Font Size

Cpanel
header2l.jpg
header4r.jpg

2002

2002 Journals

January 2002 February 2002 March 2002 April 2002 May 2002 June 2002 July 2002 August 2002 September 2002 October 2002 November 2002

November 2002
Journal of the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand Inc. Vol.42 No.11

Bromeliad

Bromeliad Society of New Zealand Inc.

Affiliated with the Bromeliad Society International
The Society was formed on 28th August, 1962. The objects of the Society are to encourage the cultivation and study of bromeliads grown indoors or outdoors, and in particular:
• 
To assist members to identify plants.

• 
To promote discussion and arrange instruction on cultivation,
propagation and control of diseases.


• 
To provide a library for members.

• 
To make awards for outstanding new bromeliads.

• 
To hold shows or public exhibitions of bromeliads.

• 
To promote the distribution of bromeliads amongst members by exchange, purchase and sale, and to encourage the importation of new plants.

• 
To affiliate with any society or other body, and to do such things as mabe deemed necessary or desirable in the furtherance of these objects.

• 
To accept affiliation from other societies having similar objects.


MEMBERSHIP SUBSCRIPTIONS

New Zealand: NZ $20.00. Ordinary.

NZ $5.00. Associate (same household). Overseas: AUD $30.00 Australia, US $20.00 United States and other
overseas. Send all payments to the Treasurer, Peter Waters, 22 Half Moon Rise, Bucklands Beach, AUCKLAND.

CORRESPONDENCE

All general correspondence should be sent to the Secretary, Bromeliad Society of New Zealand, PO Box 108 168, Symonds Street, Auckland, New Zealand. The opinions expressed in letters or articles in this Journal are the contributors’ own views and do not necessarily express the views or the policy of the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand.
Front Cover photo …

With its striking pink flower spike and lush, dark purple leaves Aechmea fasciata v. purpurea takes pride of place on our cover this month and helps us introduce our well researched article on the centuries old and universally admired family of Aechmea fasciata. See Page 7.
CONTENTS
 
President’s Page  4 
Notes about 2003 display and plant sales to the public  4 
We’re celebrating 40 years  5 
A tribute to our founders  6 
Aechmea fasciata…real ‘stunners’ with a history – Gerry Stansfield  7 
Bromeliad Root Rot and Heart Rot – Peter Paroz  10 
Auckland Conference 2003 – news and registration forms  12 
Seed Bank – Gerry Stansfield  15 
From the Registrar. Neoregelia hybrids – Gerry Stansfield  16 
Want to know how to pronounce it? This month we look at the ‘A’s …  16 
Auckland October meeting news and competition results – Dave Anderson  18 
Group news from around the country …Northland, Kerikeri, Bay of Plenty, 
Eastern Bay of Plenty, Hawkes Bay  19 
‘Members Trading Post’ classifieds  22 
Officers and Journal directory  23 

COMING EVENTS

NOVEMBER

24th Northland group meeting at Russell Road Quarry.
26th Auckland meeting, Greyfriars Hall at 7.30pm. Christmas and 40th Anniversary celebration of the Society. Members are requested to bring a plate of Christmas ‘goodies’ along for the special supper.
Monthly competition – Christmas arrangement.

DECEMBER

1st Wellington Tillandsia group meeting at 1.30pm at Phyllis and Bruce Purdie’s home, 5 Rochester St, Wellington.
Note: This is the correct date. It was incorrectly listed in our October Journal as November 30th.
8th Kerikeri group meeting at 12 noon at Leo Helleur’s place.
11th Bay of Plenty group meeting – Potluck lunch at Gladys Fisher’s home, 31 Cherrywood Drive (garden visits prior to lunch – see Group News page for details)


PRESIDENT’S PAGE

Well, summer is just around the corner now. On behalf of the committee I would like to send our very best wishes to all of our members for a very happy Christmas and a bright and healthy New Year.
Our October meeting in Auckland was well attended and thanks go to Des Yeates for his excellent work in organizing and running our annual auction – it went very well. Members attending the meeting were also able to experience our new method of speeding up the draw for the plant sales at the end of the meeting. Instead of calling out individual names, we now draw out colours. It was a success – and thanks again to Des Yeates for suggesting this simple and effective idea.
I am very pleased to report that some of our sellers of plants appeared to have taken note of my comments – and plea – in the last journal, re reasonable pricing. Thanks and keep it up!
The silent auction table will start again at our November meeting where I am hoping we will have a really good turnout for our final get together of 2002, and the celebration of our Society’s 40th birthday.
Looking forward to 2003, I should advise everyone that on Saturday March 22nd we are having a one day only, display and plant sales, at the Mt Albert War Memorial Hall, 10.00am to 4.00pm. This will be your opportunity to sell surplus plants to the public.
Finally, as we go to print we have news to hand that a new Kerikeri Bromeliad Group has been formed. Brief details are included in our Group News pages and let me say… welcome!
Best wishes to all our members.
Graham West

ANNUAL DISPLAY AND PLANT SALES
Saturday March 22nd 2003 - ONE DAY ONLY!
10.00am to 4.00pm, Mt Albert War Memorial Hall, 773 New North Rd., Mt Albert.
An opportunity for members to sell surplus plants to the public.
We will have all the floor space for the display and sales – as there is no competition
on this date. (The annual competition will be held as part of the 2003 Conference
programme).

IT’S THE 40TH ANNIVERSARY OF OUR SOCIETY...

As a tribute to the founder members we are printing a section of the minutes of the official meeting at which the Bromeliad Society was formed, and the names of those members who were at that first official meeting.
Minutes of a ‘Get together’ of the Bromeliad Fanciers held at the AHC Headquarters, 57 Symonds Street, Auckland, on July 24th 1962.
The meeting opened at 8pm
In the chair: Mr. W.(Bill) Rogers
Present: 34.
Mr Rogers welcomed those present.
He thanked Mrs. Hanson for the spade
work done in arranging the meeting and
then outlined how the late Mrs. Muriel
Waterman had popularised bromeliads.
The meeting was then asked what the
feeling was regarding the formation of a
Bromeliad Society.
Mr.F.Dankes moved that a Bromeliad
Society be formed.
Seconded by Mr. Arnott; Carried
unanimously.
Moved by Mr. Davy, seconded by Mrs.
MacArthur, that a guiding Committee be
set up to bring forward ideas at the next
meeting. Carried unanimously.

Committee appointed:
Mr. Arnott Proposed Mr. Davy, seconded
Mr. Dankes
Mrs.Hanson Proposed Mr. Arnott,
seconded Mrs McKinnen (Pat Sweeney)
Mr Rogers Proposed Mr Greenough,
seconded Mr Dephoff
Mr Davy Proposed Mrs Dephoff,
seconded Mr. Martin

 Mrs MacKinven Proposed Mrs Hanson,

seconded Mr Davy Mr Martin Proposed Mr Arnott, seconded Mr Rogers
 Mrs Niccolls Proposed Mr Greenough, seconded Mrs Holborough Mrs Belton Proposed Mrs Niccolls seconded Mr. Davy
General: Mr Rogers asked the meeting what they would like in the way of programmes and asked for suggestions as to the objects of the group. Mr Arnott suggested our main object would be to increase our collections, especially by the importation of bromeliads. All present agreed that 2/6 (i.e., two shillings and six pence) per member should be paid towards room rent and supper for this meeting.
The following members signed the attendance register when the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand was formed: F.B.Hanson; L. Dephoff; J.Dephoff; E.Donaghy; M. Niccolls; P.R.MacKinven; F.M.Kershaw; A.B.Turnwald; G.Barney; C.E.Barney; I.G.Belton; G.B.Stansfield; J.Rowe; Mr. & Mrs. Greenough; Mr. & Mrs Danks; W. Rogers; G.Arnott; M.P.Smith. K.G.Mawkes; H.L.Martin; J.Collis;. 24th—07—1962.
H. Martin, Acting President.
Editor’s footnote: It’s a pity that not all those who attended the inaugural meeting got to sign the attendance register, as you will note that the meeting actually records 34 members in attendance, but only 23 signed the register and are listed above

A TRIBUTE TO OUR PATRON…MRS BEA HANSON

Bea has often been called ‘The Mother of the Society’ because she was the one who spent so much time organizing the foundation of the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand.
The inaugural meeting of the bromeliad fanciers was held at 57 Symonds Street, Auckland on July 24th 1962 and Bea became the first Secretary. For the next 22 years she served as Secretary, President and Vice President, and worked incessantly for the progress of the Society.
During 1963 the editor of the newsletter, which was sent to country members only, resigned and Bea took the job on, on a temporary basis. If ‘temporary’ lasts 25 years, what is a permanent job? The early ‘News and Views’ newsletter later turned into our present Journal format in 1972.
Bea has been very active in mounting shows and displays and speaking on bromeliads at Garden Clubs. She was one of two members who mounted the display at the Auckland Museum in November 1971 when our Society won theAuckland City Council Centennial Cup. This is now presented annually to our ‘Overall Points’ winner.
She has often imported bromeliads from friends and growers overseas to help to keep us up to date with newer varieties.
In addition to the above work, she posted plants out to country members for some years, yet still found time to write a beginners booklet called ‘Bromeliads for Everyone’ in 1970. This very popular book was reprinted several times.
A true bromeliad lover, she has given pleasure to hundreds of people.
Editor’s footnote: Prior to the inaugural meeting on the 24th of July 1962, some first ‘get togethers’ were arranged by Bea with about 10 interested people. The people were mainly from the New Zealand House Plant Society, where Bea was a member along with others who were growing bromeliads. These first few ‘get together’ meetings were held in the Davy buildings in Wakefield Street, Auckland. As these were informal meetings there were no minutes
NEW MEMBERS THIS MONTH

Kathryn & Paul Edwards, Auckland Lorna Mole, North Shore City Erlinda & Edith Lapaan, Philippines
D. Brewer, Kerikeri Sylvia Boswell, Whangarei Joanne Mathews, Auckland Kim Scholey, Auckland Claire Smyth, Waitakere City Katrina Orr, Whakatane Tom Nicholls, Thames Welcome to you all…enjoy the Society!
We are also sad to note the death of one of our members, Mrs Betty Beadle.

AECHMEA FASCIATA...REAL ‘STUNNERS’ WITH AN
INTERESTING HISTORY


INTERESTING HISTORY -By Gerry Stansfield
Aechmea fasciata is naturally found on trees in the mountain forests of southern Brazil at elevations of 1,800 to 4,000 feet and in areas around Rio de Janeiro and the Distrito Federal in Buenos Aires. It is known for its beautifully proportioned vase-like form, wide greenish leaves barred with wide silver crossbands and its typical and very striking rose to candy-floss pink inflorescence, with blue flowers. The pink spike can lasts for up to six months or more and so it’s no surprise that this easy to grow and easy to care for plant is extremely popular with nearly every bromeliad lover.
Our story about Aechmea fasciata really begins back in the 17th and early 18th centuries. In those days the botanists and collectors were often just starting to see their first bromeliads and so it is little wonder that many of the original names they gave to particular plants are not the names that have evolved and that we use today.
We do know that Aechmea fasciata was first introduced into cultivation in Belgium in 1826 under the name of Billbergia rhodocyanea, and it was one of the first bromeliads to be seen there. In some areas of Belgium the plant is still known by that original name today. In 1828, Professor John Lindley, who was a professor of botany and a diligent administrator of the Horticultural Society of London (now the Royal Horticultural Society), renamed the plant Billbergia fasciata.
In 1830 it was called Hohenbergia. fasciata. In 1847 the French botanist Charles Lemaire described this same plant as Billbergia rhodocyanea, while ten years later in 1857 the Austrian botanist, Georg Beer, described it as Hoplophytum fasciata. Other names such as Aechmea leopoldii, Aechmea rhodocyanea and Quesnelia rhodocyanea have also been recorded. Confused? Well, our wonderful subject was finally given its permanent name of Aechmea fasciata by the Englishman Gilbert Baker, in 1879. Baker was a botanist of repute, well-known for his ability to correctly name many different plants.
The word ‘aechmea’ is from the Latin ‘aichme’ meaning a point, in reference to the calices (calyx) or the outer protective covering or envelopes as they are called, of the flower.
Aechmea fasciata flowered for the first time in Kew Gardens in England in 1878. Today it is still the most widely cultivated decorative bromeliad in Europe, especially popular in Belgium. Its many horticultural forms have slightly changed its original appearance, and here we are referring to the many fine clone forms that have evolved, such as the German Auslese or Super Auslese as it was usually known, Morgana, Silver King, v. purpurea, and so on. It still rates as the number one house plant in America, as the plants are easily pollinated, providing another plant is used as the pollen parent. Ae. fasciata will not accept its own pollen but the seed is easy to grow, even though it does take
cont. page 9


nine months for the seeds to ripen. Many large nurseries around the world grow thousands of the plants each year for special occasions and with the new flowering inducement pills, or ‘Ethrel’, Aechmea fasciata can be presented on demand in a most attractive manner to the public.
Let us look now at some of the very lovely improved clones this plant had produced. The first we have is Aechmea fasciata ‘Super Auslese’. This was developed by Walter Richter, the famous German horticulturist, and the seed was made available through the very large seed merchants Albert Schenkel in Hamburg. Charles Allen (now deceased), and myself imported the seed into New Zealand from Schenkel. Super Auslese loosely means superior or best type, and this fasciata is definitely one of the best. A quite large plant with wide flowing leaves and strong markings and almost all over silver banding. One of the advantages of this plant is that the Germans seem to have successfully bred out the knuckling seen in many American fasciatas. The other point is that Super Auslese was the forerunner of the now popular Morgana, which was produced by Cornelius Bak in Holland. Fasciata ‘Variegata’ makes a very lovely house plant, while Albomarginata is one of my favourites. Then we have v. purpurea which makes a very attractive pot plant on your patio and should be grown a lot more than it is. We have the lovely giant form of purpurea in Sangria. Down under Aechmea fasciata ‘Kiwi’ was raised by our own Bea Hanson from a packet of fasciata v. purpurea seed from the BSI seed bank back in 1980 and was registered Kiwi by Bea. The plant has consistent red-brown striping in the leaves, and has a very striking appearance. There is an extremely interesting point with Ae. fasciata ’Kiwi’, in so much as the plant is self pollinating and sets seed, from which you will grow back the original Ae. fasciata v. purpurea. Two others that we do not see very often are Ivory and Red Spike.The first has a pure white flower spike, and Red Spike has a red spike instead of the usual pink.
Aechmea fasciata hybrids.
It is strange, to me anyway, that fasciata has not been used as much as one would think to produce hybrids. There are a number in the BSI registry, but not that many considering the lovely capabilities of the plant. Perhaps it is time to do something about that!
Aechmea Fascini. a cv of Ae chantinii x
fasciata. Williams 1969.
Aechmea Pink Rocket a cv of Ae fendleri
x fasciata. Nat de Leon 1981.

Nat de Leon is one of the few to register fasciata crosses. Aechmea Fascicaulis a cv of fasciata x nudicaulis v nudicaulis. Nat de Leon 1984. Aechmea Cosmic Starburst a cv of fasciata x tessmannii. Kent, 1977. Aechmea Eileen a cv of fasciata x serrata, Nat de Leon 1988. These hybrids are where Aechmea fasciata has been used as the seed parent. There are a number of fine crosses where fasciata has been used as the pollen parent, and these and others can be found on the BSI Cultivar Registry online database – at www.bsi.org

BROMELIAD ROOT ROT AND HEART ROT

By Peter Paroz.
A talk given in August to the Queensland Bromeliad Society meeting.
At the September and October meetings in Auckland members asked questions regarding their bromeliad plants rotting in the centre cup and also in and around the basal leaves. This article from Peter Paroz in Australia will help us all. ED.
Bromeliads are not subject to many pests and diseases, but heart rot and root rot can cause considerable losses. These two conditions can be caused by the same organism Phytophthera cinnamomi depending on the origin of the attack. This organism is a fungus with swimming spores which thrive in oxygen deficient conditions. The spores have a long time resting stage estimated at 12-15 years!!. It is highly invasive particularly when some form of mechanical damage has occurred. The mode of dispersal is not known but contaminated surface water is a possibility and rain water is suspected.
The organism is widely spread in soils where it has caused appreciable losses in avocado plantations attacking the roots. It is also reported as a problem in durian, oak and cacao trees and numerous ornamental shrubs and is a problem in Queensland pineapple fields. The organism gets its specific name from the cinnamon tree and was identified as the cause of substantial losses in cinnamon tree plantations in Java about 1915.
The pineapple industry has developed a simple ‘baiting test’ for detecting phytophthera in soil, potting mixture or water. The procedure depends on the ready attack by the organism on the basal white tissue at the base of a bromeliad leaf. The original test used leaves from a pineapple top, but any young bromeliad leaf with white tissue is satisfactory.
Fill a glass jar to about 100mm with the water to be tested and place the test leaf in the water so that about 25mm of the leaf is submerged, Use a thin skewer to pin the leaf at the required depth. Allow to incubate for 8 to 10 days. Phytophthera is indicated by attack on the white tissue usually with a blue/black line and a foul smell. A less invasive organism pythium is indicated by cotton wool like growth around the leaf.
For soil or potting mix, boil and cool some water. Place 3 or 4 teaspoons of the soil or mixture in the bottom of the glass jar and gently pour in the boiled and cooled water, and set the leaf as above.
The recommended fungicide for the local pineapple industry is Ridomil (Fongarid). Aliette is a recommendation from the WWW. Another local recommendation is Phosforpine which is a phosphorous acid preparation neutralized to ph 5.7. This compound appears to act by inhibiting germination of the spores.
Bromeliad plants which are infested can sometimes be saved if the invasion is not too advanced. The best procedure is to remove as much of the affected tissue as possible back to white tissue. Treat with fungicide and allow the damaged tissue to dry and callous over. A serviceable fungicide for this purpose can be made from two parts slaked lime (calcium hydroxide not agricultural lime) and one part sulphur. The recent heart rot problems that I am aware of seem to be associated with the use of chemical sprays; one for mosquitoes and the other for scale control. A possible reason is that the chemical was too strong and caused damage to the growing point of the plant allowing invasion by the fungus.%
ED: Our member, Alan Cliffe, Development Manager of Nufram NZ, advises on some NZ equivalents.
‘The products listed above are all systemic ( absorbed by the foliage and translocated within the plant) fungicides with specific activity against phytophthora. The products that are available in New Zealand are similar to Australia. Ridomil used to be available in NZ containing only the active ingredient metalaxyl. Now there is a new product available as Ridomil Gold MZ. It contains two active ingredients: metalaxyl-M plus mancozeb.Unless
anyone has direct experience of the safety of mancozeb to bromeliads, I would be cautious because mancozeb contains a complex of manganese with zinc. A similar product, Fongarid 25WP, containing the active ingredient furalaxyl, is available from Yates, in 500g packs. This is probably the best option as it is formulated as a powder, which is typically safer than the emulsifiable concentrate formulations. Phosphorous acid formulations are available as Foli-R-Fos ( from Key Industries , available as 1litre), or Foscheck (available from Taranaki Nuchem in 1litre bottles). The other type of product which will give some protection is Bravo. This contains the active chlorothalonil. There are many brands on the market, of different strengths, some in packs as small as 1litre. This is a broad spectrum protectant fungicide (does not get into the foliage but stops disease establishing on the surface), which has activity against a wide range of diseases.’


Pottering About Garden Centre

Orchids - Bromeliads and much more
Jim and Sharon Gilchrist Military Road, RD 2 WHAKATANE 07 - 322 8201
Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Bromeliads Auckland Conference 2003. It’s being held at a great central location…
Only a 15-20 mins drive to either Auckland International Airport
or downtown Auckland City Centre and the Americas Cup action!

The Waipuna Hotel and Conference Centre is a modern purpose built
facility – one of New Zealand’s largest and best equipped.

Lifts and ramp facilities and the well appointed guest rooms we are using
overlook the attractive, tidal, Panmure Basin. (Our conference team
have even planned the dates to take advantage of expected full tides!).
The Panmure Basin has a 3.3km jogging track / walkway (approx 40 mins easy walking)
right around it and it’s also only a short distance to good shopping locations.

Best of all – the staff are friendly and efficient and our conference ‘hosting’
is in very good hands.

If you haven’t already done so…contact Waipuna about your conference accommodation. To get the special rate in March next year, make sure you tell them you’re a Bromeliad conference attendee.
See contact details at foot of next page (P.13)

 
CUT HERE
BROMELIADS AUCKLAND 2003 CONFERENCE MARCH 7TH - 10TH

BROMELIADS AUCKLAND 2003 CONFERENCE

CONFERENCE REGISTRATION

Full Registration - March 7th - 10th, 2003 Friday / Saturday / Sunday / Monday
$185.00 October 1st until January 31st
$205.00 February 1st onwards
Delegates name/s ………………………………………………………………
Address ………………………………………………………………………… Please complete form on next page as well
Full registration includes access to seminars, competitive show, sales plants, Conference breakfast, banquet, lunches, morning and afternoon teas and garden tour on Sunday. Proceedings book also included.


Daily Registration Saturday / Sunday $75.00 daily
Delegates name/s ……………………………………………………………… Address …………………………………………………………………………
Send registrations to Bromeliads 2003Auckland, P.O. Box 51-361, Pakuranga, Auckland, New Zealand. Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
To book accommodation: Freephone 0800-924-786 Freefax 0800-800-315 Phone +64-9-526-3000 Email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Website www.waipunahotel.co.nz
BROMELIADS AUCKLAND 2003 CONFERENCE
REGISTRATION


Note: Please fill this page in irrespective of whether you are registering now, or whether you’ve previously registered for the conference.
Name tag details
Name……………………………………………………………….

Partner……………………………………………………..............

Name of your bromeliad society………………………………….

Are you bringing plants for sale YES / NO
If yes, please state approx number…………
If you have marked Yes you will be contacted by Graham West early in 2003. Graham
is in charge of plant sales and all queries can be directed to him at (09) 298 3479.
Graham will be sending out a letter with conditions relating to Conference plant sales.
The normal 20% to the New Zealand Bromeliad Society Inc will apply on all plant sales.

OPTIONAL EXTRAS - Please indicate your requirements.
DON’T SEND ANY MONEY YET!
FRIDAY 7th MARCH
Harbour and City Bus/Boat trip


$45.00 per person Number attending……………
B.B.Q. evening $32.50 per person Number attending……………
SATURDAY 8th MARCH Breakfast -(partner only)
Conferees covered in Registration.

$20.00 per person Number attending…………… Morning bus trip $15.00 per person Number attending…………… Afternoon bus trip $20.00 per person Number attending…………… Evening Harbour Dinner Cruise
$40.00 per person Number attending…………...
SUNDAY 9th MARCH
Morning Bus trip $25.00 per person Number attending……………
Afternoon bus trip - (partner)
Conferees covered in Registration.

$15.00 per person Number attending…………… Evening Banquet - (partner) Conferees covered in Registration.
$40.00 per person Number attending…………..
MONDAY 10th MARCH
Morning Bus trip $25.00 per person Number attending…………..

Note: Partners are welcome to attend the afternoon session on Monday at no cost

 
CUT HERE

SEED
BANK

Aechmea-bromeliifolia, caesia, coelestis v.coelestis, coelestis (from
albomarginata), lueddemanniana, nudicaulis v. cuspidata, orlandiana,.
Alcantarea-edmundoi, imperialis (green form),.
Billbergia-brasiliensis, decora, vittata,.
Dyckia-altissima, brevifolia, platyphylla, rariflora, remotiflora v.montevidensis,.
Edmundoa-lindenii (from variegata), lindenii v. rosea.
Fosterella-penduliflora,.
Neoregelia-cruenta (pink),.
Nidularium-amazonicum,.
Pitcairnia-flammea, flammea v.roezlii, heterophylla, maidifolia,.
Puya-grafii, mirabilis, venusta,.
Tillandsia-batramii, belloensis, balbisiana, butzii, capitata, cyptantha,
deppeana, gardneri, juncea (large form), limbata, myosura, plagiotropica,
polystachia, pseudobaileyi, pohliana, schiedeana, schiedeana (major),
viridiflora,.
Vriesea-corralina-rubra-superba, ensiformis, erythrodactylon, gigantea
v.seideliana, gradata, guttata, guttata (spotted), hieroglyphica, platynema,
platynema v. variegata, procera, psittacina, racinae, retroflexa, saundersii,
magnifica (gold fish Vr), heterostachys,.
Werauhia-sanquinolenta,.

Members, please note our seed stocks are low, plus we have been taking out old
stocks, so we would appreciate some fresh seed. Please also note that we cannot
accept hybrid seeds as these will not come true to form.
New seed received from- June Gough, Bob Reilly, Michael Pascall, Gerry Stansfield,
Sue Laurent, Carolyn Scholes, Phil Mayhead. Thanks to all.

The Seed Bank will exchange two packets of 20 seed for one (1 large ) packet of your seed.
Make sure it is labelled correctly.
Please send in a large stamped envelope.
Packets ( of at least 20 seeds) are 50 cents.
Limited to one packet of seed per kind per address, maximum $5.00 per month.

Remember to consult the current month’s seed list when ordering.

Orders for seed, with large, stamped addressed envelope and spare seed to
Gerry Stansfield, 7 Noall Street, Te Atatu Peninsula. Waitakere City. Ph. (09) 834-7178.

FROM THE REGISTRAR -By Gerry StansfieldFROM THE REGISTRAR

Two hybrids that have recently been registered with the BSI.
The top photo is Neoregelia Fancy That. The cross was made in 1998, using Neoregelia carolinae x Neoregelia Julian Nally and was one of a number of rather nice seedlings from a batch of cultivars. The other was Neoregelia Charming that we featured in the June 2002 Journal. You will remember that Neoregelia Julian Nally was the result of crossing Neo. spectabilis and Neo. marmorata. Neo. Fancy That is a splendid large plant about 800mm across with 60 to 70 mm wide leaves.
The bottom photo is of Neoregelia Lavender Girl and was made in 1989 between Neoregelia carolinae v. carolinae and Neoregelia carolinae ‘Princeps. It is quite a large plant with long narrow green leaves and at flowering time the inflorescence changes from deep princeps colouring to dark lavender.
Remember, if you have a hybrid bromeliad that you have made, ora sport that you have developed, send me a photo and a write up and we will print it so we can all enjoy and learn
WANT TO KNOW HOW TO PRONOUNCE IT?
Whenever we have room in the Journal we will list the correct pronunciations
of the most commonly grown bromeliads in each genus.

References: Johnson’s Garden Dictionary by C.H.Wright F.R.M.S. and D. Dewar,
Covent Gardens London, first print 1894.
Also Victoria Padilla, Los Angeles, California USA. 1966.

The genus BROMELIA, as well as the total family BROMELIACEAE, was named in
honour of Olaf Bromel, the Swedish botanist (1639-1705).

This month we have some A’s:


Acanthostachys strobilacea (a-cantho-steak’is stro-bil-a-see-a).
Aechmea (e’k-me’a, or eek-me’a).
angustifolia (an-gus’ti-fol’ee-a).
aquilega (a-kwil-ee’ga).


OCTOBER MEETING NEWS FROM AUCKLAND

Notes by Dave Anderson
There was another large attendance for the October monthly meeting. This monthly meeting with the traditional annual auction of those special and rare plants always draws a large crowd. Planning is well in hand for the upcoming Conference 2003 at Waipuna Lodge. Purchasing of plants at the Conference will be restricted to attendees - see Graham West about details if you wish to sell plants. The Society will also be putting on a display with plant sales at Mt. Albert War Memorial Hall on Saturday March 22nd 2003. The display and sales will be open to the general public. The November meeting will mark the 40th anniversary of the society when we will have four foundation members with us. As well as this members are asked to bring a plate of food for the supper that will follow the shortened meeting, this being our Xmas breakup.
Peter Waters hosted the Show and Tell plants. Gerry Stansfield brought in for display some Neoregelia fluminensis plants that he had grown from seed supplied by the BSI. He said that four of the plants had turned out to look like Neoregelia Barbarian and disappointingly Peter said that the remaining plants were not Neo. fluminensis either and were probably an ampullacea cross. Len Trotman brought in a Tillandsia ionantha ‘Druid’in full flower, the petals being quite white (hence its name) and quite different to the usual purple flowers of the other ionantha species. Next a plant with the leaves that are rotting around their base. Some of the centres of other plants growing in the near vicinity had also rotted out. Although it could be a fungus causing the problem Peter thought that it was more than likely to be from the tanalised timbers particularly as they had been growing under ‘Novaroof’ that was attached to tanalised timber. The condensation off the underside of the roof was quite sufficient to rot out the bromeliads. An aechmea with a tiny purple flower needed a name. It was an unidentifiable hybrid. Next a neoregelia that was thought to be either a largish Gold Fever or a small Bobby Dazzler. Following this was a nidularium - either innocentii or amazonicum. As it had flowered some months ago it was impossible to name. However one of the easier ways to differentiate these two plants is that innocentii has white flowers whereas amazonica has greenish flowers but to be really sure you need to remove the petals and see if they have appendages inside at the base. If they do it is amazonicum. Next, another nidularium with pink flowers identified as Nidularium Something Special
-a cross between innocentii lineatum and regelioides that was made by Gerry Stansfield many years ago. A variegated billbergia was named as either Billbergia Santa Barbara or Perriam’s Pride, anyhow it is probably a distachia hybrid. Another variegated billbergia that has been the subject of much controversy over the years has now been named Billbergia pyramidalis ‘Foster’s Striate’. Aneoregelia with shiny pinkish/purplish leaves with a bright pink centre was thought to be Neoregelia Autumn Leaves. Lastly there were three plants all with different names that looked identical and were identified as Neoregelia Aztec.
The Auction was quite a lively affair with plants being sold at excellent prices.
The top price achieved was for a Vriesea gigantea ‘Nova’ at $144.00, followed by a large Vriesea fosteriana (green form) at $100.00.
COMPETITIONS
Open Flowering:
First was Len Trotman with Guzmania Peacockii - a large plant with purplish red colourations and stripes in the leaves. This lovely plant was also awarded plant of the month. Lester & Bev Ching were second with Hohenbergia correia-araujoi.
Open Foliage:
Gerry Stansfield was first with aAechmea Ensign with its striking variegations and second was Len Trotman with Neoregelia Manoa Beauty.
Tillandsia:
Glenys Guild’s T. imperialis was first, with second going to Win Shorrock’s T. bergeri.
Nidularium:
First was Lester & Bev Ching’s Nidularium Chantrieri followed by Gerry Stansfield’s Nidularium Something Special.
Novice Flowering:
First was Pam Lang withAechmea triangularis and second was Carolyn Scholes’ Neoregelia Inferno
Novice Foliage:
First was Carolyn Scholes’ Neoregelia Fosperior ‘Perfection’ and second was Pam Lang with a Neoregelia Lovely Purple. The Plant of the Month Trophy went to Len Trotman’s Guzmania Peacockii.
Congratulations to all the winners. NEXT MEETINGTuesday 26th November.

NEWS FROM AROUND
THE COUNTRY

Northland Bromeliad Group.
-Jill Hudson ( for Jacqui O’Connell)
About 30 members attended a meeting on the Sunday of Labour weekend at the home of Robyn Powell, Maungatapere. In a few years Robyn has achieved enviable success in her well planned garden. A diversity of plants thrive – from fuchsias, camellias, magnolias, vireyas, roses (without black spot!) to succulents and sub-tropicals and unsurprisingly, bromeliads.
A couple of problem bromeliads rotting at the centre were displayed. Moisture dripping from nearby tanalised timber was suggested as a possible cause. Some members queried this as they have the same problem without adjacent timber. Any theories ? (See article on root rot and heart rot in this issue – ED)
Variegated plants were discussed, with Maureen Green explaining the mysteries of spotted, tessellated or albo-marginated bromeliads. Albino pups should be discarded as they will not thrive without chlorophyll. Variegated plants require less sun.
Feeding of bromeliads, or lack of it, was discussed, with Maureen advocating the latter approach, saying that a healthy plant growing naturally should not require ‘extras’.
Often it pays to repot a new acquisition if you suspect it has been force fed or the potting mix looks to be pure peat.
Robyn showed us her two impressive seedlings of Aechmea lueddemanniana ‘Medio-picta’. They live on top of Robyn’s microwave. A couple of members reported that their seedlings have pups. Competition results were: First: Maureen Green with Neoregelia Furnace. Second: Ann Drever with Aechmea recurvata ‘Big Ben’. Third =: Iris Symonds with Vriesea hieroglyphica. Third =: Rae Cox-Smith with Guzmania ‘Rubra’.
Our November meeting will be at the Quarry gardens, Russell Rd, Whangarei on the 24th at 1:30 pm. A car boot sale is scheduled so do bring your plants, white elephants... plus, your name tag; and a cup
Kerikeri Bromeliad Group
– Poppy Fuller
Our very first get together was at the home of Pauline and Grant Sutherland, attended by 18 keen bromeliad ‘fans’.
The President of the Society, Graham West, was our guest speaker and he gave us great ideas from his travels and experiences and answered many questions with ease. Thanks for being with us and for your generous donation to the silent auction.
Special thanks to Avon Ryan for his generous donation of assorted bromeliads and for his awesome talk on pollinating-hybridizing and germinating.
Congratulations to our inaugural ‘team’ : Leo Helleur - President Poppy Fuller - Secretary Pauline Sutherland - Treasurer Len, Wini, Judy, Vivian - Committee
For more information phone 09 407 8080 or 09 407 9183 New members welcome.
Next Meeting: Leo’s place, December 8th, 12 noon.
Eastern Bay of Plenty Bromeliad and Orchid Group
-Christine Borlase
The Garden Ramble on the 20th October was on a cold and windy day but this did not dampen the spirits of the 25 people attending. We welcomed two new members, Pam and Kate, and we hope they enjoy our group. The first garden we visited was Helene Clarke’s, on a hilltop overlooking Waiotahi Beach with its beautiful pohutukawas. A glorious spot although it’s prone to high winds.  The Clarke’s have enclosed areas of garden with fences and pergolas to combat the wind, with very different planting, ranging from cottage garden to bromeliads to shrubbery, all interspersed with that wonderful view! The other two gardens faced the Ohiwa Harbour, but being lower were much more sheltered, especially Irene Zeier’s, on a sloping section catching all the sun. Irene tells us it can be very different when the wind comes in across the harbour and she has her special bromeliads in a small shadehouse, or on the inland side of that shadehouse, a position they obviously love. She also has many fine succulents, mainly on her front porch. Up the hill at the rear of the house more bromeliads shelter under tall trees with many other plants.
The last garden, that of Elsa McGuigan, was just around the corner and almost at sea level. The owners have added a conservatory across the front so they can enjoy the view all year round. They have not been long in this house, but what a beautiful spot to retire, and already well planted with many of Elsa’ s favourites. We held our meeting here, following up with afternoon tea and the sales tables. Three raffles and a couple of spot prizes meant five of us left with a smile! Our next meeting on Sunday November 17th is the last for the year and we resume again in February.
Hawkes Bay Bromeliad Group
-Julie Greenhill
Considering our October meeting was held during Labour weekend we did well to still manage 15 attendees and we had an interesting session. Final plans were made for our display at the cacti and succulent show where we hope to entice more people to become bromeliad enthusiasts and members of our group. We also discussed our first garden visit to be held at the home of one of our members and this will double as our November meeting and be the last for the year.
A demonstration on attaching tillandsias with glue to a mount of cork bark was interesting for us all and a confidence booster for those who haven’t tried it yet. One plant (probably an aechmea?) shown was suspected as having the problem of quilling but it also could have been this unnamed plant’s natural form as the pup was on a stolon and the parent plant also seemed very narrow at the base. A small discussion on quilling ensued and we were able to give the recipe to help resolve the problem.
On the sales table were a number of tillandsias which proved very popular especially Tillandsia capitata and Tillandsia flabellata. There were also a small number of green leafed bromeliads as well as other non-bromeliad plants and treats like fruit and home baking kindly donated to raise funds for the club. One member removes strips of fibre from the trunks of his fan palms and sells these for a small fee for the club. It is excellent stuff for lining hanging baskets or for attaching plants to mounts. A lovely little Tillandsia stricta was the raffle prize after which we concluded with refreshments.
Bay of Plenty Bromeliad Group
-Lynley Breeze
November meeting held at the Tauranga Yacht and Power Boat Club Rooms – Sulphur Point. The plant of the month was tillandsias and there was a lovely display. We had a discussion and demonstration on how to cut off pups from vireseas which illustrated both how to do it, and how not to do it (i.e. by snapping off one Viresea Platynema which had no part of the root attached. Types of fertiliser were discussed.  Both types of phostrogen were recommended and miracid fertiliser, which is all that Audrey Hewson uses. Her plants are grown in tiny containers of scoria and nothing else and are watered every five days with miracid and a teaspoon of Epsom salts - and she consistently produces stunning plants! In November we also enjoyed a visit to Gwen McCallum’s, which illustrated that a garden need not be large to be beautiful, and Grace Christie’s lovely garden on the Minden. Competition Winners for November First -Neo. Orange Crush -Cushla Chudleigh Second – Neo. carolinae - Gwyn Glentworth Third – Vr. guttata -Natalie Simmonds The Raffle Winners were Goldie from the office, and Gwyn Glentworth.
Next Month’s Events Next Meeting – Wednesday 11th December
-a Christmas Potluck lunch at Gladys Fisher’s home, 31 Cherrywood Drive. This will be mainly a social event so there will be no plant of the month or sales. Bring a plate of finger food to share and a chair. There will be two garden visits prior to the lunch :
1.
Audrey Hewson’s 14 Wiremu St, Otumoetai Intermediate

2.
Anne Connolly’s 6 Linklater Ave, Cherrywood


NB. There will be no meeting at the club in January and no garden visits arranged for that month either. The next club meeting will be on the second Wednesday in February 2003 at the TYPB clubrooms
i.e. 12th February.
There will be a committee meeting at
11.30am that day.

MEMBERS TRADING POST
 
Wanted to buy:
Plants of Pitcairnia nigra and P. atrorubens. Any size, age considered. Cash or swap for other bromeliads. Contact Andrew Maloy, 09 836 1913. Wanted to buy:
Plants of Aechmea fosteriana, Aechmea fasciata ‘Variegata’, Nidularium atalaiaense, Nidularium RaRu. Contact Gerry Stansfield, 09 834 7178. We are happy to publish short Buy, Sell or Swap notices from members of the Society. These should be a maximum of 30 words. Please send to Murray Mathieson, email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or post: 14 Matanui Street, Northcote, North Shore City. 
Bromeliads Online Check out the website at www.bromeliads.co.nz Buy pups and plants, books and more. Send a Christmas Bromeliad to your friends and family with the click of a button. 


SOCIETY OFFICERS

PATRON  Bea Hanson  (09) 527-6830 
PRESIDENT  Graham West  (09) 298-3479 
VICE PRESIDENTS  Lester Ching  (09) 576-4595 
Dave Anderson  (09) 638-8671 
SECRETARY  Dean Waters  (09) 422-2235 
TREASURER  Peter Waters  (09) 534-5616 
LIBRARIAN  Des Yeates  (09) 838-6535 
COMMITTEE  Bev Ching  (09) 576-4595 
Carol Davis  (09) 832-0510 
Laurie Lang  (09) 410-9557 
Pam Lang  (09) 410- 9557 
Murray Mathieson  (09) 418-0366 
Chris Patterson  (09) 625-6007 
Colin Rickard  (09) 623-0453 
Noeline Ritson  (09) 625-8114 
AUDITOR  Colin Gosse 
LIFE MEMBERS  Laurie Dephoff  Bea Hanson 
Harry Martin  Patricia Perratt 
Patricia Sweeney 
SCIENTIFIC OFFICER  Peter Waters 
CULTIVAR REGISTRAR  Gerry Stansfield 

BROMELIAD JOURNAL

EDITORIAL TEAM Gerry Stansfield (09) 834-7178 Murray Mathieson (09) 418-0366 Peter Waters (09) 534-5616 Louise Joyce (09) 418-0711 Dave Anderson (09) 638-8671
All enquiries and contributions welcome. Please contact the Editorial Team, 7 Noall Street, TeAtatu Peninsula, AUCKLAND.
Gerry Stansfield, (09) 834-7178, Email:This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Deadline for Journal copy and advertising: First Tuesday of publication month.
ADVERTISING RATES

Full Page $30.00 Half Page $15.00 Quarter Page $ 7.50
WE SALUTE THE FOUNDERS OF THE
BROMELIAD SOCIETY OF NEW ZEALAND...

Inaugural meeting 24th July, 1962.
Here are the signatures from the attendance register...

Bea (Trix) Hanson Laurie Dephoff Patricia Sweeney Harry Martin
40th anniversary celebration. 1962 - 2002

October 2002
Journal of the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand Inc. Vol.42 No.10

Bromeliad

Bromeliad Society of New Zealand Inc.

Affiliated with the Bromeliad Society International
The Society was formed on 28th August, 1962. The objects of the Society are to encourage the cultivation and study of bromeliads grown indoors or outdoors, and in particular:
• 
To assist members to identify plants.

• 
To promote discussion and arrange instruction on cultivation,
propagation and control of diseases.


• 
To provide a library for members.

• 
To make awards for outstanding new bromeliads.

• 
To hold shows or public exhibitions of bromeliads.

• 
To promote the distribution of bromeliads amongst members byexchange, purchase and sale, and to encourage the importation of new plants.

• 
To affiliate with any society or other body, and to do such things as mabe deemed necessary or desirable in the furtherance of these objects.

• 
To accept affiliation from other societies having similar objects.


MEMBERSHIP SUBSCRIPTIONS

New Zealand: NZ $20.00. Ordinary.

NZ $5.00. Associate (same household). Overseas: AUD $30.00 Australia, US $20.00 United States and other
overseas. Send all payments to the Treasurer, Peter Waters, 22 Halfmoon Rise, Bucklands Beach, AUCKLAND.

CORRESPONDENCE

All general correspondence should be sent to the Secretary, Bromeliad Society of New Zealand, PO Box 108 168, Symonds Street, Auckland, New Zealand. The opinions expressed in letters or articles in this Journal are the contributors’ own views and do not necessarily express the views or the policy of the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand.
Front Cover photo … Nidularium Something Special
We’re featuring nidulariums this month. Our cover is a cross, made in 1963 between Nidularium innocentii v. lineatum and Nidularium regelioides. Nidularium innocentii was the seed mother. The plant has a lush green lettuce foliage, a gene from innocentii, but has inherited the pink blush at the base from regelioides and also the darker green spots. The inflorescence at flowering starts off white, then pink, then light to dark red. The flowers are pink, a gene from regelioides. Some growers have given this plant a wrong name, such as innocentii or v. wittmackianum and even regelioides. Remember, if it has pink flowers, and the foliage is the same as in the photo, it’s Nidularium Something Special. ED


CONTENTS

President’s Page

4 Auckland September meeting news and competition results – Dave Anderson 5
From the Registrar. More vriesea hybrids – Gerry Stansfield  6 
Bromeliad group news from around the country… Northland, Bay of Plenty, 
Eastern Bay of Plenty, Hawkes Bay, Wellington  8 
Bromeliad ‘madness’ in Whakatane – Sue Laurent  11 
More news…October plant auction… garden visits ... free workshop  12 
Auckland Conference 2003, registration forms  13 
Grooming your plants for the Show – Peter Waters  15 
Competitive Show – schedule of classes – conditions of entry  16 
The genus Nidularium – beautiful, graceful bromeliads – Gerry Stansfield  17 
Seed Bank – Gerry Stansfield  21 
Officers and Journal directory  23 


COMING EVENTS

OCTOBER 20th Eastern Bay of Plenty Garden 26th Hawkes Bay group meeting Rambles (see group news page for details) 27th Northland group meeting (see group 22nd Auckland meeting, Greyfriars Hall at news page for details). 7.30pm. Annual Auction. Monthly competition – nidulariums.
NOVEMBER
10th North Shore, Auckland, two garden visits (see P. 12)
13th Bay of Plenty group meeting at 1.00pm
16th Free workshop for members at 1.30pm, 158a Henderson Valley Road, Henderson, Auckland
17th Eastern Bay of Plenty group Christmas meeting (see group news page for details)
24th Northland group meeting at Rusell Road Quarry
26th Auckland meeting, Greyfriars Hall at 7.30pm. Christmas and 40th Anniversary celebration of the Society. Monthly competition – Christmas arrangement
30th Wellington Tillandsia group meeting at 1.30pm at Phyllis and Bruce Purdie’s home, 5 Rochester St, Wellington


PRESIDENT’S PAGE

Spring has arrived and so has daylight saving. Now, let’s hope we will soon see the end of these cold windy days.
Our September meeting in Auckland was well attended by over 100 members, plus visitors. Our main speaker was Sue Laurent from Whakatane. Sue gave us a most interesting talk on the very enthusiastic Eastern Bay of Plenty Bromeliad and Orchid Group. Thanks Sue, and don’t be too surprised if there are some Auckland bromeliad lovers already planning a visit down! (See Sue’s article on P.11)
I have received some complaints about the prices being asked for plants on our monthly trading table. I would simply ask all our members to remember the ‘spirit’ of the trading table and to price plants at a level that you yourself would be happy to pay. It should be more about giving other members the opportunity of sharing the plants you do not require yourself and less about ‘commercial selling’. Please, all think about this. We don’t want to spoil a very important and special feature of our society. You know those great words …’do unto others …’
Last month, I posed 5 questions about what we should be doing to help and retain new members. Thanks to the 3 people who replied with comments (as it happened they all made favourable comments). I was hoping for more feedback, so come on – it’s not too late. Tell me what we can do better!
Cheers,
Graham West

A ‘thank you’ from the editorial team…
On behalf of the team I would just like to pass on our appreciation for all the nice things members have been saying to us about the ‘new’ look Journal. It is very encouraging for us to hear that you think the Journal is looking great and going in the right direction. We are trying hard to produce a quality Journal and we hope it will get even better as we move forward. To do this we need your help. Remember, this is your society and your Journal. If you have a story to tell about your bromeliads we would love to hear it and if you have good photos we would love to see them too.
We are currently putting together a photo album of quality pictures, so that we can draw on this from time to time when writing an article, or when we receive an article from our members and need an illustration. So, please give this some thought, and the next time you are taking that photo remember the Journal. Thanks, ED .

SEPTEMBER MEETING NEWS FROM AUCKLAND

Notes by Dave Anderson
With the large attendances at our monthly meetings we also have a large number of plants for sale. It would be appreciated if people selling plants could have a proper sales sheet and appropriate standard coloured paper (one colour per seller) identifying the vendor’s plants sold. This would make the task of reconciliation much easier. If you have any queries on this matter please contact Peter Waters.
Sue Laurent was up from Whakatane and gave us a very interesting talk on her beautiful garden and the starting of the Eastern Bay of Plenty Bromeliad and Orchid Group.
Lester spoke about the upcoming Conference 2003 . Please note that the conference fee is being subsidised by the Society by $75 and includes the Sunday night banquet, breakfast on Saturday, the conference book and the garden tour. Registrations for the conference are progressing very well with over 130 at end of September. Indications are that it will be great event!!
Peter Waters once again took us through the Show and Tell plants. First up was Vriesea ospinae v. gruberi; a plant that Len had brought in some months ago and had purposely taken the top off during a demonstration of pup removal. The bare eight inch long stump had now produced a further 4 pups around the top of the stump. For naming was an Aechmea cylindrata with its characteristic purple flower head. Two plants of Aechmea warasii v. rubra were brought in, one having plain green leaves while the other had reddish coloured leaves. Yes, they have the same flower and were both correctly named - the plain green plant having been here for a number of years. Wanting to be named was a stoloniferous neoregelia clump of 12 green plants. It could possibly be Flaming Lovely but as with numerous neoregelia hybrids it is virtually impossible to be certain. The small Vriesea carinata with its easily identifiable flower spike wanted a name, as did Tillandsia recurvifolia v. subsecundifolia. This latter plant was misnamed in NZ for many years as Tillandsia leonamiana. A medium sized flowering Vriesea hybrid made by Avon Ryan was displayed. The clump of three plants all had unusual green flower spikes emerging that were still some way off full maturity indicating that it could possibly be a cross of a Vriesea hieroglyphica. Peter then spoke briefly on the plant of the month -Vriesea fosteriana with its highly sought after six or so different cultivars.
To complete the evening Len Trotman took us through some plant spotting. Canistrum triangulare is an attractive slow growing species.
A clump of Aechmea Red Ribbons (a cultivar of Foster’s Favorite) and still a very attractive plant. Neoregelia Pemiento looks superb when grown under high light however like Neoregelia Kahala Dawn it easily loses its variegations. The Brazilian species Neoregelia correia-araujoi is also a very nice plant but does need bright light to bring out the best colour in the leaves. Neoregelia Spots & Dots is a Nat de Leon hybrid that has been known in
Cont’d on Pg 6


FROM THE REGISTRAR -

Gerry Stansfield


In the July 2002 Journal we looked at two new vriesea hybrids from the Andrew Maloy stable. You may remember me telling you that Andrew has produced a number of these very fine hybrids, and this month I would like to show you two more.
The hybrids were a result of a crossing that the late Noel Scotting made between Vriesea platynema v. variegata x Vriesea fosteriana ‘Rubra’. The seed was sown by Andrew in March 1997, and the result was some very fine new cultivars. The two we show here are: (top)Vriesea Kiwi Sunrise (bottom) Vriesea Kiwi Delight
You will be interested to hear that Andrew is now re-crossing these new hybrids with others, so I am sure we will see some very outstanding new cultivars in the future. .
Meeting news from Auckland cont’d from P.5
NZ erroneously as Skotak #8. One of the better clones of Neoregelia King’s Ransom was looking great with its deep red centre - many of these clones seem to lose their colour. Finally there was the misnamed plantAechmea pimenti-velosoi variegata that is now named Aechmea Pie In The Sky. As Derek Butcher said, “Probably a cultivar? of a comata? hybrid?” Any people with this attractive plant that is quite widely cultivated should change the name, as it certainly is not the species Aechmea pimenti-velosoi.
Maureen Fifield won this month’s special raffle prize and Beverly Davies won the Conference 2003 raffle. The door prizes went to David Goss, Barbara Edley and Daphne Malcolm.

COMPETITIONS

Open Flowering: First was Len Trotman with NeoregeliaAnnik in flower. This lovely Skotak ‘Fireball’ hybrid with bold albo-marginated leaves and a bright red centre also won plant of the month. Second was Gerry Stansfield with Canistrum triangulare. Also in the competition were Aechmea Red Ribbon; Billbergia Kahibah; Canistrum seidelianum; Guzmania Moonlight and Neoregelias Grace, Pemiento and Van Dourme.
Open Foliage: Len Trotman was first with a Neoregelia Medallion, and second was Peter Waters with Neoregelia Evan. In the competition were Aechmea correia araujoi and Pink Rocket; Neoregelias Zoe, Perfect Design, Spots & Dots and carolinae x Meyendorffii and Vrieseas Zapita and Maureen. Tillandsia: Brian Dawson was first with T. ionantha v. scaposa and second was Norma Cook with T. bergeri x aeranthos. There were also on the table Tillandsias floribunda, aeranthos, stricta, and tenuifolia.
Named Monthly Plant (Vriesea fosteriana):
First was Gerry Stansfield’s Vriesea fosteriana ‘Rubra’followed by David Anderson’s Vriesea fosteriana ‘Golden Legend’. In the competition were Vrieseas, fosteriana ‘Speckles’ and two Red Chestnuts.
 Novice Flowering: First was Carolyn Scholes with Neoregelia King’s Ransom and second was Lynette Nash with Tillandsia recurvifolia
v. subsecundifolia.
Novice Foliage: First was Carolyn Scholes
with Vriesea fosteriana x platynema while
Suzanne Williams was second with Vr.
fosteriana ‘Rubra’.

The Plant of the Month went to Len Trotman with Neoregelia Annik. Congratulations to all the winners.
NEXT MEETING Tuesday 22nd October

NEWS FROM AROUND THE COUNTRY .…

Northland Bromeliad Group
-Jacqui O’Connell
22 members of our group attended our September meeting at the home of Claudia Lomas at Whakapara. Claudia has only been here for a very short time but has already made a huge difference to the garden with a lot of hard work. She has some wonderful rocks surrounded by succulents, palms and, of course, bromeliads. A stand of immature totaras behind the house provides ideal growing conditions for bromeliads.
At the meeting a couple of problem plants were produced. One was a very sad looking guzmania and we concluded that it is getting too much sun and that it may also have been ‘watered’ by a male dog. We also had a tillandsia with a stunted flower spike and twisted leaves which had been bought from a nursery and had been ‘force-fed’ prior to sale.
Our plant for discussion was the tillandsia genus and we had quite a good selection including T.viridiflora with leaves just colouring and green spidery flowers. There was also T. lindenii which differs from cyanea as it has a white eye in the centre of its lovely purple flower.
Our popular vote competition was won by Iris Simons with a T.leomaniana with two fat spikes. Freda Nash was second with a T. multicaulis, with four orange spikes and Minnie Ayling was third with a magnificent Vriesea fosteriana (rubra).
The October meeting will be on Sunday October 27th at Robin Powell’s home at Maungatapere – first road left past Snook’s Road. The November meeting will be at the Russell Road Quarry.

Wellington Tillandsia Study Group
-Phyl Purdie
Notes on the Wellington Study Group held at Andrew Flower’s home, Pukerua Bay on Sept 29th at 1.30 pm. There were 8 members present with 4 apologies.
Among the plants was T. scaposa , which was formerly T. ionantha v scaposa then
T. kolbii. The plant had long tubular flowers set in red leaves. It was explained that T. scaposa has a short flower stem whereas this is absent in T. ionantha.
There was a clump of T. tenuifolia with deep purple flowers on magenta bracts. Also T. tenuifolia v strobiliformis with white petals and carmine bracts.
If the leaves are 20 times as long as they are wide it is T. tenuifolia, if only 10 times as wide it is T. aeranthos Other plants in flower were T. bergeri with pale blue flowers, T. erubescens with a long pink inflorescens and pale green flowers, T. crocata with scented bright yellow flowers preferring cooler temperatures, T. White Star with pale yellow flowers, T. aeranthos x T. tenuifolia, and T. recurvafolia v. subsecundifolia (formerly leonamiana) with white flowers.
T. geminiflora was in bud and growing well in a shadier position than normal.
An Aechmea recurvata v benrathii had white flowers in a very dark patch of leaves.
A coniferous plant, Pinguicula moranensis
v. mexicana, was admired with its long stalk and deep pink flower. A question was asked on fertilisers. We were told that bromeliads like a lot of potassium hence Peters Blossom Booster or Phostrogen were best.
The group eagerly looked over Andrew’s collection of plants for sale and also his large display of mature plants before concluding with afternoon tea.
Next meeting to be held at the home of Phyllis & Bruce Purdie, 5 Rochester St, Wellington at 1.30pm on November 30th.

Hawkes Bay Bromeliad Group
-Julie Greenhill
Our September meeting was held in our usual room that we rent in a local hall and 22 members were present.
 Shirley Bryan told us of her experience attending the Tauranga Orchid Show and the bromeliads she saw there. The local Cacti and Succulent Club have their show coming up in November and have suggested our group have a display table of bromeliads there.
We will try to have someone in attendance at the table at most times to answer questions and tell people about our newly formed group.
We also discussed a venue for our November meeting, as we would like to make this our first garden visit. One of our very newest members has kindly offered her garden.
It was decided to devote our next meeting to the subject of tillandsias and one of our more experienced members on this topic will share his knowledge with us. We will also have predominantly tillandsias on the sales table.
Unfortunately our guest speaker for the day was unexpectedly in hospital, so a small talk was put together at the last minute by Julie Greenhill who discussed her current seed raising venture and showed a tray of recently sown neoregelia seeds just sprouting.
We had a very well stacked sales table and the raffle draw that followed was a ticket to a garden ramble put on by a local school, which is a great weekend for gardeners. As usual the cup of tea and chat at the close of the meeting was enjoyed by all.
The next fourth Saturday of the month falls on Labour weekend for our meeting.

Bay of Plenty Bromeliad Group
-Lynley Breeze
At our October meeting the plants for the month were the less well-known genera pitcairnia and quesnelia. Our guest speaker was Graham West and he spoke about a variety of issues including the way the society functions, the gathering and growing on of seeds, the pricing of plants (he warned us against getting too greedy!), the silent auction system and details about the Bromeliad Conference 2003. Graham kindly donated five hanging baskets of plants and organised a silent auction for us.
We were so impressed with the silent auction system that we have decided to try it for special plants at our next meeting. In September we were pleased to visit the gardens of Anne Gale, with her many bromeliad shade houses and fine plants, and Margaret Mangos with her large, north facing quarter acre and large tunnel house.
We also had a very successful bromeliad display and sales table at the Orchid Show.
Competition Winners for October: 1st Vr Little Chief -Kevin Schollum 2nd Nidularium Francois Spae - Jo Elder 3rd Orthophytum gurkenii - Natalie
Simmonds The Raffle Winners were Alison Sears and Barry Jones.
Next Month’s Events: Next Meeting – Wed 13th November 1pm Committee meeting at 12 noon before the main meeting. The plants of the month will be tillandsias. We will have a workshop on what we should be doing to our bromeliads for the late spring in cutting off pups, potting, spraying and whatever other suggestions come up. All welcome to participate.
Garden Visits for Wed 20th November starting at 10.00am:
1. Shirley Litchfield , 2115 Main Rd, Te Puke, 2. Barry Jones , 11 Norrie St, Te Puke,
3. Anne Stacey , 7 Hastings St, Te Puke Please bring your lunch and have it at Anne’s home.
There will be a display, but no sales table, at the Iris Society Show on Saturday 2nd November 11 til 5 and Sunday 3 November
9.30 til 4.00, at the Arts and Crafts building in Elizabeth St West. Please bring some plants for the display. Contact Alison Sears 576 2978 for further information.

Eastern Bay of Plenty Bromeliad and Orchid Group
-Christine Borlase
Upcoming events: Sunday 20th October, Garden Ramble -Waiotahi Beach/Ohiwa Harbour area. 12.30pm start at the garden of Helen Clarke ph 07 3157541, then to Irene Zeier, 256 Ohiwa Harbour Road, then to Elsa McGuigan, 266 Ohiwa Harbour Road.
November 17th is our Christmas meeting commencing atAlison Jarrett’s, 42 Victoria St, Whakatane for lunch, then on to Ross Ferguson’s, 21 Olympic Drive, Whakatane.

Pottering About Garden Centre

Orchids - Bromeliads and much more
Jim and Sharon Gilchrist Military Road, RD 2 WHAKATANE 07 - 322 8201
Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

BROMELIAD ‘MADNESS’ IS ALIVE IN WHAKATANE

In late September my husband and I had the opportunity to attend a meeting of the Bromeliad Society in Auckland, where I was invited to give a short talk.
I have wanted to attend an Auckland meeting for a number of years but, because it takes three and a half hours to drive up, and because my visits to Auckland were never at the right time, I hadn’t made it until last month.
My interest in bromeliads started many years ago with my grandmother (Ida Berg). She and my grandfather were camellia growers and had bred many, which are named after members of the family. As well as camellias she had many other very different plants which she grew very easily. One day she gave me a very precious pup off Vriesea platynema variegata and my obsession to grow bromeliads had started!
Whakatane is in the eastern Bay of Plenty and we enjoy a warm, sunny climate which is ideal for growing bromeliads outside. Because we are so far away fromAuckland we decided to follow the model of the western Bay of Plenty and form our own group. We have been very fortunate to have the on-going support fromAuckland members of the society.
Because of this and because of the growing interest of people around the district we have formed a group which encompasses the areas of Opotiki, Kawerau, Whakatane, Matata and Rotoiti. Generally at a meeting we will have 30 plus ‘bromaholics’ and orchid lovers, some of whom will have travelled for up to an hour to attend.
The meetings are very informal and are held at the gardens of members. We enjoy a format that includes a speaker, general discussion, plant sales, afternoon tea and a garden ramble.
We have some very beautiful gardens in the district. While we may not have some of the plants or big clumps of bromeliads that you find in the gardens of people who have been in the society for many years, we are well on the way and well worth a visit.
Many of us grow our bromeliads outside all year round and find that putting on a layer of frost cloth when the temperature gets to 0 degrees ( which was 5 times for me this winter) is all we need. This winter has been particularly mild.
Because of our inexperience we have plodded along a bit by trial and error and have often grown plants in areas that aren’t strictly recommended. Many have survived and done very well, while some have not done so well.
We are very fortunate here to have an availability of pongas from surrounding farms and also some of the best driftwood gathering places in New Zealand. Pongas, driftwood and pieces of old farm machinery feature in lots of the local gardens.
We are only a short drive from both Rotorua and Tauranga. There are a number of gardens that can be visited and beaches to collect driftwood from. All in all, we’re well worth a visit. See back cover photo from Sue Laurent. ED .

REMINDER…OCTOBER PLANT AUCTION

It’s time again for our annual plant auction at the Auckland meeting on Tuesday October 22nd. This event always draws a large number of members looking for ‘special plants’. If you have some large special specimen plants to auction, please contact our Auctioneer, Des Yeates, (09) 838-6535. If you are interested in bidding, please be a little early to view the plants so that you will be ready for the bidding. Then, it is just a matter of putting your hand up at the right moment and, if you are successful, calling out your name. Best of luck…it’s fun! .
TWO NORTH SHORE GARDEN VISITS – NOVEMBER 10TH

1.30pm. Bryan and Gay McDonald, 10 Waterview Road, Devonport
Bryan is a landscape designer and he uses bromeliads extensively in his work.

3.00pm. Joe and Barbara Murray, 4 Seaview Road, Glenfield
Joe and Barbara have a large range of bromeliads and over 120 roses.

There will be plants for sale at both gardens and you can enjoy afternoon tea at Joe
and Barbara’s. Please bring your own cup. .

FREE WORKSHOP FOR MEMBERS – NOVEMBER 16TH

FREE tuition…learn how to take pups off and pot them up. Bring along your plants

(with pups on) and share ideas.
Where? At Des Yeates, 158a Henderson Valley Road, Henderson, Auckland.
Tel (09) 838-6535

When? Saturday 16th November at 1.30pm.
Plus...Brian Dawson will talk about growing and looking after tillandsias. .

WE WELCOME MORE NEW MEMBERS …

E. Binns, Whakatane Beverley Davies, North Shore City Tania Long, Christchurch Delia Ackland, Manukau City Eleanor Kerr, Whakatane Helen and Ken Rozell, Helensville Christine Ramage, North Shore City Helena and Alexander Couper, Apia, Samoa
CUT HERE
BROMELIADS AUCKLAND 2003 CONFERENCE MARCH 7TH - 10TH

BROMELIADS AUCKLAND 2003 CONFERENCE

CONFERENCE REGISTRATION

Full Registration - March 7th - 10th, 2003 Friday / Saturday / Sunday / Monday
$185.00 October 1st until January 31st


$205.00 February 1st onwards
Delegates name/s ………………………………………………………………
Address ………………………………………………………………………… Please complete form on next page as well
Full registration includes access to seminars, competitive show, sales plants, Conference breakfast, banquet, lunches, morning and afternoon teas and garden tour on Sunday. Proceedings book also included.
Daily Registration Saturday / Sunday $75.00 daily
Delegates name/s ……………………………………………………………… Address …………………………………………………………………………
Send registrations to Bromeliads 2003Auckland, P.O. Box 51-361, Pakuranga, Auckland, New Zealand. Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
To book accommodation: Freephone 0800-924-786 Freefax 0800-800-315 Phone +64-9-526-3000 Email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Website www.waipunahotel.co.nz
BROMELIADS AUCKLAND 2003 CONFERENCE
REGISTRATION


Note: Please fill this page in irrespective of whether you are registering now, or whether you’ve previously registered for the conference.
Name tag details
Name……………………………………………………………….

Partner……………………………………………………..............

Name of your bromeliad society………………………………….

Are you bringing plants for sale YES / NO
If yes, please state approx number…………
If you have marked Yes you will be contacted by Graham West early in 2003. Graham
is in charge of plant sales and all queries can be directed to him at (09) 298 3479.
Graham will be sending out a letter with conditions relating to Conference plant sales.
The normal 20% to the New Zealand Bromeliad Society Inc will apply on all plant sales.

OPTIONAL EXTRAS - Please indicate your requirements.
DON’T SEND ANY MONEY YET!
FRIDAY 7th MARCH
Harbour and City Bus/Boat trip


$45.00 per person Number attending……………
B.B.Q. evening $32.50 per person Number attending……………
SATURDAY 8th MARCH Breakfast -(partner only)
Conferees covered in Registration.

$20.00 per person Number attending…………… Morning bus trip $15.00 per person Number attending…………… Afternoon bus trip $20.00 per person Number attending…………… Evening Harbour Dinner Cruise
$40.00 per person Number attending…………...
SUNDAY 9th MARCH
Morning Bus trip $25.00 per person Number attending……………
Afternoon bus trip - (partner)
Conferees covered in Registration.

$15.00 per person Number attending…………… Evening Banquet - (partner) Conferees covered in Registration.
$40.00 per person Number attending…………..
MONDAY 10th MARCH
Morning Bus trip $25.00 per person Number attending…………..

Note: Partners are welcome to attend the afternoon session on Monday at no cost

CUT HERE
GROOMING YOUR PLANTS FOR THE SHOW

By Peter Waters

It is less than six months until the Conference and by now you should be thinking about the plants you want to enter in the Competitive Show. It is to be hoped that lots of members will wish to enter as we need to put on a good display for our overseas guests and to show them just what we can achieve. To this end I have made a few notes of the important things to consider in selecting and presenting your show
plants.
1.
Read the schedule and rules carefully. Many times plants have been overlooked in the judging because the rules are not followed. (see P.16)

2.
Be sure of the class you are entering. Some plants could be entered in more than one class i.e Neoregelia carolinae tricolor could be in Neoregelia Foliage or Variegated Plant. You must make the decision.

3.
When you choose plants for exhibition a most important aspect is that they are mature or nearly so. Small or immature plants will not win prizes.

4.
At this stage you should be selecting the plants and then placing them so that they have plenty of space to grow without touching their neighbours and that they are turned regularly to keep their conformation even.

5.
Make sure that the pot is allowed in the rules and then clean it thoroughly. Ensure that it is the right size for the plant and that the overall effect is pleasing. If you need to re-pot it should be done now so that the plant is firm by the time of the show.

6.
A few days before the Show you will need to spend some time on each plant to make sure that it has the best chance to be considered by the judges.


7.
See that the label is clean and legible and that the names are not abbreviated and are spelled correctly. If you do not know the name and it is a Neo hybrid then Neoregelia hybrid is OK on the label.

8.
Make sure the plant is centralised in the pot and that the potting mix is free from weeds and looks clean and tidy. It may pay to put some new mix on the top.

9.
Clean the leaves carefully, washing off dirt and removing spiderwebs, algal deposits and scale. Be careful of leaves with heavy trichome cover, you don’t want to remove the silver scurf.

10.
Leaves that have dead sections can be removed or trimmed if there are not too many. Bottom leaves can be split down the middle and removed to each side while upper ones will need to be trimmed at the last minute. Make sure that the typical leaf shape is retained. Ensure the base where leaves have been removed is just covered by the mix.


It is not difficult to prepare and enter plants. It gives a great deal of satisfaction to see your bromeliad on the show-table, and it is especially gratifying if you win one of the awards. This is not difficult to achieve. It does not need an expensive or rare plant but it does need some care in its presentation. Please give it a go and make this Show special..

BROMELIAD SOCIETY OF NEW ZEALAND INC.
COMPETITIVE SHOW SCHEDULE OF CLASSES

1. Aechmea Blooming  16. Vriesea Blooming 
2. Aechmea Foliage  17. Vriesea Foliage 
3. Billbergia  18. Bigeneric or other genus not listed above 
4. Cryptanthus  19. Miniature bromeliad 
5. Guzmania  20. Variegated bromeliad 
7. Neoregelia Blooming  21. Novice Blooming 
8. Neoregelia Foliage  22. Novice Foliage 
9. Nidularium  23. Dish or tray garden or novelty planting 
10. Tillandsia Small Blooming  24. Bromeliad arrangement 
11. Tillandsia Small Foliage  25. Artistic or floral arrangement 
14. Tillandsia Large Blooming  26. Decorative container 
15. Tillandsia Large Foliage  27. Hanging container 
CONDITIONS OF ENTRY
 
1. Exhibitors must be financial members of the  measurements exclude inflorescence and 
Bromeliad Society of N.Z.  mount. 
2. A maximum of two plants may be entered  11. Miniature bromeliad may be single or have 
in each class.  multiple heads, no plant more than 
3. Plants must have been grown by exhibitor  12.5cm(5in) high excluding inflorescence. 
for at least three months prior to show.  Tillandsias are not permitted in this class. 
4. Plants must be clean and healthy, free from  12. Variegated bromeliad is a plant with white, 
scale and insects and drained of water. Pots  pink or red longitudinal stripes on leaves. 
must be clean and potting mix free of weeds  13. Novice classes are for members of less than 
and other plant material. Each plant should  three years standing and who have not won 
be correctly labelled where possible, with no  a prize in a bromeliad show. 
abbreviations. Labelling not necessary in  14. Olive Allan Trophy for Best of Show chosen 
Classes 23 to 27.  from Classes 1 to 20 only. 
5. Plants may be potted only in standard clay,  15. Class 24 Bromeliad Arrangement has 
terracotta, green or black plastic or  bromeliads only and must use only natural 
unadorned bonsai pots. Tillandsias may be  materials. Plastic pots are not allowed. Ern 
mounted on driftwood or similar.  Bailey Trophy for Best Arrangement 
6. No commercial leaf shine, cream or milk  awarded to winner of this class. 
may be used to enhance the appearance of  16. Class 25 Artistic or floral arrangement may 
the plant.  use other types of plant but must include a 
7. A pot may contain single or multiple plants  significant amount of bromeliad material. 
provided they are attached to a single  17. Class 26 Decorative Container may contain 
rootstock.  one bromeliad only but may have multiple 
8. A plant which has changed in shape or colour  heads 
because of impending blooming is permitted  18. Class 27 Hanging Container may contain 
in blooming classes only.  multiple plants but of one type only. 
9. Tillandsias must be firmly attached to  19. Entries may not be removed from show until 
mounts and must look established. They may  after 4pm on Sunday 9th March. 
be single or multiple plants within the stated  20. Unless mentioned above other rules as B.S.I. 
measurements. Fiji Trophy awarded for Best  standard show. Final decision rests with 
Tillandsia.  Competition Stewards. 
10. Tillandsia sizes are:- Small (up to 20cm  21. Entries will be accepted between 11am and 
(8in)), Large (20cm up (8in plus)). These  2pm only on Friday 7th March 

THE GENUS NIDULARIUM

.... beautiful and graceful bromeliads

This month it is the turn of nidulariums to take centre stage in the special monthly plant competition at the October meeting in Auckland, and also in our Journal.
The genus Nidularium was established in 1854 by Charles Lemaire a learned French botanist, and the name Nidularium was created by him for the plant we know so well, Nidularium fulgens. Lemaire derived the name from the Greek word (Nidus) which is referring to the nest form in which the leaves are arranged in the centre cup. The genus is relatively not a large one as compared to some other genera such as neoregelias etc as there are only about forty to fifty species, although new species are still being found. They are all endemic to the rain forests of Brazil and the south Atlantic areas of South America. Most species are epiphytes but are also happy to grow as terrestrials on the forest floor, denoting that they are mainly shade lovers. They are generally medium to large type plants forming dense, low rosettes with strong, sometimes leathery leaves. Their flowers are white, blue, orange, reddish or pinkish, and in the case of Nidularium amazonicum the flowers are white with a greenish tinge. The flowers are dome-shaped and nearly always closed, which is one of the reasons why they are difficult to pollinate, and hence why their seeds are not readily available. Because there is copious amounts of pollen, opening up the flowers to pollinate can very easily lead to pollen contamination. Like many bromeliads, nidulariums will not accept their own pollen. One of the most By Gerry Stansfield outstanding features of the nidularium genus is their blushing inflorescence in the centre cup. Unlike the blushing hearts of the neoregelias, nidulariums form a cluster of what is known as floral bracts, and it is at the base of these floral bracts, that you will find the flower groups or fascicles as they are known. It is these coloured floral bracts that the hummingbird sees in their natural habitat that attracts them to to find the flower, and the nectar or honey dew at the base of the flower. Naturally, going from plant to plant the humming bird can and does effect pollination.
Nidulariums are some of the most graceful and handsome of plants of the Bromeliaceae, even when not in bloom.
The leaves are usually of soft texture, finely toothed and vary in colour from green to dark purple and maroon and can be plain, or striped, as in variegated, or spotted. At flowering time the inflorescence is their clowning glory and can last for up to twelve months or more, making them worthy of a place in our collections. Nidulariums are not difficult to grow, if one keeps in mind that they are rain forests dwellers, so that tells us they prefer high shade and moist conditions, and will grow well in pots in a very open mixture. I useYates Bloom potting mixture plus Mimi Bark plus sawdust (untreated) 1x1x1 plus I add sheep pellets and Grow-plus citrus fertilizer, the amount depends on how much mix you make. If you use a 20 litre container to make up the mix, then say 100grams of each.
Cont’d on Pg 19


So, let us look at this wonderful family of plants and see just how many we have in our own collections.
Nidularium amazonicum. This very lovely nidularium has had some what of a confusing history as although it started out as Nid.amazonicum, it was later changed to Wittrockia amazonica an then finally back again to Nid. amazonicum. It can be a little difficult to grow, in so much as browning off tips due to dryness and insufficient air circulation. It is a real shade lover and loves moist conditions, its long slender leaves of rusty red underside contrast with the matte dark green paper thin top sides. At flowering time the floral bracts are a rusty red with greenish flowers. This is one of the few nidulariums that are self pollinating.
Nidularium fulgens. Still one of the most popular of the nidulariums, and one of the hardiest, with its light to dark green leaves with dark green spots and its heavily serrated leaf-edges. At flowering time the cup becomes a bright cerise with blue flowers. This is known as the red bract form, as there is also an orange bract form. Nid. fulgens has been used in hybridising and particularly in making bigenerics because of its strong dominant gene in the serrated leaf-edges, and its brilliant red centre.
Nidularium innocentii. Again named by Charles Lemaire in honour of Pope Innocent in 1855 because of their white flowers, this very lovely range of nidulariums has a number of varieties, such as, innocentii, lineatum, striatum, wittmackianum (now Nidularium longiflorum) and paxianum which has a single white stripe in the centre of the leaves. Then there is Nana, a small dwarfish cultivar that is delightful. They all make excellent specimen plants and especially v. striatum as it is inclined not to flower until it reaches quite a large plant, and therefore makes a very nice indoor plant. On the other hand, v. lineatum can produce some interesting multi striped plants, although it can also revert to minimal stripes and even plain green. This would be a good opportunity to check your Nidularium innocentii range, as two plants sometimes do get wrongly named. One is innocentii v. innocentii, which should have white flowers, and the other is Nidularium amazonicum which is sometimes called innocentii but it is not, and has green flowers.
Nidularium Leprosa. Another nidularium that has had a checkered history, as it has been called Nid. rosulatum, Nid. regelioides v. rosulatum, Nid. Spotty, and finally Nidularium Leprosa by Derek Butcher. Similar to regelioides, but with definite dark spots over the leaves. At flowering, the floral bracts are more pinkish as compared to regelioides which is more orange, but the flowers are the same orange colour. The plant forms a nice rosette, and can grow quite large.
Nidularium purpureum. A lovely nidularium with thin metallic purple leaves. These have a dark green matte upper surface and a glossy, metallic purple under surface. The centre nest becomes a rusty red at flowering time with small rosy red flowers.
Nidularium procerum. We imported this plant some 30 years ago as N.lubersii, but we now know it to be procerum, of which there are many hybrids, it was a popular
Cont’d on Pg. 20
plant to play with in those early days, this plant was used for my bi-generic
Niduregelia. Sensation.
Nidularium regelioides. Botanically, this plant has been reclassified as Nid. rutilans, but can be called regelioides SP, so as to distinguish the plant from Nid. rutilans. The plant is an old favourite with its thick leathery dark green leaves with darker green blotches, the centre at flowering time is rose pink with orange flowers.
Nidularium rutilans. A handsome plant with long narrow green leaves with spots of darker green, the short narrow floral bracts are bright crimson with rose-salmon flowers. This plant forms a more tubular appearance and nothing like regelioides, which is more of a rosette form.
Nidularium terminale. Although this is a found species, it is similar to the procerum group in so much as it has long narrow strap-like foliage and strong serrated leaf edges, and, as with the procerum group, the deep red flower head rises up and is star shaped. The plant forms a nice clump.
And now for some hybrids:
Nidularium Chantrieri. This lovely hybrid was made in 1895 by Edouard André, a famous French collector, and was named in honour of his friend Chantrier the French hybridizer, by crossing Nidularium innocentii v.innocentii with Nidularium fulgens. The plant has features of both parents with its wine red underside leaves from innocentii and lime green on top and its prominently serrated leaf edges from fulgens. The inner rosette is a bright cerise and quite spectacular.
Nidularium Francois Spae. This is also an innocentii x fulgens hybrid but with striatum giving the plant large serrated green leaves. It is a handsome plant that originated in Belgium, at flowering time the inner floral bracts of rose red last in colour for many months.
Nidularium Madam Robert Morobe.
There appears to be two forms of this plant, one is a soft green all over spotted with a deeper green, and the other is soft green on top, while the underside is a rich purplish maroon. The leaves are prominently toothed and when in flower the centre is a vibrant cerise collarette. Both are very large plants.
Two very lovely dark Nidulariums are Nid. Ruby Lee, and Nid. Nat de Leon after the hybridiser of the same name. Both have a dark, almost chocolate, colouring.
Nidularium rutilans x lubbersiana. The strap like foliage of this plant turns pinkish in good light and the inflorescence and flower spike of rusty red rises well above the centre to make an outstanding plant.
I hope you will find a place for nidulariums in your collections. They are very graceful plants and very much worthy of recognition. We have only been able to talk about the most popular varieties, but if you get the chance to read Elton Leme’s new book on nidulariums you will see there are many more lovely plants. .
* * * * * * * * *
Also, see colour picture on outside back cover. ED


SEED
BANK

Aechmea bromelifolia, caesia, coelestis v. coelestis, coelestis (from albomarginata), lueddemanniana, mexicana, nudicaulis v. cuspidata, orlandiana Alcantarea edmundoi, imperialis (green form) Billbergia brasiliensis, decora, vittata Dyckia altissima, brevifolia, platyphylla, rariflora, remotiflora v. montevidensis Edmundoa lindenii v. roseum Fosterella penduliflora Guzmania sanguinea v. brevipicellata, monostachia Neoregelia cruenta (pink) Nidularium amazonicum Pitcairnia flammea, flammea v. roezlii, heterophylla, maidifolia Puya grafii, mirabilis, venusta Tillandsia bartramii, belloensis, balbisiana, brachycaulos, butzii, capitata, cryptantha, deppeana, gardneri, juncea (large form), limbata, myosura, plagiotropica, polystachia, pseudobaileyi, pohliana, schiedeana, schiedeana v.major, tricolor, viridiflora Vriesea corralina-rubra-superba, ensiformis, erythrodactyylon, gigantea v. seideliana, friburgensis v. tucumanensis, gradata, guttata, guttata spotted, hieroglyphica, platynema, platynema variegata, procera, psittacina, racinae, retroflexa, saundersii, magnifica (goldfish Vr fresh seed) Werauhia sanquinolenta
PLEASE, OUR SEED STOCKS ARE LOW, plus we have been taking out some old
stock, so we appreciate some fresh seed.
New seed received from Bob Reilly, Michael Pascall, Gerry Stansfield. Sue Laurent,
Carolyn Scholes, Phil Mayhead. Thanks to all.
The seedbank will exchange two packets of 20 seeds for one (1) large packet of your
seed. Make sure it is labelled correctly.

Please send in a large stamped envelope.

Packets (of at least 20 seeds) are 50 cents.
Limited to one packet of seed per kind per address, maximum $5.00 per month
Remember to consult the current seed list when ordering.

Orders, with large, stamped, addressed envelope and spare seed to; Gerry Stansfield.
7 Noall Street, Te Atatu Peninsula. Auckland. Ph. (09) 834-7178.

BROMELIADS
@ EXOTICA

Best Bromeliad selection
in NZ now at:
304 Matakana Rd,
Warkworth


Labour Weekend
Sale Starts
Friday 25th October

OPEN 7 DAYS, 10am - 5pm Ph: 09 425 7474 www.bromeliads.co.nz
Bromeliads for Sale
Vrieseas, Neoregelias, Aechmeas,
Billbergias, Tillandsias,
Nidulariums, Guzmanias etc

LABOUR WEEKEND
SATURDAY 26TH, SUNDAY
27TH & MONDAY 28TH
OCTOBER
10.00AM TO 3.00PM
ALL THREE DAYS

32 Pandora Pl. Pakuranga

BEV & LESTER CHING

SOCIETY OFFICERS

PATRON  Bea Hanson  (09) 527-6830 
PRESIDENT  Graham West  (09) 298-3479 
VICE PRESIDENTS  Lester Ching  (09) 576-4595 
Dave Anderson  (09) 638-8671 
SECRETARY  Dean Waters  (09) 422-2235 
TREASURER  Peter Waters  (09) 534-5616 
LIBRARIAN  Des Yeates  (09) 838-6535 
COMMITTEE  Bev Ching  (09) 576-4595 
Carol Davis  (09) 832-0510 
Laurie Lang  (09) 410-9557 
Pam Lang  (09) 410- 9557 
Murray Mathieson  (09) 418-0366 
Chris Patterson  (09) 625-6007 
Colin Rickard  (09) 623-0453 
Noeline Ritson  (09) 625-8114 
AUDITOR  Colin Gosse 
LIFE MEMBERS  Laurie Dephoff  Bea Hanson 
Harry Martin  Patricia Perratt 
Patricia Sweeney 
SCIENTIFIC OFFICER  Peter Waters 
CULTIVAR REGISTRAR  Gerry Stansfield 

BROMELIAD JOURNAL

EDITORIAL TEAM Gerry Stansfield (09) 834-7178 Murray Mathieson (09) 418-0366 Peter Waters (09) 534-5616 Louise Joyce (09) 418-0711
All enquiries and contributions welcome. Please contact the Editorial Team, 7 Noall Street, TeAtatu Peninsula, AUCKLAND.
Gerry Stansfield, (09) 834-7178, Email:This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Deadline for Journal copy and advertising: First Tuesday of publication month.
ADVERTISING RATES

Full Page $30.00 Half Page $15.00 Quarter Page $ 7.50

September 2002

Journal of the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand Inc. Vol.42 No.9

Bromeliad

Bromeliad Society of New Zealand Inc.

Affiliated with the Bromeliad Society International

The Society was formed on 28th August, 1962. The objects of the Society are to encourage the cultivation and study of bromeliads grown indoors or outdoors, and in particular:

To assist members to identify plants.

To promote discussion and arrange instruction on cultivation,

propagation and control of diseases.

To provide a library for members.

To make awards for outstanding new bromeliads.

To hold shows or public exhibitions of bromeliads.

To promote the distribution of bromeliads amongst members byexchange, purchase and sale, and to encourage the importation of new plants.

To affiliate with any society or other body, and to do such things as mabe deemed necessary or desirable in the furtherance of these objects.

To accept affiliation from other societies having similar objects.

MEMBERSHIP SUBSCRIPTIONS

New Zealand: NZ $20.00. Ordinary. NZ $5.00. Associate (same household). Overseas: AUD $30.00 Australia, US $20.00 United States and other

overseas. Send all payments to the Treasurer, Peter Waters, 22 Halfmoon Rise, Bucklands Beach, AUCKLAND.

CORRESPONDENCE

All general correspondence should be sent to the Secretary, Bromeliad Society of New Zealand, 24 Campbell Drive, Warkworth, New Zealand. The opinions expressed in letters or articles in this Journal are the contributors' own views and do not necessarily express the views or the policy of the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand.

FRONT COVER PHOTO

Front

A Neoregelia cruenta hybrid graces our front cover. Of course, the large cups of beautiful bromeliads frequently harbour mosquitoes. On P.15 we have an article on how to control mosquitoes in and around bromeliads. The article also features Len Trotman's original special recipe for repelling 'mozzies'.

CONTENTS

President's Page – Graham West

4 Auckland August meeting news and competition results – Dave Anderson 5-6 From the Registrar. Vriesea hybrids – Gerry Stansfield

6 Mounting bromeliads – by Odean Head, from BSI website

8-9

Bromeliad group news from around the country... Northland, Bay of Plenty, Eastern Bay of Plenty, Hawkes Bay 10-11 Auckland Conference 2003, news and registration 12-14 Getting rid of mosquitoes – Gerry Stansfield, with Len Trotman's recipe 15 Seed Bank – Gerry Stansfield 16 Raising bromeliads from seed – Gerry Stansfield 17-20 Book Review - 'The Book of Bromeliads and Hawaiian Tropical Flowers' 20 Auckland panel discussion. Bromeliad Q's and A's with Dave Anderson,

Peter Waters and Len Trotman 21-22 Officers and Journal directory 23

COMING EVENTS

SEPTEMBER 22nd Northland group meeting at 1.30pm, at the home of Claudia Lomas, Whakapara

24th Auckland meeting, Greyfriars Hall at 7.30pm.Talk by Sue Laurent – growing bromeliads in Whakatane. Monthly competition – Vriesea fosteriana 28th Hawkes Bay group meeting

29th Wellington Tillandsia group meeting at 1.30pm at Andrew Flower's home, Pukerua Bay

OCTOBER

1st Deadline for copy for October Journal 9th Bay of Plenty group meeting at 1.00pm 16th Bay of Plenty garden visit

20th Eastern Bay of Plenty group meeting and garden rambles, near Opotiki

22nd Auckland meeting, Greyfriars Hall at 7.30pm. Annual Auction. Monthly competition - nidulariums

PRESIDENT'S PAGE

Well, it's September and it does appear that spring is trying to arrive on time. I say welcome!

At our August meeting we had over 100 members and also some visitors.

We had a panel handling questions from the floor about any aspects of bromeliads and I'm sure most people present would have benefited from the very practical answers that were given. We've reported on the panel session in more detail on page 21 of this month's Journal. We are very fortunate to still have well grown, colourful plants for sale at this time of the year. The silent auction table was also well stocked and excellent prices were received.

Megan Thomas has had to resign as Secretary of the Society and I would like to thank her for the time and effort she has put in to this always onerous position. We are very fortunate to have quickly found a new Secretary - a fairly new member of the Society - Dean Waters. Dean is well known in carnivorous plant circles, and he is also very keen on orchid and bromeliad growing. Welcome aboard!

We have a new team producing the monthly Journal and I'm sure you will all agree they have started off well with good first up efforts. Thanks to them.

At our November meeting we will once again be having our Christmas break-up. We will also celebrate the 40th anniversary of the Society on the same evening. We are hoping to have many of our original members present and also our five life members.

Well, Conference 2003 is now just six months away. Remember, if you want the cheapest rate of $165, your payment must be in by September 30th. There is a registration form in this Journal.

As President, I have been concerned that there have been a number of new members who come along to two or three of our meetings and then we don't see them again. What are we doing wrong? Or, maybe, what should we be doing better to keep them? -Are our talks too long or too technical? -Is the evening format too congested? -Should we allow more time to mix and

mingle? -Should we be encouraging more input

from the floor? -Do you all think the Journal is meeting

the needs of new members?

Whether you are a fairly new member or a 'regular' I would welcome any feedback and comment you can offer. It's important that we try and meet the needs and expectations of new members and 'old' members too for that matter. Please give me your thoughts.

Thank you everybody.

Graham West

We welcome new members...

Jill Howard – Whangaparaoa Martyn Peck – Waitakere City Paddy Escott – Pukekohe Jill Hudson – Whangarei Maxine August – Tauranga Pat Trotter – Golden Bay Donna and Alfred Fish – Waitakere City Kristina Hjelm – Russell Richard Moore – Kerikeri Minnie Whitehead – Whangarei Wayne Deed -Auckland

AUGUST MEETING NEWS FROM AUCKLAND

Notes by Dave Anderson

There were over one hundred members in attendance at the monthly meeting. The committee are looking into what can be done about the lack of tables for the sales plants.

Peter Waters as usual chaired the discussion on the Show and Tell plants. First up for naming was a neoregelia that had dark green leaves with red stripes. The plant could have been any one of several hybrids such as Neoregelia 'Thunderbird' or 'With Love' etc. and as such it could not be specifically named. The plant would certainly look a lot better if it was grown in higher light. Next was Neoregelia 'Pink Sensation' with the owner wanting to know why there were rust spots/marks on the mother while the pups were virtually unmarked. The plant was growing in a shade house and had flowered some months ago. Peter said that the marks were typical cold spots from the winter temperatures that mainly affected the mother plants that lose their strength after flowering. An Aechmea 'Bert' had spots on the leaves that were probably caused by hailstones. A large fascicularia that had flowered a year ago now had over 14 pups growing around the base. The owner said that he fed it regularly which would account for the pups growing well and not flowering. Certainly if you want plants to flower you should severely restrict the amount of nitrogen in the fertiliser. An overcrowded Aechmea bromelifolia clump wanting a name was growing in a far too small a pot. Three neoregelia plants – 'Sharlock', 'Crackerjack' and 'Royal Burgundy' were brought in with the owner wanting to know was there any difference between them. Yes they are quite similar but at the same time distinctly different. A medium sized stoloniferous vriesea that had black bases to the leaves was brought in for naming. The plant with many pups was identified as Vriesea vagans. Aechmea pineliana var. minuta with its characteristic foliage was also brought in for naming. The lovely species, Guzmania multiflora, in full flower was brought in for display. The quite distinctive orange flower spike with white petals is a warm growing plant that is certainly very rewarding to grow. Gerry Stansfield brought in new Aechmea recurvata hybrids - these had been crossed with a Charles Allan hybrid, produced some 40 years ago in Auckland. The plants had retained the Aechmea recurvata characteristics but with black colouration to the tops of the leaves. Another plant for naming was Aechmea weilbachii or one of its hybrids. The owner asked you could tell the difference between a hybrid and a species? One way is to self fertilise the flowers and grow the seed on - a species will produce identical plants to the parent whereas with a hybrid the seedlings will all be different. An Aechmea nudicaulis with many pups was displayed, the owner finding that a lot more pups come from where the root ball is exposed. Finally a word of caution about attaching bromeliads to living tree ferns. A member has found that after attaching bromeliads to a NZ 'Ponga' (black tree fern), the fern envelops the bromeliads over time and suffocates them. Obviously a dead tree fern is OK for mounting plants on.

Laura Gosse won the special raffle prize this month and Mary Hautus won the Conference 2003 raffle. The door prizes went to Carolyn Scholes, Brian Dawson and Ruth Baird.

Cont'd on P.6

FROM THE REGISTRAR -

Gerry Stansfield

This month we have two very interesting vrieseas that have been around for some time and yet have only just been named. The first is Vr. Majestic Beauty and is a cross between Vr. gigantea and Vr. platynema v. variegata. Although these plants have been around for a while, we do not know the name of the hybridiser and it would appear it has never been given a cultivar name. I re-made this cross in the summer of December 1998 and January 1999. The resultant seeds were grown on by Andrew Maloy in August 1999. Today, the seedlings, are some 3years old, and quite a number are identical to the above cross, that we all grow, proving that the cross was in fact Vr.gigantea x platynema v. variegata, so we, i.e.(Derek Butcher and I) have decided the original Vr. gigantea x Vr platynema v. variegata and any look-a­like seedlings will be called Vr. Majestic Beauty. See top photo.

The second vriesea has also been around for some time and unnamed, as a cross between Vr.saundersii and Vr.bituminosa, I can remember seeing this plant in Harry Martin's collection back in the late 60s and these came from the very famous Muriel Waterman's collection, who was a hybridiser and seed grower, and remember that both bituminosa and saundersii are very old and early vrieseas, so it is possible that this lovely cross originated there. Anyway, this plant had been called Vriesea Highway and the connotation is (bituminosa sounds like bitumen for roading so highway). Vriesea Highway sported a variegated plant, and it is this we will show, now known as Vriesea Highway Beauty. This is truly a lovely variegated plant and makes a fine specimen as we saw last month at our Auckland meeting with Marie Healey's plant from Hamilton. To add more confusion, there is another form and that is albo-marginated. All three plants have multi bract spikes which they have taken from Vr.saundersii as bituminosa has a ladder type spike.

Not to be confused with Vriesea RoRo, which is Vr. saundersii x Vr. platynema and can be variegated or albomarginated. ED .

August meeting from Auckland cont'd from P.5

COMPETITIONS

Open Flowering: First was Len Trotman with Vriesea Margaret Ruth 'Negro' with its beautiful dark purple inflorescence and second was Gerry Stansfield with Aechmea Bert - a lovely large clump of four plants in flower. Open Foliage: Chris Paterson was first with a Vriesea gigantea x Red Chestnut - a real beauty that was awarded plant of the month, and second equal were Peter Waters with Vriesea fosteriana (rubra) and Norma Cook with Guzmania Fiesta. Tillandsia: Brian Dawson was first with a dark flowering clump of T. aeranthos and second was Peter Waters, T. bulbosa (giant).

Named Monthly Plant (Aechmea recurvata):

First was Pam Lang with Aechmea recurvata var. ortgiesii whilst second went to Chris Paterson's Aechmea Aztec Gold. Novice Flowering: First was Ruth Graham's Tillandsia parryi and second was Neil Douglas with Guzmania Orangeade. Novice Foliage: First was Maureen Fifield's Vr. hieroglyphica and Maureen was also second with Vriesea fosteriana (rubra). The Plant of the Month - Chris Paterson, Vriesea gigantea x Red Chestnut Congratulations to all the winners.

NEXT MEETING Tuesday 24th September

MOUNTING BROMELIADS

By Odean Head

Reprinted from the Bromeliad Society International website www.bsi.org

Mounting plays such an important role in the displaying of our beautiful bromeliads. After all, there are very few plant families that have plants that will grow as epiphytes so we need to take advantage of this capability in our displays. We really need to have more quality mountings entered in our shows so the public can see the full capabilities of bromeliads.

This ability to grow on wood is one of the qualities that attracted me to bromeliads so I am sure that many others have had the same experience. So let's create some exciting conversation pieces ourselves and maybe we can attract some more of our friends to grow bromeliads. Growing, working and sharing plants with friends becomes the most enjoyable experience we have in our hobby.

The first steps are to find some good mounts and some good plants that are ready to be mounted. I will select my mount first because those resources are usually more limited. Once you get started mounting you will always be on the look out for good mounting material. Mount material should be rot resistant, salt free and contain no wood preservative. Some good woods to use are cedar, juniper, oak, mesquite and rosewood. Tree fern slabs and cork bark also make good mounts. Some of the most beautiful mounts that I have found are stumps from juniper or cedar trees. You can also purchase some interesting designs made from tree fern and grape vines at some of the nurseries and pot places.

Once you have selected your mount, take a little time deciding which plants you are going to use. Pick something that will improve in appearance as it is allowed to grow and multiply on your mount. Most tillandsias and billbergias form attractive clumps. Other genera such as neoregelias, aechmeas, canistrums and vrieseas that have stolons will make nice displays. The mount for your selected plant should provide balance between it and the plant(s) and space for the plant to form its natural shape. I prefer to mount pups so I must visualize how they will look when they have matured and multiplied.

The reason I prefer to mount pups is because, when mounted, they will form a small number of hard strong roots that just serve as holders and do not provide nutrients to the plant. When grown in soil they form large, soft root systems which provide additional nutrients to the plant. If you choose to mount a plant that has already formed the soft root system, the mount should be able to accommodate the plant's root ball. This root ball should be covered with sphagnum moss and will need to be watered regularly to continue the nutrient flow to the plant.

Once I have selected my mount and plant I must decide the best way to achieve a good firm fit. This is important because roots will not attach to the mount if the plant is loose. Larger plants are easier to mount if they have stolons. I attach these plants by nailing two staples around their stolons into the mount. Several sizes of staples are available to accommodate the different sizes of stolons. I use juniper or cedar mostly which is so hard that I have to drill holes for the staples to penetrate deep enough to hold the plant tight. I will use some pantyhose strips on larger plants for extra support. When using tree fern slabs or cork bark it is best to put holes in the mount and tie the plant on using plastic coated wire.

Most of your smaller tillandsias can be attached by only using hot glue, liquid nails or plumber's goop. You can also use these to secure any existing roots on all your mounts. When using the hot glue be careful not to damage the plant. Apply the glue to the mount and allow to cool a few seconds before pressing the plants roots against it. Do not glue the tender part of the plant above its roots. Now that you have the basics, all that is left is to practise. Each mounting you do will be better than the one before; each artistic masterpiece will please you more than previous one. .

Choosing the right bromeliads for mounting does not just mean tillandsias. Aechmeas and the stoloniferous types are most suitable because they are truly epiphytic plants and in a very short time spread their new pups over the logs etc. Think about Ae, fulgens and the lovely miniata v. discolor, Royal Wine, Red Wine, Red Ribbon, Fosters Favourite, orlandiana and the many variegated forms of this. Ae. Bert also makes an excellent subject as do the small neoregelias i.e. Fireball of which there are many lovely hybrids we can use. I have seen Neoregelia Meyendorffii - the small neo of the carolinae range - used effectively too. And remember, we do have competitions throughout the year for mounted bromeliads. ED.

Pottering About Garden Centre

Orchids - Bromeliads and much more

Jim and Sharon Gilchrist Military Road, RD 2 WHAKATANE 07 - 322 8201

Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

NEWS FROM AROUND THE COUNTRY...

Northland Bromeliad Group

-Jacqui O'Connell

The August meeting for our group was held at the home of Keith & Maureen Green at Maungakaramea, with 30 members present.

We had some discussion on growing broms from seeds. Pauline Sutherland from Kerikeri is having great success with her efforts. Some members had followed instructions from one of the journals and had sowed their seeds in palm peat, but Maureen Green told us that this medium can be salty and although the seeds will strike, the baby plants may turn yellow and sickly. Other members use fine pumice, spaghum moss or just fine seed raising mix.

The competition was won by Bev Baxter with a very nice Guzmania Ostara with it's beautiful torch like flower, second was my Vriesea barilletii with a very dark red flower & third was a Neoregelia Kahala Dawn belonging to Freda Nash. We had a huge range of prizes for our raffles, punga logs, puriri bits, sacks of Kerikeri oranges as well as a lot of bromeliads.

We were then let loose in Maureen's shadehouse and glasshouse with cartons, boxes, and in one case 3 fish bins, spending up large on plants. It's absolutely amazing how extremely addictive bromeliads are. The Green's garden was just as lovely as ever with lots of unusual trees and shrubs as well as bromeliads everywhere.

The next meeting will be held at the home of Claudia Lomas on the left hand side just before the Whakapara Garage on Sunday September 22nd at 1.30pm. Please bring a chair, a cup, raffle prize and a skite plant.

Eastern Bay of Plenty Bromeliad and Orchid Group - Christine Borlase

We had no meeting in August due to us having a stand at the Whakatane Camellia Show, This was a success with about half a dozen new names for our mail-outs.

We don't have a meeting in September either as we are visiting the Tauranga Orchid Show on Saturday 14th, followed by lunch at the Te Puna quarry, which is now a garden area supported by many diverse garden groups.

The October meeting on the 20th will be a garden ramble along the coast to visit three of our group who live near Opotiki. They are Helen Clark, Irene Zeier and Elsa McGuigan.

Apart from that we had three horrendous frosts in the final ten days of August. Roll on spring!

Hawkes Bay Bromeliad Group

-Julie Greenhill

The Hawkes Bay Group is alive and well, with 27 people attending the August meeting. It is very heartening to see new faces each month and the names are all growing more familiar. We now have official positions appointed and the bank account up and running.

Due to the scarcity of bromeliads in the area for sale and the fact that a lot of members are just beginning their collections, the club purchased a bulk order of plants and these were sold at the meeting (every last one!). The plants were all of a type suitable for mounting on wood or ponga logs and a demonstration on how to attach and artistically arrange the plants was given by Shirley Bryan. The meeting was rather a long one and everyone more than ready for afternoon tea and the raffle draw - Aechmea Lucky Stripe.

Our July meeting saw us have a workshop on pup removal and potting up. A young man from Bangkok who is living and studying in Napier at the moment was at our meeting for the first time. He has been collecting bromeliads for some years, especially rare neoregelias. His host family who were with him, also have an interest in bromeliads so he has been advising them with the upkeep of their plants while here.

We suggested he lead our workshop and it was most interesting to talk with him and watch him work.

At our next meeting, on the 28th of September, we will have Colin Anderson as our guest speaker and he will be showing us slides and telling us about his travels to Peru and the bromeliads he saw in habitat there.

Bay of Plenty Bromeliad Group

-Lynley Breeze

September meeting held at the Tauranga Yacht and Power Boat Club Rooms – Sulphur Point.

Jo Elder spoke about the current growing conditions and work to be done. With a mild wet winter pests such as scale and mealy bug are likely to be a problem and she recommended spraying early for these. Confidor was recommended but she had also successfully used Gild and Shield with no problems.. Fertilising should not take place until October as we can still get cold or wet spells.

The plant for the month was 'bromeliads in hanging baskets'. Growers felt that suitable plants for hanging baskets are any stoloniferous bromeliads and the observation was that they pupped considerably better in the baskets than they did when grown on punga stumps. Some gave quite a lot of fertiliser to the baskets particularly if they were growing cryptanthus. Neo Fireball, Neo Tiger Cub and Neo zonata were frequently used.

Competition Winners for September

1st -Neomea Strawberry – A Hewson 2nd – Ae Foster's Favorite – Anne Gale 3rd – Neo Cherub's Blush – J Elder The raffle winners were Cliff Taucher and Des Shaw.

Next Month's Events

Next Meeting - Wed 9 October 1pm. We will welcome Graham West, President of the Bromeliad Society bromeliad as our guest speaker. Plants of the Month for October will be pitcairnias and quesnelias Further to last month's AGM, the competition winners for the year were

1. Audrey Hewson, 2.Bertha Schollum,

3. Jo Elder Points were based on winning first, second or third in each of the monthly competitions. We urge people to continue bringing special plants for the competition table as it gives members a chance to see special plants when they are at their best.

Garden Visits for Wed 16 October starting at 10.00am. 1.Gwen McCallum's at 1/28 Whittaker St, Otumoetai, 2.Grace Christie's at 219A Minden Rd. Bring your lunch and have it at Grace's home.

BROMELIADS AUCKLAND 2003 CONFERENCE MARCH 7TH - 10TH

BROMELIADS AUCKLAND 2003 CONFERENCE

IF YOU'RE COMING TO THE CONFERENCE, PLEASE

HELP US NOW WITH SOME INFORMATION.

If you're travelling from a distance, many of you will have completed your travel arrangements and we would now like you to advise us of your flight number, date and e.t.a. to enable us to arrange for you to be met and transported to your hotel. Also, please give us your contact telephone / fax or email address.

Some conferees have already advised us of the optional activities they wish to attend. If you haven't already, could you please advise on the form on page 14 in the section marked 'Optional Extras'. This will enable us to progress arrangements with bus and boat companies and caterers. Thanks.

Participation in the optional extras is open to conferees and their partners only. No refunds will be made without the consent of the Conference Committee.

Plant Sales will take place at the times stated in the programme These will be open to conferees only. Members who have paid a daily attendance fee will be eligible to attend that day's plant sales only.

Many thanks to those individuals and Australian societies who have made donations to our society. It is very much appreciated.

To those who haven't registered yet...

Don't forget the early bird price of $165.00 is only valid until 30th September 2002, after that it increases to $185.00 until 31st January 2003.

ACT NOW – it's going to be a great conference!

CUT HERE

BROMELIADS AUCKLAND 2003 CONFERENCE MARCH 7TH - 10TH

BROMELIADS AUCKLAND 2003 CONFERENCE

REGISTRATION

Full Registration Friday / Saturday / Sunday / Monday

$165.00 until September 30th.

$185.00 October 1st until January 31st

$205.00 February 1st onwards

Delegates name/s ........................................................................

Address ....................................................................................

Full registration includes access to seminars, competitive show, sales plants, Conference breakfast, banquet, lunches, morning and afternoon teas and garden tour on Sunday. Proceedings book also included.

Daily Registration Saturday / Sunday $75.00 daily

Delegates name/s ........................................................................ Address ....................................................................................

Send registrations to Bromeliads 2003Auckland, P.O. Box 51-361, Pakuranga, Auckland, New Zealand. Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

To book accommodation: Freephone 0800-924-786 Freefax 0800-800-315 Phone +64-9-526-3000 Email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Website www.waipunahotel.co.nz

BROMELIADS AUCKLAND 2003 CONFERENCE

REGISTRATION

Note: Please fill this page in irrespective of whether you are registering now, or whether you've previously registered for the conference.

Name tag details

Name.........................................................................

Partner..........................................................................

Name of your bromeliad society........................................

Are you bringing plants for sale YES / NO

If yes, please state approx number............

If you have marked Yes you will be contacted by Graham West early in 2003. Graham

is in charge of plant sales and all queries can be directed to him at (09) 298 3479.

Graham will be sending out a letter with conditions relating to Conference plant sales.

The normal 20% to the New Zealand Bromeliad Society Inc will apply on all plant sales.

OPTIONAL EXTRAS - Please indicate your requirements.

DON'T SEND ANY MONEY YET!

FRIDAY7TH MARCH

Harbour and City Bus/Boat trip

$45.00 per person Number attending...............

B.B.Q. evening $32.50 per person Number attending...............

SATURDAY8TH MARCH Breakfast -(partner only)

Conferees covered in Registration.

$20.00 per person Number attending............... Morning bus trip $15.00 per person Number attending............... Afternoon bus trip $20.00 per person Number attending............... Evening Harbour Dinner Cruise

$40.00 per person Number attending...............

SUNDAY9th MARCH

Morning Bus trip $25.00 per person Number attending...............

Afternoon bus trip - (partner)

Conferees covered in Registration.

$15.00 per person Number attending............... Evening Banquet - (partner) Conferees covered in Registration.

$40.00 per person Number attending..............

MONDAY10th MARCH

Morning Bus trip $25.00 per person Number attending..............

Note: Partners are welcome to attend the afternoon session on Monday at no cost

CUT HERE

GETTING RID OF MOSQUITOES

By Gerry Stansfield

During the hot summer months, Auckland and many other places in New Zealand have mosquitoes. For those of us who grow bromeliads in our gardens this can become a real problem. Here are some suggested 'solutions.'

If you have only a few bromeliads, the problem can be best solved with a spray of ordinary fly spray in the cups and surrounding leaves, but if you have many hundreds or perhaps thousands of plants, this method is obviously not suitable.

So, let's look at the life cycle of the mosquitoes as it can help us to combat them more efficiently. Their life cycle has various stages: e.g. egg, larva, pupa, and adult. If the life cycle is interrupted on any one of these, then the mosquito can't reproduce. This interruption can occur in several ways.

Preventing water from standing is obviously the best way, as each of these stages requires water, but unfortunately so do our bromeliads, but hosing them out over the summer months is one way we can prevent them from breeding. But here again, if you have a large number of bromeliads and many of us do, this can be not only time consuming, but awkward, stretching over large areas of plants etc.

One very good solution come from our well knownAuckland grower Len Trotman of Te Atatu South.

(Actually, this was not originally designed for mosquitoes but as a repellent against slugs, snails, and also to avert quilling in bromeliads).

Len Trotman's recipe for

mosquitoes:

500ml of Sunlight Liquid (dish washing)

200ml of Household Cloudy Ammonia.

100ml of Citronella or Pine-O-Cleen

disinfectant.

Pour the contents into 5ltrs of cold water.

As this mixture is very concentrated use only at 2 to 4 tablespoons per litre of water in your watering cans. It can also be mixed with your liquid fertilizer, and can be used weekly if desired. It is not detrimental to your bromeliads even at the seedling stage.

You will notice when spraying, that foam is generated, but this is not a problem as each of the stages in the life cycle of the mosquito is dependent upon the surface tension of the water. The adults rest on the surface to lay eggs and the other forms hang below the surface. If the surface tension is broken, then the life cycle is interrupted. .

Some of this information was extracted through the Internet from the Hawaii Department of Health.

SEED

BANK

Aechmea bromeliifolia, caesia, coelestis v. coelestis, coelestis (from albomarginata),

lueddemanniana, mexicana, nudicaulis v. cuspidata, beeriana, orlandiana,

orlandiana cv Jean

Alcantarea edmundoi

Billbergia brasiliensis, decora, vittata

Dyckia altissima, brevifolia, platyphylla, rariflora, remotiflora var. montevidensis

Edmundoa lindenii v.roseum

Fosterella penduliflora

Guzmania sanguinea v brevipicellata, monostachia

Nidularium amazonicum

Neoregelia cruenta (pink)

Pitcairnia flammea, flammea var. roezlii, heterophylla, maidifolia

Puya grafii, mirabilis, venusta

Tillandsia bartramii, belloensis, balbisiana, brachycaulos, butzii, capitata,

cryptantha, deppeana, gardneri, juncea (large form), limbata, myosura,

plagiotropica, polystachia, pseudobaileyi, pohliana, schiedeana, schiedeana v.major,

tricolor, viridiflora,

Vriesea Corralina-rubra-superba, ensiformis, erythrodactyylon, maxoniana,

gradata.

gigantea v seideliana, friburgensis v tucumanensis, gradata, guttata, guttata spotted,

hieroglyphica, platynema, platynema variegata, psittacina, retroflexa, racinae,

saundersii, saundersii (upright spike) Splenriet, magnifica (goldfish Vr, Note new

fresh stock)

PLEASE, OUR STOCKS ARE GETTING LOWAND WE ARE ALSO TAKING OUT

OLD SEEDWEWOULDAPPRECIATE SOME FRESH SEED

New seed received from . Michael Pascall, Gerry Stansfield. Moyna Prince & Peter

Waters, Graham Burr, Sue Laurent. Brian Dawson. Thanks to all.

The seedbank will exchange two packets of 20 seeds for one (1) large packet of your

seed. Make sure it is labelled correctly.

Please send in a large stamped envelope.

Packets (of at least 20 seeds) are 50 cents.

Limited to one packet of seed per kind per address, maximum $5.00 per month

Remember to consult the current seed list when ordering.

Orders, with large, stamped, addressed envelope and spare seed to; Gerry Stansfield.

7 Noall Street, Te Atatu Peninsula. Auckland. Ph. (09) 834-7178.

RAISING BROMELIADS FROM SEED

By Gerry Stansfield

In the two previous articles on bromeliad seed, we talked about the types of seed and how to go about collecting, gathering, pollinating and hybridizing. We also talked about the reasons for collecting bromeliad seed, and how important it is to continue the Society's Seed Bank, not only for present members, but also new members coming along, remembering we all lose plants from time to time so growing from seed is also a good way to replenish our stocks.

Bromeliad seed, is referred to as tropical seed, i.e. similar to anthurium, and crotons etc, and we are talking about the three subfamilies here. There are some special requirements for their successful germination, and if we can supply these requirements, then you will find that raising bromeliads from seed can be both relative easy, and rewarding.

I have observed a number of methods that members use to raise seed and we will discuss some of these. My talk was based on the way that I do it and if you would like to try this method, well and good, but remember an old adage - if you are having 100% success rate in your seed raising, then stick to it, we do not have to re-invent wheels.

The first two pre-requisites are heat and light. There have been many seeds lost because members have not given the seeds bottom or surround heat, or have put them in a dark place. Bottom heat is where we have a heat pad and this can be thermostatically controlled or the same for a heat blanket. The light can be artificial as with light bulbs or fluorescent, or it can be day light as in the garage or under the house with an outside window. Surround heat is a hot box with say a 15 to 40watt light bulb. The temperature in both cases should be around 75 to 80°F or 20 to 25°C. Always use a thermometer to guard against over temperature, remember 80°F or 26°C is maximum.

Before we discuss the different methods, there is a very important step we must all take. As we are dealing with electricity, and water or dampness and electricity DO NOT MIX, you will need to have some protection. If you have an isolating transformer OK, if not, you should purchase an R.C.D., or Residual Current Device. There are a number of these on the market. I use both HPD Portable heavy duty, safety switch Cat.D5101, and a PDL Powerguard Cat. 955. If you want to go a little further, you can purchase a RCD three pin plug power point single or double and change your present power point for the RCD. If you are doing this under the house, it is not difficult to do, but if you are not sure, then ask a friendly electrician.

From the pictures you can see that there are a number of methods one can use. In picture 1. we can see a standard heat blanket that is thermostatically controlled, with fluorescent tubes above. The lights are on a timer and go off at 10 pm and on at 6 am, as it has been proved that a period of rest or darkness is beneficial to the seedlings. You can also use 'Glow-Lux' tubes, although they are dearer than standard tubes. In picture 2 we see a hot box and this is surround heat. This idea, came to us from Avon Ryan of Whangarei

and can be made in a variety of sizes. This one is a polystyrene box with a lid from the vege shops, in which our brussels sprouts come up from the south. The lid is cut out and covered with plastic sheeting. On the long side, a standard light fitting is attached with a cord and plug and the fitting glued in with Selley's No-nails. A large tin, say an ex-fruit salad type is attached and holes are drilled around the out side and this helps to dissipate the heat over the whole box. This size will allow you to have a number of seed pots germinating at once. If you want a larger size, you can fabricate your own from 40mm thick polystyrene sheeting from your local building merchants and it can be glued and nailed with clouts and Selleys No-nails.

For the seed containers you can use ice cream or margarine containers or whatever you like. I now use clear plastic containers with lids, 10cm high x 12 cm in diameter from Pay-less Plastics where they are very cheap.

You may even be lucky like me, and find an old Coca Cola shop display cabinet in which I replaced the cooler part with fluorescent tubes (small ones) in two banks of two, to give the right temperature. Perhaps you can use an old fridge. With the shelving, these make excellent hot boxes with plenty of room.

The mixture I use is 60% Bloom potting mix and 40% pumice sand. The mixture is sterilized with boiling water, drained and spooned into the containers when still hot and this helps to keep everything sterile. It is then flattened down to form a flat surface for the seed and allowed to cool. The next day the seeds are sprinkled on the surface and the lid replaced. Incidentally the lids have had a hole drilled in the top and this has a cotton wool bung to prevent contamination from getting in. I cannot stress enough the importance of cleanliness and sterility. It is all very well to get, say, a dozen seeds to germinate, but, that should tell us that something is not right and we should strive for 100% germination and we will only get that if we follow the rules.

Some important points:

The seed should be as fresh as possible. It should be clean and washed and if in doubt, washed again. The containers should be cleaned by washing with boiling water. The mixture should be sterilized, and placed in the container with the lid on as soon as possible. Before closing the lid on the seed containers, give a few mist sprays of Virkon which is an excellent anti-bacterial and fungal disinfectant, but there are a number of others like Benlate, Chinsol, and Physan

20. With Virkon it is 1gm to 1 litre of warm water and the others as per instructions.

Fertiliser? Look for a high potassium based fertiliser such as Yates Thrive N.P.K 15-4-26, or Phostrogen N.P.K 14-4.4-22.5. If you like using a milder liquid type you can use Watkins Bounty or Nitrosol, in any case it is advisable to alternate between the types. Twice a week, or when necessary, mist spray your seedlings at half strength mixed with Yates Bravo for a fungicide. This is an added precaution against fungal problems. If you continue to use the Bravo, your die back or damping off days are over. This is mixed up in a large container with hot water from the hot tap and allowed to cool before use, so that you have plenty on hand.

Cont'd on Pg. 20 Rasing from seed - cont'd from Pg. 19

If you follow this procedure, you should have germination in about 4 days and plants to prick out in about 5 months depending on the genus. .

BOOK REVIEW

The Book of Bromeliads and Hawaiian Tropical Flowers. By: Ronald W. Parkhurst - Hanalei Nursery, Hawaii.

A number of our members have asked me about this book, so I thought I would pass this information on and then those who are interested can have a look at it. The book, which has been out for some time now, comes as a welcome addition to our collection of books on the bromeliaceae, and let's face it, there is not much around at the moment on our favourite subject. The book can be classed as a coffee table book and has 216 pages, 17 chapters and over 650 colour identification photos which include aechmea, billbergia, neoregelia, guzmania, tillandsia, vriesea and cryptanthus.

The book also has sections on landscaping and floral art, all in all a very nice book to have. For those on the net, it can be viewed on www.bromes.com and Hanalei Nursery .You can email at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. to make arrangements and for those not on the net, you can write to Pacific Isle Publishing Company P.O.Box 827, Makawao, Hawaii. 96768. Costs? At the moment they are saying US$39.95 plus post and pack and insurance US$27.50, but you will need to check at the time because of exchange rates and they will only accept bank drafts from this end. As the well-known TV ad says, 'We're worth it'. ED. .

Our Auckland panel answer some 'curly' questions ...

At our August meeting in Auckland we had an experienced panel on hand to answer members' questions from the floor. Many thanks to panel members, Dave Anderson, Peter Waters and Len Trotman for an interesting and very informative session. The general feeling seemed to be that this was a very good format that could usefully be repeated again in the future. Here are some of the questions and answers from the night:

Q. What causes quilling of the leaves (i.e. the leaves sticking together)?

A. There is still some debate as to whether irregular watering of the plants during dry periods causes it or if it is just an innate fault in the plant. Len has found that the best way of rectifying the problem is to pour detergent (washing up liquid) into the top of the plant and leave it a little while, tease the leaves apart and flush out any remaining detergent when completed.

Q. What causes corrugations across the leaves?

A. Irregular watering and/or application of fertilisers to the plants.

Q. How do you get rid of scale on the leaves?

A. Len uses a detergent-based spray. Alternatively spray with orthene, the powder form not the emulsion, or use Beta Bug a pyrethrum based spray. Note that scale normally thrives on unhealthy plants where there isn't much air movement. Scale has a particular affinity forAechmea Pink Rocket which makes this a good indicator plant.

Q. What is the best potting mix?

A. A good mix that is often used is 1/3 parts by volume of peat moss, pumice and number 3 bark. Some people have found that 'Yates Bloom'mix or the 'Just'potting mix from the Warehouse is also very good. Whatever is used it has to be free draining.

Q. How do you tell the difference between a neoregelia and a nidularium?

A. With plants not in flower - the ends of nidularium leaves are pointed whereas neoregelias are round. Nidularium leaves are narrower and heavier at their base. In flower, nidularium petals do not spread out. Neoregelias do. The primary bracts on nidulariums change colour but with neoregelias there is no change.

Q. Does 'Wet and Forget' or any other chlorine based spray used for moss removal on paths damage bromeliads?

A. Yes these sprays will damage and can kill many plants including bromeliads.

Q. What causes the end of the leaves to go brown?

A. Strange as it sounds brown tips to leaves at the top of the plant can be caused by the plant being kept too dry or too wet. Severe cold can also turn the leaves brown.

Q. How do you prevent newly repotted pups from falling over?

A. Plant the pups 1/3 into the potting mix and make sure that the mix is well firmed around the plant. Alternatively use plastic skewers or spikes around the edge of the plant to prevent it moving.

Q. How do you get rid of fungus gnats that live in the mix?

A. Spray with an insecticide.

Cont'd on Pg. 22 Cont'd from Pg. 21

Q. Is there a general rule of where plants can be grown with respect to sunlight?

A. As a rule red leafed plants like bright light and green leafed plants the shade.

Q. What causes white spots on the leaves?

A. Hail will cause the formation of white spots to form on the leaves. These spots remain permanently on the leaves

Q. Is there any way of preventing a young dog eating bromeliads?

A. No.

Q. What causes a plant, in this case a Vriesea hieroglyphica, to grow with a lean to one side? In particular is this an inherent fault that will pass on to its pups?

A. There was no answer to this question with the questioner asked to bring the plant to the next meeting so that it can be inspected. .

BROMELIAD

WORKSHOP

Annual Demonstration...

Potting

Cutting off pups

Mounting on wood

SUNDAY 29TH SEPTEMBER

1.00PM TO 3.00PM

32 Pandora Pl. Pakuranga

BEV & LESTER CHING

Bromeliads for Sale

Vrieseas, Neoregelias, Aechmeas,

Billbergias, Tillandsias,

Nidulariums, Guzmanias etc

SATURDAY 28TH & SUNDAY 29TH SEPTEMBER 10.00AM TO 3.00PM BOTH DAYS.

32 Pandora Pl. Pakuranga

BEV & LESTER CHING

BROMELIADS

@ EXOTICA

Best Bromeliad selection

in NZ now at:

304 Matakana Rd,

Warkworth

Labour Weekend

Sale Starts

Friday 25th October

OPEN 7 DAYS, 10am - 5pm Ph: 09 425 7474 www.bromeliads.co.nz

SOCIETY OFFICERS

PATRON Bea Hanson (09) 527-6830

PRESIDENT Graham West (09) 298-3479

VICE PRESIDENTS Lester Ching (09) 576-4595

Dave Anderson (09) 638-8671

SECRETARY Dean Waters (09) 422-2235

TREASURER Peter Waters (09) 534-5616

LIBRARIAN Des Yeates (09) 838-6535

COMMITTEE Bev Ching (09) 576-4595

Carol Davis (09) 832-0510

Laurie Lang (09) 410-9557

Pam Lang (09) 410- 9557

Murray Mathieson (09) 418-0366

Chris Patterson (09) 625-6007

Colin Rickard (09) 623-0453

Noeline Ritson (09) 625-8114

AUDITOR Colin Gosse

LIFE MEMBERS Laurie Dephoff Bea Hanson

Harry Martin Patricia Perratt

Patricia Sweeney

SCIENTIFIC OFFICER Peter Waters

CULTIVAR REGISTRAR Gerry Stansfield

BROMELIAD JOURNAL

EDITORIAL TEAM Gerry Stansfield (09) 834-7178 Murray Mathieson (09) 418-0366 Peter Waters (09) 534-5616 Louise Joyce (09) 418-0711

All enquiries and contributions welcome. Please contact the Editorial Team, 7 Noall Street, TeAtatu Peninsula, AUCKLAND.

Gerry Stansfield, (09) 834-7178, Email:This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Deadline for Journal copy and advertising: First Tuesday of publication month.

ADVERTISING RATES

Full Page $30.00 Half Page $15.00 Quarter Page $ 7.50

Bromeliad

January 2002

Society of New Zealand Inc. Vol. 42 No.1

Bromeliad Society of New Zealand

Affiliated with the Bromeliad Society International Inc.

The Society was formed on 28th August, 1962. The objects

of the Society are to encourage the cultivation and study of

Bromeliads grown indoors or outdoors, and in particular:

To assist members to identify plants.

To promote discussion and arrange instruction on

cultivation, propagation and control of diseases.

To provide a library for members.

To make awards for outstanding new bromeliads.

To hold shows or public exhibitions of bromeliads.

To promote the distribution of bromeliads amongst

members by exchange, purchase and sale, and to encourage

the importation of new plants.

To affiliate with any Society or other body, and to do

such things as may be deemed necessary or desirable

in the futherance of these objects.

To accept affiliation from other Societies having similar

objects.

MEETINGS: Held on the fourth Tuesday of each month

except December, at 7.30pm in Greyfriars Church Hall, 544 Mt.

Eden Road, Auckland,

CORRESPONDENCE: All general correspondence should

be sent to the Secretary, Bromeliad Society of New Zealand, 33

Marsden Avenue, Mt. Eden, Auckland 4, New Zealand.

Journal articles, photos and advertisements to The Editor,

P.O. Box 57-021, Mana 6230 New Zealand. Tel. (04) 2399-659, fax

(04) 2399-671 or if possible (to avoid re-typing) email to

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Deadline for copy: First Tuesday of publication month.

The opinions expressed in letters or articles in this magazine are the

author's own views and do not necessarily express the policy of the Bromeliad

Society of New Zealand

2

Contents

4 President's Page

5 November Meeting News, Dave Anderson

8 Wellington Tillandsia Study Group, Phyl Purdie

10 Wittrockia 'Leopardinum', Gerry Stansfield and Derek

Butcher

13 Announcements

15 Northland Bromeliad Group, Jacqui O'Connell

16 Annual Competitive Show Schedule

18 Seed Bank

19 Society Officers, subscription details

Front Cover

Part of a spectacular bromeliad floral arrangement by Olive and

Len Trevor from the Bromeliad Society of Queensland. The display was

at the 11 th Conference of Australian Bromeliad Societies last October

("Brom-A-Warra"), hosted by the Illawarra Bromeliad Society Inc. Olive

and Len operate a commercial bromeliad nursery in Brisbane, "The

Olive Branch," that is compulsory viewing for anyone visiting Queensland.

Photo by Andrew Flower.

BROMELIADS FOR SALE

Large range of plants available. NEOREGELIAS, VRIESEAS.

Mounted TILLANDSIAS, BILLBERGIAS, AECHMEAS,

NIDULARIUMS

January 26,27,28

10.00 AM to 4.00PM daily

Bev & Lester Ching

32 Pandora Place

PAKURANGA phone 5764595

3

FROM THE PRESIDENT

The year 2001 was another successful one for the Society. There

have been 100 or more members attending our monthly meetings

(is there another Bromeliad Society anywhere in the world

can beat that?). At our last count the membership was 508-at

the same time last year it was 405. It is very pleasing to have noncommittee

members willing to lend a hand where necessary.

Our final meeting of the year was very successful. The spirited

bidding was very noticeable; one of our elder members was

heard saying "They are mad, more money than sense!" but enjoyed

herself in the meantime. Our thanks must go to Des and

Gerry for their efforts.

The silent auction will continue next year, so if you have a

very nice plant to spare try that table. I know, as the prices that I

have received over the past twelve months always exceed my

expectations.

This coming March we are hoping to organize another garden

visit, hopefully to the North Shore area. We will inform everybody

later.

Remember the show sale is not very far away, so keep working

on your show plants, also the sale plants as that income helps

to keep your society going for the following 12 months. For any

new members wishing to sell plants, you are paid out that weekend

normally. If you are unable to attend the next meeting, please

phone me for your sale labels.

As this will be the first Journal that Andrew has produced

for some time, I wish him well. It will be most essential for all

members, particularly from outside Auckland, to send him any

information you have. [this is NOT an invitation to Auckland members

to stop contributing -Ed]

On behalf of your Society, I would like to wish you all a

very happy and healthy New Year, also a successful growing season.

Graham

4

NOVEMBER MEETING NEWS

Dave Anderson

One hundred and five members came along to our last meeting

of the year and enjoyed the start of the festive season.

The prize giving for the year followed see list below.

Peter Waters hosted the discussion on the Show and Tell

plants. First up was a plant; X Neomea 'Strawberry,'(Neoregelia

carolinae Meyendorfii' x Aechmea recurvata var recurvata) that was

displayed by Gerry Stansfield. The plant grows out in the full

sun where it has developed beautiful golden strawberry colours

in the leaves. Following this, Glenys Guild had brought in a

Tillandsia imperialis with its leaves badly chewed by the native

NZ insect -the Weta. A fearsome looking but relatively harmless

creature; the Weta loves chewing large chunks out of the sides of

bromeliad leaves and also has an appetite for the flower spikes

of Tillandsias that can be mutilated overnight. Wilma Fitzgibbons

had for display a Pitcairnia heterophylla that was in full flower

with the 60mm high by 25mm diameter flower spike coming out

the side of the plant. -quite cute even with the viscious prickly

leaves. Peter brought in a Neo. 'Imperfecta' that had lost its stripes.

The question was what do you call a variegated or marginata

plant that has lost the stripes. Well, the answer has come from

the BSI who now say that all such plants that have lost their markings

should have the word 'Sport' written after the name! Gerry

displayed an Aechmea maculata 'Picannini' that was in flower. The

plant was misnamed and was actually a hybrid of maculata x

orlandiana 'Picannini' and not a variety of Ae. maculata. The red

flower spike was within the height of the leaves. He also displayed

two of Avon Ryan's hybrids the first an F2 of Neo. 'Sheer

Delight' x 'Meyendorffii albo marginata' and the second Neo 'Princeps'

both quite colourful but the latter plant did have slightly

rolled leaves. Peter had a rare beautiful plant for display Hohenbergia

leopoldo-horstii with its grey purplish green very spiny

leaves. It had a typical Hohenbergia flower spike. Joe Murray

displayed an Orthophytum species -a hard grey/purple leafed

5

plant that had been grown from seed by the Coromandel Cactii

Nursery. Peter identified it as Orthophytum disjunetum. Graham

West was wanting a clump of Vriesea corcovadensis named. This

small/medium sized stoloniferous plant has been in NZ for many

years. Judy Graham had an Aechmea plant wanting a name. It

was similar in form to Aechmea pineliana with the same type of

inflorescence however the leaves were very green. It could possibly

be Aechmea pineliana or a hybrid from this species but it was

not Aechmea triticina, a name that was also suggested. Lastly,

Noelene Ritson had a Billbergia 'Muriel Waterman' wanting a

name.

The special raffle prize this month was won by Carolyn

Scholes, with the Aus. Conference Raffle prize going to Judy

Graham. The door prizes went to Laura Gosse, Colin Rickard

and WinShorrock.

After the break we had the annual auction of large and/or

rarer plants that was very successful with the Society having the

benefit of its usual commission.

COMPETITIONS

Open Flowering: First Peter Waters with Neo. 'Kahala Dawn

Reverse' and second was Len Trotman with a Guz. wittmackiana

'Red'. Also in the competition were Ae' triangularis 'Red Bands';

Nidularium 'Chantiere'; Guzmania wittmaekii 'Red'; Neo's carolinae

'Meyendorfii', 'Inferno', 'Meyendorfii albo marginata', 'Orange

Glow', and 'Skotak #1'; and Vriesea 'Velva Wurthman'.

Open Foliage: Peter Waters was first with a Neo. rosea

'Lineata', and also second with Neo. johannis 'De Rolf.' In the

competition were Neo. 'Autumn Leaves', and Billbergia collevii.

Tillandsia: Len Trotman was first with T. imperialis and second

was Bev Ching with T. cacticola. There were also on the table

T's. hondurensis, bulbosa and magnusiana.

Christmas Decoration: First was Gill Keesing with a decorative

arrangement; the central plant being Vr. 'Splendrite' followed

by Charmian Whitby decorative arrangement involving

6

Neo. 'Meyendorffii marginata'.

Novice Flowering: First was Carolyn Scholes with Neo.

'Royal Cardovan' and second was Tui Ruwhiu with Ae.

nudicaulos.

Novice Foliage: First was David Goss with a Vr. X platynema

and second was Judy Graham with an Ae. 'Mirlo.'

The Plant of the month went to Peter Waters with Neoregelia

rosea 'Lineata'.

Congratulations to all the winners.

NEXT MEETING Tuesday 22nd January. NB This is not

the last Tuesday in January

The annual competitive show will be at the Mt. Albert Memorial

Hall on 23rd & 24th of February 2002.

BROMELIADS-from SEEDLING TO

FLOWERING SIZE

SPECIALIST-in OUTDOOR GROWING

ORCHIDS

and ALL KINDS OF SUBTROPICAL

PLANTS

POTTERING ABOUT

250m along Military Road (S.H. 34) from its junction with S.H.

30 (Te Teko end)

Jim and Sharon Gilchrist

Phone/Fax (07) 322-8201

7

WELLINGTON TILLANDSIA STUDY GROUP

Our November meeting was held on 25 November at the home of

Phyllis and Bruce Purdie, 5 Rochester Street, Wellington. 8 members were

present, with apologies from Andrew Flower and Lois and Merv

Dougherty.

Phyllis and Bruce shared on their attendance at the Australian 'BromA-

Warra' Bromeliad Conference held on August 11 to 15,2001. Notice was

given of the next Australian [Australasian?-Ed] Conference to be hosted

by the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand in Auckland on May 7 to 10,

2003. Our group has been asked to mount a display, and members were

asked to give this some thought. Plants could be sold there.

Plant discussion. Tillandsia ionantha var scaposa was showing a lavender

tubular flower bud [this plant has a sorry history of naming and renaming

by the 'experts.' Once it was re-named "kolbii," then that name

was shown to be unavailable due to priority; now some call it "scaposa"

and others still call it "ionantha var. scaposa." I call it Tillandsia scaposa-Ed.]

Two plants of Tillandsia seleriana were compared. One, a large clump with

offsets was imported from USA several years ago. The silvery leaves had

colored as the flowering began and set off the purple flowers well. The

other was a hybrid with the second parent unknown-there was a flush

of grey on the leaves as well as the pink, the stem of the inflorescence was

longer, and the flower bracts green. [compare the "unknown" on this

month's back cover-Ed] Three plants grown in a shade-house had survived

the heavy frosts in Akatarawa this year. It was noted these survivors

were all thick-leaved species (T. aeranthos, T. stricta var albifolia, and T.

recurvifolia var. subsecundifolia), whilst those with thinner leaves had nearly

all been killed.

A plant of T. deppeana, bought as an import from the USA some years

back was obviously wrongly named. The inflorescence was branched on

a tall spike, whereas pictures of T. deppeana showed only the one Vriesealike

inflorescence. [there may be some confusion with photos of T. dyeriana

here: T. deppeana does have a tall multi-spiked inflorescence-Ed] Identification

might be possible when the flowers are out.

Two T. streptocarpa were in flower with deep purple blooms. The

larger plant was scented and was a seedling bought in 1989 from John

Scott in Auckland. The smaller and newer plant had no apparent scent.

These plants do not appear to offset but keep growing from the top and

also flower successively up the stem. Also displayed was T. scaposa.

There was a variety of growing conditions and flowering of T. secunda

was discussed. Some were potted, others mounted; some grown

cold while others were grown warm. One member could never flower his

8

while others did so in a variety of conditions. It was suggested that

they needed plenty of water.

Following afternoon tea, members viewed the glasshouses of

bromeliads, orchids and cacti. Next meeting to be on January 27, 2002

at the home of Ginny and Wayne Rastall; 3 Cypress Grove,

Paraparaumu at 1:30pm.

Phyl Purdie

Photo by Andrew Flower

Tillandsia deppeana. This is a large, quite variable species with a

wide habitat range through Mexico and central South America and the

West Indes. Pam Koide has reported specimens with petals varying

from violet, to pale violet, to violet with white margins, or to white

with many tiny violet dots-Ed.

9

Wittrockia 'Leopardinum'

Photos by Gerry Stansfield, text by Derek Butcher (Adelaide)

It is strange that a plant introduced in 1888, and rarely flowers,

should persist in collections in Europe, USA and Australasia. I had

grown this plant as Canistrum leopardinum for 15 years and gave up in

disgust because it did not like Adelaide winters and did not even try to

flower! However, as Gerry's photograph shows,this is a handsome plant

when in flower.

The first mention of this plant is in Revue Horticole (1888) where,

on page 201, Jacob Makoy and Company introduce a Canistrum

leopardinum. No further information is given. In Les Bromeliacees by

Duval (1896) (reprinted as The Bromeliads in 1990 by Rothenberg and

Read) Canistrum leopardinum Hort. is mentioned, but no further information.

There is no mention of the name in Das Pjlanzenreich,

Bromeliaceae by Mez in 1934. In the 1942 Catalogue des Bromeliacees by

Chenvalier and Son, C. leopardinum Hort. Leod. is mentioned as nonclassified

but still a species. Finally in 1946 in The Bromeliads by Dutrie

(translated and reprinted in the Journal of The Bromeliad Society 1988,

p.20) the following information is given:

"C. X Leopardinum Hort. Makoy. A very beautiful species, the

sturdiest of the genus. Leaves nume4rous, thick, leathery, in a short

rosette, strongly sheathed, 70-80cm. long, 7-8cm. wide, erect, spreading,

edged with strong, black spines. and brilliantly green flecked with

irregular dark green or brownish spots. Rarel blooms. M. Declercq van

Ghyseghem managed to obtain seeds around 1935."

Here the name is prefaced with an "X" to denote hybrid, but the

10

word species is used in the text. Could it have been in the mind of the

translator that this was a hybrid because elsewhere in the translation

there is clear, unarguable use of the hybrid indicator?

In Bromeliads by Padilla, 1973, we find the first reference to this

being a hybrid where alleged parents are given: "Canistrum Ingratum

[now Wittrockia gigantea] x Roseum [now Edumundoa lindenii var. rosea]

.... a large handsome foliage ploant with mottled green leaves that tum

purplish red if the plant is grown in good light. The inner rosette is

dark wine-red; the petals are purple"

p.124. No indication was given as to

the source of the parentage although

the description seems correct except

for the purple petals!

This parentage was repeated

with a few typographical errors in

the International Checklist of

Bromeliad Hybrids (1979) and updated

in the Bromeliad Cultivar

Registry 1998 but with the same coloration

repeated as in Padilla (1973).

No reference to Canistrum

leopardinum is made in Smith &

Downs Bromelioideae (1979).

In Canistrum (1997) Leme treated C. leopardinum as a species and

considered it to be synonymous with his Wittrockia gigantea. He mentioned

that he had seen C. leopardinum in Australia, and I knew he had

been to the Australian Bromeliad Conference in Brisbane in 1993. On

reading this book I telephoned a friend in Brisbane and enquired. It

transpired that there were two "leopardinums" in Brisbane-one with

concolorous leaves and one with spotted leaves. Did Leme see one or

both forms? Was Leme incorrect? Was C. leopardinum a hybrid?

I started asking questions. In 1999 Brian Chan from California

reported white flowers but was not prepared to dissect someone else's

plant!

Things really started moving in 2001 (only 113 years after it was

named!) when Gerry Stansfield sent me a photograph of

"Leopardinum" in flower. He had used 'ethylene' pills recommended

by Herb Plever of New York! Gerry was prepared to butcher his plant

for science and found the inner workings of a Nidularioid inflorescence

a new experiience. He found thigs he had never seen before. I had the

11

same experience and certainly Elton Leme has shown he found things

not previously reported! There is no hair to be found in the inflorescence,

negating the claim by Padilla that Edmundoa lindenii [was

Canistrum] was involved in its make-up.

The differences we found from Leme's description of W. gigantea

were;

1. Petals only 30mm. long, not 45mm.

2. Sepals rusty-red not yellow.

3. Primary bracts broader and red, tipped green and blotched, not yellow-

green and red towards apex and not blotched.

4. Leaves 90mm. wide not 40-60mm.

5. Leaves gradually narrow from sheath to blade, not a narrowing between

sheath and blade.

6. Leaves strongly marked with blotches and spots, not concolorous.

The sepal color is interesting because, post floral, it seems to have

been confused with petal color. The description of C. giganteum in Smith

& Downs (1979) shows petals yellow, but as Leme pointed out the petals

are really white. In our 'Leopardinum' the sepals are rusty-red and

could well be what was quoted as petal color in Padilla (1973). In the

description for W. gigantea, Leme does not mention any spotting of the

leaves (as he does with Nidularium rutilans) but this information has

been published for C. leopardinum. This supports my view that he did

not see the spotty-leaved non-flowering plant in Queensland.

I believe that C. leopardinum is very close to Wittrockia gigantea

and intend to treat this cultivar as a form of W. gigantea and not a hybrid.

Gerry Stansfield has suggested that the plant seemed bigeneric

in origin, but we have checked all of the traits of the Nidularioid complex

and cannot suggest what the other parent may be. Clearly this

plant has not been found again in the wild, which we can only assume

is in the vicinity of Rio de Janeiro. Despite the fragmentation of the

Brazilian forests, particularly the Atlantic forest, old, almost forgotten

species are still being found and perhaps Elton Leme, Tanya Wendt,

Andrea Costa, or others may find our 'Leopardinum' and describe it

correctly.

In the meantime, the Bromeliad Cultivar Registry will be amended

to read Wittrockia 'Leopardinum' cv. of W. gigantea.

Advertising Rates

One third page (12-13 lines) $10

12

Announcements

New members. Welcome to the following new members, we hope you

enjoy your time with the Society:

Jannette Farley & Catherine Lee, 248A Pt. Chevalier Road, Akld.

Ngawini Pepene, 10/21 Cobham Road, Kerikeri

Carol Jolly, 248 Dominion Road, Akld.

John Williams, 107 Western Springs Road, Akld.

Victor Kwok, 104 Westerham Drive, Howick, Manukau.

Mr E. Silvester, P.O. Box 59, Edgecumbe

Glenda Betts, P.O. Box 289, Whangamata

Mary Bacica, Waihara RD4, Kaitaia

Y. Irving, 470 Bayly's Coast Road, RD7, Dargaville

Sandy Stonham, 15 Marco Polo Avenue, Lynfield, Akld.

Our Annual Show dates are 23rd and 24th February 2002 and setup

will be on Friday 22nd from 10:00 am until 6:00 pm and we will require

plants for the display and helpers to set up. We will also be making up

a roster for helpers on the sales table, door raffle sales and helping in

the kitchen. It's not too late to let us know if you can help in these

areas.

Our Annual Dinner is being held on Saturday the 23rd February at the

Springs Restaurant, costing around $30. If you would like to corne, you

must make your booking with Dave Anderson a.s.a.p. Tel. 638-8671

Annual subscriptions are now due. These can be paid at the meeting or

posted to the Treasurer; Peter Waters, 22 Half Moon Rise, Bucklands

Beach, Auckland.

The Annual General Meeting will be held prior to the March meeting,

and if you would like to serve on the Committee please let the Secretary

(Dave Anderson) know.

The Northland Bromeliad Group meets 24 February at John & Colleen

Frew's horne; 20 Vogel Street, Karwakawa 1:30pm.

The Wellington Tillandsia Study Group meets 27 January at the Rastall

house; 3 Cypress Grove, Paraparaumu 1:30pm.

SATPE, the Second Australasian Tillandsia Participation Event, will be

held in Albury over Easter 2002. Attendees at the first SATPE, actually

the FATPE, during Easter 2000, participated in 19 educational sessions

plus one from Derek Butcher; including discussions on pests, seed-raising,

rare plants from Peru, the CAM process, growing the green stuff,

T. tectorum, and the T. capitata complex. Everyone had a great time,

and unanimously agreed to continue with a biannual event. All

attendees must lead at least one half-hour session, and numbers are

limited. Anyone interested should contact the Editor forthwith.

13

Northland Bromeliad Group

November's meeting of the Northland Group was held at

Keith and Maureen Green's home at Maungakaramea. There

were 28 members present including a couple of new faces. It is

always a pleasure to visit Maureen and Keith and explore their

wonderful garden. Of course most of us went home with a

number of new plants which we had purchased.

Our plant for discussion was Billbergia, we had a number

of these including B. Santa Barbara, a nice striped plant but all

the attached pups had reverted to plain green. A nice Muriel

Waterman, Kahiba, horrida, disticha and a vittata hybrid were also

displayed.

Sick plants included a Vriesea splendens that was getting too

much light. An Aechmea fasciata 'Silver King' that needed better

drainage and a Guzmania in a concrete pot would come in to bud

and then the buds would go brown and die off. The same

Guzmania stuck in the fork of a magnolia tree was flowering and

growing well. We came to the conclusion that the one in the pot

was very root bound and needed some TLC.

Our December meeting consisted of a very nice lunch at a

local restaurant, following which some members went on to visit

Freda Nash for a wander around her garden. Points for the 'skite'

plant for the year were tallied up: Colin and Iris Simons won

first prize, Susie Bliss and Jacqui O'Connell were second equal.

January meeting will be a visit to Avon Ryan's garden at

219 Morningside Road on the 13th at 1.30pm. This garden will

certainly be an eye-opener and an inspiration to our newer members

who have not been there before.

February meeting will be held at John and Colleen Frew's

at 20 Vogel Street, Karwakawa on the 24th at 1.30pm. Bring a

chair, a raffle prize, a 'skite' plant and a Cryptanthus (if you have

one) for a discussion of these fascinating little gems.

Jacqui O'Connell

15

Annual Competitive Show

Schedule of classes:

1. Aechmea blooming

2. Aechmea foliage

3. Billbergia

4. Cryptanthus

5. Guzmania blooming

6. Guzmania foliage

7.

Neoregelia blooming

8. Neoregelia foliage

9.

Nidularium

10. Tillandsia, small blooming

11. Tillandsia, small foliage

12. Tillandsia, medium blooming

13. Tillandsia, medium foliage

14. Tillandsia, large blooming

15. Tillandsia, large foliage

16. Vriesea blooming

17. Vriesea foliage

18. Bigeneric or other genus not listed above

19. Miniature bromeliad

20. Variegated bromeliad

21. Novice blooming

22. Novice foliage

23. Dish or tray garden or novelty planting

24. Bromeliad arrangement

25. Artistic or floral arrangement

26. Decorative container

27. Hanging container

Conditions of entry:

1.

Exhibitors must be financial members of the Bromeliad Society of

New Zealand Inc.

2. A maximum of two plants may be entered in each class.

3.

Plants must have been grown by the exhibitor for at least three months

prior to the show.

4. Plants must be clean and healthy, free from scale and insects and

drained of water. Pots must be clean and the potting mix free of weeds

and other plant material. Each plant should be correctly labelled

where possible, with no abbreviations. Labelling is not necessary in

classes 23 to 27.

16

5.

Plants may be potted only in standard clay, teracotta, green or plack

plastic or unadorned bonsai pots. Tillandsias may be mounted on

driftwood or similar.

6 No commercial

leaf shine, cream or milk may be used to enhance the

appearance of the plant.

7. A pot may contain single or multiple plants, provided they are attached

to a single rootstock.

8. A

plant that has changed in shape or color because of impending

blooming is permitted in blooming classes only, e.g., neoregelias with

blushing centres.

9. Tillandsias must be firmly attached to mounts and must look established.

They may be single or multiple plants within the stated measurements.

The Fiji Trophy is awarded for the best Tillandsia.

10. Tillandsia sizes are:

SMALL up to 15cm. (6"); MEDIUM 15-30cm.

(6-12"); LARGE 30cm. up (12" plus). These measurements exclude

the inflorescence and mount.

11.

Miniature bromeliads may be single or have multiple heads, no plant

to be more than 12.5 em. high excluding the inflorescence. Tillandsias

are not permitted in this class.

12. A variegated bromeliad is a plant with white, pink or red longitudinal

stripes on the leaves.

13. Novice classes are for members

of less than three years standing

and who have not won a prize in a bromeliad show.

14. The Olive Allan Trophy for Best of Show is chosen from classes 1 to

20 only.

15. Class 24, Bromeliad Arrangement, has bromeliads only and

must

use only natural materials. Plastic pots are not allowed. The Ern

Bailey Trophy is awarded to the winner of this class.

16. Class 25, Artistic or Floral arrangement, may use other types

of plant

but must include a significant amount of bromeliad material.

17. Class 26, Decorative Container,

may contain one bromeliad only

but may have multiple heads.

18. Class 27, Hanging Container,

may contain multiple plants but of

one type only.

19. Entries may not be removed from the Show until after 4pm. on Sunday.

20. Unless mentioned above, other rules as BSI standard show, Final

decision rests with the Competition Stewards.

21. Entries will be accepted between 3pm and 6pm only, on the Friday

before the Show.

17

SEED

BANK

SEED

BANK

Aechmea -aquilega, caesia, coelestis v. coelestis, coelestis (from albomarginata),

lueddemanniana, lueddemanniana v. alverez, lueddemanniana v. medio-picta,

mexicana, nudicaulis v. cuspidata, recurvata, recurvata

cardinalis, williamsii

Alcantarea -edmundoi, imperialis

Billbergia -brasiliensis, dec0 ra, vittata, zebrina

Dyckia -altissima, brevifolia, platyphylla, rariflora, remotiflora yare montevidensis

Edmundoa -lindenii (from variegata)

Fosterella -penduliflora

Guzmania -sanguinea yare brevipedicellata, whitmakii, monostachia,.

Neoregelia -punctatissima

Nidularium -amazonicum

Pitcairnia -flammea, flammea yare roezlii, heterophylla, maidifolia

Puya -butcheriana, coerulea v. violacea, grafii, mirabilis, venusta

Racinaea -fraseri

Tillandsia -bartramii, belloensis, balbisiana, bractycaulos, butzii, capillaris,

capitata, deppeana, gardneri, guatemalensis, hotteana,juncea (large form), limbata,

myosura, paucifolia, plagiotropica, polystachia, pseudobaileyi, pohliana, schiedeana,

schiedeana v. major tricholepis, tricolor, tricolor var. melanocrater, viridiflora,

Ursulaea -macvaughii

Vriesea -angostiniana, corralina rubra superba, ensiformis, erythrodactylon,

gigantea,guttata, hieroglyphica, platynema, platynema (variegata), racinae,

saundersii, schwackeana,

Werauhia -gigantea, gigantea

nova

New seed received from Raewyn Adams, Pauline Sutherland, Bob Reilly,

Derek Butcher, Audrey Hewson, Bob Hudson, Peter Tristram, Maureen

Green. Ken Woods, &Kevin Schollum, Maragert Patterson.Thanks to all.

The seedbank will exchange two packets of 20 seeds for one (1) large

packet of your seed. Make sure it is labelled correctly.

Please send in a large stamped envelope.

Packets (of at least 20 seeds) are 50 cents.

Limited to one packet of seed per kind per address, maximum $5.00

per month.

Remember to consult the current seed list when ordering.

Orders, with large, stamped, addressed envelope and spare seed to; Gerry

Stansfield. 7 Noall Street, Te Atatu Peninsula. Auckland. Ph. (09) 834-7178

18

SOCIETY OFFICERS

PATRON & LIFE MEMBER

HISTORIAN & LIFE MEMBER

PRESIDENT

VICE-PRESIDENT

SECRETARY

TREASURER

LIBRARIAN

COMMITTEE

AUDITOR

LIFE MEMBERS

SCIENTIFIC OFFICER

CULTIVAR REGISTRAR

EDITOR

Mrs Bea Hanson

Laurie Dephoff

Graham West

Lester Ching

Dave Anderson

Peter Waters

Des Yeates

Owen Bird

Bev Ching

Brian Dawson

Wilma Fitzgibbons

Murray Mathieson

Chris Paterson

Noelene Ritson

Colin Gosse

Harry Martin

Patricia Perratt

Patricia Sweeney

Peter Waters

Gerry Stansfield

Andrew Flower

(09) 527-6830

(09) 527-7789

(09) 298-3479

(09) 576-4595

(09) 638-8671

(09) 534-5616

(09) 838-6535

(07) 576-2766

(09) 576-4595

(09) 837-4598

(09) 624-6469

(09) 418-0366

(09) 625-6007

(09) 625-8114

(04) 239-9659

MEMBERSHIP SUBSCRIPTIONS

New Zealand NZ$ 20.00 Ordinary

NZ$ 5.00 Associate (same household)

Overseas A$ 30.00 Australia

US$ 20.00 all other countries

Please send payments to the Treasurer Peter Waters, 22 Halfmoon

Rise, Bucklands Beach, Auckland, New Zealand.

www.anwyl.com

NEW ZEALAND'S LARGEST BROMELIAD

Internet Site

Free access to over 400 color photos, cultural information, and

more. Anwyl Bromeliads, Pukerua Bay, tel (04) 2399-659

19

Photo by Brian Chudleigh

Do you know this plant?

One of the objectives of our Society is to assist members to identify

plants. Here is one from Katikati, purchased some years ago from

Bea Hanson in Auckland. Bearing in mind that 80% of our members do

not attend meetings on a regular basis (how many Bromeliad Societies

have such a low attendance rate?) how about:

(1) All members, please feel free to send in a photo of any

bromeliads you want identified (yes, the plant above is a bromeliad).

Please photograph the plant in flower, and preferably in color.

(2) If you have any ideas on what the plant is, please let me know-

Ed.

August 2002

Bromeliad
Journal of the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand Inc. Vol.42 No.8


Bromeliad Society of New Zealand Inc.

Affiliated with the Bromeliad Society International
The Society was formed on 28th August, 1962. The objects of the Society are to encourage the cultivation and study of bromeliads grown indoors or outdoors, and in particular:
• 
To assist members to identify plants.

• 
To promote discussion and arrange instruction on cultivation,
propagation and control of diseases.


• 
To provide a library for members.

• 
To make awards for outstanding new bromeliads.

• 
To hold shows or public exhibitions of bromeliads.

• 
To promote the distribution of bromeliads amongst members byexchange, purchase and sale, and to encourage the importation of new plants.

• 
To affiliate with any society or other body, and to do such things as mabe deemed necessary or desirable in the furtherance of these objects.

• 
To accept affiliation from other societies having similar objects.


MEMBERSHIP SUBSCRIPTIONS

New Zealand:  NZ $20.00. Ordinary. 
NZ $5.00. Associate (same household). 
Overseas:  AUD $30.00 Australia, US $20.00 United States and other 
overseas. 

Send all payments to the Treasurer, Peter Waters, 22 Halfmoon Rise, Bucklands Beach, AUCKLAND.

CORRESPONDENCE

All general correspondence should be sent to the Secretary, Bromeliad Society of New Zealand, 16 Sanders Avenue, Takapuna, Auckland, New Zealand. The opinions expressed in letters or articles in this Journal are the contributors’ own views and do not necessarily express the views or the policy of the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand.

COVER PHOTOS

Front
Wonderful colour from Florida. A stunning Neo ‘Kings Ransom’. More great photos and a report on the World Bromeliad Conference
on pages six and seven.

Back
No, it’s not the heart of South America. These bromeliads, growing as natural epiphytes, are in the garden of the late Jim Rowe, nestled in the slopes of the Waitakere ranges, west of Auckland city. The garden has developed over the last 40 to 50 years.

CONTENTS

President’s Page – Graham West

4 Auckland July meeting news and competition results – Dave Anderson
5 Fabulous colour at the World Bromeliad Conference in Florida – Peter Waters 6 -7
Bromeliad Group news from around the country… 
Northland, Eastern Bay of Plenty, Wellington, Bay of Plenty  8-10 
Seed Bank  11 
Auckland 2003 Conference Programme and Social Events  12-13 
Auckland 2003 Conference Registration Form  14 
Inducing bromeliads to flower – Gerry Stansfield  15 
From the Registrar. Beautiful new hybrids  19 
New Members  19 
Bromeliad Pollination and Hybridization - Gerry Stansfield  20 
Officers and Journal directory  23 


COMING EVENTS

AUGUST 25th - Northland group meeting at 1.30pm, 27th -Auckland meeting, Greyfriars Hall Maureen and Keith Green’s home, at 7.30pm. Panel Discussion, chaired by Maungakaramea Peter Waters. Monthly competition
– Aechmea recurvata.
SEPTEMBER 3rd -Deadline for copy for September Journal.
11th - Bay of Plenty group meeting at 1pm
18th - Bay of Plenty garden visits resume 24th -Auckland meeting, Greyfriars Hall at 7.30pm Talk by Sue Laurent – all about growing bromeliads in and around Whakatane. Monthly competition – Vriesea fosteriana
29th - Wellington Tillandsia group meeting at 1.30pm at Andrew Flower’s home, Pukerua Bay.


PRESIDENT’S PAGE

At our July meeting in Auckland, 79 members, 8 new members, plus visitors braved the winter evening. The 5 minute talk by Len Trotman on how he got into bromeliads and also how he began importing them was most informative and interesting. When you visit Len’s house, you would think he has been growing them all his life. Once again, there were a large number of good plants for sale. Unfortunately, there were no tables available but we should have that sorted out by our next meeting. The silent auction table only had 2 plants, but fetched excellent money. There has been a change in the publishing of our Journal and it is now being edited and produced in Auckland by a small team. It will continue to be printed by Balmoral Copy Centre. Not having the Editor in Auckland did create some difficulties. On behalf of the committee and our members I would like to thank Andrew Flower for the effort and time he has put in, once again, as Editor. Thank you Andrew.
At next month’s meeting, instead of a main speaker we are going to have 3 or 4 senior members as a panel to answer any questions on bromeliads, so please, have some good questions ready for the night!
This winter has really taken toll on my outside bromeliads and, although I have covered and treated them exactly the same way as in previous years, there has been a lot of frost damage. I can only put it down to the fact that, with so much rain (4 to 6 weeks continuous), the plants were so soft that they had no resistance.
I am certainly looking forward to spring!
Graham West.


BROMELIADS AUCKLAND 2003 CONFERENCE

March 7th – March 10th.

We all need to keep our minds focused on this. We already have 65 overseas bromeliad lovers booked to attend. First, please remember to register. Do it before September 30th and it is only $165. From October 1st it goes up to $185 so, be in NOW and save. Plants for Conference, for both the show competition and for sale, should all be being sorted out now. Please, put all those special plants to one side and start grooming them. We want a really good display to show all our overseas visitors. Anyone wishing detailed information on exactly what is required for plants should contact Lester Ching, Graham West or Peter Waters. You will find our contact details on the inside back cover under ‘Officers’. Thanks, Graham.


JULY MEETING NEWS FROM AUCKLAND

Notes by Dave Anderson.

With rain on forty or so consecutive days, we at last had a few fine days leading into the July monthly meeting. 79 members saw a superb display of slides that Peter Waters had taken at the recent BSI conference in Florida, USA.
Raffles
The special raffle prizes this month were won by Vicki Carter and Kirstie Bain with the door prizes going to Lani Yates, Joan Farrow, and Carol Stewart.

Show and Tell
First up was a squat grey/green bromeliad with succulent leaves. This species was identified as Ursulaea macvaughii - see the photos on page 80 in Baench’s book. The plant needs protection from the cold through winter. Next was a clump of Vriesea bleherae with several yellow flower spikes. Note that this plant was previously named Vriesea bleheri but has had a name change as it is named after the wife of the collector. Gill Keesing brought in a Quesnelia lateralis for dis­play with its three lateral spikes emanat­ing from the base of the plant, this being quite unusual. The flowers are a beautiful blue colour. A plant for naming was Nidularium Leprosa. This plant with small purple spots on the green leaves has been in N.Z. for a number of years masquerad­ing under several wrong names - Nid. regelioides x rosulatum, Nid. Spotty among others. It is a very easily grown nidularium with pink /red bracts. Next were two Tillandias - compressa and tricolor with the owner wanting to know if they are best grown mounted or in pots. They grow as epiphytes in their natural state and are perfectly happy grown as mounted plants however when grown in pots they tend to grow to a larger size. Tillandsia didisticha with a thin red spike and white flowers was brought in for nam­ing, as was an unidentified miniature tillandsia. Lastly a Canistropsis billbergioides with reddish flower spike ­the plant has the varietal name Tutti-Frutti.

Competitions
Open Flowering: First Marie Healey with Vr saundersii x bituminosa variegata now known as ‘Highway Beauty’ and second was Gerry Stansfield with Aechmea orlandiana ‘Ensign’ - a lovely clump of three plants in flower. Aechmea orlandiana ‘Ensign’ was ‘best plant’ of the month.
Open Foliage: Gerry Stansfield was first with a Vr. fosteriana (rubra) and second was Len Trotman with Neoregelia Empress.
Tillandsia: Lester & Bev Ching were first with
T. cacticola and second was Len Trotman with
T. bourgaei.
Hanging Baskets: First was Len Trotman’s Neoregelia ‘Sarah Head’ - a clump of 10 stoloniferous plants that were a deep red colour followed by Lester & Bev Ching’s Vr. x retroflexa
-a natural hybrid. Novice Flowering: First was Carolyn Scholes
with Aechmea chantinii and second was Dawn Ashton with a Billbergia pyramidalis. Novice Foliage: First was Charmian Whitby with
a Neoregelia Fosperior ‘Perfection’ and second
with Neo. Rosatina was Pam Lang. The Plant of the month went to Gerry Stansfield with Aechmea orlandiana ‘Ensign’.
Congratulations to all the winners.
NEXT MEETING: Tuesday 27th August

‘BROMELIAD BEACH PARTY’

Peter Waters reports on the World Bromeliad Conference in Florida.
The 15th World Bromeliad Conference was held in St. Petersburg, Florida in the week to May 19th and Jeanette and I made our way there after spending two weeks in the Caribbean and at Miami with our son, Chris, and his wife, Melissa.
We arrived in the beautiful city of St. Petersburg on Monday night. Situated on a peninsula on the west coast of Florida it has the most beautiful beaches and the theme of the Conference was ‘‘Bromeliad Beach Party’’. The foyers of the Hilton hotel were decorated with many displays erected by commercial growers and Florida societies all with a beach or holiday slant, umbrellas, sandcastles, shells etc. There is nowhere like Florida to colour bromeliads. The warm climate does wonders for the Neoregelias especially.
On Tuesday the BSI held the annual board meeting and the 20 or so directors spent all day discussing the affairs of the society. The next day the Scientific Seminars took place, and a line-up of the top scientists involved in bromeliad research gave talks to a very interested audience. Thursday was spent show judging and setting up the sales plant room. This opened to the 400 registrants on Thursday evening and once again the initial rush was reminiscent of the Great Stampede.
The Conference Seminars commenced on Friday morning and continued until Sunday lunchtime. They were well attended and I certainly learnt a lot from them. On Friday the Show was opened and we had a chance to view the wonderful plants that had been entered and the prize-winners which had all been taken to one of the ballrooms and set out for easier viewing. The Rare PlantAuction on the Friday night was a lot of fun and a chance to view some of the really unusual and rare bromeliads. The prices fetched were quite amazing - in total some $US20,000 was taken.
Saturday night was the Banquet and a few speeches, the main one by Don Beadle, who has virtually retired from growing bromeliads. He is so well-known that everyone enjoyed his amusing anecdotes. On Sunday afternoon we helped to clear away the displays and it was all over for another two years. On Tuesday we left the hotel and headed south to visit Michael Kiehl at Venice. He bought the nursery formerly owned by Don Beadle and has taken over the huge collection of Billbergia hybrids which, when added to his own extensive collection, particularly of Neoregelias, has filled many large shadehouses. I spent a whole day collecting plants to take home.
From Venice we went further south to Naples (this is Florida, not Italy!) and once again were impressed by the beautiful beaches of pure white sand. The next day we entered the Everglades and spent some time on back roads marveling at the huge number of bromeliads on the trees - they were everywhere - and also the alligator population which were there in their hundreds, even sunning themselves on the road and they were big! They didn’t even seem very worried by the car.
We had a very enjoyable time in Florida, and the weather was fine and very warm all the time so it was a shock to arrive back in New Zealand to find rain for the next six weeks.

NEWS FROM AROUND THE COUNTRY…

Northland Bromeliad Group -Jacqui O’Connell
There were 33 members present at our July meeting held at the Russell Road Quarry Garden. We have had an extremely wet winter and for the two days before our meeting the wind was so strong it was literally blowing bromeliads out of my garden! The Friends of the Quarry Trust have shifted an old school classroom on to the site next to their existing shed. It is an ideal site for meetings and a lovely spot with the sound of a bubbling stream nearby. David Muir, who has been appointed Project Manager for the Quarry, welcomed us. Last month there had been some discussion on our group holding a display and sale of bromeliads with the local cacti and succulent club. We decided against the idea at this stage as it is an awful lot of work and there were not enough volunteers for the job. We decided that every time we have a meeting at the Quarry members can bring their plants for sale. Plant for discussion this month was the neoregelia and as Lester Ching from Auckland was present he was volunteered for the job of answering any queries. Lester told us how he manages to root his plants quicker by leaving the pups after removal from their mother for a week and then standing them in 2 inches of water, where they would then grow very good roots. I am sure most of us will try this method just to see how it goes (most of us were a bit sceptical, it seems to go against everything we have learnt about good drainage). Keith Green clarified about using Orthene for scale control. It should always be the powder form of Orthene rather than the liquid form, which contains oil, which will damage or kill the plant. We then had afternoon tea, gathered up our boots, spades, trowels and bromeliads and went up to our allocated spot and planted another 30 or 40 plants. The display is getting better and better with many of the large Aechmeas just starting to flower, as well as Bilbergias. The August meeting will be held at Maureen & Keith Green’s home at Maungakaramea on Sunday August 25th at 1.30 pm. Please bring a chair, a raffle prize a ‘skite’ plant and the cheque book!!.
Eastern Bay of Plenty Bromeliad and Orchid Group -Christine Borlase
The meeting at Pam and Trevor Signal’s home on the 21st July was highly successful despite the somewhat cloudy and miserable day, but that didn’t dampen the enthusiasm of the 32 people attending. At the end of the meeting I had another five names to add to my database, which will make 67 in all, with some members living almost 50km from Whakatane. We were welcomed by Sue Laurent, who explained for the newcomers how our group is organised, the attendance roll was handed around and the raffles, a nidularium and two orchids displayed. This month we were lucky to also have two spot prizes of donated plants. We thank the donor, we have been very fortunate in having such generous people take an interest in our group. Next month we do not have a meeting, as we are having a stand at the Camellia Show in Whakatane. Variegated plants were on display this month, with plants from the Neo, Aechmea and Billbergia genera. The difference in colour between two plants with the same name being explained by conditions, one kept in high light the other in semi shade. We moved outside so Trevor could demonstrate potting on, and dividing cymbidiums. Many questions were asked and ably answered by Trevor. We then drew the raffles and had afternoon tea before opening the sales table and exploring the Signal’s property.
Pam and Trevor have been orchid enthusiasts for many years, with bromeliads being a more recent enthusiasm. Because their block of land lies in the path of winds that can sweep down the valley from Mt Tarawera, (which frequently is snow capped at this time of year) many of the broms live with the orchids in the three large tunnel houses, and are obviously happy in these surroundings. It was obvious that our members were too, with ‘have you got any of this for sale’ being the most frequent comment! After the meeting many carried on to ‘Pottering About’, the home and business of Jim Gilchrist.


Wellington Tillandsia Group
Phyl Purdie
The meeting of the Wellington Tillandsia Group was held at the home of Jean
Young, 92 Derby St, Feilding on Sunday 28th July at 1.30pm. 8 members and 1 visitor were present. There were not many plants in flower at this time. A clump of T. tenuifolia looked very attractive with its deep purple flowers and red bracts.T. flabellata had scarlet bracts and long purple flowers. Other plants were T. leonamiana (now named recurvifolia v subsecundifolia) , and two branched plants T. acostae and T. orogenes.  Vriesea rauhii, looking very like a tillandsia, still looked attractive even though its flowers had finished with its cyclamen branched inflorescence. It was classified as a vriesea because of a groove running down the back of the petals. T. streptophylla flower stalk had broken off but now had two more growing from the same spot. This plant normally does not do this. T. gymnobotrya with its branched inflorescence was past its best too.
The glasshouse collection was viewed next. This was housed in several places. One of these had the tillandsias hung in several rows alphabetically on one side with a cover lowered in frosty weather.
Flowering at the time were a clump of T. crocata with its yellow flowers and a T. bandensis. Jean also breeds birds and these took up some of the housing. Members then shared the afternoon tea before heading back to Wellington.
Next meeting will be on September 29th,
1.30 pm at the home of Andrew Flower, Pukerua Bay


Bay of Plenty Bromeliad Group
Lynley Breeze
AGM -14th August The Annual General Meeting was well attended with 38 members and 4 visitors. Gay Bambery gave her report and thanked all members of the club who contributed to the very successful year.  Lynley Roy reported on a healthy balance in the finances. Gay was re-elected as president; Lynley Breeze was elected secretary and Des Young as the treasurer.  The following were elected to the committee; Anna Long, Gwen McCallum, Audrey Hewson, Bertha Schollum, Kevin Schollum, Lynley Roy, Margaret Craig, Johanna Elder, Cliff Taucher.  Des Young thanked the outgoing committee for their smooth organisation and particularly commended Gay Bambery for her leadership as president. It was resolved that the subscriptions would remain at $15 per person or $20 for a couple from the same household. It is expected that all members will subscribe to the Bromeliad Journal (this is due usually early in the New Year). The August monthly meeting then resumed. There was a lovely show of orthophytums and ochagavias some of which were in flower, but the foliage was spectacular even in the absence of flowers. A feature of orthophytums is that they do need lots of water and do not absorb nutrients from the leaves but just from the roots. They are terrestrial (ground dwelling) in their native habitat. We will have a sales and display table at the Orchid Show (racecourse) on September 13 – 15. The helpers for the display will be Fred Wright, Johanna Elder, Gay Bambery and Gwen McCallum. Display plants are welcome. The newly formed Hawkes Bay Bromeliad group intend to travel to Tauranga for that show and would like to visit some bromeliad gardens so that will be arranged and we will try to fit in with their timetable. Plants for sale and display can be dropped off at the site (racecourse) after 3pm on the Thursday. Elizabeth Bailey was our guest speaker describing the way she grows succulents. There were lots of gems of information.
August Competition Winners
First Guzmania Guinn, J Elder Second Vr fosteriana ‘Red Chestnut’,
I Clotworthy Third Ae recurvata ‘Cardinalis’,
Margaret Craig Raffle Winners were Cushla Chudleigh, the office lady, Brian Chudleigh and Pat Smith. Next Month Events Next Meeting – 11 September Wed 1pm. (Committee meeting at 12 noon) Plant of the Month for September will be hanging baskets. Garden Visits resume on 18 September (the third Wednesday of the Month)
10.00 am Anne Gale at 5 Linwood Place and then on to Margaret Mangos garden at 11 Linley Terrace. A reminder about garden visiting etiquette; no handbags or shoulder bags in glasshouses/ shadehouses; arrive promptly so that the host can visit the next garden; don’t gather a slip off anything.


Aechmea-bromelifolia, caesia, coelestis v. coelestis, coelestis (from albomarginata), lueddemanniana, lueddemanniana ‘Alvarez’, mexicana, nudicaulis v. cuspidata, recurvata, beeriana, orlandiana, orlandiana ‘Jean’, orlandiana ‘Pickaninny’ Alcantarea edmundoi Billbergia brasiliensis, decora, vittata Dyckia altissima, brevifolia, platyphylla, rariflora, remotiflora, montevidensis Edmundoa lindenii v.roseum Fosterella penduliflora Guzmania butcheri,sanguinea v brevipicellata,sanguinea Nidularium amazonicum Neoregelia punctatissima Pitcairnia flammea, flammea var. roezlii, heterophylla, maidifolia Puya butcheriana, coerulea v. violacea, grafii, mirabilis, venusta Tillandsia bartramii, belloensis, balbisiana, brachycaulos, butzii, capitata, cryptantha, deppeana, gardneri, guatemalensis, juncea (large form), limbata, myosura, plagiotropica, polystachia, pseudobaileyi, pohliana, schiedeana, schiedeana v.major, tricolor, viridiflora Vriesea corralina-rubra-superba,ensiformis,erythrodactyylon gigantea v seideliana, friburgensis v tucumanensis, guttata, hieroglyphica, platynema, platynema variegata, psittacina, racinae, saundersii, saundersii (upright spike) schwackeana, magnifica (goldfish Vr), sucrei, malzinei (yellow form) Werauhia gigantea
New seed received from Bob Reilly, Derek Butcher,Audrey Hewson, Michael Pascall, Gerry Stansfield. Moyna Prince & Peter Waters. Thanks to all.
The seedbank will exchange two packets of 20 seeds for one (1) large packet of your seed. Please make sure it is labelled correctly.
Please send in a large stamped envelope.
Packets (of at least 20 seeds) are 50 cents.
Limited to one packet of seed per kind per address, maximum $5.00 per month
Remember to consult the current seed list when ordering.

Orders, with large, stamped, addressed envelope and spare seed to; Gerry Stansfield.
7 Noall Street, TeAtatu Peninsula, Auckland. Ph. (09) 834-7178.

CONFERENCE PROGRAMME March 7th - 10th 2003
Waipuna Hotel and Conference Centre, 58 Waipuna Road, Mt Wellington

THURSDAY - 6TH 
2pm  Displays set-up  Foyer 
5-8pm  Registration  Hospitality Desk 
FRIDAY - 7TH 
8-11am  Show set-up  Show Room 
9.30am  Harbour sights cruise/ Bus Tour  (optional - 6 hours) 
11-2pm  Show staging  Show Room 
1-5pm  Sales plants set-up  Promenade Room 
2-5pm  Show judging  Show Room 
5-6pm  Sales open (conferees only)  Promenade Room 
6-9pm  Show open  Show Room 
7pm  BBQ (optional) 
SATURDAY - 8TH 
7-8.30am  Conference Breakfast  Horizon Lounge 
8am  Registrations  Hospitality Desk 
8.45am  Conference opening  Conference Room 
9-4pm 9.00am  Show open Auckland City Bus Tour  Show Room (optional - 3 1/4 hours) 
9-9.45am  Seminar 1  Conference Room 
9.50-10.35am  Seminar 2  Conference Room 
10.35  Morning Tea  Horizon Lounge 
10.55-11.40am  Seminar 3  Conference Room 
11.45-12.30pm  Seminar 4  Conference Room 
12.30pm 1.30pm  Lunch West Auckland Scenic Bus Tour  Horizon Lounge (optional - 3 1/4 hours) 
1.55-2.40pm  Seminar 5  Conference Room 
2.45-3.30pm  Seminar 6  Conference Room 
3.30pm  Afternoon Tea  Horizon Lounge 
3.45pm  Raffle Draw  Horizon Lounge 
4-6pm 7pm  Sales open (conferees only) Harbour Dinner Cruise  Promenade Room (optional - 3 1/2 hours) 
SUNDAY - 9TH 
8am  Registrations  Hospitality Desk 
9-4pm 9am  Show open Eastern Bays & Crafts Bus Tour  Show Room (optional - 3 1/4 hours) 
9-9.45am  Seminar 7  Conference Room 
9.50-10.35am  Seminar 8  Conference Room 
10.35am  Morning Tea  Horizon Lounge 
10.55-11.40am  Seminar 9  Conference Room 
11.45-12.30pm  Seminar 10  Conference Room 
12.30pm  Lunch  Horizon Lounge 
1.30pm  Members Gardens Bus Tour 
4-6pm  Sales open (conferees only)  Promenade Room 
5pm  Raffle Draw  Horizon Lounge 
6.30pm  Cocktails (cash bar)  Exhibition Centre 
7pm  Banquet  Exhibition Centre 
Presentation of Prizes 
8.30pm  Plant Auction  Exhibition Centre 
MONDAY - 10TH 
9-9.45am  Seminar 11  Conference Room 
9am  Gardens, Lakes & Crafts Bus Tour  (optional - 3 1/4 hours) 
9.50-10.35am  Seminar 12  Conference Room 
10.35am  Morning Tea  Horizon Lounge 
10.55-11.40am  Seminar 13  Conference Room 
11.45-12.30pm  Seminar 14  Conference Room 
12.30pm  Lunch  Horizon Lounge 
2pm  Closing session  Conference Room 
3pm  Break down 

CONFERENCE 2003

SOCIAL AND RECREATIONAL EVENTS

For partners of conferees, and for all conferees who want to relax
FRIDAY7th MARCH All Day - Harbour and City Bus/Boat trip $45.00 per person (optional) A Harbour sights cruise will take you on the Tamaki estuary, out to Rangitoto Island, past the eastern bays to the waterfront, past the Americas Cup syndicate bases and Westhaven Marina to the harbour bridge, finishing in Downtown Auckland. Morning tea and light lunch included. We then board our bus for a city tour, arriving back at the Waipuna Hotel and Conference centre around 5.00pm. Evening - BBQ $32.50 per person (optional) At Waipuna Hotel and Conference centre from 7.00pm. A great chance to mingle

SATURDAY8TH MARCH
Start with a hearty Conference Breakfast 7am to 8.30am - included in registration, partner $20.00
Morning -Auckland City Landmarks Bus Trip $15.00 per person (optional) Just over 3 hours touring the sights - Mt Eden (great for photos of the city), popular Mission Bay, Bastion Point, the Domain where the Auckland Museum is situated. Downtown and the Viaduct harbour, home of theAmericas Cup and the harbour bridge.
Afternoon -West Auckland Scenic Bus Trip $20.00 per person (optional) Take just over 3 hours and explore the beautiful Waitakere Ranges in West Auckland, Scenic Drive, Aratahi marae (entry fee to video show included) and Crystal Mountain (gems). Afternoon tea is not included but can be purchased at Aratahi. Return to Waipuna approx 4.45pm.
Evening - Harbour Lights Dinner Cruise $40.00 per person (optional) Buses leave Waipuna around 6.45pm for Westhaven marina where we board the MV Tokerau for a three hour dinner cruise on the inner Waitemata harbour.Adelicious buffet dinner is included in the cost. The bar will be open on board, note –drinks extra. The boat will return to Westhaven approx 10.15pm, then we bus back to Waipuna. Book early for this one!


SUNDAY 9th MARCH Morning – Eastern Bays Scenic and Crafts Bus Trip $25.00 per person (optional) Approx 3 hours touring Beachlands, Formosa Country Club and visit a selection of interesting craft shops.
Afternoon -Bromeliad Garden Tours, included in registration - Partner $10.00
Approx three hour bus tours visiting at least three New Zealand Bromeliad Society Inc members’ gardens. See how well bromeliads grow in our climate and how we use them in the garden.
Evening - Sunday Banquet, included in registration - Partner $40.00
This is bound to be a highlight of the Conference. We will hold an auction, run raffles and announce the winners of the Bromeliad competition while we enjoy a superb dinner at Waipuna.
MONDAY 10TH MARCH Morning – Gardens, Lakes and Crafts Bus trip $25.00 (optional) The approx 3 hour trip will travel north and west to includeAlbany, Coatesville (twin lakes garden and café), and outstanding crafts at Westgate. Morning tea at Twin Lakes and entry fee of $7.00 all included. Partners are more than welcome to join in the afternoon conference session. The conference will conclude approx 3.00pm.

BROMELIADS AUCKLAND 2003 CONFERENCE

REGISTRATION

CUT HERE
BROMELIADS AUCKLAND 2003 CONFERENCE MARCH 7TH - 10TH

BROMELIADS AUCKLAND 2003 CONFERENCE

Full Registration Friday / Saturday / Sunday / Monday
$165.00 until September 30th.
$185.00 October 1st until January 31st
$205.00 February 1st onwards

Delegate name/s……………………………………………………….........................

Address……………………………………………………….....................................

Full registration includes access to seminars, competitive show, sales plants, Conference breakfast, banquet, lunches, morning and afternoon teas and garden tour on Sunday. Proceedings book also included.
Daily Registration Saturday / Sunday $75.00 daily
Delegate name/s………………………………………………………........................
Address……………………………………………………………............................

Send registrations to Bromeliads 2003Auckland, P.O. Box 51-361, Pakuranga, Auckland, New Zealand. Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
To book accommodation: Freephone 0800-924-786 Freefax 0800-800-315 Phone +64-9-526-3000 Email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Website www.waipunahotel.co.nz
FLOWERS ON DEMAND…HOW TO INDUCE BROMELIADS TO FLOWER.

By Gerry Stansfield

The ability and knowledge to make certain plants burst into flower at specific times of the year by using hormonal chemical substances is well known. Back in the early 60s this procedure was in its infancy and some hit and miss attempts were achieved. Today it is a scientific and highly successful practice and each year at specific times, especially for Mothers Day and Valentines Day, and at Christmas, many thousands of chrysanthemums and poinsettias etc are held back, then brought into bloom almost to the day.
To know why and how this happens with bromeliads we must go back a little in time and begin with the humble pineapple which, as you all know, is a very important member of the Bromeliaceae family.
Many years ago, a pineapple grower in Hawaii was burning off a large area of land to extend his plantation. The area had a number of large trees on it and these were felled and bulldozed into piles and set alight as part of the clearing process. It is important to note that this was an out of season time for the pineapples. Some six to eight weeks later the pineapple plants in an adjoining area set fruit. Naturally, with such an important industry at stake, the experts were called in to explain the cause. The conclusions were that the wood smoke from the fires that had wafted over the pineapple plantations contained ethylene gas, and it was this that had triggered the production of leaves to abruptly cease, and the meristematic shoot tips to start producing the embryonic beginnings of flower bracts and inflorescence tissue.
This was hailed by the industry as an extremely important find and paved the way for new synthetic organic chemicals such as ‘Omaflora’ and ‘Ethrel’, by-products of acetylene gas, and the ‘Pill’, which we will talk about later in the article. Today the pineapple industry routinely relies on ‘Omaflora’ and other products to guarantee them a good yield. As you well know bromeliads can be shy flowerers and as pineapples are rotationally cropped, every plant must bear fruit.

Why should we force our bromeliads into flower?
One good reason for doing this, obviously, is commercial gain, as with the example of our poinsettias etc. In some cases it is questionable whether some nurseries are not in fact doing bromeliads an injustice, as results to date show that the guzmanias and now neoregelias being offered are far too small, have a high mortality rate and if not sold when in flower, suffer the fate of being knocked down at bargain basement prices to someone who will lovingly try to bring the plant back to life. This could take another three years as the plant recovers from its hormonal inducement. One of the prerequisites to flower inducement by chemicals, is that the plant should be of flowering size so that it has the ability to withstand the requirements of changing from vegetative shoot tips to embryonic flower tissue. The problem with treating a juvenile plant is that when it has flowered and starts to produce pups, the pups are still juvenile and not only need care and attention, but will take a number of years to reach the true flowering size, as they almost revert to seedling plants. I say, that unless you are a bromeliad grower, and know and understand the requirements for these plants, then there is more than a possibility that your beloved Mothers Day guzmania will end up, after it has flowered, in the trash can.
An important piece of advice. If you have purchased one of the flowering guzmanias or neoregelias, re-pot it! They will have been potted in 100% peat and this can only be described as ‘soggy porridge’ and is extremely detrimental to the healthy growth of all bromeliads. Guzmanias, are closely related to tillandsias and vrieseas and their cultural requirements are similar. They are generally epiphytic and therefore enjoy an extremely open mixture. Their root system is basically for adhesion and must be able to breathe, and in this porridge like mixture you will only get die-back and eventual plant failure.
However, inducing bromeliads into flower for the purpose of hybridizing is a very acceptable method. Bromeliads, unlike orchids for instance, can be extremely fickle and one cannot guarantee that the two plants you may wish to hybridize will in fact flower for you at the right time, and no doubt, many hybrids have been made purely because that was all that was out at the time.
The ideal hybrids are planned between two plants that you have recognized will hopefully complement each other
e.g. you wish to cross Neoregelia carolinae tricolor with Neoregelia concentrica, and are hopeful you may get a variegated hybrid (even though the chances are perhaps one in a thousand). To do this you will need both plants to flower at the same time. Now we have a number of methods that will help us, from acetylene gas, to ‘Ethrel’ and now the ‘Pill.’
Acetylene gas bubbled into the central tanks of the plant can and does work, but is somewhat dangerous and should only be attempted by those who are trained and understand this method. ‘Ethrel’ is sold as a liquid and is then mixed with water to form a concentrate and is then mixed with water again to be broken down to be sprayed on to the plants and the central tanks. The ratio of ‘Ethrel’ and water is extremely important. If too much ‘Ethrel’ is present, severe burning will result in possible death to your plants. The success rate is suggested at 80% and if you are treating a large greenhouse with many plants, you will most probably get very good results.
If it is only a few plants you wish to flower for hybridizing, then the ‘Pill’ is the answer. The ‘Pill’ is a type of granulated calcium carbide and is very tiny, smaller than a match head. It is suggested that about four are required for a small plant and about six to eight for a large plant. The centre tank should only have about 2 to 3cm of water and the small ‘Pills’ dropped in the water will begin to fizz due to the acetylene gas being generated. Some six to eight weeks later your flower spike should be showing. The system is clean, and not dangerous or injurious to your plants (or your health) and I have found it to be 100% effective. I have had great success with a large number of genera including aechmea, billbergia, neoregelia, nidularium, and vriesea which includes Vr. fosteriana (rubra) and hieroglyphica.
The ‘Pills’ are only available from the Bromeliad Society International and you have to be a member to order. They come in small glass containers each holding 1000 and were US$10.00 per container, including post and pack. Two containers, or 2000 ‘Pills’ is plenty. The cost and availability should be checked if you are wishing to purchase.

We hope to start a regular column…your opportunity to ask a question about plants; share your experiences; tell us what you would like to see in the Journal; make constructive criticisms about the Society…almost anything at all about bromeliads.
Please send your contributions (over your name, initials or non de plume) to ‘Bromeliad Mailbox’ C/- G.Stansfield, 7 Noall Street, Te Atatu Peninsula, Auckland. Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Maximum of 150 words please. We will publish a selection of the best letters each month, with replies where appropriate.


FROM THE REGISTRAR -
Gerry Stansfield
Last month I was able to show you two outstanding new vrieseas from the Andrew Maloy stable from the cross of Vriesea fosteriana (rubra) or red leafed form as we are supposed to say, with Vriesea platynema variegata. When they were all quite small, and I might add nothing like the colour we see today, Andrew said I could take a couple. One appealed to me because in the cross it favoured platynema, as remember if we cross two different species of the same genus, the result is an F1 hybrid with consistent characteristics, or in other words, it would look a little like the mother or father or both and the other favoured fosteriana. Both these plants were very small at the time and you could not know how they would turn out. Both are developing into outstanding new hybrids. The top photo on the opposite page is Vriesea Kiwi ‘Pink Ice’ and the bottom photo is Vriesea Kiwi ‘Pink Supreme’ ­yet to be registered .

A WARM WELCOME TO NEW MEMBERS:

Bryce & Christine Smith - North Shore Marelyn Milligan - Napier
Dolly Clavel -Auckland Warren Mullins -Waitakere City Andrew Devonshire - North Shore Diana & Melveen Sam -Auckland. Sheree Foster - Papakura Des and Marie Shaw -Tauranga
Colleen Murphy - Whangarei Dean Waters- Warkworth Harold & Audrey Gould -Thames


Pottering About Garden Centre

Orchids - Bromeliads and much more
Jim and Sharon Gilchrist Military Road, RD 2 WHAKATANE 07 - 322 8201


Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

BROMELIAD POLLINATION AND HYBRIDIZATION

By Gerry Stansfield

In my first article I talked about collecting brom seed and what to look for, i.e. what do the seed of the various genera look like? In this article I will talk about pollination because, alas, the great majority of bromeliads do not self pollinate and many will not accept their own pollen and so require our intervention to assist in the pollination process. Some bromeliads receive help from other sources, such as birds (the Humming bird is a great pollinator in the bromeliads’ homeland of South America). In New Zealand it is possible with small fantails and yellow eyes but mostly it is bees and especially the bumblebee. Moths also play an important role in this process. Many large vrieseas like hieroglyphica, platynema, fosteriana etc open their flowers at night for the moths to do their work and then close again in the early morning. We must remember that it’s not good to leave it up to outside intervention as contamination is possible and we would have no idea what it was crossed with. So, if we do it, it’s best to know what we are doing and tag or name the crosses.
Why should we pollinate?
Firstly, if we are to expand our collection without spending a lot of money, then growing from seed is the answer, and to get seed we (or someone) must pollinate the plants. You know we have a seed bank in the Society and we receive seed from New Zealand and from around the world.
This keeps us up with a large number of species of bromeliads one can grow. Another difficulty we have to contend with is that many bromeliads will not accept their own pollen so we must have a number of the same plants so we can cross pollinate from one to another e.g. Aechmea fasciata will not pollinate from its own flowers and you will need two plants, or even better, three, where you can cross the pollen from one plant to another. Now Ae. fasciata is not an easy one to try and there are much easier aechmeas and other bromeliads to play with. Also, it takes about nine months or more for the seed to ripen so it’s a long wait before you can tell if you have been successful. The second reason for learning how to carry out pollination is so that we can hybridize. Mulford Foster, recognized as the great ‘guru’ of bromeliads, once said, “Hybridizing bromeliads is like changing an already beautiful plant into something exquisitely outstanding’’, and if we look at some of the wonderful hybrids of today we can say “how right Mulford Foster was.’’
The first principle of pollination is to understand the different parts of the flowers. In following illustrations we can see that there are two types of flowers in the Bromeliaceae family. In type A the ovary chamber is outside the flower and at the base of the stigma. All plants in the sub-family 3 Bromelioideae have this feature and it is known as having ‘Inferior Ovaries.’ In type B the ovary chamber is inside the flower but also at the base of the stigma and this refers to all the plants in the sub-families 1 and 2, being Pitcairnioideae and Tillandsioideae. These plants are known as having ‘Superior Ovaries.’All bromeliad flowers have three sepals, three petals, six pollen stamens and one pistil and stigma.

Before we attempt the pollination process there are a number of things we need to help us. A magnifying lens head piece is much easier to use than a hand held one and frees our hands to do other things. You will need a long steel or alloy pointer, about 15cm long, say an old knitting needle, and you will also need a pair of long tweezers and some folded tissues, to transfer the pollen from one plant to the other. Before pollination is carried out you must determine the time of day when the flowers are fully open and that the pistil and pollen stamens are fully receptive. Perhaps this is the difficult part, as we have nothing to tell us when that may be except a change in the pistil that will allow the pollen to stick to it. So timing is an important factor in knowing when to pollinate. Large vrieseas like hieroglyphica, platynema, gigantea etc will have opened in the night waiting for the moths and you must pollinate them early, say around 7.00am, or the flowers could be lost by 9.00am or 10.00am. I find that neos. and nids. are best pollinated around 9.00am. On cold days all this will change, so you must observe your plants and be ready.
The procedure is no different to other flowers except that with bromeliads you must emasculate (or remove) the pollen stamens from the plant you want to pollinate to guard against contamination. It will now be called the seed plant or mother plant. This can be easy on some plants but on neos. and nids. it can be difficult and is best done in the early morning before the pollen and stigma are receptive. Using the steel needle and the tweezers, open up the three sepals. You will find that this allows the three petals to open up which pulls the pollen stamens away from the stigma. You can then pinch out the pollen stamens with the tweezers. Your seed mother plant is now ready to receive pollen from your other plant in the case of two Neo.carolinae or two Aechmea fasciata etc. The pollen stamens should be pinched off with the tweezers and the pollen scraped off and placed on to the stigma of the seed mother plant.
You should remember that in the case of flower heads submerged in water e.g. neoregelias and nidulariums, the water must be taken out the day before so as not to wet the pollen. I use a small plastic tubing with a Vet’s syringe. If you tip the plant up you will empty all the water and that is not good for it so, just suck that water out to below the flower head. You can also use a cooking basting syringe.
After saying that many bromeliad plants will not self pollinate, and that they will not accept their own pollen, it has to be said that there are a number that do. All or most vrieseas, tillandsias and guzmanias can be pollinated with their own pollen, so there’s no need to strip the pollen stamens, unless you’re going to hybridize. With the tweezers, cut off a pollen stamen and wipe it on the stigma, noting that there is a nice little mound of pollen on the stigmatic surface.

The most important part…NAMING!
With all bromeliads I use a small piece of plastic slim line Venetian blind, say 50mm long x 5mm wide, with one end cut to a taper. I use a code (as there isn’t much room) so it could be VR pl x Ft which could mean Vr platynema variegata x Vr fosteriana (rubra). All of this you will have written into your bromeliad pollination handbook. Remember, it’s your plant so you can call it whatever you like as a code e.g. Vr, 631. Push the little code tag into the sepals at the back of the flower where it will stay until the flower sets seed and is ripe. In the case of neos. and nids. you can mark the flower and the next day you will find that it has sunken and this will allow you to place a piece of large drinking straw (milk shake type) over the whole flower and ovary. Remember to code the straw!

HYBRIDIZATION
Up to this point I have been talking about pollinating species. In the case of hybrids the procedure is no different. You MUST emasculate the pollen from the seed plant to avoid contamination and then proceed to take the pollen from another plant and very carefully place it on to the stigmatic surface of the seed plant. If you cross two species of the same i.e. two Neo carolinaes, then you will only get another carolinae species. If you cross two different species, say Neo. carolinae x Neo. marmorata, you will get an F1 hybrid, and each of the seedlings will have consistent characteristics – in other words, they will be a mixture of both parents. However, if you cross two F1 hybrids you will produce an F3 hybrid but with inconsistent characteristics. Most modern day hybrids have two or more parents and crossing these will produce some interesting results e.g. should you cross Neo.Catherine Wilson with, say, Neo.Lambert’s Pride as I have done, you will find some very lovely new hybrids, as with some of the Skotak hybrids that have four or five parents. Good luck and next time I will talk about seed raising.

SOCIETY OFFICERS

OFFICERS
 
PATRON  Bea Hanson  (09) 527-6830 
PRESIDENT  Graham West  (09) 298-3479 
VICE PRESIDENTS  Lester Ching  (09) 576-4595 
Dave Anderson  (09) 638-8671 
SECRETARY  Megan Thomas  (09) 489-5507 
TREASURER  Peter Waters  (09) 534-5616 
LIBRARIAN  Des Yeates  (09) 838-6535 
COMMITTEE  Bev Ching  (09) 576-4595 
Carol Davis  (09) 832-0510 
Laurie Lang  (09) 410-9557 
Pam Lang  (09) 410-9557 
Murray Mathieson  (09) 418-0366 
Chris Patterson  (09) 625-6007 
Colin Rickard  (09) 623-0453 
Noeline Ritson  (09) 625-8114 
AUDITOR  Colin Gosse 
LIFE MEMBERS  Laurie Dephoff  Bea Hanson 
Harry Martin  Patricia Perratt 
Patricia Sweeney 
SCIENTIFIC OFFICER  Peter Waters 
CULTIVAR REGISTRAR  Gerry Stansfield 

BROMELIAD JOURNAL

EDITORIAL TEAM Gerry Stansfield (09) 834-7178 Murray Mathieson (09) 418-0366 Peter Waters (09) 534-5616 Louise Joyce (09) 418-0711
All enquiries and contributions welcome. Please contact the Editorial Team, 7 Noall Street, TeAtatu Peninsula, AUCKLAND.
Gerry Stansfield, (09) 834-7178, Email:This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Deadline for Journal copy and advertising: First Tuesday of publication month.
ADVERTISING RATES

Full Page$30.00 Half Page$15.00 Quarter Page$ 7.50

Bromeliad February 2002
Vol. 42 No.2

Society of New Zealand Inc.

Bromeliad Society of New Zealand

Affiliated with the Bromeliad Society International Inc.

The Society was formed on 28th August, 1962. The objects
of the Society are to encourage the cultivation and study of
Bromeliads grown indoors or outdoors, and in particular:


To assist members to identify plants.

To promote discussion and arrange instruction on
cultivation, propagation and control of diseases.

To provide a library for members.

To make awards for outstanding new bromeliads.

To hold shows or public exhibitions of bromeliads.

To promote the distribution of bromeliads amongst
members by exchange, purchase and sale, and to encourage
the importation of new plants.

To affiliate with any Society or other body, and to do
such things as may be deemed necessary or desirable
in the futherance of these objects.

To accept affiliation from other Societies having similar
objects.
MEETINGS: Held on the fourth Tuesday of each month
except December, at 7.30pm in Greyfriars Church Hall, 544 Mt.
Eden Road, Auckland,

CORRESPONDENCE: All general correspondence should
be sent to the Secretary, Bromeliad Society of New Zealand, 33
Marsden Avenue, Mt. Eden, Auckland 4, New Zealand.

Journal articles, photos and advertisements to The Editor,

P.O. Box 57-021, Mana 6230 New Zealand. Tel. (04) 2399-659, fax
(04) 2399-671 or if possible (to avoid re-typing) email to
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..
Deadline for copy: First Tuesday of publication month.

Theopinionsexpressed inlettersorarticlesin thismagazineare the
author'sown viewsanddonotnecessarilyexpressthepolicyoftheBromeliad
Societyof NewZealand.

22

Contents

24 President's Page
25 January Meeting News, Dave Anderson
28 Wellington Tillandsia Study Group, Phyl Purdie
30 Neoregelias For You, byAlan J. Thomson
33 Announcements
34 Bay of Plenty Bromeliad Group, Lynley Breeze
35 Garden Visits, Graham West
36 Annual Competitive Show Schedule
38 Seed Bank
39 Society Officers, subscription details

Front Cover

A feature of Sue and Aloris Schatzdorfer's Pakuranga garden, with
Tillandsia somnians winding up a Queen Palm. See article beginning on
page 35. Photo by Sue Schatzdorfer

BROMELIAD HAVEN FOR SALE

3 bedroom house with conservatory, covered decking
and two-car garage is for sale due to health problems.
Includes an established garden (22 years), private 866
square meter garden (no lawns) planted in bromeliads,
succulents, cact and many specimen trees.

Please phone or fax Brian Dawson or Tony Bishop
09837-4598

23

FROM THE PRESIDENT

Summer is certainly here, very hot days and nights alsogreat
weather for coloring up our bromeliads.

The numbers at our last meeting were down slightly: 95
members, 7 visitors. Maybe it was the heat, or still holiday time!
The sales table was well stocked with good quality colored plants.
The silent auction table had a record number of plants. Excellent
prices were paid on that table.

As I write this the annual Show and Sale is barely two weeks
away, and that promises to be an exciting weekend. Remember
the weekend is for all members, also the public to enjoy
bromeliads. The committee have bent their backs to make it a
success, now it is up to you. If you are from out of town, please
come up and introduce yourself and we will endeavour to make
you very welcome-say hello to me, or to one of the committee
members.

On Sunday March 10th there is another garden visit organized.
Starting at Kevin Kilsby's at 1:30pm, then on to Peter
Brady's. Two very interesting gardens, well worth the time to
visit.

Please remember that our March meeting is also theA.G.M.
All positions come up for re-election, so if you would like to be
involved in therunning of the club just get somebody to nominate
you..

Graham

New season's Bromeliad imports now available

including mature flowering-size Tillandsia compressa, T.
flabellata, T. fasciculata varieties, T. magnusiana, large-form T.
tricolor melanocrater, T. matudae, and manyothers...

Catalog with 45 color photos $2 (refunded with purchase.)
from Anwyl Bromeliads, P.O. Box 57-021, MANA 6230.
More information and photos, plus on-line ordering, from

www.anwyl.com

24

JANUARY MEETING NEWS

Dave Anderson

In spite of the very wet summer thus far, we fortunately
had a warm and dry evening for the first meeting of the year.
With just under 100 people in attendance it is interesting to note
that the meeting night numbers have doubled over the last three
years. The AGM will be held at Greyfriars Church Hall on the
26th March, at 7.30pm. The Society is always on the lookout for
new committee members so if you think you can spare a few hours
a month please put your name forward.

The winners of the various competitions for last year were
presented with their prizes -see list in the Journal. Congratulations
to all those who were successful.

There is to be a garden visit to Kevin Kilsby's and Peter
Brady's gardens on Sunday 10th March starting at 1.30pm. See
notice on page 33.

The Society's Annual Show is now less than one week
away!!! Preparation of your plants for the competition and display
should be well under way by now. If you are able to bring
in plants for the display, which would be much appreciated,
please do so as early in the day (Friday 22nd February) as possible
so that Barbara and Gill have sufficient time to do their magic
with the display.

Peter, as usual, presided over the Show and Tell plants. First
was an interesting Neoregelia 'Sun Red' that had two inflorescences
from the one plant. Peter said that he had seen this happen on
several occasions. Next was an Aechmea cylindrata wanting to be
named. The pinkish flower spike with blue flowers is quite variable
and easily identified. This species normally flowers at this
time of the year. Following this was a dark green-leafed plant
with black bases that was either a Neoregelia or Aechmea. It could
not be identified further and the owner was told to grow it in
much brighter light, which it needs, and bring it back when in
flower. Also needing to be grown in much brighter light was a
Neoregelia 'Aztec' or a marmorata hybrid. A plant that was a
Neophytum but could not be identified further had scale indicat

25

ing that it needed a lot more water. Two Billbergias also wanted
names but as there has been so much hybridizing within this
genera all that could be said was that one of them was a Billbergia
distachia x. A Vriesea with a dark base a red spike and big yellow
flowers was probably a cross between 'Poelmanii' and
platynema the latter species giving the colour to the bracts. A
Neoregelia burle-marxii is easy to recognise from the spotted
purplish inner leaves. The next plant was identified as
Neoregelia 'Beefsteak'; a cv.of carolinae X chlorosticta hybrid made
by Richard Oeser named by Olwyn Ferris. A plant in full flower
was a Dyckia with its thin flower spike and spiny leaves was
probably the species platyphylla that has been in NZ for many
years. There are about 100 species in this genus. Next an
Aechmea nudicaulis with a nametag that had faded away. Peter
recommended writing the name or a reference number to the
bottom of the label as it does not fade at all in the soil and could
always be identified later. Apart from Tillandsia recurvata and

T. usenoides this species is the most widely distributed species,
found from Southern Brazil to Mexico, with its leaf that always
has a pucker. A Neoregelia carolinae hybrid could not be identified
further as there are thousands of Xs made from this species.
Its purplish leaves and distinctive fasciata flower spike
identified an Aechmea fasciata var. purpurea. Somehow this variety
always looks smaller and not as robust as the type fasciata.
Lastlywas a large clump oftwo Vriesea plants: corcovadensis and
flammea. There has been debate in NZ for many years as to
these plants that have been here for a long time are

the true species or are hybrids from them. Hopefully this will
be resolved at the conference next year when Elton Leme will
be here to cast his eye over them.

Chris Paterson gave an interesting talk on how he became
attracted to bromeliads.

Vicky Carter and Kirstie Bain won the special raffle prizes
this month with the door prizes going to Lani Yates, Joan Farrow,
and Carol Stewart.

26

COMPETITIONS

Open Flowering: First Len Trotman with Neoregelia cruenta
x concentrica (Head) and second was Chris Paterson with Aechmea
fasciata purpurea. Also in the competition were Aechmeas
pectinata, 'Kiwi' and fasciata var. purpurea; Guzmania sanguinea and
sanguinea variegata; Neo's. 'Dorothy', 'Purple Glaze' and 'Big
Boy'; Vriesea zamorensis and Hill #96; and Wittrockia superba.

Open Foliage: Chris Paterson was first with an Aechmea 'Ensign',
always a stunning plant when well grown which this was,
and second was Gill Keesing with Aechmea "Silver Streak' -one
of the many forms of nudicaulis. In the competition were Ae.
'Pink Rocket'; Neos. 'Aussie Dream,' 'Tartan Princess', 'Midnight
Express', 'Bobby Dazzler' and 'Kahala Dawn'; Wittrockia
'Leopardinum' and Vriesea fosteriana 'Rubra'.

Tillandsia: Len Trotman was first with T. xerographica and
second was Andrew Steens with T. Creation. There were also on
the table T. leiboldiana, fasiculata concolor, umbellata and tectorum.

Neoregelia carolinae, concentrica and hybrids: First was
Peter Waters' Neo. 'Fantastic Gardens' followed by Len Trotman's
Neo. carolinae 'Orange Centre'. In the competition were three
Neoregelia hybrids.

Novice Flowering: First was Rosemary Thomas with
Guzmania wittmackii and second was Neil Douglas with a Guz.
hybrid.

Novice Foliage: First was Pam Lang with Hohenbergia correiaaraujoi
and second with Neo. 'Fosperior Perfection' was Charmian
Whitby.

The Plant of the month went to Len Trotman with Neoregelia
cruenta x concentrica (Head).
Congratulations to all the winners.

NEXT MEETING Tuesday 26th February.

27

WELLINGTON TILLANDSIA STUDY GROUP
The Jan meeting was held at the home of Ginny & Wayne
Rastall, 3 Cypress Grove, Paraparumu at 1.30 on Sunday Jan 27.
There were 12 present, including 1 new member.

T. deppeana had flowered over the holidays and looked very
similar to the photo published by Andrew in the Jan Bulletin.
The photo in the New Tillandsia Handbook by Shimizu & Takizawa
was obviously not true to type [maybe just depauperate -Ed], hence
the confusion last meeting. A clump of T. filifolia flowering was
growing in semishade in the warm house. It should not be allowed
to dry out too much. A plant of T. baileyi grown warm was
flowering. One member reported no flowers on a plant grown
cooler. T. concolor had attractive red leaf colouring while in flower.
T fuchsii and T. fuschii v. gracilis were compared. The vari

ety gracilis had a much longer leaf than the other..

A plant needing warmth was T. wagneriana.

2 plants of T. reichenbachii imported from "Rain Forest Flora"

had purple flowers which produced a strong night scent. T

guatemalensis is usually not easy to set seed on but a plant polli

nated by another at the previous meeting had a good crop of

maturing seed pods. T. tectorum needs good light and was grown

very high up.

A photo was shown of a Bromeliad collection South West of

Sydney which had been burnt out in the recent fires there. Hope

fully some of the plants might produce new growth. Andrew

showed some photos of the varying vegetation seen while as

cending the Andes mountains in Argentina on his recent trip.

Another Tillandsia which colours well when flowering was

T. abdita.
Needing good light was T. gramogolensis, formerly named
kurt-horstii. Also colouring brightly and in flower was T. ionantha
'Rubra'. A flowering plant of "T. aff. variabilis" grown from Renate
Ehlers seed was showing strange growth. Pups were being produced
from the base but new flower stems had appeared from
the base as well as the inflorescence from the center of the plant.

A new book, "Bromeliads" by Francisco Oliva-esteve was
admired but the cost made it out of the purchasing range for the

28

members! [except the one who hadit-Ed]
As well as the normal sales plants several newly released
from quarantine were available.

Ginny is a talented artist and her paintings and pencil drawings
of Bromeliads including Tillandsias were greatly admired.
After afternoon tea members entered the sunshine and explored
the 3 well stocked plant houses. Most of the smallish section
was well covered and set out with attractive Broms in pots and
other interesting plants.

Next meeting will be at the home of Merv &Lois Dougherty,
416 Warspite Ave, Ascot Park on March 24 at 1.30 pm.

Phyl Purdie

BROMELIADS-from SEEDLING TO
FLOWERING SIZE

SPECIALIST-in OUTDOOR GROWING
ORCHIDS

and ALL KINDS OF SUBTROPICAL
PLANTS

POTTERING ABOUT

250m along Military Road (S.H. 34) from its junction with S.H
30 (Te Teko end)

Jim and Sharon Gilchrist

Phone/Fax(07) 322-8201

29

Neoregelias ForYou!

Story and photos by Alan J. Thomson. Email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Neoregelias are for you -yes you! In fact anyone can make
Neoregelias work for them because they are one of the easiest
genus of bromeliads to grow. Put them in your garden, move
them around in pots, provide adequate light and water and sit
back and watch them go forth and multiply (some like rabbits).

They provide plants with a range of beautiful colours and
are a valued asset to anybody's collection. Their popularity and
ease of growing has led to them being extensively used in landscaping
and peoples collections. This has resulted in cultivation
of over 100 species and more than 10,000 hybrids around and
they propagate easily so more and more are becoming available
for beginners and neo-addicts alike.

Hybridisation has yielded a lot of interesting and beautiful
plants but has been a Pandora's Box with regards to trying to
identify them. Some are so extensively hybridised that it is
difficult or impossible to determine their parentage.

So, what defines a Neoregelia and what are their best conditions?
They are all tank epiphytes which means they have a
vase in the centre of the plant that is used to hold water and their
roots are generally used for holding on. The rosettes are usually
broad although a few have a more pronounced vase shape. The
leaf margins are usually serrated but not too spiny and may be
green, banded, mottled, striped or spotted with various colours.

What really marks them as different from

most other genera however are the inflorescences

which are stemless. Hence, when the flowers

appear they are often inconspicuous with the

flowers barely rising above the water in the cen

tre of the plant. These flowers are often small and

short lasting but this is more than compensated
for in many Neoregelias species when the centre leaves turn brilliant
colours (like reds, pinks and purples) at maturity.

Advertising Rates

One third page (12-13 lines) $10

30

N. 'Avilla' N. 'Ozzie Dream Lucky Seven'
So where do I grow them, I hear you asking? Well, they all come
from central and South America so they generally like bright light but
most are pretty flexible and all varieties can adapt to our New Zealand
environment as long as you provide light, water and a basically frost
free environment.

The golden rule is to provide lots of light without this being direct
sun. Some Neoregelias like sun, some shade, some half and haIfa
good term is 'sun tolerant'; in other words as much light as possible
but not direct sun.

N. 'Orange Crush'
This is an outstanding
variety with beautiful
red, green and white
striping. This specimen
has been grown in Chris
Paterson's shadehouse.

Who need flowers with
foliage like this?

Most gardens have slots suitable for placing your
31

N. 'Royal Flush' is another dark variety that can do well in a sunny N. 'Royal Flush' is another dark variety that can do well in a sunny
Varieties to look for for a sunny position include the darker coloured
ones like N. 'Takemura Grande'. This is a splendid variety that
gets quite large and almost black in full sun. N. concentrica's are always
popular and hybrids like N. cruenta x concentrica like sun and can turn
an attractive yellowy colour.

spot. However, for specimens that are
used to a sheltered environment then
even just a few minutes in the hot
Auckland sun can cause burning.Such
an example is shown here with the
specimen that Chris Peterson won the
Dephof Trophy with at our annual
show in February 2001. Just the next
day it was inadvertently left out on the
desk -and got burnt. Ouch!!

Striped or variegated varieties

N. 'Royal Flush' can generally do well in more shady
positions. Possibly the most popular variety in this category would be
N. carolinae tricolor. This is famous for its' green and white striped leaves
and centre leaves that go bright red at flowering time, and looks great
both singly and when grown in a bunch
Like many bromeliads the 'flaw in the design' so-to-speak is the
vase which captures water for the plant but also far too easy for debris
to fall and gather in them. Neoregelias are particularly vulnerable to
this because they don't have anything to stop matter falling into the
vase. This is usually detrimental to the plant but is what happens extensively
in nature. However you can improve on this situation in
your garden because it's not too onerous to hose out your Neoregelias
and keep them free of debris and clean!

Some Neoregelia's are particularly suited to hanging baskets and
these are the varieties that are stoloniferous.A stolon is an above ground
stem that produces new plants at a distance from the parent plant. Perhaps
N. ampullacea is one of the most common varieties in this category
(see Peter Water's excellent article in the April 2001 issue) but others
that can be recommended are N. 'Superball' and N. 'Short & Sweet'.

Neoregelia's can be easily propagated by taking a pup (a third to
two thirds the size of the mother) and potting up in a well draining
potting mix. Simply cut the pup off with a suitable knife or implement
near it's base where it is attached to its' mother and pot the pup up.

32

Announcements

New members. Welcome to the following new members, we hope you
enjoy your time with the Society:
Anton Lachenicht 2/55 Aviemore Drive Highland Park Manukau
City
John &Patricia Robertson 97A Riverside Rd Orewa Hibiscus Coast
Luis Lachica &Jeff Saunders 38 Maioro St Avondale Auckland
David Cowie 145 Balmoral Rd Mt Eden Auckland
Margaret & Brian Kitcher 2679 Awhitu Rd RD4 Waiuku
Lois Phillips 37 Glenfern Rd Howick Manukau City
Patricia Hart 11 A Hobson Ave Kerikeri
Stephen Fleckney 28 Pohutukawa Ave Howick Manukau City
OurAnnual Show dates are 23rd and 24th February 2002 and setup
will be on Friday 22nd from 10:00 am until 6:00 pm. Anybody wanting
to sell plants who have not notified Graham West, please do so immediately
so space labels can be allocated (phone 09 298-3479. The cut-off
time on Friday night for accepting plants is 6:30 pm, as judging will be
in progress from 8:00 to p:45 am Saturday.
The Annual General Meeting will be held prior to the March meeting,
and if you would like to serve on the Committee please let the Secretary
(Dave Anderson) know.
A Garden visit on Sunday March 10th starts from Kevin Kilsby's at
1:30pm, then on to Peter Brady's
The NorthlandBromeliadGroup meets 24th February, at 20 Vogel Street,
Karwakawa 1:30pm.
The Wellington Tillandsia Study Group meets at the home of Merv &
Lois Dougherty, 416 Warspite Ave, Ascot Park on March 24 at 1.30 pm.
The BayofPlentyBromeliadGroup meets Wednesday 13 March, 1 pm.

Neoregelia's do appreciate proper application of fertiliser during
the growing season. Heavy feeding causes colourful foliage to turn
green and produces large elongated rosettes. Hence the best advice is
to feed your plants only for the first several months after separation
from the mother and then little or none from early winter through flowering
the next spring. Remember also to provide even light conditions
if you want to grow high quality plants. Providing the same conditions
throughout the plants pup-to-bloom cycle will help to create a beautiful
tight symmetry with a mature plant. So give Neoregelia's a go. There .
are often varieties for sale on the sales table at the monthly meetings
and basically there's not too much you can do wrong so go for it !

33

Bay of Plenty Bromeliad Group

There was an excellent attendance of members at our February
meeting and a very full sales table for the first meeting of
the year. We have had a poor summer with dull days and consequent
low light levels but several members have reported that
Vr. philippo-coburgii is in flower this year for the first time for many
Tauranga gardeners. Alison Sears brought a fine specimen in
flower to the meeting.

Gladys Fisher and Ann Stacy gave an excellent and very
informative demonstration on how to plant a ponga stump with
bromeliads. Ann spoke of how she grouped them by colour and
did not overplant the stump so that the plants were seen to best
advantage. To enable the display to last longer they recommended
the old mother plant be removed and the pups left to
grow on. Ann uses soft ponga stumps cut into slices (10-15cm
depth) and hangs them on the walls or fences. Number 8 wire
bent into a U shape was the favoured means of attaching plants.
Stoloniferous plants could be attached by poking a hole with a
large screw-driver and inserting the plant. Occasionally these
displays get fertilized with a spray on fertilizer. The displays
produced were beautiful and an inspiration to new efforts for
the rest of our group.

The wet summer has meant that we have had problems with
mosquitoes and it was recommended that a few drops of disinfectant
be added to the watering can and sprinkled over the plants
to eliminate the insect problem from the cups of bromeliads.

Competition Winners

First equal Guz. Iingulata variegata -Natalie Simmonds,
and Neo burle-marxii -Isobel Clotworthy.
Second Vr. saundersiix vigeri -Audrey Hewson.
Third Neo 'Goldfever' -Kevin Schollum.
March Events
Next Meeting -Wed 13 March 1pm. (Committee meeting at

12 before the meeting.)
Plants of the Month for March: Hohenbergias, hechtias,
Iymanias, navias, neophytums, neomeas
Anna Long will speak about palms and cycads which com

continued on page 39

34

Garden Visits

by Graham West

On Sunday November 11, approximately 80 of our members
met for three garden visits. The first was to Sue and Alan
Schatzdorfer to admire their sub-tropical garden with numerous
palms, succulents and bonsai intersperced with bromeliads. One
of the features was two Queen palms with Tillandsia somnians
growing about half-way up the palm [see front cover]. Then there
were the raised gardens, built with old railway sleepers, filled
with small palms, succulents and bromeliads growing nicely.
Around the corner was the vegetable garden (no bromeliads) and
further on bromeliads growing all through the shrubbery and
another feature: three large Vriesea hieroglyphica all with excellent
flower spikes. When starting off her garden, Sue appreciated
the help she received from Noel Scotting and Laurie Dephoff
over twenty years ago. She has been a member of the Bromeliad
Society for only five years, and has served a term as Secretary of
the Palm Society.

Down the road to Pat and Jim Lawson's home at the end of
a cul-de-sac. Pat is a well know bromeliad specialist and her plants
can be found tucked into all corners of her garden growing on
ponga logs, climbing fences, and also in pots. Pat has created
pathways through her garden that winds down to the water's
edge with bromeliads everywhere. Although bromeliads are Pat's
hobby, Jim keeps a watchful eye on everything, and his vegetable
garden is always very well organized. A much appreciated
afternoon tea was served by Pat and Jim.

Around the corner to Bev. & Lester Ching, with bromeliads
planted down the drive to meet us. I believe they have only been
living there for five years, it is already looking like a bromeliad
haven. Set on a third acre with full shadehouses also glasshouses
placed everywhere with their overflow planted around trees and
the rest of the garden. At the end of the property a walkway has
been built down a very steep bank, with bromeliads appearing
everywhere.

It was a very enjoyable afternoon, and I am sure people
went home with many new ideas for their gardens.

35

Annual Competitive Show

Sehedu/e afe/asses:

1. Aechmea blooming
2. Aechmea foliage
3. Billbergia
4.
Cryptanthus
5. Guzmania blooming
6. Guzmania foliage
7. Neoregelia blooming
8. Neoregelia foliage
9.
Nidularium
10. Tillandsia, small blooming
11. Tillandsia, small foliage
12. Tillandsia, medium blooming
13. Tillandsia, medium foliage
14. Tillandsia, large blooming
15. Tillandsia, large foliage
16. Vriesea blooming
17. Vriesea foliage
18. Bigeneric or other genus not listed above
19. Miniature bromeliad
20. Variegated bromeliad
21. Novice blooming
22. Novice foliage
23. Dish or tray garden or novelty planting
24. Bromeliad arrangement
25. Artistic or floral arrangement
26. Decorative container
27. Hanging container
Conditions of entry:

1.
Exhibitors must be financial members of the Bromeliad Society of
New Zealand Inc.
2. A maximum of two plants may be entered in each class.
3. Plants must have been grown by the exhibitor for at least three months
prior to the show.
4.
Plants must be clean and healthy, free from scale and insects and
drained ofwater. Pots must be clean and the potting mix free of weeds
and other plant material. Each plant should be correctly labelled
where possible, with no abbreviations. Labelling is not necessary in
classes 23 to 27.
36

5. Plants may be potted only in standard clay, teracotta, green or plack
plastic or unadorned bonsai pots. Tillandsias may be mounted on
driftwood or similar.
6 No commercial leaf shine, cream or milk may be used to enhance the
appearance of the plant.

7. A pot may contain single or multiple plants, provided they are attached
to a single rootstock.
8. A plant that has changed in shape or color because of impending
blooming is permitted in blooming classes only, e.g., neoregelias with
blushing centres.
9. Tillandsias must be firmly attached to mounts and must look established.
They may be single or multiple plants within the stated measurements.
The Fiji Trophy is awarded for the best Tillandsia.
10. Tillandsia sizes are: SMALL up to 15cm. (6"); MEDIUM 15-30cm.
(6-12"); LARGE 30cm. up (12" plus). These measurements exclude
the inflorescence and mount.
11. Miniature bromeliads may be single or have multiple heads, no plant
to be more than 12.5 cm. high excluding the inflorescence. Tillandsias
are not permitted in this class.
12. A variegated bromeliad is a plant with white, pink or red longitudinal
stripes on the leaves.
13. Novice classes are for members of less than three years standing
and who have not won a prize in a bromeliad show.
14. The Olive Allan Trophy for Best of Show is chosen from classes 1 to
20 only.
15. Class 24, Bromeliad Arrangement, has bromeliads only and must
use only natural materials. Plastic pots are not allowed. The Ern
Bailey Trophy is awarded to the winner of this class.
16. Class 25, Artistic or Floral arrangement, may use other types of plant
but must include a significant amount of bromeliad material.
17. Class 26, Decorative Container, may contain one bromeliad only
but may have multiple heads.
18. Class 27, Hanging Container, may contain multiple plants but of
one type only.
19. Entries may not be removed from the Show until after 4pm. on Sunday.
20. Unless mentioned above, other rules as BSI standard show, Final
decision rests with the Competition Stewards.
21. Entries will be accepted between 3pm and 6pm only, on the Friday
before the Show.
37

SEED
BANK
SEED
BANK
Aechmea-aquilega, caesia, coelestis v. coelestis, coelestis (from albomarginata),
lueddemanniana,lueddemanniana v. alverez,lueddemanniana v. medio-picta,
mexicana, nudicaulis v. cuspidata, recurvata, recurvata v. cardinalis, williamsii
Alcantarea-edmundoi, imperialis
Billbergia-brasiliensis, decora, vittata, zebrina
Dyckia -altissima, brevifolia, platyphylla, rariflora, remotiflora var. montevidensis
Edmundoa -Iindenii (from variegata)
Fosterella -penduliflora
Guzmania -sanguinea var. brevipedicellata, whitmakii, monostachia,.
Neoregelia -punctatissima
Nidularium -amazonicum
Pitcairnia -flammea, flammea var. roezlii, heterophylla, maidifolia
Puya -butcheriana, coerulea v. violacea, gratii, mirabilis, venusta
Racinaea -fraseri
Tillandsia -bartramii, belloensis, balbisiana, bractycaulos, butzii, capillaris,
capitata, deppeana, gardneri, guatemalensis, hotteana,juncea (large form),limbata,
myosura, paucifolia, plagiotropica, polystachia, pseudobaileyi, pohliana, schiedeana,
schiedeana v. major, tricholepis, tricolor, tricolor var. melanocrater, viridiflora,
Ursulaea -macvaughii
Vriesea -angostiniana, corralina rubra superba, ensiformis, erythrodactylon,
gigantea,guttata, hieroglyphica, platynema, platynema (variegata), racinae,
saundersii, schwackeana,
Werauhia-gigantea, gigantea v. nova

New seed received from Raewyn Adams, Pauline Sutherland, Bob Reilly,
Derek Butcher, Audrey Hewson, Bob Hudson, Peter Tristram, Maureen
Green. Ken Woods, &Kevin Schollum, Maragert Patterson.Thanks to all.

The seedbank will exchange two packets of 20 seeds for one (1) large

packet of your seed. Make sure it is labelled correctly.
Please send in a large stamped envelope.
Packets (of at least 20 seeds) are 50 cents.
Limited to one packet of seed per kind per address, maximum $5.00

per month.

Remember to consult the current seed list when ordering.
Orders, with large, stamped, addressed envelope and spare seed to; Gerry
Stansfield. 7 Noall Street, Te Atatu Peninsula. Auckland. Ph. (09) 834-7178

38

SOCIETY OFFICERS

PATRON & LIFE MEMBER Mrs Bea Hanson (09) 527-6830
HISTORIAN & LIFE MEMBER Laurie Dephoff (09)527-7789
PRESIDENT Graham West (09) 298-3479
VICE-PRESIDENT Lester Ching (09) 576-4595
SECRETARY Dave Anderson (09) 638-8671
TREASURER PeterWaters (09) 534-5616
LIBRARIAN Des Yeates (09) 838-6535
COMMITTEE Owen Bird (07) 576-2766
Bev Ching (09) 576-4595
Brian Dawson (09) 837-4598
Wilma Fitzgibbons (09) 624-6469
Murray Mathieson (09) 418-0366
Chris Paterson (09) 625-6007
Noelene Ritson (09) 625-8114
AUDITOR Colin Gosse
LIFE MEMBERS Harry Martin
Patricia Perratt
Patricia Sweeney
SCIENTIFIC OFFICER Peter Waters
CULTIVAR REGISTRAR Gerry Stansfield
EDITOR Andrew Flower (04)239-9659

MEMBERSHIP SUBSCRIPTIONS
New Zealand NZ$ 20.00 Ordinary

NZ$ 5.00 Associate (same household)
Overseas A$ 30.00 Australia

US$ 20.00 all other countries
Please send payments to the Treasurer Peter Waters, 22 Halfmoon
Rise, Bucklands Beach, Auckland, New Zealand.

Bay of Plenty Group. Continued from page 34

plement bromeliads SO well.
Garden Visits for Wed 20 March 10.30am.

1. Elizabeth Bailey, 11 Faulkner St, Gate Pa.
2. Natalie Simmons 130 Pyes Pa Rd (there will be balloons
on the gate and park inside the grounds not on the road. Bring a
picnic lunch to eat under the trees.
Bay of Plenty members are invited to join the Auckland
group garden visit on Sunday 10 March. See details on page 33.

39

A "Sea of Neoregelias" at the home of Graeme
Alderson. Photo by Alan J. Thomson, see page 30

A corner of Pat and Jim Lawson's garden. Photo by Pat Lawson,
see article on page 35

 

You are here: Home Journals 2002