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2009

2009 Journals

January 2009 February 2009 March 2009 April 2009 May 2009 June 2009 July 2009 August 2009 September 2009 October 2009 November 2009

April 2009
Vol 49 No 4


‘Waterford’... a unique Kerikeri garden

Update on our patron, Pat Sweeney

Our patron Pat is doing well now…

Amonth or so ago our patron Pat Sweeney suffered a nasty accident to her
knee. We’re pleased to report that she is now recuperating in Auckland
Hospital in Rehabilitation and her knee is gradually healing without the
need for an operation.

All going well, Pat is hoping to be home before the end of the month. We wish
her a speedy recovery and look forward to seeing her back in the front row at
our monthly meetings real soon.


Feline dental floss – Hilde Blank

We had a

couple of

bromeliads
standing on the deck,
when I realised that
the leaves started
to get shredded by
‘something’. One day I
caught our cat in action!
She used the leaves -
and quite vicious ones
too -as dental floss!
We had to move the
pots to a more secure
location.



Bromeliad Society of New Zealand Inc

Bromeliad Journal – April 2009 issue


CONTENTS

Update on our patron, Pat Sweeney
Feline dental floss – Hilde Blank
President’s Page – Kesson Sharp
March meeting news – Dave Anderson 4
Directory 7
‘Waterford’… unique garden in Kerikeri – Audrey Kent and Sue Liddington 8
Seed Bank – Bev Ching 0
Getting ready for winter – Gerry Stansfield
Naming and registering a hybrid – Gerry Stansfield
Navia arida – John Mitchell and Birgit Rhode 4
Sick of weeding? Here’s help – Gerry Stansfield 5
Group News 6
From the Registrar – Nidularium ‘Crackerjack’ – Gerry Stansfield 9
Subtle variations in the Vriesea fosteriana family – photos Peter Waters 0

The opinions expressed in articles or letters in this Journal are the contributors’ own views and
do not necessarily express the views or the policy of the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand

COMING EVENTS

Please see the Group News section starting on page 6 for more details of

group meeting times and venues.

APRIL
26Northland Bromeliad Group meeting
26 Hawkes Bay Bromeliad Group meet
28 Society meeting at Greyfriar’s
Hall, corner of Mt Eden and Windmill
roads, Mt Eden, starting 7. 0pm.
Plant swap night – members can bring
up to plants each to swap. Plants to
have labels with correct plant name
and owner’s name Monthly choice:
Nidulariums (note: not NZ hybrid
neoregelias as advised in March
Journal).

MAY
3 Sth Akld Bromeliad Group meeting
13 BOP Bromeliad Group meeting
20 Bay of Plenty Bromeliad Group
garden visits
26 Society meeting at Greyfriar’s
Hall, corner of Mt Eden and Windmill
roads, Mt Eden, starting 7. 0pm.
Speakers: Members who attended
the ‘Bromadelaide’ conference at
Easter will present their impressions.
Monthly choice, Neoregelia miniature
species.

Front cover: Far North Bromeliad Group members Audrey and Tom Kent
live with their daughter and son-in-law on a unique Kerikeri property. Read all
about it on page 9.


PRESIDENT’S PAGE

Ithank you for the privilege of being
elected as President at the AGM
last month. I will endeavour to
do my utmost to continue the strong
leadership of the past. With almost
the same committee from last year
being re-elected we look forward to
furthering the aims of the Society. Our
membership stands at over 400 and
with such an enthusiastic committee I
am sure that we will continue to grow
both in knowledge and enthusiasm.
The committee will be working hard
to bring you diverse programs for the
coming year and I’m sure Jocelyn will
have some fascinating garden trips
planned.

I would like to thank all those that help
make the Society function the way it
does. Without you and the hard work
put in by so many the Society would
be in a far poorer state than it is today.
Remember that this is YOUR Society
and we would like you to contribute
to it by letting us know what topics,
garden visits you’d like and any other
ideas that you may have.

Over the last year we have had our
highs and lows. We had the sad loss
of Avon Ryan and he will be sorely
missed by his family and the wide
bromeliad fraternity. Our Patron
Pat Sweeney broke her kneecap in
a fall last month and is awaiting the
surgeon’s recommendation if surgery
is needed. Our thoughts are with you
and we hope you’ll be back real soon
in your usual place near the front at our
monthly meetings.

On the brighter side of things, we were
well represented at the 8th World
Bromeliad Conference, which was
held in Cairns late June. Our Scientific
Officer and Treasurer, Peter Waters,
was appointed an Honorary Trustee
of the BSI. This prestigious award
recognises significant and outstanding
contributions to the understanding
and enjoyment of bromeliads. Gerry
Stansfield and Maureen Green
each received a Bromeliad Cultivar
Registration Award. Gerry’s award
celebrated his plant breeding and
naming of new cultivars and his
encouragement of other New Zealand
breeders to register their hybrids.
Maureen’s award commended her plant
breeding, registration of new cultivars,
and the growing on of seed from the
BSI seed bank.

One of the highlights of the year was
our bus trip up north in November
where we visited the wonderful
gardens of Maureen and Keith Green,
Rose and Gordon Speedy, Bev and
Brian Hutchins and Robin and Max
Thomas.

To all of our Bromeliad Groups around
the country our grateful thanks for
all the good work that you are doing
in encouraging the understanding
and culture of the bromeliad family.
Remember that our beloved winter is
fast approaching so care and thought
should be put into action for the
wellbeing of your plants.

Kesson Sharp


Bromeliad Society March

Meeting News – Dave Anderson

The AGM was well attended.
Alan Cliffe read his annual
report before taking nominations
for the executive and committee. We
welcomed our new president, Kesson
Sharp and all but two of the existing
committee were re-elected for the
coming year. The general monthly
meeting followed the AGM.
The monthly general meeting started
with the ‘Show and Tell’ section and
first up was a small/medium sized
albo-marginated plant, ( 00mm long
leaves), that could only be identified as
an aechmea or a neoregelia. It would
need to be brought back when in flower
to identify further. Following this
was the easily identified Neoregelia
‘Maggies Pride’. Also wanting a
name was Neoregelia carolinae forma
tricolor. The true Vriesea flammea
was brought in with its awl-shaped
dull green leaves and white flowers on
the 00mm high spike to be compared
to the small/medium sized hybrid that
has been in NZ many years incorrectly
under the species name. The small
green leafed Tillandsia leiboldiana
in full flower was also brought in for
identification. The next plant was a
Catopsis sessiliflora with its giveaway
thin multi branched flower spike that
has many small white flowers. For
display was the species Aechmea
haltonii in full flower that Peter Waters
had identified recently. This plant was
first described about 8 years ago and
comes from Panama with the seed
being grown in NZ by a grower in the
Helensville area. For identification
was a vriesea with its branched
distorted flower spike and dark colour
to the underside of the leaves. It was

most likely a hybrid – possibly Vr
corcovadensis x ‘Poelmannii’. Lastly
the plant Neoregelia ‘Rose Marie’ with
the owner asking if it was correctly
named. Yes, but this one is unregistered
and probably made by Grace Goode. It
is not to be confused with two hybrids
having the same name, the first cv. of
(tristis x fosteriana) x ‘Oh! No!’ by
Elmore 977; the second cv. of ‘First
Prize’ (F- ) - Odean Head 979.
After the ‘Show and Tell’, Chris
Paterson and Peter Coyle spoke about
their three favourite bromeliads.
Chris’s plants were three vriesea
species -Vriesea philippocoburgii,
fosteriana and hieroglyphica. These
plants grow very well in Auckland and
are marvellous landscaping species.
Meanwhile Peter had three beautifully
coloured neoregelia hybrids -‘Break
of Day’, ‘Bingito’ and ‘Fireball x
Avalon’.
New president, Kesson Sharp, won
the special raffle prize this month – an
attractive Quesnelia marmorata ‘Tim
Plowman’ with the door prizes going to
John Mitchell, Chris Paterson, Andrew
Devonshire and Glenys Guild.

COMPETITIONS

Open Flowering: First was John
Mitchell with Guzmania sanguinea
var. sanguinea -a very colourful
plant when in flower. He was also
second with a Navia arida – an
impressive plant endemic to the tepuys
in Venezuela. In the competition
were Aechmea fraseri, ‘Friederike’;
Guzmania ‘Fireworks’; Neoregelia
(‘Roseo Striata’ x concentrica)x‘Aussie Dream A’, concentrica x,
‘Ink Spots’, olens x ‘Lamberts Pride’,

Cont’d P6


Cont’d from P5

(carolinae x concentrica) x ‘Blue Navy
Blues’, ‘Calypso’; Nidularium ‘RubyLee’, longiflorum and Vriesea ospinae
var ospinae -with its bright yellow
flower spike that stands out.
Note that there is some confusion by
owners in NZ of the species Nidularium
longiflorum. One of its distinguishing
features is that the inflorescence is
uniutriculate – meaning there is only
one central vase that holds water and
not several. So nearly all plants of
Nidularium longiflorum that are in NZ
are wrongly named. As Nidularium
innocentii var wittmackianum is now a
synonym of longiflorum it would tend
to indicate that we never had the correct
Nid innocentii var wittmackianum in
the first place.
Open Foliage: First equal were Peter
Coyle with Neoregelia ‘Small World’

– a most sought after plant and John
Mitchell with Vriesea ospinae var
gruberi that was wonderfully coloured.
Peter Coyle was third with Neoregelia
‘Twister’. In the competition were
Billbergia ‘Hummels Fantasia’,
Aechmea ‘Pickaninny’, ‘Bert’,
‘Reverse Ensign’; Neoregelia ‘FancyThat’; Vriesea ‘Nova Queen’ and
‘Pacific hybrid’.
Tillandsia:Dave Anderson’s Tillandsia
kalmbacheri in full flower was first
and he was also second with Tillandsia
beutelspacheri also in flower. On
the table were Tillandsia secunda,
‘Creation’ and velutina.
Neoregelia: First equal were Peter
Coyle with Neoregelia ‘Fireball x
Avalon’ and Sandy Stonham with
Neoregelia ‘The Governors Plea’.
Third was Peter Coyle with Neoregelia
smithii x ‘Cheers’. In the competition
were ‘Takemura Princeps’, ‘Wild
Tiger’, ‘Fancy That’, ‘First Prize’,
‘Pink’ and ‘Manoa Beauty’.
Plant of the month – Mounted

Bromeliads other than Tillandsias:

First was Andrew Devonshire with a
Quesnelia marmorata whilst second
went to Judy Graham with Billbergia
‘Golden Joy’ & ‘Fantasia’. The only
other plant in the competition was
Neoregelia ‘Short & Sweet’.


Novice: First was Graeme Barclay with
Neoregelia ‘Dr Oeser’(variegated) and
second with Nidularium fulgens was
Laura Weber.
Novice Foliage: First was Roy
Plackett with a Vriesea ‘Pacific Ruby’
and he was also second with Wittrockia
‘Leopardinum’.


The Plant of the Month went to
Andrew Devonshire with a Quesnelia
marmorata.
Congratulations to all the winners.


NEXT MEETING:

General Meeting Tuesday 7th April.

TOTARA WATERS
BROMELIAD SALE


April 24th & 26th 9am to 4pm
April 25th 12pm to 5pm


Available now:

Aechmea ‘Madge’ $12
Aechmea chantinii $12


Top grade plants for sale.

Please note in your diaries:

‘BROMS IN THE PARK’ 2009

will be held at Totara Waters,

November 8th

89 Totara Rd Whenuapai,
Waitakere City. Ph 416 8272


OFFICERS
Patron: Patricia Sweeney Committee: Don Brown
President: Kesson Sharp (09) 8 8-805 Lester Ching
Vice Presidents: Dave Anderson (09) 6 8-867 Alan Cliffe
Jocelyn Coyle (09) 4 6-8 7 David Cowie
Secretary: Glenys Guild (09) 8 0-9669 Chris Paterson
Treasurer: Peter Waters (09) 5 4-56 6 Sandy Stonham
Librarian: Noelene Ritson (09) 6 5-8 4 Cultivar Registrar:
Life Members: Laurie Dephoff, Patricia Perratt, Gerry Stansfield
Patricia Sweeney, Len Trotman Seed Bank Chairman:
Auditor: Colin Gosse Bev Ching
Scientific Officer:
Peter Waters (09) 5 4-56 6


(09) 6 6 75
(09) 576 4595
(09) 479- 45
(09) 6 0-8 0
(09) 6 5-6707
(09) 6 7-9658
(09) 8 4-7 78
(09) 576-4595
MEMBERSHIP SUBSCRIPTION

New Zealand:

Ordinary membership NZ $ 5.00 ($5.00 discount if paid before the end of February).
Dual membership (same household) NZ $45.00 ($5.00 discount also applies as above).

Overseas:

AUD $ 0.00 Australia, US $ 0.00 United States and other overseas countries. Send all payments to
the Treasurer, Peter Waters, Half Moon Rise, Bucklands Beach, AUCKLAND.

CORRESPONDENCE

All general correspondence should be sent to the Secretary, Bromeliad Society of New Zealand,

P.O. Box 08- 68, Symonds Street, Auckland, New Zealand. The opinions expressed in letters or
articles in the Journal are the contributors’ own views and do not necessarily express the views or
policy of the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand Inc.
BROMELIAD JOURNAL

Deadline:

For all editorial and advertising, the first
Tuesday of publication month

Editorial Committee

Dave Anderson
Murray Mathieson
Peter Waters

Regular Writers

Gerry Stansfield
Alan J. Thomson

Production

Murray Mathieson

Distributon

Dave Anderson

All enquiries and contributions welcome, please
contact any member of the editorial committee
or send to Peter Waters, Half Moon Rise,
Bucklands Beach, Auckland or
email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Display Advertising

Rates are:
Full Page $60.00
Half Page $ 0.00
Quarter Page $ 5.00

‘Buy & Swap’

Listings in ‘Buy & Swap’ are FREE for
members of the Society (max. 0 words).
For advertising enquiries and material, please
contact Murray Mathieson ph (09) 4 8 0 66
or email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.


‘Waterford’… at Kerikeri


‘Waterford’… a unique garden
property in Kerikeri

– From notes supplied by Audrey Kent and Sue Liddington with photos by Sue
When Far North Bromeliad
Group members, Audrey and
Tom Kent retired from Te
Awamutu to live on their daughter and
son-in-law’s eleven acre lifestyle property
in Kerikeri in 998 they probably didn’t
realise just what a challenging project
they were about to become part of.

Over the previous years, daughter Sue
and son in law Malcolm Liddington had
already developed much of the property

– turning what had been a gorse and
scrub covered piece of land into a sub
tropical garden full of extensive native
plant life. Multiple retaining walls,
paths and garden edges had been formed
using volcanic rock harvested from the
property.
Always keen for a challenging project,
Tom and Audrey built their Bed and
Breakfast home on the other side of
the stream. Scrub on the steep river
bank was cleared with the exception of
ancient ponga. Boulder lined paths (the
width of the large digger required to
tackle the difficult terrain) were formed
prior to laying the house foundations.
Capitalising on a natural stormwater
hazard, Tom and Malcolm created two
boulder lined catchment ponds which
become a cascading tiered waterfall
down to the river in wet weather.
Selected evergreen berry-bearing
canopy trees including miro, rewarewa,
kohekohe, titoki, karaka and puriri were
planted to provide a natural food source
and habitat for wood pigeon, tui and the
diverse variety of smaller birds on the
property. Secondary under planting of

fruit bearing deciduous trees provide an
additional food source and spectacular
autumn colour contrasting beautifully
with evergreen natives such as kauri,
rimu, maire, totara and rata.

Flooding in winter has resulted in the
demise of two foot bridges linking the
two gardens. Recently, Tom built the
latest replacement rough sawn timber
bridge higher up stream and to date this
has survived. The property earned its
name ‘Waterford’ following the creation
of the concrete ford access across the
river to Tom and Audrey’s Home Stay
premises.

There is an extended walking track
providing access across the river. Tom and
Audrey joined the Far North Bromeliad
Group a year ago, and now bromeliads
feature extensively under the native and
exotic tree canopy. They prefer mixed
planting a variety of individual plants
as opposed to mass planting. Many are
planted in their pots.

Guests can wander the meandering paths,
pause on one of the many well appointed
garden seats, enjoy the songs of native
birds, the sound of flowing water and
reflect on the diverse range of styles and
planting on both sides of the river.

The property is at Waipapa West Road,
Kerikeri. For further details regarding
accommodation, weddings or viewing the
garden by arrangement, (as individuals
or group bookings), please contact Tom
and Audrey Kent 0940797 7. Email
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.


SEED BANK

Alcantarea – geniculata, glaziouana,
imperialis (rubra)
Tillandsia – gardneri, magnusiana,
viridiflora, elongata v subimbricata,
rotundata, butzii, recurvata
Vriesea – altodaserrae, ensiformis,
friburgensis var tucumanensis,
gigantea, gigantea var nova, racinae,
agostiniana


Werauhia – sanguinolenta


New seed received from L. Ching

TO ALL MEMBERS

If you have fresh seed from any species,
please send as we need to have fresh
stock at all times. Seed from hybrid
plants not accepted.

ORDERING SEED:

Send orders to Seed Bank - NZ residents only

Bev Ching, P.O.Box 51361 Pakuranga Auckland 2010
Email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Phone 09 576-4595 evenings

The Seed Bank will exchange two packets of 0 seed for one ( ) large packet of
your Seed. Please make sure it is labelled correctly. PLEASE SEND A LARGE
STAMPED ADDRESS ENVELOPE.

 packet (of at least 0 seeds) - 50cents. Limited to one packet of seed per address.
Maximum $5.00 per month. Remember to consult the current seed list when ordering.
We reserve the right to provide a substitute for an out of stock seed with another
packet of seed of the same or similar genus.

This Seed Bank information can also be viewed on the BSNZ website www.bsnz.
org. Note the user name (login) is currently aechmea and the password is fasciata.
Both words must be typed in lower case to access the members’ section containing
the Seed Bank.

Bromeliad Journal – back issues available

Back issues of our monthly Bromeliad Journal are available.

2008: $3 Prior to 2008: $2

Contact Jocelyn Coyle (09) 4168272
email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 0



Getting Ready For Winter!

It’s that time of the year and we’ve decided to reprint a good article from 2006

Pre-winter chores in the garden and the greenhouse

– Gerry Stansfield
Around about this time we
usually give out some advice
to our newer members and
perhaps a reminder to others, about
the few things we should do before the
onslaught of the cold winter months.
There is one job we must do prior to
winter, and it is extremely important to
do it now rather than waiting for the
usual spring clean up – dead leaf our
plants.

Unlike in the spring and summer
months, the dead leaves in the winter
can and do start to rot and break
down. This can very quickly turn to
bacteria and viral infection. You might
say, ‘How does that happen?’. Well,
actually, we do know quite a lot about
rotting vegetation. After all, that’s what
composting is all about. However,
the important difference between
composting and dead leaves lying next
to our bromeliads is that in composting
we allow the temperature of the
compost to rise dramatically which
generally kills any pathogenic and viral
bacteria, and leaves us with the lovely
sweet smelling compost. This does
not happen with our dead bromeliad
leaves! How does this bacteria get
into our plants? We do know that all
bromeliads have trichomes, and we
know that these trichomes are there to
facilitate the absorption of water from
rain and nutrients, and we also know
that they are quite capable of absorbing
matter from decaying vegetation.

It is well known that vectors (or
carriers) such as animals, insects,
mites, aphids, nematodes, mealy bug,
scale and the sucking or chewing type
of slugs and snails etc, are all potential
viral disease carriers, and by chewing
and sucking at our plants they can and
do pass on forms of infection that can
attack the stomata pores of the leaves
and of course also the stemcells. In
particular, the sucking and chewing
insects, that just love rotting vegetation,
are extremely harmful to our beloved
bromeliads.

By getting rid of the dead leaves
we are helping our bromeliads
to continue to grow and stay in a
healthy condition.

If you have only a few bromeliad plants,
this may not be a big job. But if you
have a large collection, either in your
garden, green house or shade house,
then it is a much bigger job and should
be planned. If your plants are in pots,
then it is just a matter of lifting the pots,
cleaning up the plant and replacing the
pot. If you have planted in the ground,
then it is more complex and perhaps
you can do with the help of a kneeler
or thick foam pad. We find the kneeler
is ideal, and the handles allow you to
easily hoist yourself up again. They
are available from the Mitre 0 shops.
Finally, when you have finished it is a
good time to lay slug baits.



Thinking of naming and registering
your new hybrid? Here’s a few tips


– Gerry Stansfield, NZ Registrar
Ihave had a few enquiries from
members lately asking can they
name and register a bromeliad.
First let me say that we welcome any
new hybrids that members have made,
or that others have made and you may
have purchased a plant and know the
plant has not been officially named
through the BSI Register. As you may
or may not know, I am the Registrar
for New Zealand. It is not an official
title from the BSI. Derek Butcher
the previous BSI Registrar gave me
the appointment to be a helping hand
from New Zealand. My job is mostly
encouraging hybridists to register
their plants with the BSI and also to
assist those members who would like
to name and register a new hybrid in
any way I can. If you wish to go direct
to Geoff Lawn in Australia who is the
new BSI Registrar, that’s fine with
me. In due course Geoff will send
me the details anyway as we have an
official New Zealand Register Book.
However, if you would like me to help
you through the process, I am more
than happy to do so. The first thing
we have to do is select a name, and let
me tell you, that’s not easy, with many
hundreds of thousands of names in the
BSI Register.

If you have a ‘prefix’ that you can
use, all the better and especially if
no one else has used it, then all the
names ever used before can now be
used again, for example, Andrew

Maloy uses ‘Kiwi’, so you could say
Neoregelia ‘Kiwi Painted Lady’.
Again, you know that Maureen Green
lives at Maungakaramea Northland,
so Maureen uses the prefix ‘Karamea’
with all her hybrids, so again you
could also say Neoregelia ‘Karamea
Painted Lady’. So, by using a prefix,
it is possible to use lots of names,
that otherwise would not be available
because they’ve been used before.

So the first thing is to find a name and
we then check with the Register to see
that the name has not been used before.
I have the BSI Register on a database
file and can quickly make a check to
see if the name is OK. If it is, we then
need two photos, one close up looking
down on the centre if it’s a neoregelia
or nidularium to show the centre colour
and top of the plant and then one from
a short distance to give us a feel of the
size of the plant showing the foliage.
If the plant is a vriesea or an aechmea,
then the photo should be from a short
distance to show the plant and also
the flower spike and then a close up
of the actual flower spike. In the case
of a neoregelia or nidularium, we also
need a diameter across the plant. I will
give you and example at the end of this
article of how to set it out. The photos
can be from a digital camera and
emailed to me by jpeg or sent to me by
mail as a normal photo print. A short
description of the foliage should go
with the photos especially if the new



hybrid is variegated and example of
what we are talking about would look
like this below.

Nidularium ‘Crackerjack’
Add---by G. Stansfield NZ. 999
‘Madame Robert Morobe’ x Nid.
rubens Large 45cm dia foliage
wine red underside, dark green
on top, centre inflorescence,
deep red/apricot.

I hope you will take up the challenge, as
it would be nice to see more members’
plants in coming Journals.


From 2009 ‘Fiesta’ – photo by Andrew Devonshire. Neoregelia ‘Jeffrey Block’. Plant by Peter Coyle.



Navia arida

– Notes from John Mitchell, photo by Birgit Rhode
Navia arida comes from the Guayana Highlands in Bolivar State,
Venezuela and neighbouring Guayana. Its habitat is 00 - 800m above
sea level. There the diurnal temperature range fluctuates between and
ºC, and the rainfall is up to 000mm annually. This plant is typically
found growing in humid areas, on rocks, in sandy savannas or near cascades in the
hot jungle. (‘Bromeliads’ by F. Oliva - Esteve and ‘Lost Worlds of the Guayana
Highlands’ by Stewart McPherson). Taking the navia habitat into account, my
cultivation strategy for this bromeliad species, approximately follows that used
for growing cryptanthus.

The plant pictured was grown from seed by Maureen Green. I got it as a year old
seedling and have had it for about or 4 years.

Footnote: Readers can also refer to our May 2007 Journal for an interesting
article (ex BSI Journal) on Lindmania and Navia and the tepuis – the unusual
table-topped mountains in south-eastern Venezuela and Guayana that are part
of their habitat.

 4



Sick of weeding your bromeliad

gardens? ‘Rout’ may be your answer

– Gerry Stansfield
Weeds come into our gardens
from many different sources
- mainly birds, but also from
the wind. The seed of most weeds are
very fine and are very easily wind-
borne so they can travel quite long
distances. Even gardens that are very
heavily mulched and pine barked still
get the odd weed or two. Of course you
can kneel down and fork them our by
hand. You can also use a weed stick
which can be filled with a variety of
weed killers. It has a trigger handle
and there are a number of products
around. It doesn’t hold a lot of liquid
and is really only meant for spotting
so it’s good if you only have a few
weeds. Of course there is ‘Round-up’and ‘Paraquat’, but these are extremely
poisonous weedkillers and they don’t
do our gardens a great lot of good.

I believe there is now a much better
product that will cut down weeding
time dramatically. It’s called ‘Rout’
and it’s a pre-emergent herbicide that
has been designed and developedprimarily for the commercial nurseries
and landscapers to control weeds in
container-grown things. I’m told that
‘Rout’ will even control pesky weeds
like liverwort, wild selagenella and
other moss-like pests.

‘Rout’ comes in granulated form and
you will also need to purchase the
special shaker with twist type lid, so
you can easily adjust the application
and be very sparing with it. Only 8
particles are required per square inch.
I only need two holes open to give me
the required amount. ‘Rout’ is not a

scheduled poison. Margaret and I are
in our early trials and there is no sign
of any weeds, so it’s looking good. The
downside is the cost. Pacific Growers
Mt Wellington have ‘Rout’ in 0kg
buckets for $ 45.88. It’s economical if
you consider that you only need 8 to
0 particles per square inch, so a 0kg
pale will last you a very long time. If
you have a go with this product, please
give us some feedback.

I also came across a very interesting
little booklet the other day, published
by Waitakere City Council, entitled
‘Sprays are not the only way, Reducing
Herbicide Use in Waitakere’. It’s free
from all libraries in the Waitakere
City Council areas, and for members
outside the area, you can go to www.
weedfree.org.nz or www.waitakere.
govt.nz (or check with your local
Council for similar publications). The
book has some excellent information
on weeds especially the noxious ones,
what they look like and how to get rid
of them successfully and the correct
type of weedkiller we should use.

 
5



Group News

Far North Bromeliad Group

– Eric Stephens
Our March meeting was a double
pleasure for us, with a visit from our
good friends of the South Auckland
Group, and the first birthday of
Fullbert Bromeliads, the enterpriseof Poppy and Alan Fuller. Poppy and
Alan together with family support, fed
and entertained over 00 of us at their
residence – a delightful setting under
the very mature trees, surrounded
by the garden filled with oodles of
broms, not withstanding the separate
exhibition areas. Our visitors had
arrived the day before, and visited
several gardens about Kerikeri, on the
Saturday; before checking out more
gardens on the Sunday morning, and
then arriving at a very social regular
Far North meeting. .

The increased numbers and the
presence of further ‘experts’ made
for an ‘invigorating’ Show and Tell
session, and brisk trade in the raffles
and plant auction. Southern visitor Roy
Morton gave a light hearted address,
amid many interruptions, on ‘Mistakes
I have made’, and his memorable
rendition of ‘a la Franglais’ of Paris in
the Spring, brought the house down.
Among the plants demonstrated were
a Bromelia balansae (or possibly

B. sylvicola, equally as nasty!),
and several neoregelia cultivars
– ‘Formosa’, ‘Marble Throat’, and
‘Green Ripple’ (one of Avon Ryan’s
registered hybrids). A Tillandsia
standleyi in full flower, and an
aechmea – possibly a de Roose hybrid
– or some thought it to be ‘Popcorn’.
There was also discussion on the fine
– but increasingly confusing – range of
billbergias, ranging from ‘Domingos
6


Martens’ to ‘Hallelujah’, with the
many variant blotches and background
colours in between. The April meeting
will be on Sunday April th, at Elaine
and Ian Wright’s residence. 54 Kapiro
Rd, Kerikeri

Northland Bromeliad Group

– Jill Hudson
Our AGM was held on March nd 009
at the Russell Road Quarry Gardens,
Whangarei. Prior to this event we held
a car boot sale of plants which had
been advertised to the public. Those
who attended bought enthusiastically.
Of course members could always sell
to each other!

The Gardens themselves are well worth
a visit, a wonderful tribute to the hard
working volunteers who toil to develop
and maintain a difficult site. ‘Our’
bromeliad plots, of which we now
have two, are looking fine. All praise
to Freda who does most of the work.
There is only one change in the line-up
of office holders who are: President:
Jan Mahoney; Vice president: Sandra
Wheeler; Secretary: Sylvia Boswell;
Treasurer: Joy Barnes

The competition was won by Sylvia
with Tillandsia ‘Creation’. This was
a must have from Mitre 0 some time
ago and it has never looked back in
terms of increase and flowers.
nd was Treasurer Joy with a hugefloriferous clump of aptly named
Nidularium ‘Rusty’.
rd was Freda Nash with Tillandsia
multicaulis, a smallish plant with
several truly beautiful flowers.

Next meeting: April 6th at Margaret

Cont’d P17


Cont’d from P16

and Colin Wrack’s, 568 NgunguruRoad, Glenbervie. Max and Robyn
Thomas will talk on vrieseas.

Bay of Plenty Bromeliad Group

– Jo Elder
Our March Meeting and AGM
attracted 9 members, visitors and
apologies. President Lynley gave a
special welcome to 0 new members
who had signed up at our verysuccessful ‘Open Day’ in February.
Officers elected were: President:
Lynley Breeze; Vice President: to be
confirmed; Secretary: Jo Elder;
Treasurer: Maxine August; Librarian:
Leo Mangos (outside committee).
Committee: Wilma Fitzgibbons,
Bertha Schollum, Audrey Hewson,
Gill Keesing, Graeme Alabaster,
Gwen McCallum, Lois Brown, Neila
Fairweather. Many thanks to Anna
Long who has stood down from the
position of Librarian after many years.
Our subscription remains the same
as last year, $ 5.00 per person and
$ 0.00 per household, and these are
now due. Lynley mentioned that our
sales table at the club has good plants
at reasonable prices. More people are
encouraged to bring plants for sale and
to a limit of 0 plants per household
has been placed on the sales table. Jo
Elder spoke about preparation and
presentation of plants for the sales
table. Wilma and Jo spoke about their
trip to the ‘Fiesta’ in Auckland. They
commented on the high quality of
plants in the competitions.

Plant of the month was variegated
neoregelias, On the table were
Neoregelia ‘Morado’, ‘Van Dourme’,
‘Pemiento’, ‘Dorothy’, ‘Dr. Oeser’,
(variegated), ‘Burnsie’s Spiral’. ‘Aussie
Dream’ cv ‘Big Pinkie’, ‘Orange

Glow’, ‘Hot Gossip’, ‘Meyendorffii’

– all stunning plants.
Competition Winners:

 st x Neophytum ‘Ralph Davis’

I. Clotworthy
nd Neoregelia ‘Hannibal Lector’
‘Clarise’ C. Chudleigh
rd Neoregelia ‘Rosa Morada’

J. Elder
Tillandsia Competition:

 st Tillandsia ‘Creation’
nd Tillandsia brachycaulos
rd Tillandsia edithiae (large)

Next Meeting: Wednesday th May at
. 0pm, TY&PB Club rooms.
Andrew Maloy will speak about
vrieseas and will have plants for sale.
Garden visits: Wed 0th May 0.00am.
. Nola Cresswell, 70 Pembroke Drive,
Bethlehem
. Bernadette Ross, 06 Moffat Rd.
Bethlehem (park Elder Lane)
. Gary & Mgt. Schroeder, 0 Kildonan
Place, Bethlehem.

South Auckland Bromeliad Group

– Marion Morton
On 5th April we had our last garden
meeting of the summer. A good turnout
assembled at Gellerts Nursery and we
were very pleased to welcome visitors
from around the North Island including
Judy and Noel Newman from Napier,
and Poppy Fuller and David Brewer
(without his whistle), from Kerikeri.
Steve Gellert showed us around and
we were most intrigued by his new
and very weird looking Bat Flower.
We spent up large there and then went
to Margaret and Brian Kitchers’ where
we had lunch and our meeting proper.
The only thing in their garden when
the Kitchers moved into their new
house was an old orange tree. Now,

Cont’d P18 7


Cont’d from P17

 8 months later, it looks like they have
been there forever. One feature of
their garden is the en masse plantings
including Nidularium fulgens and
Aechmea pectinata.

Norma Cook put up a clump of ‘Sheer
Joy’ for auction that she had for more
than 0 years and Marie Healeyauctioned off a bottle of bubbly. The
raffles were won by Jenny Gallagher,
Lee Smith and Jessie Cranfield. We
finished up at Norma Cook’s place. Her
garden suffered quite badly during the
last winter – however it has recovered
well and is now a real credit to her. She
is a lovely lady and gave us a guided
tour of her home.

Next Meeting: The first winter
meeting will be at . 0pm on Sunday,
rd May at the Botanic Gardens, Hill
Rd, Manurewa. This will also be our
AGM, and we will hold a workshop
aimed at naming the Botanic Gardens’various bromeliads.

Eastern Bay of Plenty Bromeliad
and Orchid Group – Joy Insley

Our March meeting was held at the
Rivett/Laurent residences, Camellia
Lane,Whakatane. The extensive views
of Whale Island and the Whakatane
environs were the setting for a shared
lunch. Cor Schipper, from Rotorua,
then educated and entertained us with
a talk on tillandsias and carnivorous
Plants. We learned about the process
of trapping insects by setting up an
attractant aroma, providing slippery
slopes in hollow tubes and finishing
off the luckless insect in a bath of
digestive enzymes. Ugh. And the
fascinating Cobra Lily whose roots
required icy conditions and whose tops
needed temperatures circa 0 degrees

-ice cubes one end with heaters the
other. All the while pollinated by - not
bees - but spiders. Cor shared some of
his extensive collection of tillandsias
along with display ideas and growing
techniques. Members displayed and
discussed their Plant of the Month -
Miniature Plants.
Next meeting: 9th April on the Ohiwa
Circuit. See Maureen’s newsletter for
details.

Hawkes Bay Bromeliad Group

-Judy Newman
Our March meeting was held on a lovely
autumn afternoon and because new
president Anna Le Comte was away,
our new secretary Judy Newman lead
the meeting which was held outside, at
the home of Julie and David Greenhill.
There wasn’t a lot of business to
discuss except for where we all want
to go for our next trip away (always
an exciting topic) and some additions
to our newsletter which Pauline
Sutherland is making a sterling job of.
We spent a fair amount of time in the
plastic house where the bulk of Julie’s
bromeliads are grown and talked about
various plants of interest. Wade Smith
also brought along a spectacular and
very unusual orchid with two lovely
flower spikes that he had grown.
The competition:
st equal Guzmania ‘Amaranth’
Margaret Bluck; Neoregelia ‘OrangeCrush’ - Grace Smith; Neoregelia‘Annick’ - Julie Greenhill.

 nd Vriesea ‘Red Chestnut’

Wade Smith

 rd Neoregelia ‘Exotica Velvet’

Judy Newman

Next meeting: April 6th pm – venue
to be decided.

 8



FROM THE REGISTRAR – Gerry Stansfield
Nidularium ‘Crackerjack’


By way of a change, I thought
you might like to have a look
at some hybrids of mine that
have just been registered, so for the
next couple of months I will show you
some of my favourites.

Nidularium ‘Crackerjack’. This
was made in 999, the cross being
Nid. ‘Madame Robert Morobe’ x Nid.
rubens.Back in 999 we all thought Nid.
rubens was Nidularium purpureum,
and it wasn’t until 000 when Elton
Leme’s wonderful book ‘Nidularium’
came out that some doubt was raised
by quite a few knowledgeable people
that not only our plants in NZ but
also this same plant in Australia, were
not Nid. purpureum. Derek Butcher
from Australia performed a taxonomy
inspection of the plant and confirmed
that the plant was not purpureum but
in fact Nidularium rubens. Back in
999, I made a number of nidularium
crosses using this plant, but was unable
to register them until now, because
on the uncertainty of Nidularium
purpureum.

This is a large plant at 65cm dia which
obviously comes from the parent of
Nid.‘Madame Robert Morobe’, which
you probably know is a very large
nidularium. The foliage is a very lovely
wine red under the leaves and deep
green on top. The centre inflorescence is
a lovely deep red/apricot. Incidentally,
I should mention that for Nidularium
‘Madame Robert Morobe’ there have
actually been two separate plants.. One
is from Australia, called Nid. ‘Madame
Robert Morobe’ (my plant) and the
other was grown here in New Zealand
by Maureen Green from seed and was
originally called Nid. ‘Madame Robert
Morobe’, but Maureen changed it to
Nidularium ‘Karamea Morobe’ in May
005 so that we could have a clear
distinction between the two plants.

REGISTRATION DETAILS:
Nidularium ‘Crackerjack’ (Nid.
‘Madame Robert Morobe’ x Nid.
rubens) large 65cm, foliage wine red
underside, dark green on top, centre
inflorescence, deep red/apricot by G.
Stansfield 999.

 
9



Vriesea fosteriana leaf colours and
leaf patterns have many subtle
variations

Recently retired Registrar, Derek Butcher, also points out that Vriesea fosteriana,
if grown from self set seed, will often produce seedlings with different coloured
leaves. Photos courtesy of Peter Waters.


Vriesea ‘Red Chestnut’ Vriesea fosteriana (rubra)


Vriesea fosteriana seideliana Vriesea ‘Golden Legend’

 0

 

March 2009
Vol 49 No 3


• ‘Fiesta’ 2009 Show results • Derek Butcher retires as Registrar

NEW BROMELIAD RELEASE – Gerry Stansfield


Vriesea ‘Favourite Yellow’

This year’s Bromeliad ‘Fiesta’
and Competitive Show and Sale
saw another new release from
Gellert’s Nurseries, Vriesea ‘Favourite
Yellow’. The plant is one of the Vriesea
splendens and ‘Splenriet’ group except
that this plant has a yellow spade flower
spike as apposed to the red or ‘Flaming
Sword’ as it is known, of the others.
It would be interesting to know just
how they developed the yellow form
and no doubt Corn Bak or De Roose in
Holland who have developed this plant
would not disclose, however with such

advanced laboratories and the help of
tissue culture these companies have
at their disposal, the development of
new and exciting plants is inevitable.
Initially, the plants have been released
through the Kings Plant Barn nurseries,
but I believe it will be available
nationally soon. Remember, this is a
warm growing bromeliad, the original
species plants come from Venezuela
Trinidad and Guyana and so becomes
a House Plant or green house plant
where you should winter it with some
warmth. They do not like the cold.


Vriesea ‘Favourite Yellow’



Bromeliad Society of New Zealand Inc

Bromeliad Journal – March 2009 issue


CONTENTS
New release: Vriesea ‘Favourite Yellow’ – Gerry Stansfield 2
President’s Page 4
Bromeliad Society February meeting news – Dave Anderson 5
Derek Butcher retires as Registrar – Peter Waters 7
‘Fiesta’ 009 Show results and winners 9
‘Fiesta’ photography – Andrew Devonshire
Society April garden ramble April 5th 4
Mathematical Fibonacci sequence in pineapples – Alan J. Thomson 5
Seed Bank – Bev Ching 7
Group News 8
Society officers, membership information and Journal directory 21
From the Registrar – new hybrids from Andrew Steens – Gerry Stansfield 22
Nidularium’Madonna’ revisited – Gerry Stansfield 24

The opinions expressed in articles or letters in this Journal are the contributors’ own views and
do not necessarily express the views or the policy of the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand

COMING EVENTS

Please see the Group News section starting on page 8 for more details of group

meeting times and venues.

MARCH
22nd Wellington Tillandsia Group
meeting.
22nd Northland Bromeliad Group
meeting and AGM.
24th Society meeting and AGM at
Greyfriar’s Hall, corner of Mt Eden
and Windmill roads, Mt Eden, starting
7. 0pm. Monthly choice, mounted
bromeliads (rocks and logs) other than
tillandsias.
29th Hawkes Bay Group meeting.

APRIL

5th South Auckland Group meeting.
5th Society garden ramble, 0.00am
to .00pm (see page 4).
8th Bay of Plenty Group meeting.
28th Society meeting at Greyfriar’s Hall,
corner of Mt Eden and Windmill roads,
Mt Eden, starting 7. 0pm. Monthly
choice, NZ hybrid neoregelias. This will
be a plant swap night – members can
bring up to plants each to swap.


Front cover: Another successful ‘Fiesta’ has come and gone and this month we
feature some great ‘Fiesta’ photos, courtesy of Andrew Devonshire – the variegated
bromeliad table featured on the cover helps set the colourful scene.


PRESIDENT’S PAGE

Another great ‘Fiesta’! We had
over 400 visitors attend and
while this was less than last
year we expect to make a similar
profit of over $5,000. This revenue
is essential to allow the Society to
continue to provide services such as
our Journal and to maintain our low
subscriptions. We also want to build
our funds with the objective of holding
another Australasian conference in a
few years time.

In regards to the ‘Fiesta’ I have a few
bouquets and a few brickbats. Firstly
the bouquets. A huge vote of thanks
to the committee and the many other
helpers who put the time, effort and
expertise into making sure things
ran smoothly from before the event
through to the clean-up. Regrettably, I
also have a few brickbats:

• The demand for seller’s tables
increases every year and allocating the
space is a difficult job. Anybody who

books a table must advise the show
committee if they cannot attend. They
cannot reserve a table in their name

for the benefit of one of their mates.

Anybody suspected of this will not be
allowed to sell.

• There appeared to be a leaf shine
product used on some plants. This is
prohibited and these plants were not
judged.
• Plants entered into the competition
must be grown by the person entering
them for at least 6 months prior.
• Sale prices must be in even dollars
– with no cents.
For‘Fiesta’next year yourcommittee
has decided:

• A show committee of three people
will be set up to adjudicate on any
contentious issues when they arise.
• Only bromeliads and associated
materials such as bark or wood for
mounting, or books or paintings of
bromeliads, will be allowed for sale.
Our March meeting will be our AGM. I
will be standing down as President after
years and I would like to formally
thank everybody who has made my
time so pleasant and easy. I am happy to
continue on in the committee and most
of the current committee are prepared
to stand again. We are always keen

to find ‘new blood’ and you can get a

nomination form at the meeting. I will

accept nominations from the floor.

At the April meeting we will try a plant
swap night. Members can bring along
up to plants each. Please make sure
the plants/pots are clean and dry. Each
plant must have a paper slip with the
plant’s name and the member’s name
on it. Please wear your name tags so

that you can be identified. If you do

not have a name tag, see Noelene, our
librarian. In April a number of us will
be visiting ‘Bromadelaide’in Adelaide.
If you attended the ‘Fiesta’ you will
have seen Agatha Lambert’s lovely
bromeliad paintings. The committee
has purchased one of these paintings to
donate to the Australian conference for
their auction.

Regards, Alan Cliffe


Bromeliad Society February
Meeting News – Dave Anderson

Thanks were given to all those
helpers who had made the
‘Fiesta’ a great success this last
weekend. We have booked the hall for
the same time next year. Following the
General Business the show trophies
were presented. The 5th Australian
Conference – ‘Bromadelaide 009’
is to be held in Adelaide over Easter
weekend 0th to th April 009. A
reminder that the AGM will be held
prior to the general meeting in March.
Robert Dilling – a visiting grower from
Brisbane gave a presentation about his
nursery after the awards for the ‘Fiesta’
had been made.

Peter Waters once again took us
through the ‘Show and Tell’ plants.
First were two different plants labelled

Neoregelia ‘Fairy Paint’ – the first was

a green plant that was wrongly named
and was an ampullacea hybrid whilst
the second was true to name. ‘Fairy
Paint’ is a hybrid made by Hummel
prior to 970 described as cv. of
unknown parentage – (Other cvs. =
‘Aristocrat’, ‘Audrey’, ‘Perry Faint’,
and ‘Riens Pride’ – medium stacked
symmetrical rosette of apple green
rounded red tipped leaves – red centre
at anthesis – heavier red in lower
leaves. Next was a plant thought to
be a Margaret Paterson hybrid that
the owner had revived from a sick
plant – unfortunately it could not be

identified further. Following this

was a small ( 5mm high) plant was
thought to be one of the numerous

Aechmea recurvata hybrids. Another
plant wanting a name was the species
Fasicularia bicolor that grows well in
Auckland and has leaves that look so
vicious but are actually quite soft to
touch. I had taken in for display the
species Hohenbergia pennae that is
rather unique with its bulbous form.
Finally the hybrid Neoregelia ‘Quoll’

– NB some people have this plant’s
name as ‘Quail’ – a lovely lime green
plant with red spots that is named after
the Australian marsupial.
Genneth Marshall-Inman won the

special raffle prize this month with the

door prizes going to Jill Porter, Ross
Walker, and Andrew Maloy.

COMPETITIONS

Open Flowering:First was Peter Coyle,
with Alcantarea geniculata – a plant

with a stunning inflorescence. Second

was David Goss with Neoregelia
‘Rosy Morn’. Also in the competition
were Aechmea fasciata (variegated),
‘Silver King’; Canistrum triangulare

– a lovely small plant with brown leaf
markings and a beautiful orange-red
coloured inflorescence; Neoregelia
‘Lavender Girl’; Nidularium ‘Ruby
Lee’ and Vriesea ospinae var ospinae.

Open Foliage: Peter Waters was

first with Neoregelia carcharodon

‘Rainbow’ – a much admired plant
with its reddish coloured wide leaves
and prominent spines. Second was
John Mitchell with Vriesea ‘Snowman’

Cont’d P6


Cont’d from P5

– a hybrid made by A. Maloy / P.
Coyle and as the name suggests it
has snow white colour through the
centre of the plant. In the competition
were Aechmea ‘Reginald’; Billbergia
‘Kahibah’, ‘Afterglow’ [(vittata x
Poquito Blanco) x amoena viridis] and
Neoregelia ‘Screaming Tiger’.
Tillandsia: Lynette Nash’s Tillandsia
caput-medusae was first, with second
going to Win Shorrock’s Tillandsia
disticha. There was also on the table
Tillandsia grandis, harrisii, and
streptophylla.

Neoregelia: Peter Waters was first with

Neoregelia ‘Red Tiger’. Second was
Peter Coyle with Neoregelia ‘Break
of Day’. In the competition were
‘Clarise’, ‘Garnish’, Jeffery Block’

TOTARA WATERS
BROMELIAD SALE


April 24th & 26th 9am to 4pm
April 25th 12pm to 5pm


Available now:

Aechmea ‘Madge’ $12
Aechmea chantinii $12


Top grade plants for sale.

Please note in your diaries:

‘BROMS IN THE PARK’ 2009

will be held at Totara Waters,

November 8th

89 Totara Rd Whenuapai,
Waitakere City. Ph 416 8272

and ‘The Governor’s Plea’.


Plant of the month – Albo marginated
plants: First was Peter Coyle with
Neoregelia ‘Yin’ whilst second went to
Alan Cliffe with Neoregelia ‘Garnish’.
In the competition were Neoregelia
‘Garnish’, ‘Robin’, ‘Glorious’, ‘Kahala
Dawn’ and ‘Avila’.


Novice: First was Graeme Barclay with
Nidularium fulgens and second was
Margaret Wagstaff with Neoregelia
‘Tossed Salad’.


The Plant of the Month went to Peter
Waters with Neoregelia carcharodon
‘Rainbow’.
Congratulations to all the winners.


NEXT MEETING: Tues 4th March



Derek Butcher retires as Registrar


– Notes compiled by Peter Waters
After nearly nine years in the
position, Derek Butcher is
retiring as Cultivar Registrar.

Derek, or ‘Uncle Derek’ as he is often
referred to, has become a household
name in the bromeliad world in
his tireless pursuit of order in the

nomenclature field.

Derek, who lives in Adelaide, was
recently made an Honorary Trustee of
the Bromeliad Society International in
recognition of his years of devotion to
bromeliads and in particular his work
as Cultivar Registrar. Many of our New
Zealand members have met Derek at
bromeliad conferences where he is a
frequent presenter. He was one of the
international presenters at our 00
bromeliad conference in Auckland.

He will be greatly missed and on
behalf of the Bromeliad Society of
New Zealand we thank him for all his
excellent work and we wish him well
for the next stage of his bromeliad
life. We are reprinting and adapting
excerpts from an article that Derek
wrote in the November – December
issue of ‘Bromeliaceae’, published by
The Bromeliad Society of Queensland.

In this article Derek reflects on how he
became Registrar and the significant

challenges that he faced.

When Derek announced his retirement
we wondered who was going to be able

to fill his shoes, as he had become such

an important part of the international
bromeliad scene. However I don’t think
we need worry because his successor,
Geoff Lawn, is very capable and
has a good knowledge of bromeliad
taxonomy. Geoff is a Director of the BSI
and lives in Perth, Western Australia.
He has worked well with Derek before
and I don’t think there will be major
changes to the registration system as
we know it.

Retirement of a Registrar

– Derek Butcher reflects…
(from ‘Bromeliaceae’)

‘It all started in the late 970s when
I was a voracious reader of detail on
bromeliads and Smith and Downs
three volumes was a great eye opener

regarding species but I could find

nothing about hybrids. I knew you
could register a hybrid with the BSI
but problems associated with this
made it an ‘impossible’ task for most
Australian hybridists. Early in the
980s I contacted Olwen Ferris, Grace
Goode. and Bill Morris regarding the
feasibility of getting a listing of hybrids
made in Australia because hybrids
were being made by the hundreds and
no attempt was being made to record
them.

So in 98 the lists started where it
was pointed out that these plants were
not registered as such. It was about this

Cont’d P8


Cont’d from P7

time that I corresponded with Brian
Smith who was trying to do the same
as me in Florida. He wanted to know
how I had succeeded in getting so
many Australian hybridists involved.

In the late 990s Don Beadle contacted
me and we decided that the Aussie
records should be merged with US
Register records including details of
hybrids that Don and his helpers, plus
Brian Smith, had gleaned from plant

catalogues etc. One final effort by Don

was to produce the Cultivar Register
in 998 after which he handed over
the reins to me. His words to me were
that he hoped I had better luck with
the American hybridists in convincing
them that they should register the best.

So, from 000, it was made very easy
to register a hybrid, especially if you
had access to a computer. Details of
the hybrid are held in either the BSI
Bromeliad Cultivar Registry or the BSI
Neoregelia Cultivar Registry. Linking
to this detail are photographs ( which
are worth a 000 words of description)
which are held on the fcbs.org photo

file and are what the Cultivar should

look like.

Full of enthusiasm, I felt that the best
way to tackle the problem was to appeal
to the hybridist’s professionalism.
The problem is that professionalism
also means you don’t do anything for
nothing and a non registered plant
can be sold for the same price as a
registered one. Perhaps I could have
appealed to the amateur side which in

its true sense means a love of plants or a
desire to see them at their best. But here
again amateur can mean a beginners
approach where we have plants grown
from hybrid seed, not culled because
of the ‘my babies’ syndrome.

Plant Societies are formed to promote
a particular facet of horticulture.
Bromeliad Societies promote
knowledge in bromeliads and always
have a list of aims. It always pays
to refer to these aims, from time
to time, especially in the area of

plant identification. It is not just the

responsibility of the President or the
Committee of the Society, but rather
the whole membership who should be
working to one goal.

Ever since the 970s I have tried to
put into practice that you learn from
reputable books or places of reference,
not from hearsay, and the Bromeliad
Cultivar Register is a place which all
growers should refer to. Remember that
the climate in Queensland is very good
for growing bromeliads, and down
south we often say that ‘they grow like
weeds up there.’The problem is that all
too often they can be treated as ‘weeds’
where all look alike but have different
pet names which the owners have been
too lazy to properly record.

Finally, I have been trying for over
0 years to encourage others to
teach themselves about bromeliad

identification and working to make the

base material more accessible.


2009 ANNUAL SHOW
TROPHY WINNERS

Best Aechmea Peter Coyle (Aechmea orlandiana ‘Ensign’)
Best Billbergia David Cowie (Billbergia ‘Domingos Martins’)
Best Guzmania Bev Ching (Guzmania lingulata var minor)
Best Neoregelia Peter Coyle (Neoregelia ‘Garnish’)
Best Tillandsia Lynette Nash (Tillandsia tectorum)
Best Vriesea Alan Cliffe (Vriesea ‘Sunset’)
Best Novice Chris Davis (Billbergia ‘Hallelujah’)
Best Bromeliad Arrangement Becky Cavit
Best Artistic Arrangement Lynette Nash
Most Points of the Show = Peter Coyle


= Peter Waters
Champion of the Show Lynette Nash (Tillandsia tectorum)

2009 ANNUAL SHOW CLASS WINNERS

Class 1 Aechmea Blooming Class 6 Bromeliad Species

 st Peter Coyle Aechmea fasciata st Peter Waters Vriesea pardalina

(variegated) nd Peter Waters Canistrum auratum
nd Noelene Ritson Aechmea ‘Fascicaulis’ (red) ‘Vania Leme’
rd --------- rd Judy Graham Aechmea fosteriana

Class 2 Aechmea Foliage Class 7 Neoregelia Blooming

 st Peter Coyle Aechmea ‘Ensign’ st Carolyn Scholes Neoregelia ‘Yin’
nd H & G Cooke Aechmea ‘Madge’ nd Peter Waters Neoregelia ‘Rainbow’
rd Peter Coyle Aechmea ‘Bert’ (variegated) = rd Peter Coyle Neoregelia

‘Painted Delight’
Class 3 Billbergia = rd Peter Coyle Neoregelia
st David Cowie Billbergia ‘Jeffery Block’

‘Domingos Martins’
nd Peter Waters Billbergia ‘Stardust’ Class 8 Neoregelia Foliage
rd H & G Cooke Billbergia ‘Hazy Purple’ st Chris Paterson Neoregelia ‘Milagro’

 nd Peter Coyle Neoregelia
Class 4 Cryptanthus ‘Takemura Princeps’ x
st Bev Ching Cryptanthus ‘Burgundy’ ‘Grace Darling’
nd Luen Jones Cryptanthus ‘I. G.’ rd Alan Cliffe Neoregelia ‘Garnish’
rd Luen Jones Cryptanthus beuckeri

Class 9 Nidularium
Class 5 Guzmania st Peter Waters Nidularium ‘Rusty’
st Bev Ching Guzmania lingulata nd Judy Graham Nidularium innocentii

var. minor var lineatum
nd Noelene Ritson Guzmania rd Peter Waters Nidularium altimontanum
‘Fireworks’

 rd

Cont’d P10


Cont’d from P9

Class 10 Tillandsia Small Blooming

 st Lynette Nash Tillandsia caput-medusae
nd Win Shorrock Tillandsia lorentziana
rd Peter Waters Tillandsia atroviridipetala

Class 11 Tillandsia Small Foliage

 st Johanna Elder Tillandsia tectorum
nd H & G Cooke Tillandsia edithiae
rd Win Shorrock Tillandsia tenuifolia

Class 14 Tillandsia Large Blooming

 st Win Shorrock Tillandsia disticha
nd Win Shorrock Tillandsia leiboldiana
rd Peter Waters Tillandsia rotundata

Class 15 Tillandsia Large Foliage

 st Lynette Nash Tillandsia tectorum
nd Judy Graham Tillandsia disticha
rd Peter Coyle Tillandsia cardenasii

Class 16 Vriesea Blooming

 st Alan Cliffe Vriesea ‘Sunset’
nd Robbie Burns Vriesea ospinae
rd Andrew Maloy Vriesea ‘Dark Knight’

Class 17 Vriesea Foliage

 st Andrew Maloy Vriesea ‘Nova Hybrid’
nd Alan Cliffe Vriesea fenestralis
rd Carolyn Scholes Vriesea ‘Vista’

Class 18 Bigeneric or other unlisted genus

 st Lester Ching Quesnelia ‘Tim Plowman’
nd Peter Coyle Quesnelia ‘Tim Plowman’
rd Noelene Ritson Quesnelia ‘Tim Plowman’

Class 19 Miniature bromeliad

 st Alan Cliffe Neoregelia ‘Pheasant’
nd Peter Coyle Neoregelia lilliputiana
rd Chris Paterson Neoregelia

‘Grace’s Avalanche’

Class 20 Variegated bromeliad

 st Peter Coyle Neoregelia ‘Garnish’
nd H & G Cooke Neoregelia ‘Kahala Dawn’
rd H & G Cooke Neoregelia

‘Marshall’s Select’

Class 21 Novice Blooming

 st Jordan Cleary Tillandsia tricolor
nd

Class 22 Novice Foliage

 st Chris Davis Billbergia ‘Hallelujah’
nd Chris Davis Vriesea ‘Kiwi Sunset’
rd Jordan Cleary Quesnelia marmorata

Class 23 Dish or tray garden or
novelty planting

 st Judy Graham
nd Peter Coyle
rd Becky Cavit

Class 24 Bromeliad arrangement

 st Becky Cavit
nd Judy Graham
rd Peter Waters

Class 25 Artistic or floral arrangement

 st Lynette Nash
nd Peter Waters
rd Peter Waters

Class 26 Decorative container

 st Lynette Nash Dyckia
marnier-lapostollei
nd Judy Graham Neoregelia
‘Karamea Sunbeam’
= rd Glenys Guild Neoregelia
‘Sanguine Night’
= rd Peter Coyle Vriesea lubbersii x

Class 27 Hanging container

 st Judy Graham Neoregelia pauciflora

(large form)
nd Peter Coyle Neoregelia ‘Gorrion’
rd Peter Coyle Neoregelia ‘Red of Rio’

Class 28 New Zealand Hybrid

 st Andrew Maloy Vriesea ‘Nova Queen’

(A. Maloy)
nd Andrew Maloy Vriesea ‘White Mystic’
(A. Maloy)
rd Judy Graham Vriesea ‘Nova Beauty’
(A. Maloy)
Class 29 Original Bromeliad Artwork

 st Agatha Lambert Painting – Vriesea

‘Phillip Foster’ No.
nd Peter Waters Photograph
rd Peter Waters Photograph

Class 30 Educational Display

 st David Goss Nidulariums
nd Peter Waters Neoregelia ampullacea

 0



– Photos by Andrew Devonshire
Neoregelia ‘Milagro’ – Chris Paterson

Tillandsia tectorum – Lynette Nash
(Champion of the Show)

Neoregelia carcharodon ‘Rainbow’

– Peter Waters
Neoregelia ‘Pheasant’ – Alan Cliffe


Neoregelia ‘Karamea Sunbeam’

– Judy Graham



Colour, class and style

Vriesea fenestralis – Alan Cliffe

Vriesea ‘Sunset’ – Alan Cliffe

Painting Vriesea ‘Phillip Foster’

– Agatha Lambert
Dyckia marnier-lapostollei – Lynette Nash Best bromeliad arrangement – Becky Cavit



– Photos by Andrew Devonshire
TOP: Neoregelia ‘Yin’ – Carolyn Scholes
RIGHT: Tillandsias galore

BELOW: Neoregelia ‘Thelma’s Choice’ plus
a bit of ‘Photoshop’! Peter Waters’ entry in
the Original Bromeliad Artwork class.



Fibonacci in your pineapples…


Pineapple fruitletsPineapple and it’s crown
Garden Ramble


Sunday April 5th
10.00am to 1.00pm


• Bill and Juacinda Doe
75 Upper Harbour Drive, Greenhithe.
• Becky and Tony Cavit
9 Brigantine Place, Beachhaven.
4



Mathematical Fibonacci sequence


in your pineapples – Compiled by Alan J. Thomson


Fans of The Da Vinci Code,

mathematicians, technical

analysts, believers in the
supernatural, even some bee-keepers
and rabbit-breeders – they know
their Fibonacci numbers. This is an
almost-magical sequence of numbers
first described in ancient Sanskrit
mathematics and introduced to the West
by Leonardo of Pisa, aka Fibonacci.

What gives this sequence its perceived
‘magical’ power is that the pattern
repeatedly appears throughout nature,
for example in the branching of
trees, the arrangement of leaves on a

stem, even in the spirals of florets on
a sunflower. Pine cones, artichoke
flowers, the family trees of honeybees

-all show Fibonacci patterns in their
arrangement together with pineapple
fruitlets.
How the Fibonacci sequence works

Each number in the Fibonacci
sequence is the sum of the previous

two numbers. That means the first 20

Fibonacci numbers are:
0 5 8 4 55 89
44 77 6 0 987 597 584 4
8 6765

Each number in the sequence is roughly
.6 8 times greater than the previous
number. And if you divide one number
in the sequence by the number that
comes after it, the ratio is consistently
about 6 .8%. For example, 8/ =
0.6 5 , or / 4 = 0.6 7.

This ratio, 6 .8%, is known as ‘the
golden mean’. Other key ratios are
8. % (found by dividing a number in
the series by the number two places to
the right) and .6% (found by dividing
one number in the series by the number
three places to the right).

Fibonnacci in the pineapple

The pineapple (Ananas comosus) is a
tropical plant and is native to Brazil,
Bolivia, Peru, and Paraguay. The
plant is a short ( – .5 m) herbaceous
perennial with 0 or more trough-
shaped and pointed leaves 0– 00 cm
long, surrounding a thick stem.

Much of the appeal of the pineapple
lies in the peculiarity of its physical
makeup. The plant itself grows from
a terminal bud surrounded by a thick
rosette of concave leaves close to the
soil surface. These leaves allow the
plant to collect water in the rosette,
where it can be absorbed by the aerial
roots that grow along the stem or
through the epidermis of their sheath.

Many of you will remember getting a
pineapple and cutting off the crown at
the top and growing that on to create
a new plant? Alas, in New Zealand
since 004 this has gone the way of
the dinosaur with all crowns now cut
off during importation to reduce the
chance of foreign insect introduction.

The fruitlets of a pineapple are arranged
in two interlocking spirals, eight spirals

Cont’d P16 5


Cont’d from P15

in one direction, thirteen in the other;
each being a Fibonacci number.

The stem eventually bears flowers, each

of which ripens into a fruitlet. A fruitlet
contains all of the parts of a complete

flower including sepals, petals, stamens

and a pistil with a stigmatic surface
where pollination takes place, as well
as an ovary where the fruitlets’ seeds
develop. On most bromeliads each
fruitlet survives independently, but on
the pineapple and its close relatives
they are fused together to produce a
single fruit. The biological term for
this sort of fusion, in which a single

fleshy fruit is made up of a crowd of
flowers, is a sorosis. It derives from

the Greek word soros, meaning a heap,
and there is a certain romance in the
idea that the pineapple is really just a

heap of flowers dressed up to look like

some kind of tough guy.

Perhaps the most extraordinary aspect
of the pineapple’s physical makeup
lies in its mathematical proportions.
It forms one of the most perfect
examples in nature of a phenomenon
known as Divine Proportion. In the
ancient world, great importance was
attached to this concept, which was
also known as the Golden Mean: it
affected the layout of buildings, the
composition of art and even literary
structure. The basis is a constant called
phi ( .6 80 9). Discovered by the
Greek mathematician Euclid, phi
emerges from a geometrical theorem
that generates a series of numbers
in which each number is the sum of
the two preceding numbers: 0, , ,

 , , 5, 8, , , and so on. It was
later named the Fibonacci series in
honour of the great thirteenth-century
Italian thinker Leonardo Fibonacci.

In the 8 0s it was discovered that,
amazingly, the Fibonacci series
frequently occurs in nature, illustrated
particularly clearly in the pineapple.
The fruitlets are arranged in curving
rows: one set goes one way from

base to top, the other crosses the first

row at an oblique angle. The number
of rows of each always conforms to
two consecutive numbers from the
Fibonacci series: usually 5 and 8 or 8
and , depending on the variety. Every
single fruit is the same in this respect.
In practical terms, this minimises the
amount of mechanical stress exerted
on it during growth. But it also means

that it fulfils the properties of Divine

Proportion -it is, mathematically,
perfect.

So next time you grab that pineapple
from the supermarket do a quick
inspection and calculation to ensure
that its fruitlets arrangement comply
with numbers from the Fibonnaci
series!

References for this article:

1. ‘Believe It or Not’ by: John Catlan
2. ‘Fibonacci Numbers in Nature’
by Jill Briton
3. ‘The Golden Number and Fibonacci
Line, Humans and nature’ by Stefan
Anitei

4. Entries from the Wikipedia website
on Fibonacci and pineapples.
6



SEED BANK

Alcantarea – geniculata, glaziouana,
imperialis (rubra)
Racinaea – tetrantha var aurantiaca
Tillandsia - gardneri, magnusiana,
viridiflora, elongata v subimbricata,
rotundata
Vriesea -altodaserrae, friburgensis
var tucumanensis, gigantea, gigantea
var seideliana, racinae, agostiniana

Werauhia - sanguinolenta

New seed received from B Hudson, M
Moffatt, D Anderson, H & R Blank

TO ALL MEMBERS

If you have fresh seed from any species,
please send as we need to have fresh
stock at all times. Seed from hybrid
plants not accepted.

ORDERING SEED:

Send orders to Seed Bank - NZ residents only

Bev Ching, P.O.Box 51361 Pakuranga Auckland 2010
Email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Phone 09 576-4595 evenings

The Seed Bank will exchange two packets of 0 seed for one ( ) large packet of
your Seed. Please make sure it is labelled correctly. PLEASE SEND A LARGE
STAMPED ADDRESS ENVELOPE.

 packet (of at least 0 seeds) - 50cents. Limited to one packet of seed per address.

Maximum $5.00 per month. Remember to consult the current seed list when

ordering. We reserve the right to provide a substitute for an out of stock seed with
another packet of seed of the same or similar genus.

This Seed Bank information can also be viewed on the BSNZ website www.bsnz.
org. Note the user name (login) is currently aechmea and the password is fasciata.
Both words must be typed in lower case to access the members’ section containing
the Seed Bank.

Bromeliad Journal – back issues available

Back issues of our monthly Bromeliad Journal are available.

2008: $3 Prior to 2008: $2

Contact Jocelyn Coyle (09) 4168272
email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 7



Group News

Far North Bromeliad Group

– Eric Stephens
The Far North Club got off to its normal
early start with our ‘traditional’ visit to
the Very Far North on January th. The
venue was ‘Aloe Aloe’, the delightful
residence, homestay and bromeliad outlet
of Jacqui O’Connell and Kevin Butler
in Okahu Downs, Kaitaia. Members
were also pleased to visit the gardens of
Valma Shanks, Lorraine and Jack Burke,
and Tessie Hansen. An additional treat
for the ‘out of towners’ was a visit to
the Frangipani Nursery at Lake Ngata.
February also saw us in the country at
the Ohaeawai residence of Glen and
Eric Stephens. Both meetings were
extremely well attended, and apart from

the usual fine weather and lunch; the
Trading Table, raffles and action some

very interesting plants were discussed
in ‘Show and Tell’. These included (in
Kaitaia): the Neoregelia ‘Yin’and ‘Yang’
grex brothers (or is it sisters?) from
Skotak 996, Aechmea sphaerocephala,
Acanthostachys strobilacea and a
variety of cultivars of Aech. racinae
x victoriana v. discolor demonstrating
the group of ‘Blackjack – like family’.
(at Ohaeawai): several examples of
Neo. pendula, from the subspecies
Hylaeaicum, recently acquired from
Dave Anderson, the glorious colour of
Till. velutina foliage, and the dainty red
flower of Till. albertiana. Also amongst
the high quality samples were Bill.
‘Domingos Martins’ and Vriesea ospinae
var gruberi.
Next meeting: Our March 5th meeting
is special as we are hosting our South
Auckland friends at Poppy and Alan
Fuller’s place ( 56A SH 0, Kerikeri)

 8


– the meeting day of March 5 being
also the Anniversary of the Fuller’s
new bromeliad enterprise. Everyone
welcome.
Northland Bromeliad Group

– Jill Hudson
Our February meeting was held at the
Glenberbie property of Joy Barnes and
Bob Johnson. Despite its established
appearance this is a comparatively new
garden. Bromeliads thrive amongst
palms and rocks and despite the hot
summer surprisingly few bromeliads
were showing signs of distress. Freda
Nash gave an excellent talk on attaching
bromeliads to driftwood and had brought
along several attractive examples. She

finds puriri a good base as it often has

advantageous holes. Eschewing glue,
sphagnum moss or any other aids, Freda
prefers to use pantyhose tied VERY
TIGHTLY to attach plants. The secret
is in the plants’ inability to move on the
base and they quickly put out roots.

The ‘Show and Tell’ was won by Sylvia
Boswell with a glossily handsome
Neoregelia ‘Perfection’. nd was Jan
Mahoney with Neoregelia ‘Hot Gossip’,
immaculate despite its unprotected
outdoor existence. rd was Christine Hale
with an unnamed large stoloniferous
neoregelia thought to be an Avon Ryan
seedling.

Next Meeting: Our AGM on March
nd at . 0pm at the Whangarei Quarry
Gardens, Russell Road. An advertised
car boot sale will precede this at am,
followed by a shared lunch.

Cont’d P19


Cont’d from P18

Bay of Plenty Bromeliad Group

– Gwen McCallum
On February th we had our first meeting
for 009 at TY&PB Club Rooms. A
beautiful display of bromeliads was set
in the centre of the room and around
the perimeter sales tables of members’
plants. Over 60 people attended so
most plants were sold. We also had
new members join our club. Lynley
Breeze welcomed visitors and thanked
them for coming. A question and answer
session was popular and kept Jo Elder
busy explaining about potting mixtures
used, sprays and fertilizers. Barry Jones
showed how to cut off pups and repot
them. A very good day.

Next Meeting: Wednesday 8th April at
. 0 pm, TY&PB Club rooms.
Plant of the Month: Variegated
bromeliads. Speaker: Roger Allan on
companion planting with bromeliads.

Garden Visits:

 . Alister Coleman, 5 Dixon Road,
Papamoa,
. Lynley Wilson, 9 Sandhurst Drive,
. Marcel & Antonia Authier, 9 Lotus
Ave, Mt Maunganui.


Eastern Bay of Plenty Bromeliad and
Orchid Group

– Eunice Silvester
Our new year started very pleasantly
with a garden ramble in Whakatane.

Joan Robinson is a well-known local

floral artist who has recently succumbed

to ‘brommania’ so there was a high level
of interest in seeing her garden. We
weren’t disappointed, with her beginning
collection arranged with great artistry on

different layers both inside and outside
her home. Our next garden, Magee’s,
in Eivers Rd, is one we have watched
grow and mature over several years to
its present splendid state. The palms,
cycads and bromeliads are at their peak
now, and Rose and Kevin have already
started a garden around what will be

their new home, so we await our first

visit there with great anticipation! Our
meeting and afternoon tea was at Jackie
and Neils Israelson’s in Sullivan Street,
under a pergola surrounded by the most

magnificent vegetable and fruit gardens,

crickets whirring, birds singing, gentle
breeze and not a bug or pest in sight! The
brom garden is beautifully presented
within a mellowed section they have
gardened for around 40 years, a delightful
close to an enjoyable afternoon. Trevor
and Pam displayed exquisite orchids
from their collection and there was an
extra-large selection of enticing broms
for sale.

Some new ideas for the coming year
include circulating a ‘wish list’ of broms/
plants amongst members, question and
answer sessions at each meeting, free

raffle tickets for those who bring plants

for ‘Show & Tell’ and a resounding no to
monthly competitions.

Next meeting: . 5pm Sunday 5th
March at the Lamont and Rivett adjoining
gardens. Bring your lunch and have it on

the deck. And remember….. free raffle

tickets for ‘Show & Tell’ plant owners!

South Auckland Bromeliad Group

– Marion Morton
On st March our meeting was held at
the delightful garden of Pat Labrum

Cont’d P20 9


Cont’d from P19

and Mary Cole in New Lynn. We had a
beautiful hot day and a large attendance.
Pat and Mary have a large deck at the
back of the garden and they then built
a shed intending to house their broms.
However, their neighbour’s pohutakawa
tree made the shed so cold that it is now
used as a tool shed and the bromeliads
are now housed in a plastic house in a
sunnier location. It has a lower wall of
brick that acts as a heat sink, and is ideal
for growing on their plants. Mary enjoys
physical work and has lugged heaps of
rocks from Mt Eden to create a very
attractive waterfall. Large rocks are used
in the various gardens which are packed
with bromeliads.

A great effort! It’s easy to imagine the
hard work that both have put into it. It’s
a peaceful garden with lots of interest - a
great place to relax after a day playing
golf! We then went to the garden of
June Sly in Glen Eden. June has been
a member of the Society since 994 and
made us very welcome. She told us
she is 88 and a half and does all of the
gardening herself except for the lawns.
She grows a variety of plants including
succulents and bromeliads, and has
an amazing vegetable garden. A very
energetic and amazing lady.

Finally we visited Subtropical Plants at
5 Patts Road, Glen Eden. They have
a very nicely laid out garden with lots
of palms and bromeliads and several
members bought plants.

Next meeting: April 5 commencing
at .00 a.m. at Gellerts Nursery,
Gellerts Road, Karaka, followed by a
visit to Margaret and Bryan Kitchers’
at Hamilton Drive, Waiuku, and
Norma Cook’s garden at 4a Kauri
Drive, Waiuku. We will have lunch at

the Kitchers’ so please bring your own
lunch, chairs and mugs.

Hawkes Bay Bromeliad Group

-Judy Newman
Our A.G.M. was held at The Beacon
on the st of March with a good
attendance.

The new committee; President:
Anna Le Comte, Secretary: Judy
Newman, Treasurer: Grace Smith.
Denise Dreaver remains on the committee
and is joined by Julie Greenhill, Colin
Anderson and Wade Smith.

The competition results for the year
were: st open – Grace Smith; nd –
Judy Newman; rd - Julie Greenhill and
Colin Anderson. The novice section was
won by Pauline Sutherland, nd – Denise
Dreaver and rd – Yvonne Gilbertson.
The winners all received garden vouchers.
The discussion plants were those entered
in the competition. Also shown were an
Aechmea racinae wanting a name and a
Neoregelia ‘Tascha’ (Skotak no 6) which
was showing several different coloured
sports.

The monthly competition results were;

Open – st equal – Neoregelia
‘Predator’, Grace Smith and Alcantarea
glaziouana (in flower) ,Colin Anderson;
nd – Neoregelia ‘Royal Hawaiian’,
Wade Smith; rd equal Neoregelia
lilliputiana, Julie Greenhill and Aechmea
‘Kiwi’ x ‘Morgana’, Judy Newman.
Novice – st Neoregelia ‘ Hot Gossip’,
Yvonne Richardson.

Next meeting: 9th of March at Julie
Greenhill’s home in Bayview.

 0



OFFICERS

Patron: Patricia Sweeney
President: Alan Cliffe (09) 479- 45
Vice Presidents: Dave Anderson (09) 6 8-867

Lester Ching (09) 576 4595
Secretary: Glenys Guild (09) 8 0-9669
Treasurer: Peter Waters (09) 5 4-56 6
Librarian: Noelene Ritson (09) 6 5-8 4
Life Members: Laurie Dephoff, Patricia Perratt,

Patricia Sweeney, Len Trotman
Auditor: Colin Gosse
Scientific Officer:

Peter Waters (09) 5 4-56 6

Committee: Don Brown
Robbie Burns
David Cowie
Jocelyn Coyle
Chris Paterson
Kesson Sharp
Sandy Stonham
Alan J. Thomson

Cultivar Registrar:

Gerry Stansfield

Seed Bank Chairman:
Bev Ching


(09) 6 6 75
(09) 8 5- 866
(09) 6 0-8 0
(09) 4 6-8 7
(09) 6 5-6707
(09) 8 8-805
(09) 6 7-9658
0 7 5 078
(09) 834-7178
(09) 576-4595
MEMBERSHIP SUBSCRIPTION

New Zealand:

Ordinary membership NZ $35.00 ($5.00 discount if paid before the end of February).
Dual membership (same household) NZ $45.00 ($5.00 discount also applies as above).

Overseas:

AUD $30.00 Australia, US $30.00 United States and other overseas countries. Send all payments to

the Treasurer, Peter Waters, Half Moon Rise, Bucklands Beach, AUCKLAND.

CORRESPONDENCE

All general correspondence should be sent to the Secretary, Bromeliad Society of New Zealand,

P.O. Box 08- 68, Symonds Street, Auckland, New Zealand. The opinions expressed in letters or
articles in the Journal are the contributors’ own views and do not necessarily express the views or
policy of the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand Inc.
BROMELIAD JOURNAL

Deadline:

For all editorial and advertising, the first

Tuesday of publication month

Editorial Committee

Dave Anderson
Murray Mathieson
Peter Waters

Regular Writers

Alan Cliffe

Gerry Stansfield

Alan J. Thomson

Production

Murray Mathieson

Distributon

Dave Anderson

All enquiries and contributions welcome, please
contact any member of the editorial committee
or send to Peter Waters, Half Moon Rise,
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FROM THE REGISTRAR – Gerry Stansfield

NEW HYBRIDS from Andrew Steens

It’s been a while since we have had any new bromeliad hybrids from Andrew,
so it is nice to see he is still keeping his hand in. Andrew had some of the new
plants available at the February 009 Fiesta, and I hope some of you were
lucky enough to get your hands on these lovely new hybrids. The following notes
and photos are from Andrew.

Vriesea ‘Exotica Jungle Tips’ is a large beastie that has Vriesea bituminosa as
a mother. Father unknown! While it doesn’t grow as large as the mother, it will
still reach a height and spread of 70cm. Like Mum, it has lovely black tips to the
leaves. It differs in the colour of the leaves, which are a nice mossy green, with
darker squiggles across them, making this a more interesting specimen than the
species.

Neoregelia ‘Exotica Red Queen’ came from a cross I made between Neo. ‘Sheer
Delight’ and a dark red form of Neo. aff princeps that I obtained from Brazil.
It forms rosettes of rich tamarillo red leaves lightly speckled and occasionally

splashed with lime green, up to 20cm high by 50cm wide. At flowering, the

centre lightens to crimson which makes a really nice contrast. Great as an accent
plant in open landscapes. Prefers bright light or full sun (with a little midday
shade in mid summer) to bring out red leaf colour. Can take slight frosts.

Neoregelia ‘Exotica Pink Panther’. Selected from a batch of Neoregelia
johannis seedlings from seed imported from Brazil, this cultivar achieves a
spread of 80cm with broad glossy leaves in multiple shades of pink. The colours
develop early from pup, as soon as the new leaves are exposed to the sun. As the
plant grows, the colours keep getting better.

Get involved …please!

 . Calling all members. Attend the Society’s AGM on Tuesday March 4thand have

your say in the election of officers. Better still …why not put your name forward

for election to the committee? We always need ‘new blood’ and fresh ideas.

 . Send us your material for possible publication in our monthly Bromeliad
Journal. Articles on your collection – on particular growing problems you’ve
encountered – interesting and possibly humorous anecdotes about broms. All
contributions welcome. Send your material to Peter Waters at Half Moon
Rise, Bucklands Beach Auckland or email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.



FROM THE REGISTRAR – Photos by Andrew Steens

Vriesea ‘Exotica Jungle Tips’


Neoregelia ‘Exotica Red Queen’


Neoregelia ‘Exotica Pink Panther’



Nidularium ‘Madonna’ re-visited

– Gerry Stansfield
As a sequel to last month’s article on Nidularium ‘Madonna and ‘Miranda’
you will be interested to hear that Beverly Ching of Pakuranga Auckland
very kindly supplied a pup of Wittrockia cyathiformis. I not only
discovered that it has fine hairs at the base of the pup but also the leaf form,
and its width is the same as our ‘Madonna’ and also the spines are the same in
size and space. But that’s not all it has! Wittrockia cyathiformis has dark green
mottling on the leaves, the same as Nidularium ‘Madonna’. In last month’s article
I mentioned that Maurie Kellett of Melbourne thought it resembled a canistrum.
Well, at that time cyathiformis was called a canistrum, but it has since been
changed to a wittrockia. So, it is possible that our Wittrockia cyathiformis was
one of the parents, but what the other parent was we may never know!


Wittrockia cyathiformis


Nidularium ‘Madonna’ A Nidularium ‘Madonna’

pup showing the fine hairs.

 4

 

February 2009
Vol 49 No 2
Sat 21st & Sun 22nd Feb
Mt Eden War Memorial Hall
489 Dominion Road, Balmoral, Auckland
Kay Steen’s garden, Te Puru
Front cover: This month we visit the garden of Kay and Ron Steen at Te Puru, a small
settlement north of Thames on the Coromandel coast. You can read all about it on page 8.
Article and photos by Alan J. Thomson.
Bromeliad Journal – February 2009 issue
CONTENTS
FEBRUARY
21st -22nd FIESTA. The Society’s annual
Show and Sale at the Mt Eden War
Memorial Hall, 489 Dominion Road,
Balmoral, Auckland. 9.00am to 3.00pm.
Admission $5.00. Free parking.
21st Society dinner at Tusk Restaurant,
Dominion Rd, Auckland, 7.15pm. If you
would like to attend the dinner please
contact Dave Anderson (09) 638 8671.
22nd Northland Bromeliad Group meeting.
24th Society meeting at Greyfriars Hall,
corner of Mt Eden and Windmill roads,
Mt Eden, starting 7.30pm. Speaker:
Alan Cliffe will talk about Fiesta show
winners. Monthly choice, albo-marginated
neoregelias.
MARCH
1st South Auckland Group meeting.
1st Hawkes Bay Group meeting / AGM.
11th Bay of Plenty Group meeting / AGM.
18th Bay of Plenty Group garden visits.
22nd Wellington Tillandsia Group meeting
24th Society meeting at Greyfriars Hall,
corner of Mt Eden and Windmill roads, Mt
Eden, starting 7.30pm. Monthly choice,
mounted bromeliads (rocks and logs) other
than tillandsias.
29th Hawkes Bay Group meeting.
President’s Page 3
Bromeliad Society January meeting news- Dave Anderson 4
‘Bromadelaide2009’ – four special auction lots up for grabs 6
Kay Steen’s ‘Tropicana Gardens’ in Te Puru – Alan J. Thomson 8
Seed Bank – Bev Ching 10
Society officers, membership information and Journal directory 11
Nidularium ‘Madonna’ and Nidularium ‘Miranda’ – Gerry Stansfield 12
Nidularium ‘Madonna’ background – Derek Butcher 15
Alcantarea ‘skirts’ …on or off? – Diane Timmins 16
Group News 17
From the Registrar …Dyckia ‘Brian Chudleigh’ – Gerry Stansfield 20
Bromeliad Society of New Zealand Inc
The opinions expressed in articles or letters in this Journal are the contributors’ own views and
do not necessarily express the views or the policy of the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand
COMING EVENTS
Please see the Group News section starting on page 17 for more details of group meeting
times and venues.
PRESIDENT’S PAGE
The doors open on our Fiesta
2009 at 9.00am Saturday 21st
February. Before then there
is still a lot of work to do. Plants for
sale should be set up where possible
on the Friday beforehand. Please don’t
bring any into the hall until we have
put down the plastic sheeting and set
the tables out. We have 32 sellers this
year, which are more than previously,
so space will be at a premium. Your
tolerance is appreciated. Rather than
bring everything in for the Saturday,
you may find it better to keep some
plants back until Sunday morning,
when you can restock. All plants
must be properly labelled with names
and price stickers and be clean. Sales
tables will be named and a hall plan
available. Plants for the display should
be available from 10.00-11.00 am on
Friday.
We would like as many second hand
plastic shopping bags and cartons as
possible. These can be delivered to
the foyer on Friday or before the doors
open on Saturday or Sunday.
There will be Fiesta name tags available
for helpers and sellers.
Plants for the competition must be
clean, drained of water and properly
named. If you are unsure of the name
or whether your plant fits into a
particular category the people logging
in the plants will help you. Competition
plants must be checked in between 1.00
and 5.00pm Friday. The competition
plant area is OUT OF BOUNDS to
all except the official helpers who are
putting out the plants.
Please only park in front of the hall
to load and unload. There is plenty of
parking around the back of the hall and
in the side streets.
We want to see a big crowd at the Fiesta.
This is our best opportunity to get new
members into our Society (most of us
joined after attending an annual show).
Invite along your friends, work mates
and relatives – first timers are always
amazed at the variety of plants on
display. Have a great time and good
luck in the competitions.
In April we are going to try something
different and run a swap meeting.
Everyone can bring in up to 3 plants
each which you can then negotiate to
trade. We expect absolute chaos!
Our AGM comes around again at the
March meeting. Most of the committee
has agreed to stand again but we would
like to receive nominations from
anybody else who wants to contribute.
Nominations will also be taken
from the floor on the night. I will be
standing down as President after a very
enjoyable three year term. It’s been a
lot of fun and tremendous thanks to the
committee who have been fantastic to
work with.
Regards,
Alan Cliffe
Bromeliad Society January
Meeting News – Dave Anderson
Alan Cliffe chaired the meeting
and welcomed members and
visitors. The Fiesta this year is
being held at the Mt Eden War Memorial
Hall in Dominion Rd from 20th to 22nd
Feb. Alan asked for volunteers for
helping at the weekend to contact him.
Annual subscriptions are due now with
a $5 discount applying to those who
pay before the end of February.
Peter Waters took us through the
‘Show and Tell’ and first up for
naming was a plant from the genus
Aechmea - subgenus Ortgesia. As
plants in this subgenus hybridize very
easily it is rare to see a true species
here in NZ. The plant brought in was
typical of these hybrids and thought
to be a hybrid of the species Aechmea
organensis. Next a plant for display
was the hybrid Neoregelia pendula x
eleutheropetala that forms a beautiful
clump of stoloniferous plants – see the
cover of the BSNZ journal September
2004. It is a hybrid made by Chester
Skotak, a winner at the Chicago World
Conference but difficult to grow in
NZ as it comes from the tropical
rainforests. A vriesea wanting a name
with the owner asking if it was Vriesea
flammea – no this plant has been
wrongly named in NZ for many years
and was thought to be a hybrid that was
similar too but different from Vriesea
‘Komet’. One of the distinguishing
features of Vriesea flammea is that it
has narrowly triangular, long tapered
leaves up to 200mm long, a rather
bulbous base and white petals. In full
flower was the species Aechmea nallyi
that has a beautiful spike but also
comes from the tropical rainforests
so cannot be easily grown in NZ. A
Vriesea vagans was brought in for
identification that is easily diagnosed
with its wiry vagrant spike. A plant
that looked like Aechmea pectinata
in flower was a hybrid supposedly
of Aechmea pectinata x fasciata but
it certainly did not have much if any
fasciata in it. Peter brought in three
plants for display:
1. Vriesea corcovadensis – probably
the only true one in NZ that is close
to Vriesea flammea with narrow
leaves as distinct from the wrongly
named plant that has been here for
many years - which is a hybrid.
2. Vriesea jonghei - a species from the
forests of central Brazil that has a
spike with green bracts that have a
brown edge and yellow petals.
3. Vriesea botafogensis – a plant that is
similar to the species saundersii that
many members have with its yellow
flowers, however the inflorescences
are quite distinct. Peter had also
brought in for display 12 different
hybrids made by Grace Goode
including, Neo ‘Africa’,’ Mandela’,
‘Zulu’, ‘Freedom’ and ‘Nelson’
among others.
Following the ‘Show & Tell’,
Alan Thomson gave a PowerPoint
presentation of the Society’s garden
visit to four gardens in Whangarei on
Nov 30th .
COMPETITIONS
Open Flowering: First David Gross
with Aechmea pectinata - a most
attractive plant with a distinctive
flower spike. Second was Judy
Graham with Vriesea ‘Fair to Middlin’
a clump of 10 plants with 6 orange
coloured flower spikes.
Open Foliage: Alan Cliffe was first
with an Aechmea ‘Ensign’. Peter
Coyle was second with Neoregelia
‘Takemura Princeps’ x ‘Grace
Darling’.
Tillandsia: Lynette Nash was first
with Tillandsia ‘Wildfire’. Second
equal were Peter Coyle with Tillandsia
tectorum and Judy Graham with
Tillandsia secunda.
Miniatures: First was Peter Coyle
and second was Alan Cliffe both
with Neoregelia ‘Wild Tiger’. In the
competition were Neoregelia ‘Alley
Cat’, ‘Wild Tiger’, ‘Tom Tom’,
‘Cat Scan’, ‘Tiger Cub’, ‘Felix’ and
‘Tabby’.
Neoregelia: First Peter Coyle with
Neoregelia ‘Tiger’ and second was
Peter Waters with Neoregelia ‘Moon
over Fort Dix’. Novice: Laura Weber
was first with a Vriesea ‘Summer Bliss’
and second was Graeme Barclay with
Neoregelia ‘Barbarian’.
The Plant of the month went to Peter
Coyle with Neoregelia ‘Painted
Delight’ – interestingly this plant did
not come first or second in its class.
Congratulations to all the winners.
NEXT MEETING
Tuesday 24th February.
Garden grown and
in pots. Many in
clumps, with pups
attached – great for
landscaping.
Lots of Neoregelias
and Vrieseas
(large ones).
Some Nidulariums
and Aechmeas.
 
Call Jannette to
view – Pt Chevalier
location
021 1399 246
849 4562
Four special auction lots…
at ‘Bromadelaide 2009’
1. Bromeliaceae Andreanae by
Eduard Francois Andre
This rare old classic book was
reprinted in 1983. It has 200 pages,
9” x 12”, hard bound, Dutch cloth
and English leather spine. It includes
forty full page botanical drawings,
and nine illustrations of Andre’s 1875
South American expedition. In 1983,
this book sold for about US$200.
Thanks to Ken Woods, Ian Hook and
the Bromeliad Society of Australia, a
pristine example of this classic limited
edition will be offered.
2. Pen drawing by Wilhelm Weber
Wilhelm Weber was one of the world’s
foremost bromeliad botanists. He lived
in East Germany, and in 1983 was
elected an Honorary Trustee of the BSI.
He was a prolific contributor of articles
for the journal, described many new
species, and also had bromeliad species
named after him. On 17 April, 1985,
he produced an A4-size pen drawing
on thick paper of a new species similar
to Tillandsia sprengeliana, signed and
dated. On the back, he wrote in pencil
a complete botanical description of
this plant in Latin. Sadly, he died
shortly afterwards following a long
and courageous struggle with cancer.
This sheet was passed on to Renate
Ehlers. More than a decade later,
Renate produced the 66 -page book The
Red-Flowered Tillandsias From Brazil
in which she introduced T. roseiflora
R.Ehlers & W. Weber, species nova.
The full description, in German and
English, was accompanied by Weber’s
pen drawing. Renate has donated
Weber’s original sheet together with
a signed copy of her book. This is a
unique piece of bromeliad history.
3. Watercolour painting by Anita
Cooper
Anita Cooper is a respected American
artist whose watercolours have won
prestigious awards in exhibitions.
Included in her works are several items
featuring bromeliads including the
popular print Las Bromelias de Costa
Rica; 1: Tillandsias, a copy of which
is one of our raffle prizes. She also
drew all of the illustrations in the book
Bromelias de Costa Rica. Anita has
donated a unique large 74cm x 53cm
watercolour painting of Tillandsia
excelsa.
4. Wood carving by Peter Huddy
Vriesea enthusiast and craftsman Peter
Huddy has donated a small framed
wood carving of a vriesea being
pollinated by a humming-bird.
There will be four special lots in the Rare Plant Auction at BROMADELAIDE
2009. This auction will immediately follow the conference dinner on
Saturday night, 11 April. It has been suggested that our members (not only
those registered for the conference), might be interested in prior details as these
four lots will all represent once-in-a-lifetime opportunities.
(Note: Our President, Alan Cliffe is attending BROMADELAIDE 2009 and he is
happy to place auction bids on behalf of any New Zealand Society members. Please
contact him if you’re interested.)
‘Bromadelaide 2009’ auction lots…
1. Bromeliaceae Andreanae by Eduard Francois Andre
2. Pen drawing by Wilhelm Weber 3. Watercolour painting by Anita Cooper
4. Wood carving by Peter Huddy
Kay Steen’s garden…Te Puru
Aechmea ‘Bella’ An attractive planting ‘bed’
Vrieseas complement a ‘formal corner’ of Kay’s garden.
Come visit ‘Tropicana Gardens’
at Te Puru – Article and photos by Alan J. Thomson
Kay and Ron Steen used to be
Aucklanders but fled the big
city some years ago to find a
spot where the views are great and the
fishing is on the doorstep. Five years
ago they ended up at Te Puru, a small
settlement north of Thames on the
Coromandel coast.
The beach and sea is literally on the
other side of the road and Kay is the
gardener who has transformed their
garden into a tropical oasis and nursery
called Tropicana Gardens. She is an
enthusiastic member of the Thames
Valley Bromeliad group that is thriving
and they regularly get 50 or so people
along to their monthly meetings.
Kay found there wasn’t enough water
to support lots of perennials and she
changed the plantings to more low
water plants like bromeliads. Kay
likes to buy in broms from sellers in
Auckland and grow them on and then
sell them to local ‘bromheads’. She
had quite a few Aechmea ‘Bella’ that
were bought in from Gellerts nursery
and they had bright red multi-pronged
inflorescences that looked great.
A couple of mature olive trees had
been grown and shaped into a bower
over a garden seat. This provides
welcome respite from summer sun that
has occasionally hit temperatures well
into the 40s. Kay has raised beds with
top layers of pumice on weedmat used
together with thick layers of newspaper
and pebble mix. She likes to call her
front garden the ‘Houses of Parliament’
because the members inside just sit
there and do nothing. Kay also proudly
calls herself a ‘plonker’ in that plants
are brought in and placed wherever
they look good.
Quite a few succulents are grown for sale
also. Kay feels that broms are generally
perceived as hard to understand but
succulents are supposedly easy (can’t
understand that myself!). Sitting by
her trays of succulents at the back was
a good looking cat that damages other
plants but fortunately leaves the broms
alone.
Her back garden is triangular and rises
up into dense bush. Zigzag paths are
being constructed and native plants
are being put in up the hill. Bush rats
come down from the bush and the cat
catches some. Wild goats higher up in
the bush are a regular sight and even
a big wild pig has been spotted from
time to time.
Despite the huge number of colourful
neoregelias Kay’s favourites are
billbergias and vrieseas. So next time
you are driving up the Coromandel
make sure to drop in to Tropicana
Gardens. It’s right on the main road at
Te Puru north of Thames and Kay has
a sign hanging out at the front. If the
weather is hot bring your togs too and
have a swim across the road!
10
SEED BANK
Alcantarea – geniculata, glaziouana,
imperialis (rubra)
Racinaea – tetrantha var aurantiaca
Tillandsia - gardneri, magnusiana,
viridiflora, elongata v subimbricata,
rotundata
Vriesea - altodaserrae, friburgensis
var tucumanensis, gigantea, gigantea
var seideliana, racinae, agostiniana
Werauhia - sanguinolenta
New seed received from B Hudson, M
Moffatt, D Anderson, H & R Blank
TO ALL MEMBERS
If you have fresh seed from any species,
please send as we need to have fresh
stock at all times. Seed from hybrid
plants not accepted.
ORDERING SEED:
Send orders to Seed Bank - NZ residents only
Bev Ching, P.O.Box 51361 Pakuranga Auckland 2010
Email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Phone 09 576-4595 evenings
The Seed Bank will exchange two packets of 20 seed for one (1) large packet of
your Seed. Please make sure it is labelled correctly. PLEASE SEND A LARGE
STAMPED ADDRESS ENVELOPE.
1 packet (of at least 20 seeds) - 50cents. Limited to one packet of seed per address.
Maximum $5.00 per month. Remember to consult the current seed list when
ordering. We reserve the right to provide a substitute for an out of stock seed with
another packet of seed of the same or similar genus.
This Seed Bank information can also be viewed on the BSNZ website www.bsnz.
org. Note the user name (login) is currently aechmea and the password is fasciata.
Both words must be typed in lower case to access the members’ section containing
the Seed Bank.
Saturday 21st &
Sunday 22nd Feb
BE THERE!
11
Patron: Patricia Sweeney
President: Alan Cliffe (09) 479-1451
Vice Presidents: Dave Anderson (09) 638-8671
Lester Ching (09) 576 4595
Secretary: Glenys Guild (09) 810-9669
Treasurer: Peter Waters (09) 534-5616
Librarian: Noelene Ritson (09) 625-8114
Life Members: Laurie Dephoff, Patricia Perratt,
Patricia Sweeney, Len Trotman
Auditor: Colin Gosse
Scientific Officer:
Peter Waters (09) 534-5616
Committee: Don Brown (09) 361 6175
Robbie Burns (09) 835-3866
David Cowie (09) 630-8220
Jocelyn Coyle (09) 416-8272
Chris Paterson (09) 625-6707
Kesson Sharp (09) 818-8051
Sandy Stonham (09) 627-9658
Alan J. Thomson 027 522 2078
Cultivar Registrar:
Gerry Stansfield (09) 834-7178
Seed Bank Chairman:
Bev Ching (09) 576-4595
OFFICERS
MEMBERSHIP SUBSCRIPTION
New Zealand:
Ordinary membership NZ $35.00 ($5.00 discount if paid before the end of February).
Dual membership (same household) NZ $45.00 ($5.00 discount also applies as above).
Overseas:
AUD $30.00 Australia, US $30.00 United States and other overseas countries. Send all payments to
the Treasurer, Peter Waters, 22 Half Moon Rise, Bucklands Beach, AUCKLAND.
CORRESPONDENCE
All general correspondence should be sent to the Secretary, Bromeliad Society of New Zealand,
P.O. Box 108-168, Symonds Street, Auckland, New Zealand. The opinions expressed in letters or
articles in the Journal are the contributors’ own views and do not necessarily express the views or
policy of the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand Inc.
BROMELIAD JOURNAL
Deadline:
For all editorial and advertising, the first
Tuesday of publication month
Editorial Committee
Dave Anderson
Murray Mathieson
Peter Waters
Regular Writers
Alan Cliffe
Gerry Stansfield
Alan J. Thomson
Production
Murray Mathieson
Distributon
Dave Anderson
All enquiries and contributions welcome, please
contact any member of the editorial committee
or send to Peter Waters, 22 Half Moon Rise,
Bucklands Beach, Auckland or
email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Display Advertising
Rates are:
Full Page $60.00
Half Page $30.00
Quarter Page $15.00
‘Buy & Swap’
Listings in ‘Buy & Swap’ are FREE for
members of the Society (max. 30 words).
For advertising enquiries and material, please
contact Murray Mathieson ph (09) 418 0366
or email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
12
Nidularium ‘Madonna’ and Nidularium
‘Miranda’ are reported to be hybrids,
and if so, what were the parents?
– Gerry Stansfield
Cont’d P14
These two very lovely plants have
had me puzzled for some time.
First, Nidularium ‘Madonna’.
This plant was imported by Len
Trotman some years ago from Australia
on one of his BSI conference trips,
not as “Madonna’ but as Nidularium
‘Francois Spae’. If you know your
nidulariums, you will know that they
are all from the South Atlantic Coast of
Brazil from Bahia in the north, to Santa
Catarina and Rio Grande do Sul in the
south, they are shade lovers and their
foliage would have to be considered
as soft by touch with spiny leaves
that are also soft and not hurtful, yes,
even Nidularium fulgens. The leaves
are very tender and can be torn apart
quite easily – except perhaps for the
Nidularium procerum group.
When I first saw this plant, I thought
it just can’t be Nidularium ‘Francois
Spae’ and even the genus may not
be right. After some checking with
fcbs.org and Registrar Derek Butcher
I became convinced that this plant
was really Nidularium ‘Madonna’.
The leaves are quite thick, and they
will not tear, but have to be cut with
a sharp instrument., and the foliage
is very stringy. The spines are very
sharp and dangerous. The flowering
head rises well above the centre,
unlike most other nidulariums, except
for the procerum group. But the most
interesting feature is the new pups. All
nidularium pups have some form of
stoloniferous adhesion to the mother
plant; some have a very short base as
in Nidularium rutilans and fulgens,
others have quite a long stoloniferous
base as in Nidularium albiflorum and
Nidularium campos-portoi. With
Nidularium ‘Madonna’, the new pups
are fixed firmly to the base of the
plant and when prised off will snap
like breaking a carrot in half. The
other very interesting thing about the
new pups is that they are surrounded
by brown hairs. Now, no nidularium
has hairs at the base, or anywhere
else for that matter, but wittrockias
do. In the accompanying article by
Derek Butcher you will read that Jarka
Rehak from Sydney Australia, named
and registered Nidularium ‘Madonna’
and also ‘Miranda’ and from the
article we can deduce that both plants
were the result of seed from a hybrid
cross, but unfortunately we do not
know what the parents were. We do
know that Nidularium ‘Miranda’ was
a variegated seedling from the same
grex as ‘Madonna’ but unfortunately
that does not help.
If we go back to Nidularium ‘Francois
Spae’ the parents of this hybrid tells
us that it is not possible that Len’s
13
Nidularium ‘Madonna’
Nidularium ‘Francois Spae’
Nidularium ‘Miranda’
14
Cont’d from P12
Cont’d P15
plant could have been Nid. ‘Francois
Spae’. The cross was Nidularium
innocentii var striatum x Nidularium
fulgens, remember, it is a similar cross
to Nidularium ‘Chantrieri’ - a lovely
hybrid made in 1895 by Edouard
André the famous French collector, and
named in honour of his friend Chantrier
the French hybridizer by crossing
Nidularium innocentii v. innocentii
with Nidularium fulgens. I said similar,
but as we can see Nid. ‘Francois Spae’
had Nid innocentii var striatum as
one parent and Nid.’Chantrieri had
Nid. innocentii var innocentii as one
parent. So, what does all that tell us.
Well first, both these parents have very
soft foliage, with what is described as
minute spines. One has green foliage
with white to cream striping, and the
other has maroon to wine red foliage
undersides with pale green on top.
So that colouring would account for
the very lovely wine red to burgundy
foliage of Nid. ‘Chantrieri’ and the
green foliage of Nid. innocentii var
striatum, would account for the lime
green foliage of Nid. ‘Francois Spae.’
There is quite a lot of predictability
attached to hybridising bromeliads. Like
all forms of life on earth, our bromeliad
plants have genes and chromosomes
and also colour pigmentations, along
with a few others things. All this goes
into the melting pot when a new seed is
formed. We can sometimes change the
colour, the shape, the size, depending
what seed mother plant we offer up to
the male pollen. However, we can’t
change what is not there in the genes
and chromosomes – for example, we
can’t make a very large plant from
two small plants. Getting back then
to our Nidularium ‘Madonna’, I think
you will agree with me that something
other than a nidularium was used in
this cross to have given the new plant
not only such very large proportions
but also very long and spiny foliage.
In Derek’s article, you will read that
Maurie Kellett of Melbourne Australia
has suggested there could be a hint
of Canistrum, and that’s possible as
there are a number of very large strong
foliage plants in this genus such as
Canistrum aurantiacum and Wittrockia
cyanthiformis. Now both these plants
are large with spiny foliage, so it is
possible they could have been one
of the parents, except for two other
points, the flower head on Nidularium
‘Madonna’ does not look bigeneric,
in fact I would say there is no hint of
a generic mix in the flower. To me, it
looks just like an ordinary nidularium
flower head but much larger.. The
other point is the hairs at the base
of the new pups, I don’t have either
Canistrum aurantiacum or Wittrockia
cyathiformis, so I don’t know what the
new pups would look like, but those
who have these plants may help to
shed some light on this puzzle.
I said earlier that wittrockias are the
only other plants with hairs at the
base of the new pup, but that would
also make it a bigeneric, and could
possibly change the whole appearance
of the plant, as you know wittrockias
are very large plants, very spiny and
15
Nidularium
‘Madonna’ named
by Jarka Rehak
before 1997
Grown from seed in NSW
allegedly from Seidel circa
1980 - has suggestions of a
large Nid. innocentii but has a scape
15cm long - primary bracts start out
white but become bright red at anthesis
- white petals - the inflorescence
threatens to fall over because the scape
is so long”.
The following extract is part of an
article by Registrar Derek Butcher in
Bromeletter 15(4): 7. 1997:
‘While at Gympie I was presented with
a plant that had come all the way from
the Rehaks in Sydney just for me. It
was Nidularium ‘Miranda’ which has
quite persistent variegations. I was also
given more details on the mysterious
Nidularium ‘Madonna’.
A few weeks back, that Nidularium
specialist Ruby Ryde showed me a
non-variegated plant called ‘Madonna’
which had her puzzled. Where did the
name come from’? Was it a species in
disguise? The inflorescence was well
above the leaf rosette and with a brolly
to protect me from the Sydney rain
I took its photo. Meantime, back in
Adelaide, we had this plant which we
had been given by the Rehaks, coming
into flower. The inflorescence was
deep in the leaf rosette and the primary
bracts were WHITE. This was exciting
stuff! As the inflorescence rose, its
colour became rose too!. At flowering
time the long petals were white and
the primary bracts bright red with
the inflorescence threatening to fall
over because the scape was so long!
I showed this phenomenon to Maurie
Kellett (Melbourne) and he suggested
there was a hint of Canistrum. Please
note that when I have a problem I
call in all the experts because Ruby
Ryde was personally shown this
phenomenon too. She confirmed my
suspicions that it was the same as her
Nidularium ‘Madonna’. The Rehaks
have confirmed that Nidularium
‘Miranda’ had been selected for its
potential variegation and with selective
breeding this had become quite stable.
It would appear that ‘Madonna’ was
from the same seed batch (grex?).
We now treat ‘Miranda’ as a variegated
sport of ‘Madonna’ but the imported
seed from Seidel remains a mystery’.
Cont’d from P14
some have dark green blotched foliage
that I feel sure would have come out in
the new hybrid. So, our mystery plant
will remain a mystery until someone
finds out just what the parents were,
but at least they have been registered
and these two very lovely plants have
names, as in Nidularium ‘Madonna’
and Nidularium ‘Miranda’, except,
I am not sure about the nidularium
part!
16
be…’, or ‘Once you start trimming
lower leaves, that’s it – you have to
carry on with it regularly…’
However, the major effect of keeping
the ‘skirt’ was that watering became an
issue. The lower canopy of drooping
brown leaves provided a cover around
the entire edge of the pot that deflected
water. Neither the sparse and erratic
manual watering, nor (perhaps more
significantly) the rain water that was
their lifeline to survival got through.
Even when cascading from the centre
and upper leaves down through the
plant, water never reached the roots as
it ran off the lower leaves. This in turn
led to greater die off of lower leaves
to the detriment of the beauty of the
plant.
Eventually I decided to give them
a ‘haircut’; this has led to happier
and more attractive plants. Now I’ve
definitely decided that plants in the
ground should keep their ‘skirt’ on as
they are able to still draw water from
the broader source of the ground, but
all my potted alcantarea will be getting
a regular trim from the word go.
Cutting off the lower leaves or
‘skirts’, or leaving them on
in their natural state, this is a
dilemma associated with the ongoing
care of one of the most rewarding
bromeliads – Alcantarea imperialis.
Known as the ‘Giant of Bromeliads’,
its longevity, enormous size and grand
towering inflorescence leads the
caregiver of such a plant to develop
quite an attachment to each individual
specimen.
However, throughout their development
there are decisions that have to be
made to ensure their ongoing good
health and attractive form. Deciding
to plant alcantareas up into pots as
opposed to planting directly into the
ground means taking on an obligation
to maintain them in their stressful
artificial environment.
One of the reasons I enjoy bromeliads
is their low maintenance nature. So
my plan was to follow a care plan for
alcantareas in pots that involved doing
as little as possible. This included
leaving on their ‘skirt’. My reasons
were: - ‘Look at the pretty ‘petticoat’…
that is how nature intended them to
Alcantarea ‘skirts’ …better on or off?
– Article and photos by Diane Timmins
17
Group News
The Wellington Tillandsia Group
– Phyllis Purdie
At our last meeting the plants discussed
were:
T hondurensis which had a very long
inflorescence baring pink bracts and
tubular purple flowers.
T streptocarpa ssp paraisoensis used
to be (mini), long purple flowers were
borne on a long infl.
Another plant with a very long
inflorescence and flowered scented
mauve flowers was T duratii.
T simulata also had a long infl with
flowers that can range from white
to white with mauve stripes or spots
through to blue. One plant had a white
flower bunch of flowers and a blue one
as well.
T (Medusa’s Curse) had a branch infl
with red bracts baring deep wine tubular
flowers. T caput- medusae was similar
to this but the leaves were much firmer.
T bradeana (was abdita) was different
with its long pink bracts and tubular
blue flowers. A plant which hadn’t
flowered for 3 years when kept in the
warm house was flowering this year
when placed in a cold environment.
The infl was branched with pink
bracts and purple flowers. T arhiza x
streptocarpa was flowering with lilac
flowers on a long infl. Seed was from
both Ecuador and Peru bought plants.
T straminea was another long infl plant
with scented white or light pink flowers
edged with lilac. Two very small plants
were T peiranoi with silvery leaves
and scented flared lilac flowers and a
smaller plant, T peiranoi x streptocarpa
baring scented light purple flowers.
A different looking plants was T
caulescens which had light green
foliage and short red bracts on its stem
and long white flared flowers tipped
with very pale lilac. T meridionalis
had a hanging infl with apricot /pink
bracts and flared white flowers. T
meridionalis (salmon) was similar but
its flowers were white. Probably the
smallest Tillandsia was T pedicellata.
Many plants were mounted together on
one piece of wood and had small very
pale yellow tubular flowers. They can
grow on cactus and telegraph poles or
small bushes. It is self fertile. A plant
with green tubular flowers and pink
bracts was T atroviridipetala. T abdita
had purple flowers with the centre
leaves colouring red when about to
flower. Other plants were T ‘Victoria’,
T stricta (blue) and T straminea. Plant
sales and afternoon tea followed with
members then looking at Dianne’s
glasshouse and shade quarters.
Northland Bromeliad Group
- Jill Hudson
Our first meeting for 2009 was held
at the Maungatapere home of Minnie
Whitehead. On (another) hot afternoon
we were grateful for the shade of
Minnie’s large verandah and, when we
went walkabout, the enormous totara
trees in the garden. The property is
blessed with bush, a kahikatea swamp
and magnificent rocks. Minnie has
added a variety of fascinating plants
including rare deciduous trees, a
lake and, of course, bromeliads. Not
a garden to flit around. One needs
to devote a certain amount of time
to ramble as it wouldn’t do to miss
anything!
Cont’d P18
18
After discussing a variety of interesting
‘problem bromeliads’ we were treated
to a demonstration of dividing a
neoregelia, probably a concentrica
hybrid. Most people went home with
a pup.
The ‘Show and Tell’ was won by Sylvia
Boswell whose anonymous neoregelia
with its shocking pink centre almost
had us reaching for dark glasses.
Definitely the WOW factor. Second
was Jan Mahoney with a perfect
Neoregelia ‘Manoa Beauty’ and third
was Minnie Whitehead’s Neoregelia
‘Zoe’ which had numerous pups.
Next Meeting: February 22nd at Joy
Barnes’, 84 Ngunguru Road. Another
‘Show and Tell’ will be enjoyed.
Bay of Plenty Bromeliad Group
– Jo Elder
Our last meeting for 2008 took the
form of a Christmas Pot Luck Lunch
and was held at the home of Brian &
Natalie Simmonds, at Pyes Pa. It was
very pleasant wandering around their
large garden on a sunny day in the
shade of many large and very old trees.
Brian & Natalie grow most of their
Bromeliads under glass and it was
interesting to observe the wonderful
color they get in their plants because
of the natural heat from the sun under
glass. A delicious lunch was enjoyed
by 40 members who were able to sit
under the trees and chat together. A
continuous raffle was held and many
treasures were snapped up.
Prior to the lunch we visited the garden
of Joyce & Colin Thomas, which has
an easterly aspect and slopes down
towards the harbour. They are relatively
new members of our group, but they
have a nice collection of Bromeliads
& are enthusiastic about their new
found addiction. From there we went
on to visit Elizabeth Bailey who has
a very nice collection of Orchids &
Bromeliads.
Next Meeting: Wednesday 11th March
2009 at 12.30pm TY&PB Club Rooms.
This meeting will be our AGM: This
procedure takes a short time and then
we will move on to the topic of the
month which is: Presentation and
preparation of plants for the Sales
Table. Plant of the Month: Variegated
Neoregelias
Garden Visits: Wednesday 18th March
2009 10.00am - 1. Doris Shea 15 Cedar
Grove, Matua,
2. Tom & Heather Slee, 6 Hinewa Rd
Otumoetai, 3. Jo Elder, 4 Hinewa Rd.
Otumoetai.(Bring Lunch).
South Auckland Bromeliad Group
– Marion Morton
On 1st February 68 brave souls ventured
into the unchartered part of Pukekawa.
We were delighted to be welcomed by
our genial hosts – Susann and Hawi
Winter and their family who made us
very welcome.When Hawi and Susann
first came to Pukekawa 20 years ago
it was just 25 acres of pasture and a
couple of pine trees. Every weekend
they would commute between
Auckland and Pukekawa and plant
the seeds of various trees, and now
there over 10,000 trees. He eventually
Cont’d from P17
Cont’d P19
19
quit his job in Auckland as a forensic
scientist and moved to Pukekawa to
live, retrained, and is now a chemistry
teacher at Pukekawa School.
Hawi joined the South Auckland
Bromeliad Group just 2 years ago and
quickly got the disease and has been
an avid collector ever since. All his
bromeliads are researched, catalogued,
and planted according to their preferred
conditions. He now has over 2,000
plants.
Everything on the farm is organically
grown and he has 200 varieties of fruit
and nut trees on the property.
The raffles were won by Brian Lord,
and Judy Small.
Next Meeting: 1st March at 1.30pm
at the home of Pat Labrum and Mary
Cole at 22 Sheridan Drive, New Lynn.
Go from Golf Road into Gilliam Street.
Then turn right into Sheridan Drive.
There will be the usual plant sales and
members are requested to bring along
mugs and chairs.
Hawkes Bay Bromeliad Group
– Judy Newman
We had a very good turnout of members
for our January meeting and president
Margaret welcomed members in
the lovely shady garden of Anna Le
Comte. Brenda Tuck asked if members
were interested in establishing a
garden at her rental property which
would include bromeliads and
succulents. If so the club would be able
to have advertising on the fence. The
discussion topic was sun hardy plantsvery
necessary in the summer we are
having! Colin Anderson brought along
Deuterocohnia brevifolia, a lovely
dwarf Puya hromradnikii, Hectia sp,
and Encholirion sp. He also showed
what not to have in the sun, a bleached
out Billbergia ‘Muriel Waterman’.
Margaret Bluck had a Billbergia
’Smokey Rose’ which receives a lot
of sun and looked very happy. Judy
Newman had one of the Aechmea
recurvata hybrids, and a Neoregelia
ampullacea hybrid.
Competition
1st equal Margaret Bluck Billbergia
Hallelujah’
Grace Smith Neoreglia ‘Milagro’
2nd Wade Smith Neoregelia ‘Beta’
3rd equal Colin Anderson Neoregelia
‘Manoa Beauty’
Judy Newman Dyckia marnierlapostollei
x Dyckia ‘Silver King’
Novice 1st Denise Dreaver
Neoregelia ‘Karamea Bright Surprise’
2nd Pauline Sutherland Neoregelia
‘Hula Girl’
In Show and Tell there was a very nice
Neoregelia ‘Meyendorffii Spineless’.
The raffles were won by Denise
Dreaver and Pauline Sutherland.
Next meetings:
There will be no meeting in February
as our normal meeting day falls on
Art Deco Weekend in which several
members are involved. We will have
our annual meeting on the 1st of March
at the Beacon and our normal March
meeting four weeks later on March 29th
at Julie Greenhill’s.
Cont’d from P18
20
FROM THE REGISTRAR – Gerry Stansfield
Dyckia ‘Brian Chudleigh’
This month we show you a very lovely dyckia hybrid from the late Brian
Chudleigh. It’s an interesting story. According to Brian’s wife, Cushla, Brian
wanted to cross Dyckia marnier-lapostollei with Dyckia fosteriana var ‘Silver
King’. At the time Brian’s plant was about to flower, both Brian and Cushla were
holidaying in Australia so Brian gave his plant to Johanna Elder for safe keeping and
also to cross as Johanna had the other parent Dyckia fosteriana var ‘Silver King’.
Johanna crossed the two plants and in due course Brian sowed the seed and raised
this very lovely plant. Peter Coyle purchased a plant from Brian and grew it on in his
big greenhouse. In the top photo in Peters Coyle’s greenhouse the plant has not been
subjected to high light. The bottom photo is of a small plant cut from the large mother
plant for Peter Waters. Peter has given the plant much more light and it’s showing
the very lovely mauve colouring that would have come from the fosteriana ‘Silver
King’. Peter Waters has named and registered the plant Dyckia ‘Brian Chudleigh’
as a fitting tribute to Brian and his hybridizing work.
In Peter Coyle’s greenhouse.
The same plant with higher light at Peter Waters’.

AUG 2009
VOL 49 NO 8
• Nong Nooch bromeliad house Edmundoa ‘Alvim Seidel’

Two tillandsias

Tillandsia dorotheae

Tillandsia dorotheae was found
in northern Argentina in the early
970s and first described in 987
by Werner Rauh. It is a small silvery
plant which offsets readily. Named
after Dorothea Muhr, an early
bromeliad collector.

The flowers are a striking carmine-
red. It has been suggested that it is
a natural hybrid between Tillandsia
albertiana and argentina but neither
of these plants are found in the same
area and it is generally accepted as a
good species. This plant is a cooler
growing type and does well in the
Auckland climate.

Tillandsia heubergeri

Tillandsia heubergeri is a similar
sized xeric species from Bahia
in Brazil. Discovered in 988, it
as described in 996 by Renate
Ehlers. Mainly a lithophyte, or
growing on rocks, but it has also
been found on trees. It is closely
related to Tillandsia roseiflora and
is in the group containing Tillandsia
sprengeliana. The leaves are a
silver-grey and the floral bracts a
dark pink. The petals are an intense
lilac-pink. These members of the
red-flowered Brazilian tillandsias
all have very compact form with
closely packed leaves and so it
is critical that they do not get too
wet for too long. Other members
are Tillandsia kautskyi, sucrei and
brachyphylla.

Tillandsia dorotheae. Notes by Peter Waters.
Plant and photo from Dave Anderson.
Tillandsia heubergeri. Notes, plant and photo
from Peter Waters.



Bromeliad Society of New Zealand Inc

Bromeliad Journal – Aug 2009 issue
CONTENTS


Tillandsia heubergeri and Tillandsia dorotheae – Peter Waters
President’s Page – Kesson Sharp 4
Spring Sale October 8th 4
Bromeliad Society July meeting news – Glenys Guild 5
Cultural Tips: Potting and Potting Mixes – Odean Head 6
Society officers, subs and Journal directory 8
Edmundoa ‘Alvim Seidel’ – Gerry Stansfield 9
Seed Bank – Bev Ching
From the Registrar. Neos from Andrew Steens – Gerry Stansfield
Group News 4
The bromeliads at Nong Nooch, Thailand – John and Agatha Lambert 8

The opinions expressed in articles or letters in this Journal are the contributors’ own views and
do not necessarily express the views or the policy of the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand

COMING EVENTS

Please see the Group News section starting on page 4 for more details of group

meeting times and venues.

AUGUST
22nd Hawkes Bay Group meeting
23rd Northland Group meeting
25th Society meeting at Greyfriar’s
Hall, corner of Mt Eden and Windmill
roads, Mt Eden, starting 7. 0pm.
Speaker: Peter Waters on some plant
naming problems. Monthly choice
competition: Spotted neoregelias.

SEPTEMBER

6th South Auckland Group meeting
9th Bay of Plenty Group meeting
13th Far North Group meeting
20th Eastern Bay of Plenty Orchid and
Bromeliad Group meeting
22nd Society meeting at Greyfriar’s
Hall, corner of Mt Eden and Windmill
roads, Mt Eden, starting 7. 0pm.
Speaker: Andrew Steens will talk on
his latest neoregelia hybrid releases.
Monthly choice competition: Banded
neoregelias.
27th Wellington Tillandsia Group
meeting

FRONTCOVER: Worth waiting for! The fabulous Nong Nooch bromeliad house
is on display this month. Many thanks to John and Agatha Lambert. See page 8.


PRESIDENT’S PAGE

Well another month has
rolled by and thankfully the
weather is on the improve. I
have been informed that the long range
forecast is for an early spring and it
should be warmer than usual so let’s
hope that this is correct.

I would like to thank all those members
that donated plants for our auction last
month to raise funds for the conference
and to those of you that participated in
the bidding and not least our thanks to
Peter Coyle who was our auctioneer. We
raised the sum of $ , 0 which was an
outstanding achievement and this will
go towards our conference fund which
means that the cost of attending will be
more affordable – WELL DONE.

At our last committee meeting it was
decided that we should duplicate what
the Florida Bromeliad Council is doing
to keep track of the older species so
that they are not lost to the bromeliad
world. Our thanks to Barry Uren who
has indicated that he would be willing
to take on this task. It will involve
setting up a database detailing who

Free one-year BSI subscriptions...

Continuing on with the drive to get more
New Zealanders to join the Bromeliad
Society International (BSI) the committee

have decided to take out five one-year

BSI subscriptions and ballot one off
every second month starting in August.
The ballots, to include all current

financial members of the Bromeliad

Society of New Zealand, will be drawn at
our monthly meetings. GOOD LUCK!

has any of these bromeliads growing
and making sure that there are other
members growing the same.

This month’s meeting will see the
first of our lucky draws for one of
our financial members to win a year’s
subscription to the BSI. This will be
run every second month throughout the
year. The number will be drawn and
matched against a list of our financial
members. If the lucky member is
already a member of the BSI the
prize will cover their following year’s
membership. A member can only win
one BSI membership per financial year
of our Society.

Please remember that our Spring Sale
is Sunday 8th October (note date

– Sunday NOT Saturday as previously
advertised) and we would like you to
spread the word with your friends /
work colleagues. November 0th is
‘Broms in the Park’ at Totara Waters so
please make a point of marking both
these dates on your calendar.
Take care, Kesson Sharp

SUNDAY OCTOBER 18th
10.00am to 3.00pm
Mt Eden War Memorial Hall,
489 Dominion Road,
Balmoral, Auckland.
Enquiries: Kesson Sharp (09) 818-8051
Bromeliads

Bromeliad Society July Meeting News

– Glenys Guild
President Kesson Sharp welcomed
members to the first fundraising
evening for the 0 Conference.
Peter and Jocelyn Coyle opened the
evening with a short PowerPoint
presentation on their recent visit to
Australia, taking us through one of the
gardens they saw. We were envious
of the beautiful neoregelias they
grow with such ease in the warmer
conditions. Luckily for members this
was the first instalment of several to
come.

Next was the auction of special plants,
all donated, to raise Conference funds.
There was spirited bidding for some
very special plants, including three
tillandsias – standleyi, tenuifolia,
aeranthos, with multiple plants
beautifully displayed, all donated by
Lynette Nash. Included in the auction
was a Neoregelia ‘Len Trotman’,
named after our long serving Life
Member. Largest money-raiser was
Beaucarnia guatemalensis, a form
of the ponytail palm imported from
Guatemala by a friend of Peter and
Jocelyn who was unable to resist some
vigorous arm twisting from Peter, and
donated it for our fund. Well done
Peter! I was lucky enough to score
the beautiful Vriesea ‘Sunset’, a pup
from Alan Cliffe’s Best Vriesea at the
Fiesta in February. Altogether, a most
satisfactory evening’s entertainment
and a chance for members to acquire
some much sought after plants. Thanks
to all those generous members who
willingly donated their special plants
to the Conference cause.

‘Show and Tell’, ably conducted by
Peter Waters, had a Vriesea lubbersii
for naming. Previously misnamed

Vriesea corcovadensis, lubbersii

comes from Rio De Janeiro where
it grows within the city limits. Vr.
lubbersii looks rather like a tillandsia,
with stiff pointed leaves speckled red
at the base, and a pale red flower spike
with flowers that have cream petals.
It is quite hardy and can be grown on
trees, rocks and pongas.

Door prizes were won by Jocelyn Coyle,
Glenys Guild and Nancy Murphy.
Nancy then won the Conference raffle,
and Judy Graham the special raffle.

COMPETITIONS

Open flowering: Peter Coyle was first
with the beautiful Vriesea ‘Candyman’
while John Mitchell gained equal
second place with himself with Vriesea
‘Purple Cockatoo’ and ‘Highway
Beauty’. In the competition as well
were Vriesea ‘Snowman’, and Aechmea
‘Bert’.

Open foliage: First was John Mitchell
with Vriesea gigantea var seideliana,
and second was Peter Coyle with
Vriesea ‘Yellow Wave’, which is a
sport of hieroglyphica. Also in the
competition were Vriesea ‘Tasman
hybrid’, ‘Coral Lord’, and ‘Summer
Ice’, Neoregelia ‘Red River’ and
xNeophytum ‘Ralph Davis’.

Tillandsia: Lynette Nash was first
with Tillandsia tenuifolia, and Dave

Cont’d P6


Cont’d from P5

Dawson was second with Tillandsia
montana.

Neoregelia: Peter Coyle was successful
taking both first and second places with
Neoregelia ‘Sweet Nellie’ and ‘Break
of Day’. Also in the competition were
‘Fancy That’, ‘Hojo Rojo’, ‘Wee
Willy’, ‘Manoa Beauty’, ‘Royal Flush’
and ‘Painted Lady’.

Named monthly plant: [Neoregelia
‘Hannibal Lector’ and hybrids]: First
was Diana Holt with ‘Punctate Red’
x ‘Hannibal Lector’, and Peter Waters
was second with ‘Tunisia’. These two
plants are from the same cross. Others

in the competition were three ‘Clarise’,
three ‘Hannibal Lector’ F , ‘The
Governors Plea’, ‘Hannibal Lector’
x Fosters’ concentrica, two ‘Clarise’
x ‘Painted Delight’ and ‘Moon Over
Fort Dix’. ‘Hannibal Lector’ and
other crosses in the same family are
obviously popular, with their rather
bizarre patterning.

Novice: Graeme Barclay was the
winner with Neoregelia ‘Hannibal
Lector’ F .

Congratulations to all winners.

Next meeting: Tuesday 5th August

Cultural Tips: Potting and Potting Mixes

This article by Odean Head is originally from the March 2004 newsletter of the
Houston Bromeliad Society. It was then reprinted in the Bromeliad Society
of San Francisco newsletter, June 2009.

Most of us were plant people
long before we were
introduced to bromeliads.
Consequently, most of us have already
had a lot of experience in transplanting,
propagating, and repotting other kinds
of plants. We have found that the rules
for most of these procedures are much
easier when applied to our bromeliads.
This is because most bromeliads are
less dependent on their root systems
than most other plant families.
Therefore, we do not have to be as
protective of the roots during these
transition periods. Some of us will
take off pups while we are performing
other tasks such as grooming, culling,
watering, and/or general area clean
up. These pups may accumulate a few
days before we take the time to pot

them. Again, this is not a problem in
most cases. Some of the terrestrials
that have already developed feeder
roots may suffer a little if we defer
potting very long. If we plan to defer
potting, we should stand the pups up in
an empty pot and water them. This will
give the pups needed air circulation
and allow them to begin correcting
any malformed shape that may have
occurred due to growing too close to
their mothers. Some people will have a
large container of perlite or loose soil
to stick them in until their next potting
session.

POTTING MIX – First, we need to
prepare a batch of potting mix that our
plants will be happy growing in. There
are so many different recipes being


used that it may not be as simple as it
sounds. Just be sure that the mix has
good substance to hold the plant firmly
in the pot, has good aeration, drainage,
and some moisture holding capacity.
The medium should be durable since
the plant will probably remain in it for
a long time. There is a large selection
of ingredients available that will satisfy
these basic needs. Fir bark, orchid bark,
pine bark, river gravel, coarse granite,
hadite, tree fern fiber, coconut fiber,
perlite, German peat, Canadian peat,
builders sand, and coarse leaf mold are
just some of the ingredients that are
used. You may want to start out with
some of the ingredients that are most
available in your area that will satisfy
theseneeds and do some experimenting
on your own.

If you grow outside in the summer
and the rainfall is heavy or you water
frequently, more consideration should
be given to good aeration and drainage.
Those who have problems watering
enough should have a mix that will
hold moisture better. This would also
apply to most of the terrestrials.

The mix that I am currently using is
three parts hardwood mulch, one part
Canadian peat and one part perlite. To
this I add a double handful of Osmocote
( 4- 4- 4) to a batch of 0 to
gallons. I used ground-up pine bark for
many years but have switched to the
hardwood because it firms up better
in the pot. Do some experimenting.
Check out the recipes of other growers.
Try some of them and see what does
best for you as to availability, cost and
results.

POTTING – The plant should be
potted upright to encourage a good
growth pattern. It should be firm
in the pot to stimulate root growth.
Dampening the mix before potting will
help to firm the plant in the pot. Do not
plant too deep.

The potting medium should come just
above the roots. I sometimes plant a
little deeper when the plants are large
and have few roots so I can attain the
firmness they need. Exercise caution
because if they are too wet you may
rot them off at the base. I try to repot
these higher in the pot after roots have
formed to reduce the possibility of
rotting.

A frequently asked question is ‘what
size pot should I use’? Not everyone
will agree on the answer to this
question. Plants that are expected to be
large should grow in a large pot to reach
their optimum size. Personally, I prefer
to pot pups with no roots into smaller
pots until roots have developed and
then repot those needing larger pots.
Just remember that bromeliads adapted
to pot culture will develop a larger,
softer root system that will provide
added nutrients to the plant. Normally,
the plant will grow larger in a larger
pot. Some growers will try to visualize
the size they want the mature plant to
be and select the size pot that will attain
a good balance. Other growers will try
to intentionally put them into smaller
pots to stunt the growth to make the
plant’s growth more compact. After
the plant is mature, they may want to
pot in a larger pot to get better balance.
This is particularly true when entering
it in a show.


OFFICERS

Patron: Patricia Sweeney
President: Kesson Sharp (09) 8 8-805
Vice Presidents: Dave Anderson (09) 6 8-867

Jocelyn Coyle (09) 4 6-8 7
Secretary: Glenys Guild (09) 8 0-9669
Treasurer: Peter Waters (09) 5 4-56 6
Librarian: Noelene Ritson (09) 6 5-8 4
Life Members: Laurie Dephoff, Patricia Perratt,

Patricia Sweeney, Len Trotman
Scientific Officer:

Peter Waters (09) 5 4-56 6


Committee: Don Brown (09) 6 6 75
Alan Cliffe (09) 479- 45
David Cowie (09) 6 0-8 0
Chris Paterson (09) 6 5-6707
Sandy Stonham (09) 6 7-9658

Cultivar Registrar:
Gerry Stansfield (09) 8 4-7 78
Seed Bank Chairman:
Bev Ching (09) 576-4595
Auditor: Colin Gosse

MEMBERSHIP SUBSCRIPTION

New Zealand:

Ordinary membership NZ $ 5.00 ($5.00 discount if paid before the end of February).
Dual membership (same household) NZ $45.00 ($5.00 discount also applies as above).

Overseas:

AUD $ 0.00 Australia, US $ 0.00 United States and other overseas countries. Send all payments to
the Treasurer, Peter Waters, Half Moon Rise, Half Moon Bay, Manukau 0 .

CORRESPONDENCE

All general correspondence should be sent to the Secretary, Bromeliad Society of New Zealand,

P.O. Box 08- 68, Symonds Street, Auckland, New Zealand. The opinions expressed in letters or
articles in the Journal are the contributors’ own views and do not necessarily express the views or
policy of the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand Inc.
BROMELIAD JOURNAL

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Edmundoa ‘Alvim Seidel’ – Gerry Stansfield

A new name for an old bromeliad

E dmundoa ‘Alvim Seidel’ has
just been registered as a cultivar.
Edmundoa is a relatively
new genus being created in 997 by
Elton C. Leme the noted botanist and
taxonomist from Rio de Janeiro. Leme
created the name Edmundoa in honour
of the Brazilian botanist, Professor
Edmundo Pereira ( 9 4- 986) who
was a noted authority on the taxonomy
of Brazilian bromeliads. Prior to this
time they were known as Canistrum
and they were placed in this genus by
Professor Morren ( 8 - 886) who
was director of the Botanical Gardens
in Liège Belgium. Morren wanted to
distinguish these new plants from the
Nidularium as although they came
from the same areas in South America,
they were taxonomically considered
different.

It is easy to see why Professor Morren
considered them to be canistrums as
the word comes from the Greek word
‘kanistron’ which is a kind of basket
that is carried on the heads of young
Greek girls at festival times, full of
flowers and if you look at the photo
of Edmundoa ‘Alvim Seidel’, you
can see where the inference comes
from. In 997, Leme found that they
were different to both Nidularium and
Canistrum and as they were the only
two plants of this type found, placed
them in their own genus - Edmundoa.
The two plant are Edmundoa lindenii
var lindenii and Edmundoa lindenii
var rosea.

Edmundoa ‘Alvim Seidel’ is the
first cultivar to be registered by the
BSI for this genus and is described
as a variegated form of Edmundoa
lindenii var lindenii. The BSI does
not officially recognize the difference
between variegated, albo-marginated,
lineated or picta forms in the leaf
colouring, so any form of variegation
in an Edmundoa lindenii var lindenii
plant has to be called ‘Alvim Seidel’
(you can still add variegated form or
albo-marginated form to your label).
In the 950s and 60s Alvim Seidel
was popular amongst bromeliad
collectors around the world, with a
large nursery in Santa Catarina, Brazil
and for US$ .00 he would send a
catalogue with some 5 different
bromeliads with over 00 colour
illustrations. (Although he is now
deceased, his nursery is still run by his
son, Leopoldo).

Edmundoa lindenii variegatum

appeared in his early catalogue in
976 (as Canistrum). It is not known if
the plant was developed from a sport
pup or from seed, but its popularity
obviously grew as in 979 Kent’s of
California listed it in their catalogue
as Canistrum lindenii albo-marginata
for US$75.00 and variegata for
US$ 5.00. Up until now, these two
forms of the plant have traveled the
world under the names of variegated
form and albo-marginated form. Derek
Butcher of Australia has decided to
honour Seidel for the huge part he
played in bringing South American
bromeliads to collectors, by calling
these variegated and albo-marginated

Cont’d P11


Edmundoa ‘Alvim Seidel’ – photo by Kerry Booth Tate


Edmundoa lindenii var rosea – photo by Birgit Rhode

 0



Cont’d from P9

forms of the plant, Edmundoa ‘Alvim
Seidel’. Derek Butcher notes that it
is the first time Alvim Seidel’s name
appears in the BSI register.

This means the race is on to find a
variegated form of its sister plantEdmundoa lindenii var rosea, so those
of you growing from seed, need to have
a good look at your seedlings to check
for any variegations, and seeing that
both species plant are self pollinating
and set seed very readily, collecting
and growing them from seed could be
worth it, as this plant will be very rare,
remembering that it is also possible
(although quite rare in collections ) for
the plant itself to sport a variegated pup.

The difference between the two plants
is that Edmundoa lindenii var lindenii
and now also Edmundoa ‘Alvim
Seidel’ has white petalled bracts
surrounding the flowers and the foliage
is predominately green except for
the variegated forms and Edmundoa
lindenii var rosea has pink petalled
bracts. It also has pink underside of
the leaf foliage with a pink tinge on the
top of the leaves. The excellent photo
of this attractive plant is by Birgit
Rhode.

Note: Extracts for this article have been
taken from Derek Butcher’s article on
Edmundoa ‘Alvim Seidel’ prepared for
the BSI and other journals.


SEED BANK

Aechmea – blanchetiana (yellow form)
Alcantarea – geniculata, glaziouana,
Tillandsia – gardneri, magnusiana, viridiflora, elongata


v subimbricata, rotundata, butzii, fasciculata (flat yellow
spike), balbisiana x fasciculata, variabilis
Vriesea – friburgensis v tucumanensis, gigantea, gigantea v
seideliana, racinae, agostiniana, ensiformis, heliconoides.
Werauhia – sanguinolenta


TO ALL MEMBERS

If you have fresh seed
from any species, please
send as we need to have
fresh stock at all times.
Seed from hybrid plants
not accepted.

ORDERING SEED:

Send orders to Seed Bank – NZ residents only

Bev Ching, P.O.Box 51361 Pakuranga Auckland 2010
Email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Phone 09 576-4595 evenings

The seedbank will exchange two packets of 0 seeds for one ( ) large packet of your
seed. Please make sure it is labeled correctly. PLEASE SEND A LARGE STAMPED
ADDRESSED ENVELOPE. packet (of at least 0 seeds) – 50 cents.
Limited to one packet of seed per species. Maximum $5.00 per month.


Remember to consult the current seed list when ordering. We reserve the right to provide a


substitute for an out of stock seed with another packet of seed of the same or similar genus.
This Seed Bank information can also be viewed on the BSNZ website www.bsnz.org. Note
the user name (login) is currently aechmea and the password is fasciata. Both words must be
typed in lower case to access the members’ section containing the Seed Bank.


 



FROM THE REGISTRAR – Gerry Stansfield


Neoregelia ‘Exotica Amethyst’


Neoregelia ‘Exotica Hula Girl’


Neoregelia ‘Exotica Dark Goddess’



FROM THE REGISTRAR – Gerry Stansfield

Carrying on from last month, we have three more from Andrew Steens and
one with an interesting twist. Some time ago Andrew purchased some
neoregelia hybrid seed from me and you will be seeing the resulting
plants in this series starting with two in this month’s journal. The seed cross
was Neoregelia carolinae x Neoregelia ‘Big Red’. Now this plant is actually
called Neoregelia ‘Foster’s Giant Red’ and was very popular many years ago. I
was told that it came from a late batch of seedlings from the famous cross that
Foster made, Neoregelia fosteriana x Neoregelia spectabilis, which produced
Neo. ‘Fosperior’, ‘Dexter’s Pride’, and ‘Morris Henry Hobbs’, three of the most
outstanding neoregelias we can have in our collections. Neo. ‘Foster’s Giant
Red’ is quite dark as with Neo. ‘Fosperior’, but for some reason it is a very large
plant. I would have to say that my Neo. ‘Dexter’s Pride’ plants can and do grow
to almost m across, so there is no reason to suggest that the other would not
grow to the same size grown in good conditions.

Neoregelia ‘Exotica Amethyst’: Andrew says that this came from ex
Brazilian seed and the cross was Neo. concentrica (x carolinae ?) x
Neo. concentrica (pink form). It can grow to 50cm diam. In the photo,
you can see the rich amethyst colouring against the green lower foliage.

Neoregelia ‘Exotica Hula Girl’: Andrew has named me as the hybridizer as
the seed came from me in 00 . The cross was Neo. carolinae x ‘Big Red’
which was actually Neo. ‘Foster’s Giant Red’ as I mentioned above. Andrew
says this plant has a distinctive tangerine colouring to the leaves which turn
a beautiful shade of crimson over the centre of the plant at flowering time.

Neoregelia ‘Exotica Dark Goddess’: This is another one from my seed
and the cross was Neo. carolinae x ‘Big Red’. Andrew says this is a
gloriously rich dark plum colouring, and a large plant at 50cm across. At
flowering time, the centre turns a dark blood red, and it is long lasting.

We should be on the lookout for these new hybrids, when Andrew starts releasing
some of them!



Group News

Far North Bromeliad Group

– Eric Stephens
As a consequence of the very poor
weather we have had in the Far North
this winter, for our July monthly meeting
we decided to depart from our traditional
practice of meeting at members’ gardens,
and stay indoors.
Our location was Kingston House,
and some members braved the rain
and some pretty dodgy roads to attend.
Kingston House, dates from the ‘China
People’ – the Alderton Group Settlement
of the 9 0s, who played a major role in
establishing Kerikeri as a horticultural
centre. These days, Kingston House is
occupied by a range of community and
health groups of the district and also
offers excellent facilities for function hire
in a gracious old home with extensive
grounds
Being the meeting nearest to midwinter’s
day, we shared a ‘hot soup lunch’.
Three of our bromeliad/orchid growing
members - Merle Briggs, Mary Campbell
and John Frew, were our speakers – to tell
us of their ‘other passion’ – and introduce
the general topic of companion planting
to bromeliads to our members.
‘Show and Tell’ contributions included
Aechmea weilbachii and racinae
(flowering at present) Several medium
sized neoregelia cultivars – ‘Aussie
Dream’, ‘Dr Oeser’ and ‘Amabilis’ – a
Tillandsia stricta in flower, and a lovely
little Aechmea recurvata benrathii.
Planning is now underway for our 009
Bromeliad Show, to be held, as usual
in conjunction with the Waimate North
Show on Saturday, November 8th.

Next meeting: The AGM of the Far
North Bromeliad Group is scheduled

for Sunday September th – again at
Kingston House.

Bay of Plenty Bromeliad Group

– Jo Elder
Lynley welcomed 5 members, 5
visitors and our speaker for the day;
Peter Waters.
We remembered Des Shaw, who recently
passed away. The extreme frosts we have
been experiencing were mentioned and
Barry Jones said that he had never seen
so many hard frosts.
Peter Waters’ topic was the ‘Correct
Naming of Plants’. Many of the plants
that have been around for a long time
and that we have in our collections are
misnamed. Peter brought along many
plants correctly named to show us the
difference. He explained that seedlings of
hybrids vary greatly and cannot be sold
or given away named as the parent plant.
For those members who have access to
the internet, there is a site www.fcbs.org
to look at bromeliad plants and correct
names. Peter also explained how to write
plant labels. He gave a good tip on how
to get plants to grow roots in winter,’
stand plants on top of pumice’. Lynley
thanked Peter for his informative talk

Plant of the month- Bromeliads in
hanging baskets. Elizabeth Bailey had
five baskets and spoke about them to
the group. Other plants were Neoregelia
‘Born of Fire’,’ Tiger Cub’,’ Flaming
Lovely’, ‘Bitzer’, ‘Little Faith’ and ‘Rio
Red’

Competition plants:

 st Neoregelia ‘Exotica Velvet’

– Cushla Chudleigh
4



nd Guzmania‘Neon’ – Barbara Nalder

Tillandsia competition:

 st Tillandsia gardneri

– Cushla Chudleigh
nd Tillandsia incarnata – Isobel
Clotworthy
nd equal Tillandsia stricta – Gwen
McCallum
rd Tillandsia tectorum – Audrey
Hewson
Other plants on display; Tillandsia
guatemalensis, roezlii, cacticola,
cardenasii, comarapaensis.
Next meeting: 9th September. . 0pm
TY&PB clubrooms. Topic: ‘This is a
bromeliad I can grow well’ Members are
asked to bring a plant and describe its
growing conditions.
Garden visits:

 . Bertha & Kevin Schollum, 57B
Mansells Rd. Greerton. 0am.
. The Quarry Gardens

South Auckland Bromeliad Group

– Marion Morton
A beautiful sunny day brought out over
70 members to our August meeting held
at the Auckland Botanic Gardens at
Manurewa. Mary Cole and Pat Labrum
gave a PowerPoint presentation of photos
taken during their recent trip from Africa
to Italy. The ladies accompanied their
pictures with a fantastic commentary -
their trip had everything from comedy to
high drama. One feature which kept us
enthralled was the account of their ship
being attacked by Somali pirates.
Graham mentioned that Pauline Ashton
is now out of hospital and making a slow
recovery, and we were very pleased to
see Eric Ashton on his feet again after
his spell in hospital.
We will be touring the gardens of the
Waikato on Sunday 8th November. The

bus is filling fast so be in early to avoid
disappointment.
Members were asked to contact Margaret
Flanagan if they are planning to sell
plants at our October Sale. The raffles
were won by Yvonne Waugh, Madeleine
Yolland and Grant Coyle..
Next meeting: Sunday 6th September at
. 0pm at the Auckland Botanic Gardens,
Hill Road, Manurewa. Nancy Murphy
will be offering lots of suggestions as to
where we can put our tillandsias.

Eastern Bay of Plenty Bromeliad and
Orchid Group – Joy Insley

Our July 9th meeting, held on one of the
few fine days this winter, was made even
more enjoyable by Graham West’s visit
and discussion on miniature guzmanias.
Graham and his wife Pat had brought
with them from Auckland, a variety of
these attractive broms – all in bloom –
with colours ranging from reds through
to orange and yellow variegations.
Graham’s enthusiasm for these plants
was understandable. He outlined their
potential as hospital gifts in lieu of
cut flowers and their suitability as
houseplants with flowers lasting for ages,
and giving winter colour when little else
is available.
These plants respond to good light,
but away from direct sunlight. They
appreciate good air circulation. Use
small pots with your favourite potting
mix. Digitally test the mix for moisture,
taking care with chlorinated water.
Use dehumidifier water, rainwater, or
even water from your fish tank for best
results.(Graham reckons if it’s good for
the fish it must be good for the plants!)
Watch the water temperature – not too
cold - and don’t water in direct sunlight
Happy gardening, and thanks to

Cont’d P16 5


Cont’d from P15

Graham and Pat for enthusing us to try
these miniatures.No meeting venue for
September 0th. but watch Maureen’s
newsletter for a visit to some Tauranga
gardens, the Te Puna Quarry or the
Orchid Show.

Northland Bromeliad Group

– Jill Hudson
After the weather related cancellation
of June’s meeting – a historical first
as far as anyone can remember – the
beautiful day for our July meeting was
doubly welcome. Happily, we had been
spared total deprivation, having joined
the Far North Group earlier in June
when we enjoyed their hospitality and
the presentation by Andrew and Rhonda
Maloy. The success of the day has us
planning more coach trips.
In July we met at the Maungakaramea
property of Maureen and Keith Green. No
matter how often we visit, there is always
something new to see in the garden and
those so tempting shade houses. Good
too to catch up with Keith again after
some months. After a general discussion
ranging from bromeliad nomenclature to
a Christmas lunch for bromeliad growers,
Maureen again wielded the fish knife,
this time removing grass pups from an
alcantarea.
Maureen was also our competition
winner with a lovely Neoregelia ‘Yang’.
nd equal were Sylvia Boswell with
Neoregelia ‘Purple Heart’ and Freda
Nash with Aechmea recurvata ‘Aztec
Gold’. rd equal were Jan Mahoney’s
Neoregelia ‘Guinea’ and Viv Shortland’s
Neoregelia ‘Purple Heart’.
Next meeting: August rd at the Russell
Road Whangarei Quarry Gardens at
. 0pm. This will be preceded at am
by an advertised car boot sale.

Hawkes Bay Bromeliad Group

– Judy Newman
Another friendly, successful meeting
was held in July. Marie and Eric Baggett
showed us a very interesting video of
their trip to Machu Picchu in Peru. It
was amazing to see the remains of rock
structures built so long ago. How could
they have cut and moved such huge rocks
in such a remote area? The last part of
the video showed a wonderful collection
of orchids, gathered by a man who is
concerned at the loss of habitat for these
plants in the area, with the forests being
destroyed so rapidly.
The competition results:
Open: st Neoregelia ‘Rosea
Striata’- Julie Greenhill; nd equal
Neoregelia ‘Love You’ -Grace Smith;
and Nidularium innocentii -Wade
Smith; rd Neoregelia ‘Julie’- Margaret
Bluck
Novice: st Vriesea hybrid -Viv.
Thornton
Next meeting: Saturday nd August at
Julie Greenhill’s place in Seafield Rd,
Bayview. This will be a pot luck dinner
followed by our guest speaker Roy
Morton of South Auckland. Note: This
is not on our usual Sunday!

The Wellington Tillandsia Group

– Phyllis Purdie
There were seven members present and
two visitors present at our July meeting
at Morris Tarr’s. Plants discussed were:
T disticha (major), a plant with a long
inflorescence bearing several green bracts
and very pail white flowers from clusters
if branches at the end. T punctulata was
developing a thick red coloured bract
covered stem from which would emerge
long coloured flowers. Two T. latifolia

 6



v divaricata, seeds of which came from
Peru. They were large plants with long
inflorescence ready to flower. They
would have purple flowers. An attractive
bunch of pink bracts were growing from
a short stem from T. gardneri. The
flowers would be red. T. atroviridipetala
had a clump of developing green seed
pods. Its flowers had been green too.

T. stricta had blue flared flowers, which
turned white with age arising from pink
bracts. An unnamed tillandsia had large
green bracts and purple flowers. It was
thought it might be a hybrid.
T. montana would produce blue tubular
flowers from rosy bracts. A Mexican
plant, T. chiapensis produced violet blue
tubular flowers from a clump of light
pink bracts.
T. ‘Strictly Bourgeoise’ was a cross
made by Andrew and produced pink/
lavender flowers. T.(stricta x aeranthos)
x leonamiana had long pink bracts with
flared purple flowers. A plant of T.
crocata had been flowering with single
yellow flowers on slender stems. Plants
kept indoors had been flowering for the
past months but those grown outdoors
had not flowered. A photo of .T pamelae
had a long scape with orange/pink bracts
and purple flowers on a compound
inflorescence. Seeds were the only
means of producing new plants as it
seldom offsets.
Books and plants were then sold.
Following afternoon tea, members
looked at Morris’ extensive collection,
which was housed in several houses.
Some bromeliads which had been grown
outdoors, had been affected by frost but
would probably recover.
Next meeting: Sept 7 at the home of
Phyllis & Bruce Purdie, 5 Rochester St,

Wilton, at . 0pm.

SALE OF
SURPLUS STOCK


Bromeliads, Agaves,
Aloes, Shrubs.
at GREEN’S
BROMELIAD NURSERY &
SUB-TROPICAL GARDENS

Sat 5th & Sun 6th September
Gates open from 10am


P.D.C. Maungakaramea, WHANGAREI 0146
Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
4 Tangihua Road, Maungakaramea, Whangarei
Ph. 09-4323759

 7



Cont’d from P16

The bromeliads at Nong Nooch
Tropical Botanical Gardens, Thailand

– Article and photographs by JAGA
In July John and Agatha Lambert
took us on a short tour of the amazing
and immaculate Nong Nooch gardens
in southern Thailand. This month we
return again to look specifically at the
wonderful bromeliads.

Last month we shared an overview
of our visit to Nong Nooch, the
exotic garden in Pattaya, south of
Bangkok. In this second part we bring
you our experience of the bromeliad
garden, which unsurprisingly was what
lured us to these parts in the first place!

The bromeliad garden is housed within
a specifically designed shade house.
When you step inside, you are greeted by
imaginative and immaculate bromeliad
displays from every angle.

There are vrieseas, guzmanias,
tillandsias and cryptanthus alongsidebeautiful pottery and elegant lipstick
palms set within a pond or within
stone edged raised gardens. There are
colourful vertical walls of neoregelias
held up by a concealed frame which
allows pots to be slotted into metal
hoops. Terracota bowls of flowering
guzmanias and tillandsias with veils
of Spanish moss raised on beautifully
crafted terracotta columns or palm-
tree trunks creates colour and texture
at different heights. There are also
bromeliad columns formed by colourful
bromeliads climbing up tree trunks.

Beautiful pottery and water features
complement the stunning displays.
Most of the bromeliads are still in their
pots except for the alcantareas which

are planted. This is no doubt so they can
be swapped so that only the best are on
display at all time. Indeed the plants are
near flawless and all the guzmania and
tillandsia flowers are at their peak. We
observed as we wondered around the
labyrinth of pathways that the shade
house was controlled by a sprinkler
misting system, ensuring that they are
constantly moist in this hot climate
(around 0 degrees plus temperature).

No effort is spared to provide a visual
feast for the lucky visitor. All the plants
here, and indeed in the entire garden,
are superbly grown specimens, and we
hope this small insight will encourage
some of you to visit this wonderful
establishment. Anyone needing further
information is welcome to contact us.

 
8



Nong Nooch bromeliads…


 
9



Nong Nooch bromeliads…


 
0

 

Bromeliad Society of New Zealand Inc Bromeliad Journal – January 2009 issue CONTENTS President’s Page 4 Bromeliad Society November meeting news – Dave Anderson 5 Northland Ramblings – Alan J. Thomson 6 The Society at the Auckland Flower Show 10 Bay of Plenty Group February Open Day 10 2008 Monthly Competition Winners 11 Fiesta 2009, Annual Show classes and conditions 12 Preparing Plants for Competition – Dave Anderson 14 My Dad Is Bromeliad Crazy! – McKenzie Devonshire 14 Seed Bank – Bev Ching 15 Society officers, membership information and Journal directory 16 A tribute to Avon Ryan – Dave Anderson 17 The Necessary ‘Loggery’ – Rod and Val Bieleski 18 Group News 20 Becky Cavit’s garden in Birkenhead – Alan J. Thomson 22 From the Registrar – Neo. ‘Magenta Fire’ and Vr. ‘Snowman’ – Gerry Stansfield 24 The opinions expressed in articles or letters in this Journal are the contributors’ own views and do not necessarily express the views or the policy of the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand COMING EVENTS Please see the Group News section starting on page 20 for more details of group meeting times and venues. JANUARY 27th Society meeting at Greyfriars Hall, corner of Mt Eden and Windmill roads, Mt Eden, starting 7.30pm. There will be a talk on the Society’s November bus trip to Northland and also a discussion on how members can ensure they enter their plants in the correct classes at the February Fiesta. Monthly choice, Grace Goode miniatures that have a ‘cat’ theme included in their name. Note: this will be interpreted fairly liberally – e.g. plants with names like ‘Wild Tiger’ and ‘Tabby’ are all OK. FEBRUARY 1st South Auckland Group meeting. 11th Bay of Plenty Group meeting. 18th Bay of Plenty Group garden visits. 21st – 22nd FIESTA. The Society’s annual Show and Sale will be held at the Mt Eden War Memorial Hall, 489 Dominion Road, Balmoral, Auckland. 9.00am to 3.00pm. Admission $5.00. Free parking. 21st Society dinner at Tusk Restaurant, Dominion Rd, Auckland, 7.15 pm. If you would like to attend the dinner please contact Dave Anderson (09) 638 8671. 24th Society meeting at Greyfriars Hall, corner of Mt Eden and Windmill roads, Mt Eden, starting 7.30pm. Monthly choice, Albo-marginated neoregelias. Front cover: The richly coloured glossy leaves of Neoregelia ‘Perfection’ in the Northland garden of Bev and Brian Hutchins. Read about the Society’s visit to Northland, starting page 6. Photos by Alan J. Thomson. 3 PRESIDENT’S PAGE I hope everyone had a great Christmas and that you all saw in the New Year in style. I’m sad to report the death late last year of Avon Ryan of Whangarei who has been a prominent and notable member of our Society for many years. Please see the tribute to Avon by Dave Anderson on page 17. Our November meeting was the last for 2008 and was a great night. Congratulations to all category and trophy prizewinners of our annual competition. The auction, admirably conducted once again by Peter Waters and Peter Coyle, generated spirited bidding on some quality rare plants. We finished the evening with a fabulous supper- special thanks to all who brought along a plate. Planning is well under way for this year’s Fiesta which runs from Friday 20th to Sunday 22nd February. As in recent years it will be held in the Mt Eden War Memorial Hall at 489 Dominion Road, Balmoral. Friday is the setting up day. We have plastic sheets to roll out over the carpet and will need to set up the hire tables before sales plants can be taken into the venue. Competition plants will be accepted from 1.00pm until 5.00pm on Friday. Last year we had a record number of entries and plants of very high quality– let’s see if we can exceed it this season. There are plenty of categories so start grooming your best plants now and bring them along. The display will be set up on Friday 4 morning – contact Noelene Ritson if you can help with this. Our January meeting is the last before the Fiesta so I will be trying to confirm both sellers and helpers at that meeting. Selling space will be more limited than at the spring sale because we have to accommodate the competition plants – so please be tolerant if you have less space than you would like. All sellers must bring along at least 3 plants for the display and sellers will be allocated time on the sales and packing tables, so volunteer first if you want to get a particular job or time spot. The committee is working on promotion of the Fiesta, but remember that the cheapest form of advertising is word-of-mouth; encourage your friends, family and workmates to come along. We will have small posters available at the January meeting, plus a downloadable flyer that you can email to your contacts. Entry is $5 for adults and the doors will be open to the public from 9.00am until 3.00pm Saturday and Sunday. Let’s make this year’s Fiesta another great event. I am pleased to confirm that we have renewed our agreement with Greyfriars Presbyterian Church to use the hall again during 2009 for our monthly and committee meetings. They have generously agreed to maintain their fees at the 2008 level. Regards, Alan Cliffe Bromeliad Society November Meeting News – Dave Anderson T here was a large attendance a Tillandsia tenuifolia hybrid or an for the last meeting of 2008. aeranthos hybrid that had dark blue Alan thanked those members flowers. For display Peter had brought involved in setting up and ‘manning’ in a beautiful mature Neoregelia the bromeliad display at the Auckland Garden Show – it looked great. He also expressed special thanks to those members who helped at the ‘Broms in the Park’ sales. Our hosts Peter and Jocelyn Coyle were thanked for their very generous donation as too were Lester and Bev Ching with their donation from the proceeds of the plant sales. The ‘Fiesta’ Annual Show and Sale will be held on the weekend of Feb 21/22 2009 at the Mt. Eden War Memorial Hall. Please ring Alan Cliffe if you can help! Note that the ‘Seed Bank’ is again up and running – see the relevant page in the Journal. Alan thanked the Bay of Plenty Group for their donation towards publishing the Journal. Following on from the talk Alan gave last month on insects, pests etc - he said that the white tufts (3mm diameter) on the leaves of broms were grey mites that were a benefit to the plant as they killed other detrimental insects. This grey mite is totally different to the red spider mite. The evening finished with the convivial annual Christmas supper. The ‘Show and Tell’ followed general business and first up were two Tillandsia streptophylla one of which had been kept quite dry and had wavy leaves whilst the other had been well watered and had straight leaves. Next carcharodon ‘Tiger’. He had also for display a table full of Sharon Petersen’s brilliantly coloured neoregelia hybrids that all but glow when wet. The monthly competition trophies and prizes for the year were then presented. After the break the annual auction of rare and special plants was held. COMPETITIONS Open Flowering: First was Alan Cliffe with a Vriesea ‘Sunset’ and second was Dave Anderson with an Aechmea tessmannii (orange). Also in the competition were Aechmea tessmannii (banded); Neoregelia ‘Meyendorfii’ x ‘Sheer Delight’; Vriesea ‘Snowman’ and ‘RoRo’. Open Foliage: John Lambert was first with a Vriesea ‘Angela’, and Peter Coyle was second with Neoregelia ‘Milagro’. In the competition were Neoregelia ‘Gorrion’; Vriesea ‘Golden Legend’, ‘Yellow Wave’, ‘Philip Foster Red’ and gigantea var seideliana x ‘Red Chestnut’. Tillandsia: Lynette Nash was first with Tillandsia ionantha ‘Rosita’ and second with Tillandsia albertiana was Brian Dawson. Also in the competition were Tillandsia bergeri, cardenasii, stricta and matudae. Neoregelia: Peter Coyle was first with Cont’d P6 5 a Neoregelia ‘De Rolf’ – a beautiful large plant and second was Judy Graham with a Neoregelia ‘Eclipse’. In the competition were Neoregelia ampullacea (albomarginated), ampullacea ‘Tigrina’, ‘Alley Cat’, ‘Black Beauty’, ‘Black Forest’, ‘Gold Lotto’, ‘Engagement’ and ‘Wee Willie’. Christmas Decoration: First was Judy Graham with another beautiful arrangement and second was Lynette Nash also with an attractive arrangement. Novice Flowering: First was Maui Bradbury with a Neoregelia red hybrid and second with Vriesea hieroglyphica was Graeme Barclay. The Plant of the month went to Alan Cliffe with a Vriesea ‘Sunset’ – a superb specimen that Alan had growing on the windowsill at his office. Congratulations to all the winners. Christmas supper followed the closure of the meeting to complete a most enjoyable evening. NEXT MEETING: Tues 27th Jan. Cont’d from P5 NOTE: It’s time to return Annual Show trophies! Could members holding Annual Show trophies, awarded in 2008, please ensure they return them at our January meeting – to Sandy Stonham. Thanks. Society Dinner… Saturday Feb 21st Once again we have booked the Tusk Restaurant (Thai) in Dominion Road Balmoral for a meal starting 7.15 pm, Saturday February 21st. ($29.50 for banquet meal). This is the Saturday evening of the Fiesta weekend. Society members, partners and friends are all welcome. If you would like to attend the dinner please contact Dave Anderson (09) 638 8671. Northland Ramblings – Article and photos by Alan J. Thomson A great day weather-wise greeted Maureen and Keith Green’s Bromeliad Society members as we gathered Garden at Maungakaramea is well early in the morning at Western known to most of us as Maureen has Springs and climbed aboard our bus been growing and selling her broms with some excitement! It was the last day of November and ‘Captain’ Robbie Burns was at the helm ably assisted by our ‘maitre de’ Jocelyn Coyle. After picking up a North Shore contingent at Silverdale we headed north to reach our first garden late in the morning. 6 and seeds to many of us for a number of years. A long driveway leads towards the house with an expansive lawn and garden on the left and plastic houses on the right. A riot of colour hits all who dare to enter the plastic houses and a magnificent Aechmea ‘Kiwi’ grabbed Cont’d P9 Northland gardens… Maureen and Keith Green: Tillandsias thrive on their water tank ‘home’. Rose and Gordon Speedy: Aechmea roberto-seidelii is very effective with rocks. 7 Northland gardens… Bev and Brian Hutchins: Striking yellow neoregelia miniatures emerge from the rocks (left) and an attractive bed of neos and succulents (right). Robyn and Max Thomas: Superb neoregelias and vrieseas thrive in their garden. 8 Cont’d from P6 my attention, a cultivar derived from A. fasciata. It has vertical stripes of deep red and deep green and broken white horizontal striations up the leaves as well. A number of us were intrigued with a constant sound of frogs. This would cease when someone approached the large ponds behind the Greens’ house but soon start up again when they thought the humans had gone. Also behind the house was a large water tank impressively covered with netting and host to lots of tillandsias that thrived there on neglect. We all convened on the drive and heated negotiations on purchases of a number of plants proceeded before we climbed aboard and set off to our second garden nearer to Whangarei. This was the wonderful garden of Rose and Gordon Speedy that has been created over the last few years and is basically a dry garden with succulents, cacti, aloes, agaves, bromeliads and other plants that can survive with low water requirements. It has variety with a wooded area and shade loving plants and has a lake that has been beautifully landscaped. We had lunch here in their cafe and sat looking out at the large expanse of plants, rocks, trees, pathways and pieces of garden art. A lot of work and effort has gone into the design and landscaping of this impressive garden that definitely has the wow factor! I particularly liked the setting of broms like Aechmea roberto-seidelii up against a rock covered in lichen. The rock behind seems to set off the bromeliad clump nicely. Moving on to our third garden that was located more into the residential area of Whangarei we arrived at the lovely garden of Bev and Brian Hutchins. This is a brom lover’s paradise as superb specimens were to be found all around the garden and also on a sales table. Not a weed was left in the whole place and the presentation was damn near perfect. Neoregelia ‘Perfection’ nestling on a glaucous festuca grass and rocks looked great as did a number of large vrieseas. In the front garden I zoomed in on a clump of neoregelia miniatures in a beautiful shade of yellow, that emerged from rocks and a mulch of pebbles. Our last garden of the day was at the home of Max and Robyn Thomas. This was a wonderful garden with shadehouses at the back and we were all so grateful for the afternoon tea they provided. Magnificent orchids were flowering and a selection of broms and palms were for sale. The Whangarei climate is warmer than Auckland and the widespread use of rocks and pebble mulches created an almost tropical environment. I think we all picked up ideas of things that we could do in our own gardens after seeing what the four gardens here had achieved. We all greatly enjoyed our day trip out and I would like to thank all those involved in the organisation of this memorable event. 9 The Society at the Auckland Flower Show… in November. A qualified success. A new name and event with a new venue at Alexandra Park. Our Society team of Jocelyn Coyle, Sandy Stonham, Kesson Sharp and Noelene Ritson put in another sterling effort with a lovely brom display. There was some disappointment at the very spread out nature of the show and the lack of adequate wayfinding signage. The also definitely well down on the recent Ellerslie Flower Show numbers… which was probably to be expected. However, it all helps to promote our Society and in particular our February ‘FIESTA’ to the public. Well done team and a special thank you to Andrew Maloy and Totara Waters visitors that came by our display were for supplying some great plants. Special Open Day in TAURANGA Bromeliad display… great plants for sale… plus DEMOS THE BAY OF PLENTY BROMELIAD GROUP is holding a special OPEN DAY on 11th February 2009 at the Tauranga Yacht Club at Sulphur Point 12.30pm - 2.30pm. There will be a special display of bromeliads and there will be four sales tables with many premium plants available direct from growers. Also, demonstrations on cutting off pups and attaching bromeliads to pongas and tree stumps. Our members will be available to answer questions. All welcome. Free Entry. 2008 Monthly Competition Winners – Judged over the eleven monthly meetings of the Bromeliad Society. Flowering Peter Coyle 45 points Judy Graham 22 David Goss 21 Foliage Peter Coyle 65 points David Goss 18 Chris Paterson 17 Peter Waters 17 Tillandsia Lynette Nash 45 points Win Shorrock 25 Brian Dawson 23 Monthly Choice Judy Graham 42 points Peter Coyle 41 Chris Paterson 12 Novice Flowering Dave Dawson 24 points Robbie Burns 12 Chris Davis 6 Maui Bradbury 6 Novice Foliage Maui Bradbury 12 points Michelle Tohi 6 Margaret Wagstaff 6 Dephoff Trophy – Most points Novice Dave Dawson 32 points Maui Bradbury 18 Robbie Burns 16 Bea Hanson Trophy (Most points for person who has not won a trophy before) Lynette Nash 47 points Centennial Trophy – Most points overall Peter Coyle 159 points Judy Graham 75 Lynette Nash 47 Greenough Trophy – Plant of the Month Judy Graham Bea Hanson Memorial Trophy (Awarded to a member who has given outstanding service to the Society in the last year and who typifies the founding spirit and commitment of Bea Hanson. Judged by President and Patron) Peter Waters 10 11 Mt Eden War Memorial Hall, 489 Dominion Road, Balmoral, Auckland. 12 13 My Dad is Bromeliad Crazy! – Article by McKenzie Devonshire, age 11 years. Alcantarea – geniculata, glaziouana, imperialis (rubra) Racinaea – tetrantha var aurantiaca Tillandsia - gardneri, magnusiana, viridiflora, elongata v subimbricata, rotundata Vriesea - altodaserrae, friburgensis var tucumanensis, gigantea, gigantea var seideliana, racinae, agostiniana New seed received from B Hudson, M Moffatt, D Anderson, H & R Blank TO ALL MEMBERS If you have fresh seed from any species, please send as we need to have fresh stock at all times. Seed from hybrid plants not accepted. Werauhia - sanguinolenta ORDERING SEED: Send orders to Seed Bank - NZ residents only Bev Ching, P.O.Box 51361 Pakuranga Auckland 2010 Email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Phone 09 576-4595 evenings The Seed Bank will exchange two packets of 20 seed for one (1) large packet of your Seed. Please make sure it is labelled correctly. PLEASE SEND A LARGE STAMPED ADDRESS ENVELOPE. 1 packet (of at least 20 seeds) - 50cents. Limited to one packet of seed per address. Maximum $5.00 per month. Remember to consult the current seed list when ordering. We reserve the right to provide a substitute for an out of stock seed with another packet of seed of the same or similar genus. My Dad loves Bromeliads. When I need to find him he’ll be outside perfecting his colourful collection. When he’s on the computer he’s chatting to his brom friends about the latest news. When he’s reading a book it’ll be a bromeliad resource for sure. He knows all the names and markings, he knows all the top tips of hybridising and always marks the flowers with little striped straws. Bromeliads sunbathe in my back yard, front yard, down the sides of the house and driveway – you get the picture! You can tell my dad LOVES Bromeliads, just the thing for him! 14 15 This Seed Bank information can also be viewed on the BSNZ website www.bsnz. org. Note the user name (login) is currently aechmea and the password is fasciata. Both words must be typed in lower case to access the members’ section containing the Seed Bank. OFFICERS Patron: Patricia Sweeney President: Alan Cliffe (09) 479-1451 Vice Presidents: Dave Anderson (09) 638-8671 Lester Ching (09) 576 4595 Secretary: Glenys Guild (09) 810-9669 Treasurer: Peter Waters (09) 534-5616 Librarian: Noelene Ritson (09) 625-8114 Life Members: Laurie Dephoff, Patricia Perratt, Patricia Sweeney, Len Trotman Auditor: Colin Gosse Scientific Officer: Peter Waters (09) 534-5616 Committee: Don Brown (09) 361 6175 Robbie Burns (09) 835-3866 David Cowie (09) 630-8220 Jocelyn Coyle (09) 416-8272 Chris Paterson (09) 625-6707 Kesson Sharp (09) 818-8051 Sandy Stonham (09) 627-9658 Alan J. Thomson 027 522 2078 Cultivar Registrar: Gerry Stansfield (09) 834-7178 Seed Bank Chairman: Bev Ching (09) 576-4595 MEMBERSHIP SUBSCRIPTION New Zealand: Ordinary membership NZ $35.00 ($5.00 discount if paid before the end of February). Dual membership (same household) NZ $45.00 ($5.00 discount also applies as above). Overseas: AUD $30.00 Australia, US $30.00 United States and other overseas countries. Send all payments to the Treasurer, Peter Waters, 22 Half Moon Rise, Bucklands Beach, AUCKLAND. CORRESPONDENCE All general correspondence should be sent to the Secretary, Bromeliad Society of New Zealand, P.O. Box 108-168, Symonds Street, Auckland, New Zealand. The opinions expressed in letters or articles in the Journal are the contributors’ own views and do not necessarily express the views or policy of the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand Inc. BROMELIAD JOURNAL Deadline: All enquiries and contributions welcome, please For all editorial and advertising, the first contact any member of the editorial committee Tuesday of publication month or send to Peter Waters, 22 Half Moon Rise, Bucklands Beach, Auckland or Editorial Committee email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Dave Anderson Murray Mathieson Display Advertising Peter Waters Rates are: Full Page $60.00 Regular Writers Half Page $30.00 Alan Cliffe Quarter Page $15.00 Gerry Stansfield Alan J. Thomson ‘Buy & Swap’ Listings in ‘Buy & Swap’ are FREE for Production members of the Society (max. 30 words). Murray Mathieson For advertising enquiries and material, please Distributon contact Murray Mathieson ph (09) 418 0366 Dave Anderson or email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Avon Ryan will be greatly missed. We were very sad when we heard garden not far from his home. When that Avon Ryan had passed away on I asked the owner, ‘what beautiful 29th November 2008 after suffering red stoloniferous neoregelia is that?’ ill health for quite some time. – the answer, of course, was that it was one of Avon’s hybrids. He Avon joined the Bromeliad Society made many great hybrids, sadly of New Zealand in August 1980. most remain unnamed, but some Despite having to drive 2½ hours of the more well-known include each way, he regularly attended Neoregelia ‘Kiwi Magic’, ‘Pink our monthly meetings for many Champagne’, ‘Sheer Delight’ and years. In the early days, there were ‘Samson’. A lovely red plant has relatively few species and hybrids just been registered by Peter Waters in New Zealand and it was not long as Neoregelia ‘Avon Ryan’ in his before Avon started to import plants memory. and hybridise bromeliads. His particular interest was neoregelias Our Society will certainly be the and he was always trying to breed a poorer without him. ‘perfect’ red neoregelia. His hybrids became highly sought after. – Dave Anderson Avon was always very generous with his knowledge and experience and willingly gave advice to novices, growers and hobbyists. He talked on hybridising at our society meetings. Many of his wonderfully coloured hybrids are in collections throughout NZ and are testament to his generosity. He was very approachable and always warmly welcomed visitors to his extensive garden in Whangarei. It was my privilege to have known him from when I joined the Society 1983. Certainly his legacy will remain with us. This was exemplified A fitting way to always remember Avon. on the day after his death. Whilst Neoregelia ‘Avon Ryan’, recently registered on a Society bus trip, we visited a and photographed by Peter Waters. 16 17 The necessary ‘Loggery’ – Article and photo by Rod and Val Bieleski T The germ of an idea came when we saw a magnificent rockery, supporting a fine population of bromeliads. Val craved one for our own garden, but rockery rocks in our area were hard to come by. While wandering the garden one morning, we happened upon the pile of logs. ‘Eureka! – what if we were to make a ‘rockery’ with those logs and kill two birds with one stone – or at least a lump of wood?’. The problem of what to call it was quickly solved. If a bunch of rocks piled together and planted up with plants was a rockery, then surely a bunch of logs piled together and supporting plant life was a ‘loggery’. Besides, we were inventing the word so it was our choice. Early on, it was obvious that logs were much more regular in shape than rocks, and if you just piled them up 18 without thinking about where each one went, you’d get something that looked like a pile of logs. It was essential to mix up big ones and small ones, and to do things to disrupt that regularity. Put one log flat on its bottom; put the next on its side, lean the next one between the two, and so on. Build up the next layer so that no log rested flat on another. Particularly valuable were the logs that made difficult firewood, the ones with knots where branches had been cut off. These were naturally awkward, and interesting. We built up a mound grading from one log high at the front to three logs high at the back. Then came the coup de grace. On a handy tarpaulin, we created a nice free-draining mix of 3 parts potting mix, one part peat and 2 parts coarse pumice. This was tossed liberally over the log pile, and then the logs were wiggled, the gaps poked Cont’d P19 hey say that necessity is the mother of invention. When we first moved to our 2 acre section, we planted little trees that you could leap over in a single bound. Forty years later, even Superman would have had trouble. We began cutting things down. Small then medium-sized branches presented little problem, as our cozy winter fires kept us on top of the supply. But the branch diameters reached 40 cm. It was necessary that we Do Something! Cont’d from P18 with a stick, and the whole thing hosed down to get the mix to dribble into the gaps, right down to the bottom layer. Then came the acid test – putting selected broms (NOT the rare ones) in place. To deter passing dogs, Val put the smaller, prickly ones around the front, only a log high, working up to the biggest and fleshiest at the top of the pile at the back. Would the broms take to this new environment? Rather sadly, just as the loggery was reaching full power, we decided to sell our house and move to a much smaller one on the North Shore, so we don’t know how it developed further. We’d like to recreate it where we are, but the only tree available to supply the necessary logs is a big old pohutukawa, and perhaps there isn’t enough room anyway. But making the first loggery was fun, it worked, and maybe one of you lot will be prepared to have a go. We can be hired out as consultants. 19 Group News Far North Bromeliad Group – Eric Stephens Our November meeting was held at the Kerikeri residence of Norma Midgley. Norma is a long time bromeliad fancier, and has the added claim to fame, of having transported (and culled) her collection from her former Coopers Beach property, to her smaller ‘town’ section in Kerikeri. Quite a feat! The meeting was the day after the Waimate North Show, where the Club holds its Annual Show – as part of the Home Industries section - an excellent site and very good exposure of bromeliads to a large and wide audience. Our ‘Show and Tell’ was an interesting selection which included Aec. ‘Black Jack’ (probably), Neo. ‘Tiger Cub’, Vr. ospinae var. gruberi, Quesnelia lateralis, and arvensis. There was an interesting discussion on a Northland favourite – Vr. ‘Highway Beauty’ or is it now ‘Roro’? It is likely that all specimens in NZ have identical parentage, and without the two cultivars ‘side by side’, the difference must be subtle. (see article by Peter Waters in our November Journal, for the latest on this subject. Ed.) A summary of our Annual Show results: Best in Show: Bevlyn Bibby, with a fine example of Vr. ‘Kiwi Sunset’ from the Andrew Maloy stable, but only after a close tussle with Wini Pepene in the Vriesea section. Neoregelia: John and Colleen Frew, with a stoloniferous hanging basket clump of Neo. pauciflora. Aechmea: Jacqui O’Connell with Ae. ‘Red Flamingo’ Billbergia: Jacqui O’Connell with Bill. ‘Domingos Martins’ Tillandsia: Jacqui O’Connell with Till. 20 tectorum. Any Other Genera: Eric Stephens with Quesnelia liboniana. Not surprisingly Jacqui, who took out the ‘Artistic Arrangement’section, also won the overall points prize. The December ‘festive’ meeting of our Group is being held at Wendy and Jim Mathews’ place in Reinga Rd, Kerikeri on December 14th. South Auckland Bromeliad Group – Marion Morton Our last meeting of the year was held at the home of Ann and Graham Thomson at Te Toro. The weather couldn’t have been better and we had a big turnout. Ann and Graham were great hosts and their garden looks more stunning with every visit. We had an amazing array of plants for sale; they were the best quality to date and in great abundance. There was spirited bidding at our annual auction. It was good to see Graham West back at the helm after his stay in hospital and the group presented him and his wife Pat with a beautiful hamper for all the work that they had put in over the year to arrange our monthly meetings, annual sale and trips away. Our trip to Kerikeri is on 14th -15th March, and those interested in going need to pay for the bus fare by the February meeting. It will be on the basis of first in first served. The raffles were won by Judy Graham, Joyce Fox, Dawn Ashton, Pierre Kordina and Delma Pell. Next Meeting: 1.30pm on 1st February 2009 at the home of Hawi and Susann Winter at 57 Brewster Road, Pukekawa. Maps were handed out at our last meeting but anyone wishing to go who doesn’t have a map please contact Graham West. There will be the usual plant sales and members are requested to bring along mugs and chairs. Bay of Plenty Bromeliad Group – Jo Elder There was a good attendance of 47 members and 5 visitors from other groups at our November meeting. President Lynley spoke about the successful Sales Day that was held at the Matua Hall on November 1st and thanked all members who had participated. We’ve all been asked to think about ideas for the programme next year – speakers and gardens to visit. Volunteers are needed at the quarry garden to help remove pups and weeds. They will need to bring their own equipment, gloves etc. 9.30am. – 11.30am. on a Tuesday. Our Group will supply sheep pellets for the garden. The collection of funds for the ‘Brian Chudleigh Memorial Walkway’ has closed. We have collected $508.00 and together with the Bromeliad Society’s generous donation this is enough to purchase a very nice piece of art, a sculpture of a ‘Cormorant’, made by a Taupo artist. Lynley introduced our guest speaker, Andrew Flower, who spoke about his specialty, tillandsias. He is a humorous and interesting speaker and gave us a very good insight into the propagating of seed, the growing on and conditions that these wonderful plants enjoy. On Sunday 23rd November, members travelled by bus for garden visits in the South Auckland area. We wish to thank Gellert’s Nursery, Judy Graham, Ann and Graham Thompson, Paddy Escott and Margaret and Robert Flanagan for allowing us to enjoy their gardens and make it such a special day. Competition Plants 1st Cushla Chudleigh Neophytum ‘Burgundy Hill’ 2nd Audrey Hewson Neomea ‘Strawberry’ 3rd Gill Keesing Neoregelia ‘Red Romance’ Tillandsia CompetitionPlants 1st Jo Elder Tillandsia geminiflora 2nd Cushla Chudleigh Tillandsia ehlersiana 3rd Audrey Hewson Tillandsia tectorum Plant of the Month – Tillandsia Tillandsia – tenuifolia, bulbosa, montana, capillaris, ionantha var stricta, imperialis, duratii, cacticola, magnusiana, erubescens, fuchsii (4 spikes), tenuifolia, ‘Amethyst’, carminea. Next Meeting: Wednesday 11th February at 12.30pm TY&PB Club Rooms. This will be an Open Day for visitors and new members. Cutting off pups, potting mixes, sprays and fertilizers. All members to help please. Garden Visits: 18th February, 10.00am. 1. Gwen McCallum, 4A Esme Place, Matua 2. Lynley and Alec Roy, 251 Levers Rd. Matua 3. Lynley Breeze, 46 Manuwai Drive, Matua (Bring lunch) 21 Breathtaking in Birkenhead – Article and photos by Alan J. Thomson B ecky Cavit is an enthusiastic with Buxus sempervirens and old plants and knowledgeable member of like standard roses together with some the Bromeliad Society having pieces of garden art like a beautiful caught the ‘addiction’ some years ago Zimbabwean stone carving of a mother and this has led to the transformation of her garden in the coastal suburb of Birkenhead on Auckland’s North Shore. Today the garden is picture perfect and sitting on the patio at the back of the house you can look up and see an elevated and terraced back garden with a gazebo as a focal point, two mature bangalow palms and a multi-level pond and waterfall arrangement. Becky and her husband Tony started on the section in 2000 and designed and had the house built. Tony did the bulk landscaping and Becky has designed the magnificent bromeliad gardens at the front and back of the property. Having ‘converted’ to bromeliads nine years ago, Becky started visiting other gardens and getting lots of ideas and learning about the different species. She loves the reds and range of colours. Unusual neoregelias and lately the miniatures have caught her eye. Big specimens of vrieseas fit well and there are increasing numbers of wall mounted tillandsias. She has plans for more water features, a Japanese bridge and will possibly extend the pond arrangements. Some of the neat raised beds are edged and child. The section is not far from the sea and is elevated with a huge deck that overlooks the bay towards Auckland city. Hence the salty sea air comes in at the front but doesn’t seem to damage the broms. But with strong westerly winds at the front the plants there need to be hardy. A couple of Alcantarea vinicolor are focal points at the front with their distinctive maroon red foliage. Tony took a great photo of Becky against one when its inflorescence was out and towering above her! It was good to see a variety of miniature neoregelias. A clump was a rich green in the shade but another was looking quite different in a sunny spot where they were a lovely mix of red and yellow. Pride of place when I visited was a recent acquisition of a Neo. ‘Golden Lotto’ that Becky had bid hard for in an auction and secured for a three figure sum. Planted into a bright yellow pot it made a great centrepiece on the patio table. Thank you Becky and Tony for inviting me to your place and you are to be congratulated on creating a lovely North Shore garden. 22 Becky’s garden in Birkenhead… 23 FROM THE REGISTRAR – Gerry Stansfield F or the start of the New Year we have two hybrids from Peter and Jocelyn Coyle of Totara Waters to finish off this series, Peter and Jocelyn have lots more exciting new hybrids coming along, including a very lovely red striped neoregelia obviously from the Neo. ‘Rosea Striata’ parentage, and also some very new vriesea hybrids that are showing real promise. Neoregelia ‘Magenta Fire’ Neoregelia ‘Magenta Fire’ (by Andrew Maloy, named by Peter Coyle) [‘Vivacor’ x (‘Rosea Striata’ x concentrica)]. As the name suggests, this is a gorgeous deep fiery red that blushes the whole plant, a real stunner. Vriesea ‘Snowman’ Vriesea ‘Snowman’ (by Andrew Maloy named by Peter Coyle) [gigantea x platynema var. variegata]. Also a very lovely plant, and the pups just get better and better. Peter is thinking of getting this one tissued, so we will all be able to share in having one of these beautiful plants. Both plants have been registered at Reg Doc 8/2008 BSI. 24

JULY 2009
VOL 49 NO 7
Inside … we visit exotic Nong Nooch in Thailand
Vriesea ‘Galaxy’

More fascinating coloured leaf patterns

– Photos and notes by Peter Waters
Vriesea ‘Nova Pink Beauty’

Vriesea ‘Nova Pink Beauty’ is a
Vriesea gigantea hybrid made by
Andrew Maloy.


Vriesea ‘Galaxy’

Neoregelia ‘Red River

Neoregelia ‘Red River’ is a hybrid by
Shane Zaghini of Brisbane. The cross
was Neo. ‘Marble Throat’ x ‘Yellow
Sand’. ‘Yellow Sand’ in turn is a cross
of Neo.‘Barbarian’ and Neo.‘Gold
Fever’.

Vriesea ‘Galaxy’ (featured on our
cover) is a variegated sport of Vriesea
glutinosa. This species was described
in 856 and is found on the island
of Trinidad in the Caribbean where
it grows on rocks near waterfalls and
occasionally epiphytically. It grows to
about one metre high when flowering
in New Zealand, with branched red
bracted spikes. It produces many
adventitious pups when young. It is
not known exactly where ‘Galaxy’
originated, but it’s believed to be in
Hungary.


Bromeliad Society of New Zealand Inc

Bromeliad Journal – July 2009 issue
CONTENTS


More colour and leaf patterns – Peter Waters
President’s Page – Kesson Sharp 4
Broms in the Park, 009 4
Bromeliad Society June meeting news – Glenys Guild 5
Spring Sale notice 5
Vriesea ‘Snow-White’. Is it really a species? – Derek Butcher 6
From the Registrar. Three neos from Andrew Steens – Gerry Stansfield 8
Seed Bank – Bev Ching 0
Buy & Swap 0
Society officers, subs and Journal directory
Is Neo. correia-araujoi a natural hybrid? – Derek Butcher
Hail damage in the Bay of Plenty – Sue Laurent 4
Group News 5
Nong Nooch. Thailand tropical gardens – John and Agatha Lambert 8

The opinions expressed in articles or letters in this Journal are the contributors’ own views and
do not necessarily express the views or the policy of the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand

COMING EVENTS

Please see the Group News section starting on page 9 for more details of group

meeting times and venues.

JULY
26th Hawkes Bay Group meeting
26th Wellington Group meeting
28th Society meeting at Greyfriar’s
Hall, corner of Mt Eden and Windmill
roads, Mt Eden, starting 7. 0pm.
Plant auction for NZ conference 0 .
Speakers: Jocelyn and Peter Coyle.
Monthly competition: Neoregelia
‘Hannibal Lector’ and hybrids.

AUGUST

2nd South Auckland Group meeting
12th Bay of Plenty Group meeting
16th Eastern Bay of Plenty Orchid and
Bromeliad Group meeting
25th Society meeting at Greyfriar’s
Hall, corner of Mt Eden and Windmill
roads, Mt Eden, starting 7. 0pm.
Speaker: Peter Waters on ‘muddled
plant names’. Monthly competition:
Spotted neoregelias.

Front cover: This month’s striking plant is Vriesea ‘Galaxy’, from Peter Waters.
See page for the details.


PRESIDENT’S PAGE

Well, we are half way through
this bleak cold winter and
it’s almost time to start
looking forward to spring which is not
that far away. Won’t it be great to be
able to get out and once again really
enjoy our gardens! I would like to
thank Diana Holt, John Lambert and
Andrew Devonshire for combining at
our June monthly meeting to produce a
very interesting session. Even though
meeting numbers were down, no doubt
due to the cold night, those attending
were all left with a better insight into
the trials and tribulations and rewards
of raising bromeliads from seed.

The July meeting is a must attend, as
there is going to be an auction of a
variety of bromeliads that Peter Coyle
is organizing to raise funds for the 0
Conference. This will be maybe the
only chance you will have of getting
these special bromeliads, so don’t miss
out.

Our Spring Sale is not far away
(October 7th) and at the moment I have
only one person who has indicated that
they want to sell. What’s happening?
Please give me a call to book your
sales place.

Peter Waters has been hard at work
getting the early planning for the
conference in place. Our aim is to
make this conference so good that it
will ‘blow the socks off’ anything that
has been done before. There will be a
suggestion box at our monthly meeting
so please jot down anything that you
would like to see being done. I have
included the following to remind
you all that the last conference held
here was extremely successful. An
extract from BROMELIADS XIII
CONFERENCE BRISBANE 005
Newsletter # reads:

‘Firstly we offer our congratulations
to the New Zealand Bromeliad Society
for their first Australasian conference
conducted in Auckland. All who
attended will agree that the conference
was very successful and will be a
hard act to follow. The venue, which
provided for all on-site activities to be
held under one roof, was the envy of
our committee members.’

I look forward to seeing you all on
Wednesday evening 9th July.

Keep warm.
Cheers, Kesson Sharp


Sunday November 8th
at Totara Waters
Starting 10.00am
• • • MARK IT IN YOUR DIARY NOW! • • •

Bromeliad Society June Meeting News


– Glenys Guild
U nfortunately the mid-winter
weather meant there was a
much smaller gathering of
members than normal at our June
meeting and consequently a reduction
in plants entered in the competitions,
although the entries were of a high
standard. We were treated to three short
talks from members Diana Holt, John
Lambert and Andrew Devonshire, who
all spoke about beginning hybridising
and how they went about it. They
all brought along parent plants and
the resulting offspring. All three had
chosen different plants to work with,
and had achieved different results.
It was interesting that previous talks
on the subject by Gerry Stansfield
had fallen on fetile ground, so to
speak, and resulted in more members
becoming interested in creating their
own designer plants.
There was no ‘Show and Tell’ this
month. A reminder that this section of
the meeting is a chance for members
to get advice on plant problems and
identification.
Door prizes went to Andrew
Devonshire, Robbie Burns and June
Sly, while the special raffle was won by
President Kesson Sharp. There is now

an extra ‘special’ raffle each month
to raise funds for the 0 bromeliad
conference in Auckland, and the first
one was won by Diana Holt.

COMPETITIONS

Open Flowering: David Gosse won
first and second places with his entries
Billbergia vittata, and Edmundoa
lindenii var ‘Rosea’.
Open Foliage : Glenys Guild was
first with a large Neoregelia ‘Exotica
Velvet’.
Neoregelia: First was Roy Plackett
with Neoregelia ‘Cayenne’, and Diana
Holt was second with Neoregelia
‘Gene McKenzie’, a plant she bred and
registered.
Tillandsia: Lynette Nash was first
with Tillandsia tenuifolia, second
was Lester Ching with Tillandsia
sphoeroephel. Also in the competition
were two Tillandsia stricta.

Monthly Choice – Vriesea fosteriana
and cultivars. David Gosse was first
with Vriesea fosteriana var ‘Red
Chestnut’.
Plant of the Month went to Lynette
Nash with Tillandsia tenuifolia.
Congratulations to all winners.
NEXT MEETING: Tues 8th July

SATURDAY OCTOBER 17th
Mt Eden War Memorial Hall, 489 Dominion Road, Balmoral, Auckland.
10.00am to 3.00pm.
Sellers – please contact Kesson Sharp
as soon as possible to reserve your place. Tel (09) 818-8051

Vriesea ‘Snow-White’… for now, but is
it really a species?

– Adapted from The Bromeliad Society of Queensland’s ‘Bromeliaceae’,
February 2009, by Derek Butcher, former BSI Registrar
Some years ago Cheryl Basic
imported a Vriesea sp.5 from
Pam Koide at BirdRock in
California but it remained unidentified.
Recently when Mick Romanowski was
marauding in Queensland he was rather
taken by this dainty vriesea in Cheryl’s
collection that did not fit the description
of V. corcovadensis or V. lubbersii. My
wife, Margaret, took an interest in this
plant in Mick’s collection on one of our
trips to Melbourne and we scrounged
an offset. Mick said it was reticent to
flower! In 008 it started to produce
a flower scape. In 009 we brought it
indoors during the infamous heatwave.
It flowered, so I took photos from all
angles and even got permission from
Margaret to remove ONE flower to
scan. I was ready for a telephone brag
to Mick when he said, “All mine are
in flower too!” An email was sent to
Harry Luther.

Harry,
You love challenges and have a good
memory. This plant came to Australia
from the USA several years ago as
‘sp’ but no-one queried it until now.
I think it is a species rather than a
hybrid. You will remember the saga
of the corcovadensis versus lubbersii.
The main problem is the white petals
which lean me towards corcovadensis
but the leaves lean me to lubbersii. I
have given up on the distichousness of

the flowers! Have you seen this around
Florida? Any thoughts?
Derek

And the answer:

Derek,
As far as I can see, Vriesea lubbersii,
not the old, broader leaf clone. Several
Floridians collected it in the 90s or late
80s. There is also a V. aff lubbersii that
I think is just a very large clone (more
than 0 cm tall) that I’ve never seen
flower. Vriesea corcovadensis seems
more delicate or thinner but I’ve not
seen enough of either.
Harry Luther
PS Why don’t you ask Elton Leme?

So I asked Elton and he replied:

Derek,
You cannot imagine how many different
plants of this group I have collected,
all of them with specific discrepancies,
which make identification inaccurate.
At this very moment, I have some of
them flowering and I gave up trying
to identify most of them. Apparently,
few of them are new. Others look to be
just variations of different populations.
I agree with you that your plant looks
closer to Vriesea corcovadensis, and
I would not be much concerned with
the rosette conformation at this point
of the available knowledge. There is a
PhD student trying to understand this


group right now, so we wait to see
what conclusions she makes.
Best,
Elton


This information made me decide to
bite the bullet because it is better to
identify this clone with a cultivar name
than just Vriesea sp. Margaret came
up with ‘Snow-White’. Anyone who
knows their nursery stories will know
that Snow-White had white skin and
dressed in white (white petals) had
ruby lips (red floral bracts) and black
hair (colour of the leaf sheaths). Plant
0cm diam, x 5cm high, flowering
to 0cm high. We will be linking this
name to both V. corcovadensis and V.
lubbersii in the Cultivar Register for
possible amendment in the future.

Vriesea ‘Snow-White’



FROM THE REGISTRAR – Gerry Stansfield


Neoregelia ‘Exotica Flame’


Neoregelia ‘Exotica Inferno’


Neoregelia ‘Exotica Purple Wave’


FROM THE REGISTRAR – Gerry Stansfield

We have not heard from the very popular Andrew Steens for some time,
so I thought it was time we took a look at just what he has been up
to of late. Starting this month, and for the next few months, we will
be showing you a number of Andrew’s very lovely new neoregelias. You will
remember me saying that you could use a prefix or a suffix before or after a
name to help you create a distinctive final name for your plant. As you will see,
Andrew has taken advantage of this as with many of his hybrids.

Neoregelia ‘Exotica Flame’

This is a ([Neo ‘Fireball’ x Neo concentrica ‘Plutonis’] x Neo carolinae hybrid?).
As you can imagine this is a large plant at 40cm diam x 0cm high and as the
name suggests has a vibrant crimson colouring.

Neoregelia ‘Exotica Inferno’

([‘Fireball x ‘Plutonis] x carolinae hybrid?) 40cm diam. This plant is outstanding
at flowering time, where the whole centre turns scarlet and the outer leaves a
dark red, as you can see, this plant came from the same cross as the plant above,
and is very lovely.

Neoregelia ‘Exotica Purple Wave’

This most unusual plant is a SPORT as the result of tissue culture of Neo ‘Purple
Star’and is an outstanding plant as the purple outer narrow leaves curl up forming
a cup. The new plants are semi-stoloniferous. Andrew says this plant looks more
like an oversized cryptanthus than a neoregelia, and that originally as the plant
was growing from a seedling it was discarded to the compost before one of the
staff rescued it.

As you may know, Andrew has a website – they call it a blog site – so you
can have a look at what else Andrew has been up to at http://exoticabromeliads/
blogspot.com

Andrew says that he does not sell bromeliads now from home, but he will be
selling at our Spring Sale and our annual Fiesta show.


SEED BANK

Aechmea – blanchetiana (yellow form)
Alcantarea – geniculata, glaziouana,
Tillandsia – gardneri, magnusiana,
viridiflora, elongata v subimbricata,
rotundata, butzii, fasciculata (flat
yellow spike), balbisiana x fasciculata,
variabilis
Vriesea – friburgensis v tucumanensis,
gigantea, gigantea v seideliana, racinae,
agostiniana, ensiformis, heliconoides.
Werauhia – sanguinolenta

TO ALL MEMBERS

If you have fresh seed from any species,
please send as we need to have fresh
stock at all times. Seed from hybrid
plants not accepted.

ORDERING SEED:

Send orders to Seed Bank – NZ residents only

Bev Ching, P.O.Box 51361 Pakuranga Auckland 2010
Email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Phone 09 576-4595 evenings

The seedbank will exchange two packets
of 0 seeds for one ( ) large packet of
your seed. Please make sure it is labeled
correctly. PLEASE SEND A LARGE
STAMPED ADDRESSED ENVELOPE.
packet (of at least 0 seeds) –
50 cents. Limited to one packet of seed
per species. Maximum $5.00 per month.

Remember to consult the current seed
list when ordering. We reserve the right
to provide a substitute for an out of stock
seed with another packet of seed of the
same or similar genus.

This Seed Bank information can also
be viewed on the BSNZ website www.
bsnz.org. Note the user name (login) is
currently aechmea and the password
is fasciata. Both words must be typed
in lower case to access the members’
section containing the Seed Bank.

BUY & SWAP
WANTED TO BUY:

Tillandsias –

brachyphylla, caput-medusae

‘Sonoran Snow’, chapeuensis,

dorotheae, eltoniana,

friesii, heubergeri, klausii,

muhriae, peiranoi, praschekii,

schatzlii, sprengeliana, sucrei,

weberi, zecheri.

Please phone Bertha Schollum

(07) 578 2026 – Tauranga
We will publish Buy or Swap notices from
members of the Society. Maximum 30
words. Email: mathieson.marketing@
xtra.co.nz or post to: 14 Matanui St,
Northcote, North Shore City.

 0



OFFICERS

Patron: Patricia Sweeney
President: Kesson Sharp (09) 8 8-805
Vice Presidents: Dave Anderson (09) 6 8-867

Jocelyn Coyle (09) 4 6-8 7
Secretary: Glenys Guild (09) 8 0-9669
Treasurer: Peter Waters (09) 5 4-56 6
Librarian: Noelene Ritson (09) 6 5-8 4
Life Members: Laurie Dephoff, Patricia Perratt,

Patricia Sweeney, Len Trotman
Scientific Officer:

Peter Waters (09) 5 4-56 6


Committee: Don Brown (09) 6 6 75
Alan Cliffe (09) 479- 45
David Cowie (09) 6 0-8 0
Chris Paterson (09) 6 5-6707
Sandy Stonham (09) 6 7-9658

Cultivar Registrar:
Gerry Stansfield (09) 8 4-7 78
Seed Bank Chairman:
Bev Ching (09) 576-4595
Auditor: Colin Gosse

MEMBERSHIP SUBSCRIPTION

New Zealand:

Ordinary membership NZ $ 5.00 ($5.00 discount if paid before the end of February).
Dual membership (same household) NZ $45.00 ($5.00 discount also applies as above).

Overseas:

AUD $ 0.00 Australia, US $ 0.00 United States and other overseas countries. Send all payments to
the Treasurer, Peter Waters, Half Moon Rise, Half Moon Bay, Manukau 0 .

CORRESPONDENCE

All general correspondence should be sent to the Secretary, Bromeliad Society of New Zealand,

P.O. Box 08- 68, Symonds Street, Auckland, New Zealand. The opinions expressed in letters or
articles in the Journal are the contributors’ own views and do not necessarily express the views or
policy of the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand Inc.
BROMELIAD JOURNAL

Deadline:

For all editorial and advertising, the first
Tuesday of publication month

Editorial Committee

Dave Anderson
Murray Mathieson
Peter Waters

Regular Writers

Gerry Stansfield

Production

Murray Mathieson

Distributon

Dave Anderson

All enquiries and contributions welcome, please
contact any member of the editorial committee
or send to Peter Waters, Half Moon Rise,
Half Moon Bay, Manukau 0 or email:
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Display Advertising

Rates are:
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‘Buy & Swap’

Listings in ‘Buy & Swap’ are FREE for
members of the Society (max. 0 words).
For advertising enquiries and material, please
contact Murray Mathieson ph (09) 4 8 0 66
or email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.



Is Neoregelia correia-araujoi a natural
hybrid?

– Derek Butcher. Reprinted from an article in the Bromeliad Society of Queensland
‘Bromeliaceae’, magazine, issue number 4, 2007.
First I must point out there is no
stigma attached to a plant being
called a natural hybrid. Most
plants were at one time a natural hybrid
– it was just that some settled down
to become treated by taxonomists
as a species. There are many plants
currently described as species which
are most likely recent hybrids! But
this should not stop us discussing odd
happenings. Elton Leme is strongly
of the opinion that this taxon is not
a hybrid. This is what he had to say
while showing photographic slides
in the Report of proceedings at the
Bromeliad Conference New Zealand,
00 .

On the contrary Neo. johannis grows
in an area covered by forest close to
the ocean. You can see it here in the
south part of Rio de Janeiro, some
rock formation and you can see when
johannis grows on the rocks very close
to the salt water. You can see here the
level of the high tide and it is very
adapted to the salt conditions. You can
select all kinds of shapes and colours
and I saw here and in many other
places, different plants supposed to be
hybrids or supposed to be cultivars but
they are just selections of the typical
populations. Here are some examples
of different populations just two
kilometres apart. You can also find
variegated ones sometimes but these
are a different category in terms of

taxonomy and you can use a cultivar
name. (This is where ‘DeRolf’ comes
from.)

Another problem is Neo. correiaaraujoi, you can see that it has spotted
leaves that never occur in the typical
johannis. People used to say that
correia-araujoi may be a natural hybrid
between cruenta and marmorata
but the populations of cruenta and
marmorata are never in contact in the
environment, Neo. cruenta grows up
north of Rio de Janeiro and johannis
grows to the south. Neo. marmorata
grows in Sao Paulo state far away. Here
is correia-araujoi in shade conditions,
and you can see it is keeping the spots
on the leaves.

This is the typical Neo. marmorata from
Sao Paulo, a smaller plant compared
to correia-araujoi and johannis, with
narrow leaves and a very peculiar kind
of ornamentation. In the cruenta the
petals are blue and in johannis, white.
Here we have some white petals with
tips of lilac, and also some shades of
green in the lower part of the petals.’

As far as I am aware Neo. cruenta
has never been part of the discussion
although there was much confusion
up to the 990s as to what constituted
a Neo. cruenta and what was Neo.
johannis. Elton does know where these
species are found whereas we have to



rely on reportings from publications
such as Smith & Downs. As such we
are unaware of the exact localities
for Neo. johannis although we do
know that Neo. marmorata has been
reported from Parati in the state of Rio
de Janeiro.

In 98 Pereira and Penna described
Neo. correia-araujoi and compared it
with Neo. marmorata.

In the late 980s Lisa Vinzant of
Honolulu obtained two verified clones
of Neo. correia-araujoi which she
crossed in both directions. She got
/4 to / plain green ‘johannis’ type
plants and the rest with some degree of
marmoration.

In 99 I obtained seed from Brazil
called Neo. correia-araujoi and the
resultant progeny included green
‘johannis’ type plants which when

flowered linked to the Neo. johannis
description. Others seemed closer
to Neo. marmorata but could not be
linked directly to the Neo. marmorata
description.

In private correspondence with Harry
Luther I also found out that he too
believed there was a link with these
two species but I do not know what he
based his opinion on.

Clearly, something odd was happening
from two different sources. The
problem is that hybridisation occurs
more easily from plants held in
Brazilian collections rather than in
the wild but to have similar results
from two different sources suggest
that there is a close relationship
with all three species. Whether you
write Neo. correia-araujoi or Neo.
Xcorreia-araujoi on your label is your
decision.


Neoregelia correia-araujoi in flower. Photo by Andrew Devonshire.



Hail Damage

The Bay of Plenty was hit by severe hail storms in May and much damage
was suffered to crops and gardens. This picture gives a graphic illustration
of the damage that can be done by hail in a very short time. The photo
was taken in the garden of Maggie Dominic who lives at Otarawairere in Ohope,
Eastern Bay of Plenty. Photo supplied by Sue Laurent.


Exotic colour and form in Thailand. See page 18.

 4


Group News

Far North Bromeliad Group

– Eric Stephens
Our June meeting was something we
had been looking forward to all year

– a visit and presentation by Andrew
and Rhonda Maloy and the opportunity
to share the day with a busload of
our good friends from the Northland
Group.
What we couldn’t control was the
weather – however as we had arranged
to meet at Fullbert Bromeliads at
Kerikeri – in the garden – it was
reasonably easy to convert from an
outdoor location, to inside Poppy
Fuller’s spacious shop. It was a bit of
a squeeze, but the 80 odd who attended
managed to cuddle up, and enjoy a great
lunch – and a special and entertaining
talk and display by Andrew. The sale
plants he and Rhonda brought were
eagerly snapped up.

‘Show and Tell’ included a long
discussion, and a learning experience
on the finer points of vriesea
development and general care. Other
plants demonstrated were Tillandsia
guatemalensis, Aechmea caudata var.
variegata, and Orthophytum sucrei.

President David Brewer was also able
to welcome new members Ron and
Merle Bishop, Bill and Jean Blanchon
and Gary Martin. Our membership
now stands at 94.

Next meeting: Having put up a dismal
performance at weather forecasting

these last few months – our next
meeting (Sunday July th) will be
held indoors at the Kingston House.
Kerikeri. A special treat will be a ‘hot
soup’ lunch, presented by some of our
local exponents of ‘vichyssoise’ and
more.

South Auckland Bromeliad Group

– Marion Morton
Despite the inclement weather we had
78 people turn out for our July monthly
meeting at the Auckland Botanic
Gardens at Manurewa.

Graham West told us that Pauline
Ashton is currently in hospital and we
all wish her a speedy recovery.

Eric Ashton was scheduled to
demonstrate mounting bromeliads
onto driftwood but due to a bout of flu
was unable to attend, so Roy Morton
did so instead. Neil Douglas showed
us how to remove vegetative offsets or
pups from mother plants, and how to
pot them up. There was great interest
by new members on both of these
subjects and several people went away
with their mounted bromeliads.

As a surprise for Graham and Pat
West’s 50th Wedding Anniversary,
Margaret and Robert Flanagan made
a fantastic cake which we got Graham
and Pat to cut with a ceremonial sword.
Hawi Winter presented them with a CD
of our Kerikeri trip and photos of their
wedding which were shown at our last

Cont’d P16 5


Cont’d from P15

meeting but which Pat and Graham did
not see as they were unable to attend.
The raffles were won by Kaye Main
and Sharron Balle.

Next Meeting: Sunday nd August
at . 0pm at the Auckland Botanic
Gardens, Hill Road, Manurewa. There
will be a PowerPoint presentation of
Pat Labrum and Mary Cole’s exciting
trip from Africa to Italy.

Bay of Plenty Bromeliad Group

– Jo Elder
On a cold wet day 5 brave people
braved the elements to attend our
meeting. Excellent photos taken
by Cushla Chudleigh of the ‘Brian
Chudleigh Walkway’ in Katikati were
shown to the group.

Guest speaker, Erica Cowdell, has
a history of horticulture and science
and is a most interesting speaker. A
member of our own Bay of Plenty
Group, Erica has many strings to her
bow. She spoke of traveling to Japan
and being entertained by growers and
distributors of orchids.

Distribution areas are a family affair
and are passed on from father to son
and jealously guarded. She said that
the public are being manipulated with
plants treated with ethylene to flower
before maturity. This is fine if one
should wish to have a house plant
that one is prepared to throw away
once it has finished flowering, and of
course this is what happens in the large
markets of Europe and U.S.A.

Erica and her husband have a business
in which it is important to know what
the future colour trends are, well
ahead of time. It appears that purple
is one of the up and coming colours.
We all know that there are trends in
bromeliads as well; Purple coloured
Bromeliads could well be the plants to
have in a few months time.

In our Silent Auction – Alcantarea
imperialis (rubra) was won by Diane
Filford.

Competition Plants:

 st Neoregelia Hybrid – Gil Keesing
nd Guzmania Luna – Barbara Nalder
rd Alcantarea vinicolor – Cushla
Cudleigh
Other plants in competition; Neoregelia
‘Nuance’, xNidumea ‘Chantrieri’

Tillandsia Competition:

 st Tillandsia stricta (green form) –
Audrey Hewson
nd Tillandsia crocata – Jo Elder
rd Tillandsia stricta (soft leaf) – Jo
Elder

Plant of the Month was Aechmea
recurvata and hybrids. On display,
Ae. recurvata ‘Inky’ Ae. recurvata
‘Covata’ and many others.

Next Meeting: Wednesday th August
. 0pm. At T.Y.P.B. Clubrooms,
Worm Farms to be the subject of the
day. Plant of the Month for August:
spotted/speckled Neoregelias. There
will be a committee meeting at
. 0am.

 6 Cont’d P17


Cont’d from P16

Eastern Bay of Plenty Orchid and
Bromeliad Group – Joy Insley

Regardless of frost and flu our June
meeting held in the Professional’s office
in Whakatane was well attended. As
a winter solstice treat Helen and
Colleen Clark from Opotiki stirred our
creative juices with a series of floral art
demonstrations. They assured us that all
of the materials used would be available
at this time of the year from our own –
or our neighbours’– gardens. Locating
gadesia seeds, pleated aspidistra leaves
and Asparagus springerai could be a
challenge for some of us, but we’ll
cope with the floral art principles of
contrasting textures, dull and shiny
surfaces, and varied levels to give
oomph to our arrangements. Sue hopes
our Christmas bromeliad arrangements
will reflect some of the ideas presented
today.

The ‘Show and Tell’ feature was
Barbara Rogers’ Nidularium procerum
with its long lasting stunning red
blooms. A mystery plant with deep
based striped leaves, no prickles and
an orange and yellow pinball flower
challenged identification even by our
more experienced members and
those of us who are lovers of orchids
enthused over Pam and Trevor Signal’s
more unusual blooms from their vast
collection.

Next meeting: 6th August at the
Professional’s. Featured will be Lester
and Bev Ching’s tillandsias.

Hawkes Bay Bromeliad Group

– Judy Newman
If we thought the weather for last
month’s meeting was bad well this
month was even worse - it teemed with
rain but that did not deter a good number
of members turning up. Vrieseas were
the topic of discussion for the month
and a large number of lovely plants had
been brought along ranging from the
small Vr. racinae and Vr. agostiniana
to two huge Vr. hieroglyphica. There
was more talk of our trip to Auckland
and it was decided to change the date
to the last weekend of October and
visit gardens only. Then we’ll go up
again for the Fiesta in February. The
committee had been to see the site for
our display at the Home and Garden
Show in September where we will be
next to the Orchid Society. We felt that
a combined display could work for
both groups. Noel had brought along
his Quesnelia lateralis, which was
flowering for the first time, with the
flower spikes coming out horizontally
from the base of the plant.

Open competition:

 st Neoreglia ‘Milagro’ – Wade Smith;
nd Vriesea philippo-coburgii – Judy
Newman;
rd equal – Colin Anderson and Grace
Smith both with Vriesea hieroglyphica
and Noel Newman – a neoregelia
which had been purchased as Neo.
‘Camelot but which members thought
was Neo. ‘Beefsteak’. There were no
entries in the Novice section.

Next meeting: At the Beacon on 6th
July. Please bring some nice weather
with you!!

 7



Nong Nooch Tropical Botanical

Gardens, Thailand – Article and photographs by JAGA

We are running two articles
on Nong Nooch. In part
one, this month, we have a
general overview of the garden. Next
month, in part two, we will feature the
bromeliads in the garden. All thanks
to John and Agatha Lambert.

If you are ever near Pattaya (south of
Bangkok) in Thailand make sure you
plan a trip to this spectacular garden. It
will leave you breathless in more ways
than one! Covering approximately 600
acres, this is one of the biggest and most
well maintained gardens in Southeast
Asia. The garden was established
by Mrs Nongnooch Tansacha, who
was inspired by the world renowned
gardens that she saw on her travels,
to create a tropical garden featuring
an incredible diversity of plants,
all stunningly displayed in themed
areas. It was opened to the public in
980, and it has since evolved into a
tourist attraction with the addition of a
resort and a theatre complex featuring
cultural shows and the popular elephant
performances.

For us the highlight was the gardens –
with such a huge space you have three
choices to get around:
. By tour tram which gives a quick
overview of the garden (only stops
and takes about 0mins).
. By elephant which is great fun but
again only gives you an overhead view.
. By foot… allow for at least half a
day, wear sensible shoes and drink
heaps in this hot humid environment.

Happily, there are plenty of cold drink
stalls and restaurants dotted around. Of
course for serious garden lovers option
is the only legitimate one!

We made our way through the
colourful orchid house where a wide
variety of orchid hybrids and species
can be enjoyed in full bloom. Then we
took our time at the highly anticipated
bromeliad display garden (yes, sorry
you will all have to wait another month
for that). Other highlights include the
`Caribbean Walk’ which features
palms and cycads from Caribbean
island nations. Indeed, palms and
cycads are prominently displayed
through the gardens and there are some
00 varieties of palms including 800
species. We were particularly enchanted
by the silvery blue display created by a
whole avenue of Bismarckia nobilis.
Also particularly memorable was
the cactus and succulent area, with
specimen plants featured on a rocky
landscape. These rocks are also littered
with a trail of metallic red ants - indeed
these creatures appear to make their
way through the garden. Other theme
gardens include a seriously large
French garden, a European garden, a
pottery garden, a canna garden and a
butterfly garden.

All the gardens are immaculate with
an army of workers endlessly toiling
away to provide a flawless and
beautiful display. We enjoyed our day
here immensely and recommend the
experience to you all.

 8



Nong Nooch, Thailand…


Entry Orchid house
Elephants and Bismarckia nobilis
9



Nong Nooch, Thailand…


Pottery garden
0

 

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