeting here with four new members attending. Sue
Laurent welcomed us and spoke about the numbers that are joining
the Bromeliad Society. As our numbers increase, the funds will
become available to start a reference book collection, and Alison
Jarrett agreed to be our librarian. One of our group, Avis Barnard, is
the 5001h member to join the New Zealand Society and was lucky
enough to be sent a selection of the journals. lt was decided to make
the November meeting the last for the year, on the 181h November at
Alison's for finger food lunch and then possibly on to Ross's. An
orchid and a neoregelia were the raffle prizes. The sales table and
afternoon tea completed the afternoon.

Christine Borlase.

MY DREAMS OF EDEN

Gay Bambery

My husband and I started building our present home progressively
over the last eight years in a somewhat barren subdivision. With no
neighbouring fences and with paving etc. taking a lower priority, only
a few previous favourite plants came with us to be planted willy-nilly
against the house. Redevelopment to fit with the newer areas is now
my focus and old loves have become past loves.


In late 1997, we began developing "the bank" and my fervour for
exotic places was reflected in the plant choices. I became a palm nut
with visions of creating a little tropical paradise. My overly ambitious
idyll, including great canopy trees, had to yield to the reality of my
small plot with close neighbours. Pots replaced grandiose mass
plantings and palms, vireyas and foliage plants governed my wish list.

Reading broadened my horizons to the extent that I would pester
my nurseryman with obscure botanical names to which he would
exasperatedly reply, "What have you been reading now?"

Bromeliads became a natural progression as I needed fillers but
soon became another absorbing passion. The lack of shelter made it
very trying for the first plants I bought at a garage sale and their initial
season was a trial by fire. Summer temperatures reached 43 and 34
in the shade, with little air movement to alleviate the stress but the
fantastic Bay of Plenty climate soon remedied that and I am now
constantly pruning.

As yet I have not exhausted my spaces for insidiously addictive
bromeliads but I do challenge my rubbish collector's brawn with the
past loves and prunings. Of course my garden is far from complete
with a water feature still on the wish list and my goal is to someday
call myself a gardener.

BACK PAGE:

Bromeliads to the right, bromeliads to the left. Aechmeas,
neoregelias and vrieseas make wonderful underplants on both sides
of the boardwalk. An imaginative use of Scleranthus biflorus hanging
over the retaining wall and Sprekelia formosissima bottom centre.
Photo: Gay Bambery


OFFICERS

PATRON & LIFE MEMBER

HISTORIAN & LIFE MEMBER
PRESIDENT
VICE-PRESIDENT
SECRETARY

TREASURER
LIBRARIAN

COMMITTEE

AUDITOR

LIFE MEMBERS

SCIENTIFIC OFFICER

CUL TIVAR REGISTRAR

Mrs. Bea Hanson
Laurie Dephoff
Graham West
Lester Ching

Dave Anderson
Peter Waters

Des Yeates

Owen Bird

Bev Ching

Brian Dawson
Wilma Fitzgibbons
Murray Mathieson
Chris Paterson
Noelene Ritson
Colin Gosse

Harry Martin

Patricia Perratt

Patricia Sweeney

Peter Waters

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COMING TO WHAKATANE
THIS SUMMER?

You are welcome to view my garden which is brimful
of bromeliads, palms and water features.
Judged best overall and most imaginative
garden this year.


Bromeliads, window gardens and novel potholders for sale.
Groups welcome. Cost $2.00

ALISON JARRETT, 42 VICTORIA AVENUE, WHAKATANE.
PH. (07) 308-9169

BROMELIAD
Society of New Zealand Inc.
 May 2001 Vol.41 No.5
BROMELIAD SOCIETY OF NEW ZEALAND (INC).
Affiliated with the Bromeliad Society International.
The Society was officially formed on the 28th. August, 1962.
    The objects of the society are to encourage the cultivation and study of bromeliads grown indoors or outdoors and in particular-
(a) To promote discussion and arrange instruction on cultivation, propagation and control of diseases.
(b) To provide a library for members.
(c) To assist members to identify plants.
(d) To make awards for outstanding new bromeliads.
(e) To hold shows or public exhibitions.
(f) To promote the distribution of bromeliads amongst members by exchange, purchase and sale, and to encourage the importation of new plants.
(g) To affiliate with any Society or other body, and to do such things as may be deemed necessary or desirable in the furtherance of these objects.
(h) To accept affiliation from other Societies having similar
_objects.___
MEETINGS
Held on the FOURTH Tuesday of each month except December, at Greyfriars Church Hall, 544 Mt. Eden Road, Auckland at 7:30pm.
MEMBERSHIP SUBSCRIPTIONS
New Zealand NZ$20.00 Ordinary
                      NZ$ 5.00 Associate (same household)
Overseas A$30.00 Australia
                       US$20.00 United States and other overseas Send all payments to the Treasurer, Peter Waters, 22 Halfmoon Rise, Bucklands Beach, AUCKLAND.
CORRESPONDENCE
All general correspondence should be sent to the Secretary, Bromeliad Society of New Zealand, 33 Marsden Avenue, Mt. Eden, AUCKLAND. 4.
FRONT COVER Nidularium procerum
is from the rainforests of eastern Brazil and along the Atlantic coast down to southern Brazil, where it grows in shaded areas on rocks near the coast and in humid inland forest, forming ground covers under trees and growing on trees, rocks and bushes.
   The form seen locally has brick-red bracts and an unusual shade of jade blue flowers (it may possibly be a hybrid). The stemmed bracts can be up to 20cm across and last in colour for 6-8 months. Hardiness is about the same as for Nidularium fulgens (it usually stands some frost down to -2°) and it is also able to stand high light -some of the hybrids will stand sun._Photo: Harry Martin
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CONTENTS
4 From the President
5,6 April meeting news
7-9 Cold hardiness
9,10 Bromeliads & the Mighty Amazon Basin
11-13 Vriesea fosteriana and hybrids
14,15 Why grow nidulariums?
16 Vriesea carinata
16,17 My garden
18 Question/Answer...How to grow a pineapple
19 Badges
21 Bay of Plenty Bromeliad Group
23 Northland Bromeliad Group
24,25 Seedbank
26 Basics for beginners - Potting mixes
27 Officers, Journal, advertising
COMING EVENTS
Graham West Dave Anderson Jay Thurrott Len Butt Dave Anderson Art Hyland
Vicki Carter
Laurie Dephoff Kevin Scholium Jacqui O'Connell Gerry Stansfield
MAY
20th
22nd
27"
Bay of Plenty Bromeliad Group - day trip to Whakatane. Auckland meeting, Greyfriars Hall at 7:30pm. (*► 4th Tuesday) Talk: Len Trotman will demonstrate some basic techniques. Monthly plant competition: Miniature bromeliads, excluding tillandsias.
Northland Bromeliad Group - 1:30pm at the Russell Road Quarry Gardens. Please bring a cup, chair, plate & raffle prize.
JUNE
5th Deadline for copy for the June Journal.
9th Bay of Plenty Bromeliad Group - 1pm at the Tauranga Yacht Clubrooms.
20th BOP garden visits - Anne Connolly, 6 Linklater Ave Otumoetai Gladys Fisher, 31 Cherrywood Drive, Cherrywood and Lorna Grey, 9 Bristol Avenue, Otumoetai.
26th Auckland meeting, Greyfriars Hall at 7:30pm.
       Talk: Neoregelia carolinae and hybrids.
       Monthly plant competition: Nidulariums & canistropsis.
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FROM THE PRESIDENT
  I have been away on holiday in the South Island and while in Reefton gave a talk on bromeliads to the Reefton Garden Club. Most of the people present had never seen a bromeliad. They experience 65-70 frosts a year. However, they were a very keen and lively group and some expressed interest in the building of glasshouses to house some bromeliads.
   While in the neighbourhood, so to speak, we visited Graham and Judith Alderson at Rangiora, our second most southerly members. All their plants are in heated plastic houses, which were very well laid out and the displays included some very unusual bromeliads.
  Some of our members, who seldom get a mention, carry out the time consuming business of giving talks on bromeliads to various plant and gardening groups. The enthusiasm engendered by these talks/demonstrations helps the Society to grow.
  Conference 2003 will be needing more input from members over the coming months - ensuring that our first Conference to be held here will turn out to be a notable success.
Graham
COMMENT
  When Sarah Beresford, the Editor of the New Zealand Gardener, rang me, enquiring about the possibility of one of our more knowledgeable members being interviewed for an article on bromeliads, I suggested that Peter Waters, as our Scientific Officer, would be a suitable person to ask. That he is a Director of the BSI was an extra bonus.
   The projected two-page article turned into a five-page article with another inside page and the front cover. So if you would like some great photographs and an interesting article buy the current issue of the NZ Gardener and show your non-bromeliad growing friends what it is all about.
  An added bonus is that it is a great issue for mild climate gardeners - bamboo, succulents, narrow gardens et al - a foretaste of changing attitudes to what constitutes a Pacific garden.
Editor
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APRIL MEETING NEWS
   Ninety-five members attended the April meeting. The evening was cool and was a distinct change from the relatively warm days and nights that Auckland has been experiencing over the last several weeks.
  A reminder was given to members to print their names in the attendance book as this helps the plant ballot to go much more quickly and efficiently at the meeting.
   Peter Waters led the discussion on the Show & Tell plants. First was a x Cryptbergia Red Burst (was rubra), a cross between Cryptanthus bahianus x Billbergia nutans. It had lost its coloration as it had been growing in the shade and was now quite green. Next was Tillandsia kirchhoffiana - a clump of ten or so grasslike plants with one in flower. It appears that this plant only flowers in largish clumps. Then there was an unusual Tillandsia somnians with variegated stripes down the leaves. This plant goes red all over when grown in full sun when the stripes in the leaves would probably disappear. Gerry Stansfield brought in a neoregelia-like plant that he had got from David Austin in Kaitaia. The plant was probably a bigeneric as the flowers were in fascicles, possibly a neoregelia x nidularium. Two small seedling Alcantarea imperialis were displayed with very small grass pups growing around the base. The owner wanted to know what to do with them. As the plantlets were very small they would take a very long time to mature. However, if they are left on the plant they sometimes just die off, so take them off and look after them. For display was Nidularium Oddball, a cultivar of procerum, that looked very attractive with its bright red bracts and blue flowers. Lastly, and also for display, was Aechmea dichlamydea var. trinitensis, still out in high colour six months after the flowers first opened.
   The special raffle prize was won by David Goss. The door prizes went to Janice Mills, Luen Jones and June Sly. The Conference 2003 raffle was won by Graeme Foden.
COMPETITIONS
Open flowering: 1st Len Trotman with Guzmania Ultra, 2nd Gerry Stansfield with Aechmea Friederike, a cultivar of Fascini without the spines. Also in the competition were Aechmeas flavorosea and zebrina, Neo.'s Annick, Chirripo and a hybrid, and Guzmania wittmackii.
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Open foliage: 1st Peter Waters with Vriesea Pahoa Beauty x fosteriana, 2nd Len Trotman with Neo. Painted Delight. In the competition were Neo.'s Painted Lady x Plutonis, a concentrica cross, Scarlet Charlotte and Billbergia Borracho.
Tillandsia: 1st Peter Waters with T. rothii, 2nd Len Trotman with T. tectorum 'Minuta' There were also on the table T. crocata (small form) with 6 highly perfumed flower spikes, T. aff. capitata (Guatemala), punctulata and Emilie.
Plant of the month: Canistrum & Edmundoa species & hybrids:
1st Len Trotman's Edmundoa lindenii variegata and 2nd Peter Waters with Canistrum seidelianum. In the competition were Edmundoa lindenii var. roseum forma humile, Edmundoa lindenii var. roseum forma procerum, Canistrums fosterianum and seidelianum.
Novice flowering: 1st was Russell Spence with Neoregelia Royal Cordovan and 2nd was Megan Thomas with Nidularium procerum. Novice foliage: 1st was Betty Goss with Vriesea altodasserae, also 2nd with Vriesea fosteriana (rubra).
Best plant of the month: Len Trotman with Guzmania Ultra equal with Neoregelia Painted Delight.
Congratulations to all the winners. Dave Anderson
# NEXT MEETING...22nd May...4th Tuesday in May (not the last!)
NEW MEMBERS
Anderson, Colin, 34 Alamein Crescent, Onekawa, Napier.
Brehm, Joyce, 5080 Dawne Street, San Diego, CA 92117-1351,USA. Cliffe, Richard, 3 Mizpah Road, Browns Bay, Ak. - Associate.
Collings, John, 123 Shore Road, Remuera, Ak. de Lore, Mary, Box 414, Surfdale, Waiheke Island Drever, Jill, 3/4 Pleasant Street, Onehunga, Ak.
Harris, Mrs. D, 68 Kingswood Road, Brookfield, Tauranga.
Howard, Ann 32 Park Road, Titirangi, Ak.
Hunt, Doug, 52 Tourist Road, Clevedon.
McKechnie, Olive, 150 Te Horo Street, Maungatapu, Tauranga. Poynter, Shirley, 39 Kaipara Portage Road, Riverhead, Ak.
Rivett, Bubbles, 3 Camellia Lane, Whakatane.
Slee, Tom & Heather, 6 Hinewa Road, Otumoetai, Tauranga.
Wright, Fred & Annette, 189A Maungatapu Road, Tauranga.
The opinions expressed in letters or articles in this magazine are the authors' own views and do not necessarily express the policy of the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand._
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COLD HARDINESS
Jay Thurrott Florida
When someone says a particular bromeliad is 'cold-hardy' or 'cold-tolerant', what does that mean?
   To me, a truly cold-hardy plant doesn't show cold damage in its foliage when it gets cold. That's not necessarily the case with bromeliads despite what you have heard. That cold snap before Christmas this year sent the temperatures plunging to 28° F (-2.2° C) in Port Orange and the bromeliads that I left outside (with a few exceptions) are either keeling over or showing a lot of damaged leaves. The truth of the matter is that this is another of those terms like 'full sun', 'filtered light' and 'partial shade' that mean different things to people in different locations. First of all, we need to distinguish among three very different circumstances:
   1 - Frost - We often get frost in Port Orange during the winter months. Frost forms during those cool nights or early mornings when the humidity is relatively high, the temperatures are below 40° F (4.4°C) and there is little or no wind. Frost damage on bromeliad leaves often doesn't show up for some time after the event and manifests itself either as large brown areas on the leaf, browned leaf edges or many tiny brown spots resembling pin pricks (I often find this type of damage on Aechmea fulgens in its many forms) across the leaf. The damage is caused by the formation of ice crystals within the leaf, which then expand and cause the leaf cells to burst and die -resulting in brown areas where this occurs.
  2 - Freeze - Freezes occur whenever the temperature drops below 32°F (CPC). When temperatures drop further into the 20's (-3° to -6.6° C), this is almost always referred to by the weatherman as a "hard freeze". Freeze damage is more severe than that caused by a frost and often either kills the plant or ruins major portions of its leaves. The degree of damage is directly proportional to the number of hours that the plant was exposed to freezing temperatures, so anything you can do to minimise this time works in your favour. Often after a freeze, plants will look fine for a few days and then just wilt and hang limply over the edge of the pot, or rot off at the base and fall out of the pot. If you are lucky and the damage is not too severe, the plant may surprise you with a showy bloom soon after the freeze or
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produce a number of offsets that will ensure the survival of the plants' lineage. Too often, however, a hard freeze is simply 'the end of the line' for bromeliads and you have to begin shopping for replacements. This is not always such a bad thing either - it gives you a reason to acquire new plants!
   3 - Cold - To me, anything below 75° F (24° C) is cold so this is a very subjective term. I've often heard that staghorn ferns won't survive temperatures below 50° F (10°C - will actually stand 2°C and less) and that some orchids need help if the temperature falls below 60° F (15.5°C). While I don't necessarily agree with these numbers, clearly some plant varieties are better at handling low temperatures than others and bromeliads are no exceptions.
   At the other end of the extreme from the term 'cold-hardy' are the 'cold-sensitive' plants. These often show damage well before temperatures dip low enough to produce frost and include bromeliads having origins from the Amazon basin or other areas with uniform warm temperatures throughout the year. You can add plants in this category to your collection, but plan on moving them indoors or to a greenhouse when the weatherman says cold weather is on its way! These plants simply can't tolerate cold weather. To me, plants in the Aechmea chantinii group are a good example of cold-sensitive bromeliads. Once the temperature drops into the low 40's (4-7° C), I find that I not only get leaf damage, but the plant seems to just lose all of its vigour. Offsets that should mature in a year or two may take three years or more before blooming (assuming they don't experience more cold the following winter).
  Does that stop me from trying to grow Aechmea chantinii 'Ash Blonde' and 'Grey Ghost'? No, some people are just slower learners than others! Carol Johnson of Pineapple Place used to say that, if you wanted to have success growing bromeliads, stick to those that originate from areas of South America where the climate is similar to ours in central Florida. That's good advice and a good reason to make use of our club library for looking into the particulars of each plant in your collection.
   What plants are most likely to survive the cold weather? There are many lists of cold hardy plants out there that have been developed by hobbyists and commercial growers and occasionally there is even agreement over the plants that should be included. Generally, those that do the best in cold weather are the big spiny terrestrials like Aechmea distichantha var. schlumbergeri or Quesnelia testudo.
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Florida residents have grown these in their yards for so many generations that they are often thought of as native plants. Many neoregelias thrive in cold weather and actually develop their best coloration during the winter months (* winter is dry season in Florida). Surprisingly, the delicate looking vrieseas hold up very well in cold weather. A large number of the tillandsias are also quite cold hardy, but there are some very notable exceptions, so check the reference books before deciding to leave them outside when cold weather is predicted. Here's a hint...unless you like shopping for T. xerographies, bring this plant inside when the weatherman says we're going to have a cold night!
   Back to the question on hand - What's a cold hardy bromeliad? This is any bromeliad that your own experience has shown survives temperatures below normal for your area. Depending on the area that you grow your plants in, this may be occasional temperatures in the upper 30's (3°+C), mid 30's (0-3° C) or even low 30's (-!!!). Once that mercury falls into the 20's(!!!), though, all bets are off!
  Reprinted from the Florida East Coast Bromeliad Society Newsletter, January 2001.
BROMELIADS AND THE MIGHTY AMAZON BASIN Len Butt
   It is almost impossible to imagine the vast quantities of wild territory that houses our bromeliads when they are in their native habitat! The magnificent Amazon River, which winds across the country, nearly splitting it in twain, is the great beating heart of that very tropical paradise of plants and rainforest.
   Rising as a small stream some 17,000 feet (6000m) above sea level in the snow capped Peruvian Andes, it tumbles and plunges down ravines and chasms onward through a great, green jungle basin and finally enters the Atlantic Ocean. It is 200 miles wide at the mouth and laced with many islands. The journey of this river is 4000 miles and it is said that ocean going liners can navigate some 2300 miles inland.
   The jungle surrounding the great green basin is unique in the world's geography. Wet, dripping, dimly lit, the area is unmarked by the seasons and has had relatively no disturbance or change in over one million years. Now, we know by reading our newspapers that man, the primary destroyer, is trying to change it!
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   The epiphytes, be they orchids, aroids or bromeliads, which live in this vast ecological system have developed their own water supplies and have come to terms with their own mini-world of life. Other great forests of our northern and southern hemispheres have experienced Ice Ages and therefore are only young in comparison. So, like parts of our tropical Australian rainforest, here is an ancient primeval area where one can look into the past.
   Apparently, this great rainforest and its almost limitless canopy, is unbelievably rich in fauna and flora and yet, to quote some few of the naturalists who have wandered there, it is the most hygienically clean walkway ever. Everything that crashes down, be it a tree or an animal, is consumed by the denizens of the area in a very short period. Trees are ant or borer ridden and become dust in a short time and fungi also help in this. Excrement from man and animal vanishes overnight, back into the forest floor. Animals and the burial dead of man are picked to clean bones in short order.
   Bromeliads flourish as epiphytes on a huge number of the jungle trees, never really reaching the top storey section of the tree, but growing on lianas, buttresses, in tree crotches, out of stumpholes and among rocks on the jungle floor. The neoregelia, billbergia and aechmea genera are scattered through many parts of Brazil. The shoreline of the great river's many streams, inlets and rocky terrains is very rich in the Bromeliaceae.
   Bromeliads are not only a cache for water, but often many forms of small animals and insects live in these reservoirs. Some forms harbour mosquito larvae as well as crabs, swimming beetles, little lizards and even brilliantly painted tree frogs. These latter are known as arrow poison frogs, having deadly toxins in their skin glands.
   Reprinted from Bromletter, Bromeliad Society of Australia, No. 3 1982.
# The late Len Butt was a Life Member of the Queensland Bromeliad Society Inc. He was one of the founding group, the Editor of their magazine 'Bromeliaceae' and a regular contributor to it and to 'Bromletter', the journal of the Bromeliad Society of Australia Inc. He was also leader at one time of the Cycad/Zamiad & Palm Study group.
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Vriesea fosteriana and hybrids
David Anderson April talk
   It was on a garden visit to Hazel and John Jack's in the early 1980's that I first saw this magnificent species, growing in full sun. As the plants were practically impossible to obtain here at that time, I imported three plants from Warners Bay Nursery in Australia and these have multiplied and thrived outdoors in Auckland ever since. Of course I have added to my collection of this species since then. They certainly are plants that everybody admires, whether you are a bromeliad enthusiast or not.
   Vriesea fosteriana comes from the south of Brazil at Morro Do Sol in the state of Espirito Santo, where it was first collected in 1940. The type plant was collected from plants growing in full sun at an altitude of approximately 1000 metres where they grow on a sandy substrate. Mature specimens grow to two metres diameter with the flower spike two metres high.
   There are two different forms of the species Vriesea fosteriana -variety seideliana that has pointed (acuminate) leaves and variety fosteriana that has rounded (apiculate) that are thicker, and wider as well. The leaves are 50-65mm wide, banded across the leaves in reddish brown and green, on a cream or green background. The banding is particularly attractive when the plant is grown in bright light, and also more distinct on the underside of the leaf.
   The inflorescence is quite plain in comparison and the plant is certainly not grown for its flower spike. The greenish white flowers come out one at a time and open at night to be fertilised by bats and nocturnal insects.
   Red Chestnut is by far the most well known cultivar of variety seideliana, with a predominant red/brown and narrow cream banding colouration to the leaves. The variety seideliana has far more creamy/white in the leaf, still with red/brown banding. Then there are cultivars like 'Vista' that are so white that they are very slow growing. Vriesea fosteriana var. fosteriana (collected as the type specimen) has a predominant green colour to the leaves with bands of red/brown. A particularly nice and sought after cultivar of this variety is 'Rubra', which has wide reddish brown bands.
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   In researching this talk, I read Chet Blackburn's article in the Bromeliad Society International Journal (dated November/December 1999) about Vriesea fosteriana. As he states in his article, this species has never been written up in the BSI Journal, despite its attractiveness and popularity. This is all the more difficult to understand as it has been used to produce a number of wonderful hybrids as can be seen here tonight.
PLANTS ON DISPLAY
1 - Vr. fosteriana 'Speckles' - Olive Trevor, Queensland
2 - Vr. fosteriana 'Red Chestnut' x gigantea (photo opposite)
3 - Vr. species (Peru) x Red Chestnut - John Arden
4 - Red Chestnut x Sunspot - John Arden
5 - Red Chestnut x Lucky 13 - John Arden
6 - Pahoa Beauty (gigantea Nova x fosteriana var. seideliana)
7 - Vr. fosteriana 'Pink'
8 - Vr. fosteriana 'Midnight Splendor
9 - Vr. fosteriana x bleherae
10 - Hawaiian Sunset (Vr. platynema (variegated) x fosteriana var. seideliana - David Shiigi
11 - Vr. racinae x Red Chestnut
12 - Zapita (racinae x Red Chestnut) x gigantea - Skotak
   All of the above plants show, to greater or lesser degrees, the lovely colorations that come from Vriesea fosteriana. Adding to its appeal is that it is very easy to grow in cultivation and does not suffer from the leaf damage that so many other beautifully marked bromeliads do.
Top right:
Vriesea fosteriana (rubra)
   Probably one of the most commonly grown plants in this species, this well grown specimen is planted in a large crucible underplanted with Vriesea carinata, a neoregelia hybrid and a large clump of Nidularium leprosa against a background of bamboo.
Photo: Marjorie Lowe...taken in Pat Lawson's garden.
Bottom right
Vriesea fosteriana 'Red Chestnut' x gigantea
   This beautifully marked cultivar is one of many different examples of Vriesea fosteriana hybrids in Peter Water's extensive collection. Photo: Marjorie Lowe
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WHY GROW NIDULARIUMS?
Art Hyland Florida
   In 1950, I was given a bromeliad. It was love at first sight and I'm still hooked. The blamed things are habit-forming. In the years since, I have collected many varieties from a number of genera in all three subfamilies. As I have grown older, and perhaps wiser, I have decided to limit myself to specialising in one genus, along with a few favourites from other genera, which I have amassed over the years.
   The genus I selected was Nidularium. Why choose such an underutilised group of plants? The reasons follow:
1. It is a small genus, so I can hope to obtain representatives of all the species.
2. All species enjoy living where I do in Central Florida.
3. They are relatively colourful plants and are dependable bloomers.
4. They are easy to grow and therefore allow me to go off fishing.
   In fact, the plants are so great I can't help wondering why everyone isn't growing them. After speaking to many people, I have come to the conclusion that most believe they should be grown much like neoregelias since they are close to them genetically, according to Smith & Downs. They are also closely related to Cryptanthus, also according to Smith & Downs, and as a matter of fact, they prefer cultural conditions more akin to those used for Cryptanthus than Neoregelia. They do not appreciate being treated like a neoregelia.
   Nidulariums need high humidity and fairly moist conditions. Neoregelias grow best on the dry side. Neoregelias generally need very high levels of light while nidulariums tolerate and thrive on the lowest light levels of any bromeliad genus. Nidulariums respond to steady fertilisation but neoregelias will often lose colour if fed at the same rate. Neoregelias like to be slightly underpotted, while nidulariums prefer ample space for their roots because they are mostly terrestrial, As with all general rules, however, I am sure there are some exceptions.
   I have taken these factors into consideration in growing my plants. My potting medium is primarily peat to which I add perlite and partially composed pine bark chips. I also add potash and triple super phosphate at the time of mixing and at potting time I add an additional
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14 teaspoon of time release 14-14-14 per gallon of medium. During the growing season I feed with 15-30-15 at % label strength on a weekly basis.
   My yard is virtually covered with oak trees so I have low light conditions. The potted plants are grown on benches under 30% shadecloth to protect them from falling oak leaves and acorns. Those growing out in the landscape are treated to oak leaf removal via a portable blower. We usually have sufficient rainfall here in Central Florida to keep my nidulariums happy but if it has not rained for a week or so, I water thoroughly and make certain that all the cups of the plants overflow. Since my plants are grown outdoors, I have good air circulation thereby limiting the potential for scale infestations.
   During the winter, I move all my potted collection into a 16-foot (5m) by 24-foot (7.2m) greenhouse that I cover with plastic. Here the plants are on benches and shelves. Most of the time I keep the east end of the greenhouse open for air circulation, but if freezing temperatures are expected, I seal it and use artificial heating. I have to do this on average of about five nights a year.
  I have asked myself the title question because someone once asked me why I took such an interest in nidulariums. The only response I could come up with then was "because I like them". As I gave more thought to the question, and realised what some of the practical reasons were, I thought I would share them along with my cultural methods so that perhaps a few more growers and hobbyists would become more interested in these fascinating plants.
   Presently I am compiling a list of species, forms, varieties and hybrids. This is an annual chore to assist me in my search for new plants. I truly feel that if you start growing these plants, you too will become a fan.
   Reprinted from the BSI Journal, Volume 47, Number 4.
WANTED TO BUY
  A copy of BLOOMING BROMELIADS by Baensch & Baensch
Judy Graham Please phone (09) 236-8844 if you have one to sell.
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Vriesea carinata
   A small (15cm high) clumping bromeliad with soft green leaves that comes from the rain forests of Southern Brazil where it grows on bushes or low on trees in shady and humid areas at about 1300 metres.
   Surprisingly hardy (down to about -2/3 °C) although preferably frost free. It increases quickly to make an attractive small ground cover when grown in moist shade. It needs fast drainage and some air movement.
   Vriesea carinata is showy (particularly in clumps) for approximately six months. The red and yellow/green bracts on the flowering spike become increasingly brilliant (parrot-like colours) over a three month period and are followed by bright yellow flowers from within the bracts that continue the display for a further three months. It tends to start coming into colour in autumn and the colour lasts until spring, with new flower spikes the following season.
Photo: Brian Dawson
#■ One of our newer members has a container with more than fifty (50) flowering spikes, what a sight this must be. Please would the owner get in touch with the editor, as she would love to photograph it.
MY GARDEN Vicki Carter
   It was during the mid 1980's that while wandering the house plant section of a local nursery, I saw my first bromeliad. It was a Neoregelia carolinae in all its brilliant scarlet glory and with tiny blue flowers at its heart.
   I was fascinated and bought it and for years never saw another. Then one day I came across a hanging basket full of strange looking yellow and red flowers and bought that too. It was a Vriesea carinata and had thirteen flowerheads.
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   I discovered from my gardening books that this was a bromeliad too and from then on was hooked and actively sought them out wherever I could.
  We moved to Auckland eleven years ago to a steep Titirangi section with lots of kauris, rimus, pohutukawas etc. They are however aggressive feeders and gardening near them proved disappointing. Until, that is, I planted my bromeliad pups there and they have never looked back - flowering and multiplying and becoming the basis of the garden I have today.
Photo: Vicki Carter
QUESTION from Erik Wetting
   I have tried growing the sliced off tops of pineapples several times but without success.
  They always seem to rot or the centre dies and they just sit there.
What's the secret?
ANSWER from Zena Poulgrain
now living in Queensland
Cut the top off a mature, good quality fruit.
Slice off, leaving 2-3cm of fruit attached and trim away the flesh until the hard, stringy part in the centre is exposed.
Leave the top to dry for two to three days, then plant in loose, well draining potting mix with scoria or pumice added.
Keep in a warm site away from frost.
Feed only once a month in hot weather but not over winter.
It takes eighteen months to two years to fruit.
Makes a decorative container plant and will be ready to eat when it gives off that delicious pineapple smell.
OUR SOCIETY BADGE
Laurie Dephoff
   It was twenty-one years ago that we decided that the Bromeliad Society could do with a distinctive and colourful badge to identify members. The committee left it to the Secretary and myself to look into the matter.
  Messrs Hanson and Berry submitted twelve black and white versions with bromeliad designs. Three were picked out and coloured for further consideration. However, none measured up to what the committee wanted, so we got busy and made drawings that resulted in my design of a Neoregelia carolinae being used and manufactured by Permark Engraving.
  Members were enthusiastic about the new badges and soon everyone was wearing one - the idea being to recognise other bromeliad lovers, especially on holiday.
   Alas, on looking around at the last meeting I saw only two members wearing badges apart from myself.
   They are still available from the Sales Table at $5.00 each, so why not be proud of our Society and wear a club badge.
TILLANDSIAS
    1 New Seasons Imports
PORTUGAL CORK
                 Direct Import. Ideal for displaying tillandsias and other epiphytes
       2001 Colour Catalogue $2 - cost refunded with order Anwyl Bromeliads, P.O. Box 57021, Mana 6230
or visit our website www.anwyl.com
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POTTERING ABOUT
The Garden Centre on the Grow
 BROMELIADS
FROM SEEDLING TO FLOWERING SIZE
AND MUCH, MUCH MORE........
Orchids & orchid flasks
Palms Succulents and all kinds of subtropical plants
If you are in the Whakatane area please call in
and visit us
Situated 250m along Military Road (S.H.34) from its junction with (S.H.30)
Te Teko end
Jim and Sharon Gilchrist Phone/Fax (07) 322-8201
YU
BAY OF PLENTY BROMELIAD GROUP
  On Wednesday, March 21st our group met at Grace Christie's garden. Many of her bromeliads had been badly damaged by hail before Christmas but it was quite remarkable how the shredded plants had picked up and the new growths are all in good shape. A lot of planning has gone into this interesting garden and terracing is a feature. Thanks to Grace for the welcoming morning tea.
  From there we went to the Te Puna Quarry where we saw how a small team of workers has planted up a section of the quarry with bromeliads. Considering the nature of the ground the plants are doing magnificently.
   We had a smaller attendance than usual at our general meeting on April 11th. Our bromeliad display at the Bay of Plenty Orchid Show was lovely and generated a lot of interest.
  Plant of the month was flowering aechmeas and among them were - Aechmea fasciata 'Silver King', Ae. fasciata purpurea, Ae. Kiwi, Ae. fulgens and Ae. Red Wine.
Competition: 1st Owen Bird (Aechmea chantinii), 2nd Isabel Clotworthy (Neoregelia Fosters Giant Red) and 3rd Audrey Hewson (Hohenbergia correia-araujoi).
  On display were Neo.'s Cherry Smash & Manoa Beauty, Cryptanthus Rubra Major, Tillandsia multicaulis and an orthophytum. Raffles were won by Anne Connolly (Neo. Sundance) and Ann Stacy (Neo. Amazing Grace).
Garden visits: June 20th - First to Anne Connolly, 6 Linklater Avenue, Otumoetai, then to Gladys Fisher at 31 Cherrywood Drive, Cherrywood and on to Lorna Grey at 9 Bristol Avenue, Otumoetai.
We will have a day trip to Whakatane on Sunday May 20th. First stop at Trevor & Pam Signal's at Lambert Road, Whakatane. The programme from there will be announced before departing.
Kevin Scholium
Next meeting: 1pm, May 9th at the Tauranga Yacht Clubrooms.
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EXOTICA
TROPICAL DISPLAY GARDENS NEW ZEALANDS LARGEST BROMELIAD NURSERY
Our thanks to all those members who made the journey to Exotica over the Easter weekend. It was great to see you.
We sold more plants than ever before but our production is increasing and we have lots more plants for you.
We have committed ourselves to having at least one hundred (100) types of bromeliad (usually more than 120) on the sales tables at all times. With over 350 species and hybrids in stock, the selection is always changing.
As each variety comes into the main flowering season, it is often discounted heavily.
At the moment, many Aechmea and Canistropsis varieties are on sale at up to 50% off list price.
Of course you can also visit just to lie in the hammock and bask in the warmth of the tropical area while you look at the display of flowering bromeliads!
Our open hours are now 7 days 10am - 5pm
111 Point Wells Road, Matakana Warkworth
(Take the Leigh Road to the Omaha Beach Turnoff then head into Point Wells Village).
Phone (09) 422-9646 Fax (09) 422-9647 email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
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NORTHLAND BROMELIAD GROUP
  The April meeting was held at Maureen and Keith Green's on a lovely sunny afternoon. The weather was so nice and there were so many of us that we held our meeting outside, after having a thorough browse through thr Green's beautiful garden.
   Our group is getting larger and larger. Some discussion was held on whether we decide to find a suitable venue for our meetings or limit the number of members we can have at any time. It is difficult for all of us to fit into some members' homes.
   On this note, it was decided to hold our next meeting at the Russell Road Quarry Gardens, which are being developed. There is a building there that can be used for meetings, as well as teamaking and toilet facilities.
   Robin Armstrong had brought a piece of pururi (with holes) and a Neoregelia Fireball pup and requested a demonstration from Maureen and Keith on how to mount it. Keith explained that nylon pantyhose or wire could be used, as long as it was not copper wire. Robin had also brought along an Aechmea Bert for identification.
   Our newsletter had requested a specimen of Hohenbergia correia-araujoi be brought along after one member had seen the photograph on the front cover of the January Journal. Of course Maureen was able to provide a very luscious plant with its lovely, felted flowerspike.
   There were only five plants brought along for our popular vote competition, which was won by a very nice Guzmania monostachia with its distinct stripy flowerspike (Freda Nash), 2nd went to Jane Penny with a Vriesea platynema and 3rd equal were a Neo. carolinae x Painted Lady x concentrica and an Aechmea lueddemanniana (rubra) showing its glossy purple berries. 5th was a deep, glowing red Aechmea Mirlo.
  Maureen was asked whether she had a problem with mosquitoes breeding in the bromeliad cups, as mentioned in the Maggie Barry Garden Show recently. This is not the case and we should not be worried about whether or not we are going to get dengue fever from our bromeliads.
Jacqui O'Connell
Next meeting: May 27th at 1:30pm at the Russell Road Quarry Gardens. Please bring a cup, a chair, a raffle prize and a plate (something on it of course).
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FROM THE SEEDBANK
Dear members,
             I am concerned of late that some commercialism is creeping into the seedbank side of the Society and I wish to clarify the situation.
             Although the Society welcomes those who are growing bromeliads commercially, we as a friendly hobbyist Society cannot be seen to be supplying members with large quantities of seed for commercial gain.
             At 50 cents per packet of approximately 20 or more seeds, surely $5-$10 at a time (giving 200-400 seeds) is sufficient. Some members are asking for sixty (60) packets and one member requested 84 packets! That order took my wife and me three days to fill. Some members are asking for the same seed time and time again.
             Remember that we rely on the generosity of members for seed. Sometimes the donated seed consists of a hundred seeds or less. Large orders use up all the seed available, leaving nothing for other members.
             Also spare a thought for me - the seed has to be counted, envelopes cut (small ones cannot be bought), the names written down, envelopes taped and posted. All very time consuming.
If you are looking for seed in commercial quantities, then advertise for it in the Journal, as I am sure that some of our members have spare seed that they are willing to sell.
            From now on the maximum order is to be ten (10) packets per month per household, ordered from the current month's list in the Journal. This list is always being added to and some seed is deleted as supplies are exhausted.
Thank you.
Gerry Stansfield
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 (from albomarginata), emmerichiae, lueddemanniana, maculata, nudicaulis v. cuspidata, orlandiana, spectabilis, williamsii Billbergia - vittata
 Dyckia - altissima, brevifolia, platyphylla, rariflora
 Edmundoa - lindenii v. rosea
 Fosterella - penduliflora
 Guzmania - berteroniana, lingulata v. lingulata
 Neoregelia - pascoaliana
 Nidularium - amazonicum
 Orthophytum - foliosum
 Puya - coerulea v. violacea, grafii, mirabilis, venusta Racinaea - fraseri
 Tillandsia - bartramii, belloensis, balbisiana, capillaris, fasciculata, flabellata, gardneri, hotteana, ionantha, juncea (large form), limbata, multicaulis, myosura, paucifolia, polystachia, pseudobaileyi, pohliana, schiedeana (small form), stricta (green leaf), tricolor, viridiflora Ursulaea - macvaughii (ten seeds while stocks last).
 Vriesea - hieroglyphica, malzinei, platynema, scalaris, schwackeana Werauhia - gigantea
 New seed received from Harvey Beltz, Andrew Flower, Bob Hudson, Paul Robertson, Pat Sweeney and Gerry Stansfield.
 • The seedbank will exchange two packets of 20 seeds for one (1) large packet of your seed. Make sure it is labelled correctly.
 • Please send in a large stamped envelope.
 • Packets (of at least 20 seeds) are 50 cents.
 • Limited to two packets of seed per kind per member.
 ORDERS:
 with large, stamped, addressed envelope and spare seed to: Gerry Stansfield, 7 Noall Street, Te Atatu Peninsula, Auckland. Telephone (09) 834-7178
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BASICS FOR BEGINNERS
Potting mixes Repeat
Peter Waters
Equal parts of
Some fertiliser added
Gerry Stansfield
Unit of measurement - 10 litre paint pail.
1 x pail of Minibark (60 litre bags - $5.00 for 5 at Bark Distributors).
1 x " untreated sawdust - (60 litre bags - $2.50 at Pinepac)
1 x " Bloom potting mix (K Mart).
  " pumice sand.
1 x 15cm squat pot of sheep pellets.
1 x 7.5cm squat pot of Gro-Plus Citrus Food.
Mix well Len Trotman
   For many years I always made up my own mixes, but found that over time the work seemed to get heavier and heavier so now I use Bloom potting mix from K Mart or Just potting mix from The Warehouse. Both these mixes are very open with lots of pumice. For grey leafed tillandsias I usually add extra pumice, and most bromeliads appreciate the addition of broken up polystyrene for drainage.
Joe Murray
I use this mixture for all my plants.
100 litres of King's potting mix.
50 litres of fine bark.
25 litres of peat
I find that the potting mix includes enough food additives.
THEY ALL SAY MAKE SURE THAT YOU HAVE VERY FAST DRAINAGE!!!
                       Peat - coarse if possible. Pumice - medium, about 5mm. Bark - medium - 10-20mm. to mix. Not slow release.
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OFFICERS                                              
PATRON & LIFE MEMBER    Mrs. Bea Hanson   (09)527-6830
HISTORIAN & LIFE MEMBER Laurie Dephoff    (09)527-7789
PRESIDENT               Graham West       (09)298-3479
VICE-PRESIDENTS         Lester Ching      (09)576-4595
                        Marjorie Lowe     (09)376-6874
SECRETARY               Dave Anderson     (09)638-8671
TREASURER               Peter Waters      (09)534-5616
EDITOR                  Marjorie Lowe     (09)376-6874
LIBRARIAN               Des Yeates        (09)838-6535
COMMITTEE               Owen Bird         (07)576-2766
                        Bev Ching         (09)576-4595
                        Brian Dawson      (09)837-4598
                        Wilma Fitzgibbons (09)624-6469
                        Murray Mathieson  (09)418-0366
                        Chris Paterson    (09)625-6007
                        Noelene Ritson    (09)625-8114
AUDITOR                 Colin Gosse                   
LIFE MEMBERS            Harry Martin                  
                        Patricia Perratt              
                        Patricia Sweeney              
SCIENTIFIC OFFICER      Peter Waters                  
CULTIVAR REGISTRAR      Gerry Stansfield              
JOURNAL
Please send articles, photographs and advertisements to the Editor, P.O. Box 91-728, AUCKLAND. Phone/ Fax (09) 376-6874.
Deadline for copy is the FIRST Tuesday of each month.
ADVERTISING RATES
One third page (12-13 lines) $6.00
BACK COVER Aechmea Pink Rocket
{Aechmea fendleri x Aechmea fasciata)
   This photograph, taken in Gladys Fisher's garden at Otumoetai, Tauranga, shows a splendid plant of Aechmea Pink Rocket in full colour. The leaves are a beautiful deep pink, well marked, with the inflorescence clear of the foliage. Very high light is needed to achieve this colouration - an entry at this year's show, with a large spike in flower, had green leaves showing how different a plant can look when grown under dissimilar light conditions.
Photo: Gladys Fisher_
♦ Printed by Balmoral Office Systems Ph (09)631-5693 Fax (09)623-7440
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