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2012

2012 Journals

January 2012 February 2012 March 2012 April 2012 May 2012 June 2012 July 2012 August 2012 September 2012 October 2012 November 2012

JUNE 2012
VOL 52 NO 6

Singapore's 'Gardens by the Bay' opening June.

Singapore's amazing

'Gardens by the Bay'

opening late June

– Notes by Murray Mathieson.
All photos kindly supplied by 'Gardens by the Bay'.
In November 2011 we reprinted an article by Herb Plever, from the New York
Bromeliad Society 'Bromeliana', previewing this major Singapore development,
where Harry Luther is an assistant director for horticulture. It's about to open
and we bring you the latest news and photos:

I
I
t has been at least five years in the
making and now this 101 hectare
site by the water at the heart of
Singapore's new downtown at Marina
Bay is all set to open.

From June 29 visitors to Bay South
Garden will be able to experience
two massive conservatories – the
'Flower Dome' and the 'Cloud
Forest'. Both combine architectural,
environmental engineering and
horticultural excellence. The 'Flower
Dome' replicates the cool-dry climate
of Mediterranean and semi-arid
subtropical regions like South Africa

Elton Leme

and parts of Europe like Spain and
Italy. The 'Cloud Forest' replicates a
cool-moist climate found in regions
between 1,000 to 3,500 metres above
sea level, such as Mt Kinabalu in
Sabah, Malaysia and high elevation
areas in South America.

About 226,000 plants from every
continent except Antarctica are
expected to be featured in the
conservatories and many of the species
face the threat of climate change and
habitat loss brought about by human
activities.

3Cont'd P4
In the 'Cloud Forest' there will
be 130,000 plants and two unique
walkways, the 'Cloud Walk'
and the 'Tree Top Walk' which
will link the higher levels of the
35 metre tall 'mountain' with the
lower levels. There will be many
bromeliads included and along the
way visitors can gather a wealth of
information about cloud forests such
as location, ecology and the species
that make this climate zone their
home.
Another unique signature feature
of 'Gardens by the Bay' is the 18
Supertrees – designed vertical gardens
ranging from 25 to 50 metres in height
(9 to 16 storey buildings!) Altogether,
over the 18 Supertrees there will be
162,900 plants with more than 200
species, including bromeliads, orchids,
ferns and tropical flowering plants.
The Supertrees provide an immediate
scale and dimension to the gardens
and create height to help balance the
current and future tall developments in
the Marina Bay area. In the day their
large canopies will provide shade and
shelter. At night the Supertrees will
come alive with lighting and projected
media. A 128 metre long aerial
walkway will connect two 42 metre
tall Supertrees and enable visitors to
take in a different view of the gardens
from a height of 22 metres. The 50
metre tall Supertree will offer a treetop
bistro with a panoramic view of the
gardens and surrounding Marina Bay.
3 Cont'd P4
In the 'Cloud Forest' there will
be 130,000 plants and two unique
walkways, the 'Cloud Walk'
and the 'Tree Top Walk' which
will link the higher levels of the
35 metre tall 'mountain' with the
lower levels. There will be many
bromeliads included and along the
way visitors can gather a wealth of
information about cloud forests such
as location, ecology and the species
that make this climate zone their
home.
Another unique signature feature
of 'Gardens by the Bay' is the 18
Supertrees – designed vertical gardens
ranging from 25 to 50 metres in height
(9 to 16 storey buildings!) Altogether,
over the 18 Supertrees there will be
162,900 plants with more than 200
species, including bromeliads, orchids,
ferns and tropical flowering plants.
The Supertrees provide an immediate
scale and dimension to the gardens
and create height to help balance the
current and future tall developments in
the Marina Bay area. In the day their
large canopies will provide shade and
shelter. At night the Supertrees will
come alive with lighting and projected
media. A 128 metre long aerial
walkway will connect two 42 metre
tall Supertrees and enable visitors to
take in a different view of the gardens
from a height of 22 metres. The 50
metre tall Supertree will offer a treetop
bistro with a panoramic view of the
gardens and surrounding Marina Bay.
3

Cont'd from P3
Already 'Gardens by the Bay' has From June 29 Bay South Garden will
Cont'd from P3
Already 'Gardens by the Bay' has From June 29 Bay South Garden will
hosted a World Orchid Congress and
there are wonderful facilities in place
for hosting events of all sizes.

Dr Kiat W. Tan, CEO, 'Gardens by the
Bay' says, 'we are delivering a garden
that people can enjoy and cherish .'

be open to the public from 5.00am to
2.00pm daily. Opening hours for the
cooled conservatories and the aerial
walkway in the Supertree grove are
from 9.00am to 9.00pm daily.

For more information visit www.
gardensbythebay.org.sg

Bromeliad Society of New Zealand Inc
Bromeliad Journal – June 2012 issue
CONTENTS
Singapore's amazing 'Gardens by the Bay' – Murray Mathieson 2
President's Page – Jocelyn Coyle 6
We're 50 in July! 6
Bromeliad Society May meeting news – Dave Anderson 7
Spring Sale notice 8
San Francisco's famous Botanical Garden – Jocelyn Coyle 9
'Cool Broms' 2013 – conference programme 10
Society officers, subs and Journal directory 12
Group News 13
Peter Tristram hybridiser: 'There is no limit' – Andrew Devonshire 16
Classic Brom Corner – Graeme Barclay 20

The opinions expressed in articles or letters in this Journal are the contributors' own views and
do not necessarily express the views or the policy of the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand

COMING EVENTS

Please see the Group News section starting on page 13 for details of group
meeting times and venues.

JUNE JULY

1st

24th Hawkes Bay Group meeting South Auckland Group meeting
24th Northland Group meeting 11th Bay of Plenty Group meeting
26th Society monthly meeting at 15th Eastern BOP Group meeting
Greyfriar's Hall, corner of Mt Eden 24th Society monthly meeting at
and Windmill roads, starting at Greyfriar's Hall, corner of Mt Eden
7.30pm. Monthly choice competition: and Windmill roads, starting at 7.30pm.
Neoregelia carcharodon and hybrids. Monthly choice competition: Mounted
Graeme Barclay will talk on the same bromeliads. We are celebrating the 50th
plants. birthday of the Bromeliad Society of

New Zealand. Join in the fun!

FRONT COVER: A wonderful new attraction for plant lovers opens in Singapore
this month. Read all about the new 101 hectare 'Gardens by the Bay', starting on
page 2. Photos kindly supplied by 'Gardens by the Bay'.

Jocelyn
Mark it in your diary now!
We're turning
50 in July.
Join the fun!
Our July 24th monthly
Society meeting will be
our special 50th birthday
anniversary celebration.
We will have some
'flashbacks' to the past...
balloons... a birthday cake...
special door prizes
and lots of fun.
Mark it in your diary now!
We're turning
50 in July.
Join the fun!
Our July 24th monthly
Society meeting will be
our special 50th birthday
anniversary celebration.
We will have some
'flashbacks' to the past...
balloons... a birthday cake...
special door prizes
and lots of fun.
PRESIDENT'S PAGE

H
H
ow are your gardens handling
the winter? It hasn't been too
intense has it and I haven't had
to get the gumboots out yet.

Last month we spent a week travelling
around the bottom end of the South
Island, (that was before all the rain
and snow) and I braved the cold winds
and rugged terrain to head out to every
seal, penguin and albatross colony that
was marked on the map. At one stage
I was sure that my ears were going to
fall off as they were so cold. Needless
to say, I only saw two fur seals the
whole time. It was not a good time to
look at gardens so it will have to be
another trip during the summer. The
highlights of our trip were spending
our first night at Larnach Castle which
is part of the NZ Garden Trust (the
same as Totara Waters). The history
of the castle was fascinating, then
on to the Bluff. I think I just love the
ruggedness of it all and I could have
sat there for hours watching the fishing
boats come in. Last but not least is
all that wonderful area in the centre –
Cromwell, Bannockburn, Alexandra
and Roxburgh. Seeing those amazing
rock formations we fantasized about
coming home and starting our garden
all over again.

Didn't we have a great 'Cool Broms'
auction at the May meeting? Abig thank
you to all involved, the auctioneer,
buyers, bidders and everyone who so
generously donate their plant to help
with our fundraising.

I would like to extend a very big thank

you to Colin Gosse who has been our
auditor for many years, and now feels
it is time to hand it on to someone else.
So please, if you know anyone who
could do this for the Society could you
let me know.

Plans for our 50th celebration at the July
meeting are looking good so please
mark your diaries for the 24th and come
and join the fun.

See you the 26th June, promise to put
the heaters on!

Cheers,

Bromeliad Society April Meeting News

– Dave Anderson
J
J
ocelyn welcomed everyone
including one new member.
She spoke about the upcoming
July meeting where there will be
a celebration of the society's 50th
anniversary with a party etc on the
night. There will be a display of articles
from throughout the years so it should
be a fun evening. Lester Ching has
offered to make a cake for the night
and asked if there was anybody willing
to decorate it to contact him. Jocelyn
then spoke about the 2013 Australasian
Conference to be held in Auckland
with the proceeds of tonight's auction
of donated plants going into the fund.
The auction was held later in the
evening and was a great success with
over $1,500.00 being collected from
the donated plants. Finally Jocelyn said
that we are always looking for articles
for the journal so on these winter nights
try and put pen to paper and tell us
about your plants.

Peter Waters took us through the Show
and Tell plants. The first plant on show
and wanting a name was the miniature
Neoregelia 'Sugar and Spice' with
parents cyanea x chlorosticta – a small
plant with red spotted green/pink leaves
that was made in 1980. Next for display
was the large species Edmundoa
lindenii that was in flower with its
white bracts and flowers. Wanting a
name was the plant Vriesea simplex
with its lovely pendulous flower spike
that is always flowers at this time of
the year. Peter explained that this plant
is very similar to and often confused
with Vriesea scalaris the difference

being that the floral bracts overlap on
simplex whereas they may hust meet
on scalaris. Another vriesea wanting
a name was the plant that has been
in NZ many decades and known as
Vriesea maxoniana. Then there were
some neoregelia hybrids that had been
grown in the shade and consequently
were quite green all wanting names. It
is difficult enough, if not impossible,
trying to identify neoregelia hybrids
even when grown in very high light so
all that could be said about these is that
they were hybrids. Lastly there were
two aechmeas for naming, the first
being the readily identifiable Aechmea
coelestis albomarginata in flower
and the second probably Aechmea
cylindrata that pups prolifically and
is virtually given away to all people
starting a collection.

Peter Coyle was our auctioneer for this
month's plant sale with all proceeds
going into the 2013 Conference Fund.
Another great and successful auction –
thanks Peter.

David Cowie won this month's special
raffle prize. The door prizes went to
Lester Ching, Isla McGowan and Chris
Paterson.

COMPETITIONS

Open Flowering: First Judy Graham
with Aechmea flavorosea – a clump
of two large plants both out in flower.
Michelle Tohi was second with
Hohenbergia correia-araujoi. Also
in the competition were Aechmea
caudata 'Melanocrater'; Nidularium

Cont'd P8

Cont'd from P7 – May Meeting News

innocentii var. lineatum; Guzmania
sanguinea 'Tricolor' and Billbergia
'Purple Haze'.

Open Foliage: Peter Waters was
first with a Vriesea 'Artful Grace' –
another one of the beautiful hybrids
from the stable of Andrew Maloy; this
one having the most attractive pink/
purple hues from the species Vriesea
platynema var. variegata. It thoroughly
deserved being chosen 'Plant of the
Month'. Second was Peter Coyle
with Neoregelia carcharodon 'Tiger'.
In the competition were Guzmania
'Decora'; Hohenbergia correiaaraujoi;
Neoregelia 'Kiko'; xNeomea
'Strawberry'; Vriesea gruberi x
'Golden Legend' and 'Hunua Tiger'.

Tillandsia: Lynette Nash was first with
Tillandsia caerulea; a wonderfully
mounted huge clump with a great
many perfumed flowers. Second
equal were Win Shorrock with a
Tillandsia lindenii and Judy Graham
with Tillandsia standleyi. Other plants
on the table were Tillandsia albida,
'Strictly Bourgeoise', punctulata and

Neoregelia: First Peter Waters with
Neoregelia 'Tiger' (variegated).
Second with Neoregelia 'Garnish' was
Peter Coyle. Also in the competition
were Neoregelia 'Tiger', 'Gold Lotto',
'Jewellery Shop', 'Tiger' x 'Rainbow',
'Screaming Tiger', 'Night Sky', 'Coral
Fire' and ('Exotica Misty Pink' x
'Purple Star') x 'Marble Throat'.

Named Monthly Plant (Vriesea
species): First was John Mitchell with a
Vriesea ospinae var. gruberi; a species
that is reasonably hardy and always
looks very attractive. Peter Coyle was
second with Vriesea erythrodactylon
'White Cloud' a species that is amazing
in that it has white foliage but still
grows quite well. In the competition
were Vriesea atra, altodaserrae,
bituminosa, correia-araujoi, elata,
flammea, olmosana var. pachamamae,
ospinae var. ospinae and fosteriana
'Golden Legend'.

The Plant of the Month went to Peter
Waters with Vriesea 'Artful Grace'.
Congratulations to all the winners.

ehlersiana. NEXT MEETING: Tues 26th June.
Mt Eden War Memorial Hall
489 Dominion Road, Balmoral, Auckland
NOTE: changed public opening hours... 9.00am to 3.00pm
SUNDAY OCTOBER 14th
Sellers – please contact Dave Anderson as soon as possible to reserve
your place. Tel (09) 638 8671 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

A quick look at San Francisco's
famous Botanical Garden – Jocelyn Coyle

A
A
bout a year ago I spent a week
in San Francisco and I visited
the Botanical Garden in the
Golden Gate Park. The park is 55
acres of sanctuary, landscape gardens

and open spaces with over 50,000
plants from around the world. There's
even a New Zealand section tucked
away. In the heated 'Hall of Flowers'
I found bromeliads, most of which
were tillandsias. I loved the way they
were mounted on wood and hanging.
If you're going to San Francisco, make
sure you take the time to visit!

10
THURSDAY 14TH
2pm Displays set-up
5 – 8pm Registration
FRIDAY 15TH
8 – 5pm Registration
8 – 10am Show set-up
9am Partner tour
10 – 1pm Show staging
1 – 5pm Sales plants set-up
1 – 5pm Show judging
1 –5pm Plant sales raffle
5 – 6pm Happy hour
5.30 – 7.30pm Sales plants open
6 – 9pm Show open
7.30pm Buffet Dinner (optional)
SATURDAY 16TH
7 – 8.30am Breakfast
8 – 5pm Hospitality desk
8.45am Conference opening
9am Partner tour
9 – 4pm Show open
9 – 9.45am Seminar 1
9.50 – 10.35am Seminar 2
10.35 – 11am Coffee Break
11 – 11.45am Seminar 3
11.50 – 12.35pm Seminar 4
12.35pm Lunch
1.30pm Garden tour A
5pm Raffle Draw
5 – 7pm Sales plants open
7pm Dinner (optional)
10
THURSDAY 14TH
2pm Displays set-up
5 – 8pm Registration
FRIDAY 15TH
8 – 5pm Registration
8 – 10am Show set-up
9am Partner tour
10 – 1pm Show staging
1 – 5pm Sales plants set-up
1 – 5pm Show judging
1 –5pm Plant sales raffle
5 – 6pm Happy hour
5.30 – 7.30pm Sales plants open
6 – 9pm Show open
7.30pm Buffet Dinner (optional)
SATURDAY 16TH
7 – 8.30am Breakfast
8 – 5pm Hospitality desk
8.45am Conference opening
9am Partner tour
9 – 4pm Show open
9 – 9.45am Seminar 1
9.50 – 10.35am Seminar 2
10.35 – 11am Coffee Break
11 – 11.45am Seminar 3
11.50 – 12.35pm Seminar 4
12.35pm Lunch
1.30pm Garden tour A
5pm Raffle Draw
5 – 7pm Sales plants open
7pm Dinner (optional)
10
CONFERENCE PROGRAMME... MARCH 2013
Foyers

Hospitality Desk

Hospitality Desk

Promenade Room

Promenade Room

Banquet Room 2

Promenade Room

Hospitality Desk

Horizon Lounge

Banquet Room 2

Promenade Room

Exhibition Hall

Banquet Room 1

Foyer

Cole Theatre

Promenade Room

Cole Theatre

Cole Theatre

Horizon Lounge

Cole Theatre

Cole Theatre

Horizon Lounge

Hospitality Desk

Banquet Room 2

Sky Tower

CONFERENCE PROGRAMME... MARCH 2013
SUNDAY 17TH
8 – 5pm
Hospitality Desk Foyer
9 – 4pm Show open Promenade Room
9am Partner tour
9 – 9.45am Seminar 5 Cole Theatre
9.50 – 10.35am Seminar 6 Cole Theatre
10.35 – 11am Coffee Break Horizon Lounge
11 – 11.45am Seminar 7 Cole Theatre
11.50 – 12.35pm Seminar 8 Cole Theatre
12.35pm Lunch Horizon Lounge
1.30pm Garden tour B
5pm Raffle Draw Hospitality Desk
6 – 7pm Cocktail hour Horizon Lounge
7pm Banquet Banquet Room 1
8.30pm Auction Banquet Room 1

MONDAY 18TH
9 – 12pm
Show open Promenade Room

9 – 9.45am Seminar 9 Cole Theatre
9.50 – 10.35am Seminar 10 Cole Theatre
10.35 – 11am Coffee Break Horizon Lounge
11 – 11.45am Seminar 11 Cole Theatre
11.50 – 12.35pm Internet Cole Theatre
12.35pm Lunch Horizon Lounge
1.30 – 2.15pm Seminar 12 Cole Theatre
2.15 – 2.45pm Conference closing Cole Theatre
3pm Break down

1
111
11

OFFICERS

Patron: Patricia Sweeney Scientific Officer: Peter Waters 09-534 5616
President: Jocelyn Coyle 09-416 8272 Librarian: Noelene Ritson 09-625 8114
Vice Presidents: Alan Cliffe 09-479 1451 Committee: Graeme Barclay 09-817 4153
Don Brown 09-361 6175 Lester Ching 09-576 4595
Secretary: Dave Anderson 09-638 8671 David Cowie 09-630 8220
Treasurer: Peter Waters 09-534 5616 Chris Paterson 09-625 6707
Life Members: Dave Anderson, Patricia Perratt, Editor: Murray Mathieson 09-418 0366
Len Trotman, Patricia Sweeney,
Peter Waters

MEMBERSHIP SUBSCRIPTION

New Zealand:

Ordinary membership NZ $35.00 ($5.00 discount if paid before the end of February).
Dual membership (same household) NZ $45.00 ($5.00 discount also applies as above).

Overseas:

NZD $45.00. Send all payments to the Treasurer, Peter Waters, 22 Half Moon Rise, Half Moon Bay,
Auckland 2012.

CORRESPONDENCE

All general correspondence should be sent to the Secretary, Bromeliad Society of New Zealand,

P.O. Box 108-168, Symonds Street, Auckland, New Zealand. The opinions expressed in letters or
articles in the Journal are the contributors' own views and do not necessarily express the views or
policy of the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand Inc.
BROMELIAD JOURNAL

Deadline:

For all editorial and advertising, the first
Tuesday of publication month

Editorial Committee

Dave Anderson
Murray Mathieson
Peter Waters

Regular Writers

Andrew Devonshire
Graeme Barclay
John and Agatha Lambert

Production

Murray Mathieson

Distribution

Dave Anderson

All enquiries and contributions welcome, please
contact any member of the editorial committee
or send to Peter Waters, 22 Half Moon Rise,
Half Moon Bay, Auckland 2012 or email:
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Display Advertising

Rates are:
Full Page $60.00
Half Page $30.00
Quarter Page $15.00

'Buy & Swap'

Listings in 'Buy & Swap' are FREE for
members of the Society (max. 30 words).
For advertising enquiries and material, please
contact Murray Mathieson ph (09) 418 0366
or email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Group News

Northland Bromeliad Group

– Sandra Wheeler
After ten lovely fine days the rain came
just as we wanted to look around the
garden of Sandra and Alan Wheeler
in Crane Road, Kauri where our May
meeting was held. It had been over
two years since we visited this garden
which was looking lovely in its autumn
colours. Part of the garden had recently
been extended at the expense of twelve
mandarin trees and a large new bed was
quickly being filled with bromeliads.
Surprise, surprise! A very large,
approximately 8 year old Alcantarea
imperialis drew some attention, it was
originally believed to be (rubra) but
has never shown any colour apart from
green! It will be interesting when it
finally flowers.

President Jan Mahoney thanked the

hosts for their hospitality and welcomed
22 members and 4 visitors, two of whom
showed an interest in joining the group.
Most members were looking very smart
wearing their new name badges with an
attractive bromeliad photo on them.

Next month's meeting will be the first
of our three winter meetings to be held
at Reyburn House in the town basin.
Members were asked to bring along a
problem bromeliad. No excuses – we
know they are out there in our gardens.
We promise not to laugh at the lack of
nurturing skills, rather we can hopefully
all learn from our mistakes.

Competition: There were a pleasing
number of entries resulting in a lively
competition:
1st Mac Smith with a stunning Neoregelia

2nd

'Ying'. Eva Lewis showed a
beautiful Neoregelia 'Red Pride'.
3rd – A three way tie between Lyn White
with a pretty little Tillandsia fasciculata
'Cardinal' in flower; Gail Atkin with a
stunning neoregelia (unfortunately unnamed)
and Jan Mahoney with a large
and beautiful Andrew Maloy vriesea,
possibly from the Tasman collection.

Mac helped identify some of the unnamed
plants on the competition table
as each entry was shown and growing
conditions discussed.

Next Meeting: Sunday, June 24th at
1.30pm at Reyburn House studio in
the town basin, located at the end of
Finlayson Street adjacent to the car
park. Don't forget your 'sick bromeliad'.
Lester Ching is coming to speak at our
July 22nd meeting so please keep that
day free to join us.

Bay of Plenty Bromeliad Group
– Jo Elder
It was a very wet day for our May
meeting but this did not deter a good
turnout of 53 members and one visitor.
President Lynley welcomed all and
went on to thank those members who
had assisted at the Orchid Show at
Te Puke where our club had a sales
table and a display of bromeliads. The
show was very successful and our group
received excellent publicity in the Te
Puke Times.
Our speaker at this meeting was Conrad
Coenan and his topic was 'Planting with
sub-tropicals and bromeliads'. Conrad
is a landscape designer and has taught
botany and plant appreciation at the BOP

Cont'd P14 13

Cont'd from P13 – Group News

polytechnic. He explained that the main
points to good landscaping are 'restraint'
(so difficult when it comes to broms)
'balance' and achieving a nice palette of
colours together in groupings of three or

five.
'Show & Tell': Featured Tillandsia

tricolor, xerographica, Aechmea
orlandiana, flavorosea, 'Ensign'.

We have introduced a new competition
this year, a'novice section'. It was so
pleasing that six of our members entered
plants in this section. Well done!

Plant of the Month: Miniature
bromeliads; a wonderful selection of
these plants were tabled, 18 in all.

Competition:

Novice: 1st Aechmea 'Foster's Favorite
Favorite' – Pauline Hetherington,

2nd

Neoregelia 'Red Spot' – Yvonne

3rd

Keepin, equal Nidularium fulgens
(orange) – Neila Fairweather, and
Tillandsia punctulata – Diana Durrant.
Also tabled were Neoregelia 'Barbarian'
Neoregelia 'Rien's Pride'.

1st

Open: Vriesea heterandra –
Jo Elder, 2nd Guzmania 'Ostara'– Barbara
Nalder, 3rd Neoregelia correia-araujoi

– Gill Keesing. Also on the table were
Neoregelia 'Blushing Tiger', 'Angel
Face', 'Small World' and xNiduregelia
'Something Special '
Tillandsia: 1st T. mooreana – Cushla
2nd

Chudleigh, T. stricta – Isabel

3rd

Clotworthy, T. xerographica –
Jo Elder. Also presented were T. crocata,
leonamiana, araujoi, 'Sunset'

Next Meeting: July 11th at the TYPB
clubrooms, Sulphur Point, at 12.30pm.
The plant of the month will be 'Unusual
genera and billbergias.' The talk

will be 'Bromeliads on the internet'.
Members will show how to locate the
BSNZ website and a look at other good
bromeliad websites. There will be no
garden visits this month.

Hawkes Bay Bromeliad Group
– Judy Newman
The May meeting was good for the
lively discussion it engendered. It was
proposed to hold a workshop in June
to show members how to mount plants
on driftwood. The Group will provide
plants, driftwood and glue and members
will pay a small fee for these as a Group
fundraiser. There will be no competition
as the trestles will be needed.

The next subject up for discussion was
a day trip to Gisborne rather than a
weekend as proposed before with a date
in spring to be decided. Bus quotes were
to be obtained.

There was talk of fertiliser with the usual
story – what is best? – with some using
fertiliser, some not.

The main topic for the day, the winter
care of our plants, brought forth many
mixed views and this was lead by Bill
Young assisted by Julie Greenhill This
included flushing out all the debris and
removing dead leaves. The subject of
frost cloth was raised with differing
choices. One member mentioned it
was a good idea to hang plants in fairly
dense evergreen trees particularly citrus.
Everyone agreed the spray did not work
successfully.

Competition:

1st

Non flowering: Neoregelia
'Predator' – Daniel Franklin,

2nd

Vriesea hybrid – Margaret Bluck,

3rd Aechmea nudicaulis 'Mary Hyde'
1st

Flowering: Billbergia vittata –

2nd

Margaret Bluck, Nidularium
longiflorum – Julie Greenhill.
Tillandsia: Tillandsia butzii roseiflora –
Margaret Bluck
Miniatures: 1st Neoregelia 'Zoe' – Julie
Greenhill; 2nd equal Neoregelia 'Alley
Cat' – Margaret Bluck and Neoregelia
'Zoe' – Daniel Franklin.

Next Meeting: June 24th, 2pm, at
St John Hall, Gloucester Road, Taradale

Eastern Bay of Plenty Bromeliad and
South Auckland Bromeliad Group
Orchid Group – Alison Iremonger

Our May meeting was held in the Matata
Community Health Centre Hall with 36
members and friends attending. Guest
speakers for the day were Robert and
Margaret Flanagan. Robert spoke to a
slide show, about palms. We were shown
their own garden, listed as a Garden of
Significance, displaying a wonderful
array of palms. As most of the members
have palms in their own gardens, it was a
time to ask questions about what to grow
and how to look after them. They had
brought some palms for sale and some
to give away. Their talk was followed by
sales, raffles and afternoon tea.

Next Meeting: July 15th at the
Professional Real Estate rooms. Guest
speaker will be Peter Waters. Plant of the
month is 'patterned leaved plants'.

– Marion Morton
We had yet another sunny winter
afternoon for our June meeting at the

Auckland Botanic Gardens. We had
Andrew Steens scheduled to talk on his
new book about fruit trees. However,
due to prior commitments he was unable
to appear so Roy Morton kindly stood in
for Andrew at short notice and he gave
a very interesting and informative talk
about shady gardens and a particular
type of heritage apple tree. He also
recited a very humorous poem a la Pam
Ayres which was thoroughly enjoyed by
the group.

Graham West mentioned that Margaret

Kitcher is now taking names for our
trip to Thames in November. The raffles
were won by Deanne Oliver, Fay Cox

and Lisa Schloots.

Next Meeting: Sunday, July 1st at 1:30pm
at the Auckland Botanic Gardens,
102 Hill Road, Manurewa. Poppy Fuller
will be coming down from Kerikeri to
talk to us about the use of bromeliads in
floral art.

Peter Tristram hybridiser:
'There is no limit' – By Andrew Devonshire

N
N
estled into the surrounding
coastal forests, south of
Coffs Harbour, and just
a few kilometres inland we find
Forest Drive Nursery, the home of
bromeliad collector, and hybridiser
Peter Tristram. Peter is currently an
Australian director for the Bromeliad
Society International, he has been a
speaker at conferences, and he is also
well known for introducing many
bromeliads into Australia.

With both parents having a love of
nature, Peter says he was born with
a passion for plants. His mum was
from a farming family in Gympie,
Queensland, whereas his Sydney born
dad was an artist, poet and writer,
who had an intense interest in science.
Some of Peter's earliest memories are
of family picnics in the bush, which
gave Peter a chance to get familiar
with native plants, and to collect seeds.
He enjoyed growing all sorts of plants
from seed, and looking after plants in
the vegie plot. Peter had artistic flair
and he also took pleasure in drawing
plants, and pressing any flowers he
could find.

Growing up in Hurstville, south of
Sydney, Peter's first bromeliads were
a few billbergias. These came from
an old mansion next door, and the
wonderful elderly sisters who lived
there gave Peter many plants, as well
as mineral samples, that had been
collected by one of their husbands long
before. The one acre mansion estate
was full of rare and unusual trees from

all over Australia and many happy
memories from his childhood came
from time spent in that 'jungle'.

Peter began teaching in Western
Sydney in the 1970s, and while visiting
a nursery near Springwood in the Blue
Mountains, he discovered bromeliads
again. Before long he had 'sussed out'
just about every brom-related nursery
between Sydney and Coffs Harbour.
It was at this time that he joined the
Bromeliad Society of Australia and
the Bromeliad Society International,
deciding that a life immersed in
bromeliads was a good thing. After
exhausting the local supply of plants,
Peter began importing his own and
even started raising bromeliads from
seed whenever he could source it.
Inspired by Grace Goode, Peter also
began hybridising bromeliads, with
cryptanthus, vrieseas and neoregelias
being used to create his first hybrids.

During the 1980s, a lack of space
resulted in Peter focusing primarily
on tillandsias, and he built up a good
collection mainly from imported
plants. Peter had a young family and
this combined with increasing work
commitments meant his hybridising
and seed raising activities were given
a miss for many years. His youngest
daughter was a talented soccer
player, and the family spent years
following her developing career all
over Australia and the world. Once
the kids grew up, Peter was able to get
back into pollinating full steam, and
he had plenty to work with as he had

Peter Tristram, seen here with a

Vriesea pastuchoffiana.

Seed in the kitchen.
amassed a huge collection of just about
everything bromeliad!

Peter has always loved the big
bromeliads, so has built up an
impressive collection of alcantareas, as
well as many large spiny neoregelias
and aechmeas. The carcharodon and
gigas groups were hard to obtain,
but Peter was friendly with Chester
Skotak, whom he met at the World
Bromeliad Conference in Miami in
1988. Peter obtained some great plants
from his visits to Skotak's nursery in
Costa Rica, like Neoregelia 'Macho'
and some of the earlier 'sharky' type
hybrids.

Neoregelia 'Sharkicelli'
Neoregelia 'Agent Pedro'
Peter says compared to many others,
he's really just a hobbyist when it comes
to hybridising. Over the years he has
hybridisied many broms, and had some
success with cryptanthus, tillandsias,
vrieseas, guzmanias, aechmeas,
alcantareas, canistrums, quesnelias,
hohenbergias and pitcairnias. He has
done a lot of interesting work with
the 'sharks' (Neoregelia carcharodon
group) because he likes them, and no
one, except Chester Skotak, seems
to have done much with them. Peter
has plans for more sharky hybrids,
BUT warns... 'They grow big and I
continually run out of room! My wife
and I agree – no more greenhouses,

Cont'd P18 17

Cont'd from P17 – Peter Tristram hybridiser: There is no limit

so I'll have to work magic to fit in all
of the gigas, silvomontana, 'Spines',
'Macho', 'Rainbow', 'Silver', etc
seedlings coming on'. To date, Peter's
favourites include his neoregelia
hybrids 'MacTunis' and 'Jenna'.
Also, Canistrum 'Black Sands' and
xHohenmea 'Zebrepton' are stand out
plants, along with the tillandsia hybrids
'Feather Belle' and 'Sexy Pink'.

When Peter did his Neoregelia
'MacTunis' cross, only about 20% of
the grex were reddish-leaved and well
zonated. The unzonated plants were
culled, while some others of interest
are still to be named. Peter has done

New carcharodon variegates.

xCanmea 'Sunrise'

this cross four times now and is seeing
some variation between batches. He
says that with a primary hybrid cross,
the resulting seedlings often vary little,
and often any apparent differences
they have when young, disappear as
the grex matures.

'Something new and something
different' along with 'big, bold and
beautiful' are Peter's hybridising
philosophies. He says there is no
limit to what can be done. Bromeliads
are incredibly promiscuous and
hybridising possibilities within
compatible groups are on-going and
endless.

Peter's advice to anyone considering
hybridising is to amass a collection
of the best stuff available, including
species. Know the science and

Neoregelia 'Mactunis'

xNeomea 'Raspberry Lick'

18

Neoregelia 'Sons of Tiger Tim'

Neoregelia 'MacRegit'

remember that the bromeliad genera
are based on morphology not DNA.
Experiment and keep records. Try
to be different and have an idea of
what you want to achieve... consider
the variables of size, shape, colour,
patterning, inflorescence, variegation,
climate tolerance, etc.

Peter's climate is a touch warmer
than ours, but he still gets seasonal
change similar to what we experience.
Peter grows most of his plants
without heat in tunnel houses and
shade houses. During winter the day
time temperatures vary from 12°C to
22°C, averaging about 18°C at best

Vriesea 'Smudge Grub'
Neoregelia 'Great White' x silvomontana

if it's sunny. The nights however are
generally quite cold. Often temps drop
below 6°C with anywhere between
5°C and -2°C on frosty nights. These
nights leave the tunnel and shadehouses
sparkling in the morning light from
the ice! In this situation the plants are
probably close to 0°C but Peter has
never seen ice on them. Most of his
bromeliads cope with this, especially
the vrieseas, but some cold damage
can appear before spring arrives. In
these conditions growth virtually stops
from May to September. With heat
beds and a controlled climate, growth
would continue, but it's always a trade-
off between benefit and cost.

by Graeme Barclay by Graeme Barclay
This month we go back in time to look at a famous aechmea that helped pioneer
the world of bromeliad hybridising.

Aechmea 'Bert'

In 1945, Mulford B. Foster – the
legendary American bromeliad
collector and hybridiser, known as
'the father of the bromeliad' – crossed
the species Aechmea orlandiana
with Aechmea fosteriana. These two
plants had obvious special meaning
to Mulford Foster, as both were
originally collected by himself during
expeditions in Brazil around 1940.

Aechmea 'Bert' grown in a plum tree in
Auckland. Photo – Michelle Tohi.

Aechmea orlandiana was named after
his home city of Orlando, Florida,
while Aechmea fosteriana came from
his surname, as the original collector.

The resulting selected hybrid from

this cross was named after Mulford's
only son, Bert. It's a medium to large
size plant, often much larger than
orlandiana, reaching up to 50cm in
height with leaves up to 8cm wide. The
leaves are a creamy-greenish colour
with distinctive and irregular purplish-
brown zonated cross bandings,
particularly on the undersides.

These foliage markings, with the dark
spines and black leaf tips, make it an
excellent candidate to mount as an
epiphyte, where the bandings can be
fully admired. It also seems to do best
when grown this way, rather than in a
pot or in the garden. Like it's parents,
'Bert' is also very stoloniferous, with
pups climbing around tree branches
and trunks with ease, eventually
forming stunning clumps. The flower
spike is a dense ball of red bracts
with yellow petals, but the redeeming
features of 'Bert' are certainly its
foliage and stately form.

In the 1990s a very nice variegated
sport of Aechmea 'Bert' began to show
up and is still available. The interesting
thing about this plant, is that the
variegations commonly disappear
totally from pups, but then will often
reappear again in the next generation.
This is not a normal occurrence with
most bromeliads, so ensure you don't
throw out any 'NOVAR' variegated
examples of 'Bert' too early!

 

JULY 2012
VOL 52 NO 7

In Bev and Brian Hutchings garden.
'Hot items' sure to star at 'Cool Broms'

Andrew Maloy

Andrew Maloy will be one of the
speakers at the 'Cool Broms'
Conference in March 2013.
He is well known in New Zealand and
quickly becoming known world-wide
for his skill at hybridising and growing
vrieseas. Plants with patterns and
colours hitherto only dreamed of are
now widespread in New Zealand and
are sure to be a 'hot item' with overseas
registrants at the conference plant sales.

Andrew was born in Scotland and
did not arrive in NZ until 1974 after

marrying a Kiwi girl who very sensibly
dragged him home to Auckland.
Since leaving school he had attended
an agricultural college and had been
working in a variety of horticultural
positions while studying and when
he arrived in NZ began working in a
commercial nursery. Later on he spent
many years teaching horticulture and
also writing for horticulture magazines
and it wasn't until 2003 that he started
growing bromeliads on his property
in Henderson. He quickly realised he
needed more space and moved to his
present site in Whenuapai in 2004.
There was a lot of effort renovating old
tomato greenhouses some of which he
now leases out.

In only ten years he has produced
amazing results over several
generations of patterned-leaf vrieseas.
Andrew will be selling plenty of his
latest creations at the sale of plants
during 'Cool Broms' and his talk at the
conference will be eagerly awaited by
all participants.

'Cool Broms' ConferenCe registration:
register before December 31st, 2012 nZ$280
register after December 31st 2012 nZ$300

Conference registration prices include conference breakfast on Saturday; the
conference banquet on Sunday night; morning tea and lunch on Saturday,
Sunday and Monday and garden tours on Saturday and Sunday afternoons.

Email us: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or visit our website: www.bsnz.org

Bromeliad Society of New Zealand Inc
Bromeliad Journal – July 2012 issue
CONTENTS
Andrew Maloy to present at 'Cool Broms' 2
President's Page – Jocelyn Coyle 4
Bromeliad Society June meeting news – Dave Anderson 5
Spring Sale notice 6
Our 50th birthday... our first meeting in 1962 8
Our 50th birthday... Bea Hanson 9
Our 50th birthday... Muriel Waterman 11
Our 50th birthday... looking back with Dennis Cathcart 13
Bev and Brian's 'northern showcase' – Andrew Devonshire 14
New hybrids in New Zealand – Andrew Devonshire 16
Broms in the digital age – Evan Bartholomew 17
Society officers, subs and Journal directory 19
Group News 20
The role of water in frost protection – Andrew Maloy 22
Classic Brom corner – Graeme Barclay 24

The opinions expressed in articles or letters in this Journal are the contributors' own views and
do not necessarily express the views or the policy of the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand

COMING EVENTS

Please see the Group News section starting on page 20 for details of group
meeting times and venues.

JULY AUGUST

5th

24th Society monthly meeting at South Auckland Group meeting
8th

Greyfriar's Hall, corner of Mt Eden Bay of Plenty Group meeting
and Windmill roads, starting at 7.30pm. 12th Far North Group meeting
Monthly choice competition: Mounted 28th Society monthly meeting at
bromeliads excluding tillandsias. We Greyfriar's Hall, corner of Mt Eden
are celebrating the 50th birthday of the and Windmill roads, starting at 7.30pm.
Bromeliad Society of New Zealand. Monthly choice competition: New
Join in the fun! Zealand hybrids (any). The talk is still

being arranged.

FRONT COVER: This month we're featuring Bev and Brian Hutchings' lovely
garden, just north of Whangarei. Thanks to Andrew Devonshire for the story and
for the photos. The article starts on page 14.

PRESIDENT'S PAGE

I hope you have got through the
winter so far without any coughs,
colds or 'flu. We are crossing the
ditch for twelve days to hopefully
catch some sun, catch up with some
bromeliad friends, and to take lots of
photos to bring back and put together
to share with you. I am fortunate to
have a sister and brother-in-law who
love coming here to house sit. They
live in an apartment so enjoy getting
on the mower and doing the lawns and
pulling a few weeds around the garden.

What a great meeting last month with
Robbie Burns showing us some of the
billbergias that he has been hybridising.
The plants have really nice markings
and colour and will only get better, but
isn't it amazing how many different
ones you can get from the same cross.
I hope we will be seeing more on the
show and sales table in the future.

Graeme Barclay had put together a
really interesting and informative
presentation on N. carcharodon and its
hybrids. I didn't realise there were so

many of those really big carcharodons
around – there is just something about
them that I guess you either love or
hate. I must admit I am a great fan until
it comes to working with them!

I would like to thank everyone who
makes the effort to do these things for
our monthly meetings and also those
who write articles for the Journal.
I know we are all busy so it is great that
you find the time to do this.

I know they are enjoyed by all our
members.

I hope you've all checked out the great
'Cool Broms' conference programme
in the June magazine or online.

See you all at our 50th birthday
meeting. If you have a spare plant at
home please bring it along to go in our
lucky draw, the more plants the better.
See you all on the 24th.

Cheers, Jocelyn

Please put these dates into your diary now!
2012
Sunday November 4th
the next
society
garden ramble
sunDay novemBer 18th
Details coming soon!

Bromeliad Society June Meeting News

– Dave Anderson
Jocelyn chaired the meeting and
welcomed everyone. It was very
pleasing to see so many members
attending the meeting on such a cold
wintry night. Members were asked
to please remember to wear their
name tags on meeting night. The 50th
anniversary celebrations will be held
at our July monthly meeting where we
will have displays and memorabilia as
well as the usual monthly competitions.
The programme for the 'Cool Broms'
Australasian Conference to be held at
the Waipuna Hotel next March is in
our BSNZ June journal. The sellers of
plants at the conference are restricted to
attendees only, and the plants will need
to be of a high quality – sought after and
in very good condition. Note that there
will be a one day plant sale for all BSNZ
members to be held at the Mt Eden War
Memorial Hall on Sunday the 7th April
2013 that will be open to the general
public. This year our annual Spring Sale
and Display will be held on Sunday
14th October followed by 'Broms in the
Park' on Sunday 4th November.

Colin Gosse, a member for 25 years,
has stepped down as the society's
auditor. Many thanks, Colin, for your
years of service. If anyone knows of an
accountant who is prepared to take over
the duties of auditor would they please
contact our treasurer, Peter Waters.

We are always looking for articles for
our Journal so on these winter nights try
and put pen to paper and tell us about
your plants.

Peter Waters took us through the 'Show

and Tell' plants. First up for display
was a tray of tillandsias that had sooty
mould on them. The culprit was the
white mealybug and the best way to get
rid of it is to use a systemic insecticide
such as 'Confidor'. Other insecticides
such as the pyrethrums that rely on
having a direct hit to kill the insects
are not able to penetrate into the deeper
axis of the plants where many of the
mealybugs reside and are thus largely
ineffective. Next, and wanting a name,
was a caulescent tillandsia that had been
bought at the sale of Pat Sweeney's
plants. The plant had a mature spike
but the flowers had not yet opened. It
was thought to be the species Tillandsia
queroensis. Lastly, Peter brought in for
display a plant that has been in NZ for
many years wrongly named Nidularium
'Nat DeLeon'. The correct name of this
hybrid that was made by Nat DeLeon is
Nidularium 'Red Queen' so if you own
one of these plants would you please
change its name. NB. There is no plant
named Nidularium 'Nat DeLeon'.

Robbie Burns then gave a most
interesting talk on his experiences with
hybridising billbergias. Following this
Graeme Barclay gave a PowerPoint
presentation of Neoregelia carcharodon
and the closely related species showing
some really stunning plants.

Dennis Dufty won this month's special
raffle prize. The door prizes went to
Carolle Roberts, David Cowie and
Genneth Marshall-Inman.

COMPETITIONS

Open Flowering: First Peter Coyle with

Cont'd P6

Cont'd from P5 – June Meeting News

Billbergia sanderiana – a most attractive
species that was wrongly named in NZ
for many years as Billbergia elegans.
This plant was also voted plant of the
month. Judy Graham was second with
Billbergia 'Hazy Purple' – a plant
hybridised by the late Gerry Stansfield.
Also in the competition were Guzmania
'Christine' and Nidularium 'Exotica
Ruby Red'.

Open Foliage: Peter Waters was first
with an Aechmea 'Roberto Menescal'

– a sport of chantinii (dark form) with
central variegated stripes. Second was
Peter Coyle with Vriesea 'Tasman
Rose'. In the competition were Aechmea
'MEND'; Vriesea 'Jewel' hybrid and a
nice clump of Neoregelia 'Africa'.
Tillandsia: Win Shorrock was first
with Tillandsia stricta x aeranthos –
an attractive clump of fine dark leaved
plants. Second with a clump of Tillandsia
'Strictly Bourgeoise' also in flower was
Lester Ching. Other plants on the table
were Tillandsia duratii, kirchhoffiana,
flabellata and rodrigueziana.

Neoregelia: First Peter Waters
with Neoregelia gigas – a stunning
large plant related to Neoregelia

carcharodon and second was Michelle
Tohi with Neoregelia 'Africa'. Also
in the competition were Neoregelia
carcharodon, 'Royal Hawaiian' x
'Skotak's Tiger', 'Gemstone', 'Roseo
Striata' x concentrica x 'Vivacor' ,
'Painted Delight', 'Royal Hawaiian',
'Marble Throat' x 'Little Dazzler',
'Starling' and (smithii x 'Blushing
Tiger') x 'Cheers'.

Named Monthly Plant (Neo.
carcharodon & hybrids): First was
Nancy Murphy with a Neoregelia
carcharodon 'Skotak's Tiger'. Peter
Coyle was second also with Neoregelia
carcharodon 'Skotak's Tiger'. In the
competition wereNeoregelialilliputiana
x 'Skotak's Tiger', 'Rainbow' x
'Silver', 'Pink on Black' ((carolinae x
fosteriana) x carcharodon) variegated,
'Julia', 'Skotak's Tiger' x 'Minchoo',
'Speckles' x 'Skotak's Tiger' and
'Skotak's Tiger' x 'Silverado'.

The Plant of the Month went to Peter
Coyle with Billbergia sanderiana.

Congratulations to all the winners.

NEXT MEETING: Tues 24th July.

Mt Eden War Memorial Hall
489 Dominion Road, Balmoral, Auckland
Open to public 9.00am to 3.00pm
sunDay oCtoBer 14th
sellers – please contact Dave anderson as soon as possible to reserve
your place. tel (09) 638 8671 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Handy hints

Reprinted from 'Newslink', April 2012 – the newsletter of the Illawarra

Bromeliad Society.

• Try to avoid removing pups until
winter is definitely over. Pups taken off
from mid September to late April will
usually develop roots and commence
active growth more quickly than pups
removed during winter. Losses due to
rot and other problems are also likely to
be less.
• If you are mounting tillandsias onto
wooden or cork mounts, try to do this
well before the plant flowers as this
will improve the chances of the plant
sending out roots onto the mount, as
flowering often do not do this. Instead,
flowering plants are probably using
their energy to make flowers, then seeds
and pups.
• Treat your mounting wood with citric
acid to acidify the wood and encourage
shy rooting plants to put out roots.
• You will find that the cork used for
mounting tillandsias is much easier
to work with when it's wet because
it's softer. Soak the cork in a plastic
container of water the day before you
plan to use it and you will find it much
easier to break. Cork looks softer and
more natural if broken rather than cut.
Score the cork on the back to make it
easier to break. Of course,if using glue
when mounting, you will have to ensure
that the cork has died out completely
before applying the adhesive.
• Before applying liquid fertiliser to
bromeliads, thoroughly wet the leaves
with water as this helps to ensure the
leaves are in the best condition to
absorb the nutrients.

• When preparing soluble fertilisers,
a dash of vinegar or a small amount of
sphagnum or peat can be added to the
water before the fertiliser. This will
acidify the water and increase its ability
to dissolve the fertiliser.
• When dividing Neoregelia 'Fireball',
pups put directly into new potting mix
have a tendency to turn green. Try
rooting them in a tray of moist perlite.
When a good root ball is formed, pot in
soil but do not shake off all the perlite
from the new roots. This way the new
plants will not lose colour.
see you there!
We're turning
50 in July.
Join the fun!
Our July 24th monthly
Society meeting will be
our special 50th birthday
anniversary celebration.
We will have some
'flashbacks' to the past...
balloons... a birthday cake...
special door prizes
and lots of fun.

8
Bromeliad society of new Zealand – 50th birthday July 2012
• 34 'bromeliad fanciers' held a 'get
together' at the AHC headquarters, 57
Symonds Street, Auckland.
• Bill Rogers was in the chair and he
thanked Bea Hanson for the 'spade
work' she had done in organising the
meeting.
• The meeting agreed (unanimously)
to form the Bromeliad Society of
New Zealand and an initial guiding
committee was appointed to bring
forward ideas as to how the Society
should operate and what its structure
should be.
• Those present agreed that 2/6
(i.e. two shillings and sixpence) per
member should be paid towards room
rent and supper for this meeting.
• The new society's charter was
granted by The Bromeliad Society
(BSI). The Bromeliad Society
of New Zealand charter members
listed were: Bill Rogers (President);
Bea Hanson (Secretary); Graham
Arnott; Cliff Barney; Gladys Barney;
Mary Belton; J. Collis; Frank Danks;
Alma Danks; Laurie Dephoff;
Jennie Dephoff; Ethel Donaghy;
8
¦John Glenn was the first American to orbit
Earth.
¦The Cuban missile crisis shook the world
as President John F. Kennedy faced down
Nikita Krushchev of the USSR.
¦The first person was killed trying to cross the
Berlin Wall.
¦Actress Marilyn Monroe was found dead.
¦Andy Warhol rocked the art world with his
exhibit of a Campbell's Soup can.
¦Close to home, Keith Holyoake was our
Prime Minister, while Sir Robert Menzies
was in charge in Australia.
¦The Auckland rugby team was in the middle
of a wonderful winning run with captain
Wilson Whineray leading the way.
Ian Greenhaugh; Effie Greenhaugh;
Florence Kershaw; Patricia McKinven;
Harry Martin; Kevin Mawkes; Moira
Niccolls; Jim Rowe; Muriel Smith;
Gerry Stansfield; Margaret Stansfield
and Alice Turnwald.
Do you remember the world in 1962?
here's a few 'happenings' that may jolt some memories...
Bromeliad society of new Zealand – 50th birthday July 2012
• 34 'bromeliad fanciers' held a 'get
together' at the AHC headquarters, 57
Symonds Street, Auckland.
• Bill Rogers was in the chair and he
thanked Bea Hanson for the 'spade
work' she had done in organising the
meeting.
• The meeting agreed (unanimously)
to form the Bromeliad Society of
New Zealand and an initial guiding
committee was appointed to bring
forward ideas as to how the Society
should operate and what its structure
should be.
• Those present agreed that 2/6
(i.e. two shillings and sixpence) per
member should be paid towards room
rent and supper for this meeting.
• The new society's charter was
granted by The Bromeliad Society
(BSI). The Bromeliad Society
of New Zealand charter members
listed were: Bill Rogers (President);
Bea Hanson (Secretary); Graham
Arnott; Cliff Barney; Gladys Barney;
Mary Belton; J. Collis; Frank Danks;
Alma Danks; Laurie Dephoff;
Jennie Dephoff; Ethel Donaghy;
8
¦John Glenn was the first American to orbit
Earth.
¦The Cuban missile crisis shook the world
as President John F. Kennedy faced down
Nikita Krushchev of the USSR.
¦The first person was killed trying to cross the
Berlin Wall.
¦Actress Marilyn Monroe was found dead.
¦Andy Warhol rocked the art world with his
exhibit of a Campbell's Soup can.
¦Close to home, Keith Holyoake was our
Prime Minister, while Sir Robert Menzies
was in charge in Australia.
¦The Auckland rugby team was in the middle
of a wonderful winning run with captain
Wilson Whineray leading the way.
Ian Greenhaugh; Effie Greenhaugh;
Florence Kershaw; Patricia McKinven;
Harry Martin; Kevin Mawkes; Moira
Niccolls; Jim Rowe; Muriel Smith;
Gerry Stansfield; Margaret Stansfield
and Alice Turnwald.
Do you remember the world in 1962?
here's a few 'happenings' that may jolt some memories...

99
Bromeliad society of new Zealand – 50th birthday July 2012
9
• Bea (Trix) Hanson (1910 – 2005)
was one of the prime movers behind
the formation of the Society and
the first secretary. Over the next 22
years she worked hard and served as
secretary, president and vice president.
• In 1963 the editor of the newsletter
resigned and Bea took on the job on a
'temporary' basis. She ended up doing
the job for 25 years! The early 'News
and Views' newsletter turned into our
present format 'Bromeliad Journal' in
1972.
Bea Hanson... 'Mother' of the Society
Bea Hanson and Harry Martin cut the cake
at the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand
21st birthday celebrations. Harry was one
of the early 'drivers' of the Society and he
had a great love of broms. He served as
our president on several occasions and
he was also active in attending bromeliad
conferences and keeping New Zealand
in touch with many bromeliad societies
overseas. He was a life member of BSNZ
and a trustee of The Bromeliad Society(BSI).
• Bea was always active in organising
bromeliad shows and displays and
frequently spoke at garden clubs.
She imported lots of bromeliads and
regularly posted plants to country
members.
• Bea was honoured with life
membership of our Society in 1983.
Neoregelia 'Bea Hanson'
PHOTO: GERRY STANSFIELD
¦Olympic 800m champion Peter Snell set
a new world record of 3minutes 54.4secs
for the mile at Cook's Gardens, Wanganui –
breaking the record set by Australian Herb
Elliot.
¦The talked about movie releases of 1962
included: 'Lawrence of Arabia'; 'Lolita';
'To kill a Mockingbird'; 'Mutiny on the
Bounty'; 'The Manchurian Candidate';
'West Side Story'; 'The Longest Day'.
The first James Bond movie, 'Dr No', became
an immediate box office success.
¦Top hit songs of the day included: 'I can't
stop loving you' (Ray Charles); 'Roses are
red my love' (Bobby Vinton); 'Breaking up is
hard to do' (Neil Sedaka); 'The Loco-Motion'
(Little Eva) and 'Stranger on the shore'
(Mr Acker Bilk). The Rolling Stones gave
their first live performance in London and
The Beatles had their first big release, 'Love
me do'.
9
Bromeliad society of new Zealand – 50th birthday July 2012
9
• Bea (Trix) Hanson (1910 – 2005)
was one of the prime movers behind
the formation of the Society and
the first secretary. Over the next 22
years she worked hard and served as
secretary, president and vice president.
• In 1963 the editor of the newsletter
resigned and Bea took on the job on a
'temporary' basis. She ended up doing
the job for 25 years! The early 'News
and Views' newsletter turned into our
present format 'Bromeliad Journal' in
1972.
Bea Hanson... 'Mother' of the Society
Bea Hanson and Harry Martin cut the cake
at the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand
21st birthday celebrations. Harry was one
of the early 'drivers' of the Society and he
had a great love of broms. He served as
our president on several occasions and
he was also active in attending bromeliad
conferences and keeping New Zealand
in touch with many bromeliad societies
overseas. He was a life member of BSNZ
and a trustee of The Bromeliad Society(BSI).
• Bea was always active in organising
bromeliad shows and displays and
frequently spoke at garden clubs.
She imported lots of bromeliads and
regularly posted plants to country
members.
• Bea was honoured with life
membership of our Society in 1983.
Neoregelia 'Bea Hanson'
PHOTO: GERRY STANSFIELD
¦Olympic 800m champion Peter Snell set
a new world record of 3minutes 54.4secs
for the mile at Cook's Gardens, Wanganui –
breaking the record set by Australian Herb
Elliot.
¦The talked about movie releases of 1962
included: 'Lawrence of Arabia'; 'Lolita';
'To kill a Mockingbird'; 'Mutiny on the
Bounty'; 'The Manchurian Candidate';
'West Side Story'; 'The Longest Day'.
The first James Bond movie, 'Dr No', became
an immediate box office success.
¦Top hit songs of the day included: 'I can't
stop loving you' (Ray Charles); 'Roses are
red my love' (Bobby Vinton); 'Breaking up is
hard to do' (Neil Sedaka); 'The Loco-Motion'
(Little Eva) and 'Stranger on the shore'
(Mr Acker Bilk). The Rolling Stones gave
their first live performance in London and
The Beatles had their first big release, 'Love
me do'.

Billbergia 'Muriel Waterman'...
Bromeliad society of new Zealand – 50th birthday July 2012
Muriel Waterman
Billbergia 'Muriel Waterman'...
Bromeliad society of new Zealand – 50th birthday July 2012
Muriel Waterman

Bromeliad society of new Zealand – 50th birthday July 2012
Do you grow
Billbergia 'Muriel Waterman'?

– Bea Hanson
This article by the late Bea Hanson – one of the key founders of the Bromeliad
Society of New Zealand, of which she was the patron and a life member –
appeared in the Journal of the Bromeliad Society (BSI) in 1985 and has been
kindly supplied by Glenys Guild. It gives us an insight into the important role
that Muriel Waterman played in inspiring Bea and her fellow early 'bromeliad
fanciers' in New Zealand. Muriel was a foundation member of The Bromeliad
Society (BSI) and an honorary trustee until her death in 1961. Her efforts helped
lay the foundation for the establishment of our own Society in 1962.

I am sure there are many bromeliad
fanciers who do grow the lovely
Billbergia 'Muriel Waterman'.
Many of us admire the plant, but I
wonder how many know it was named
after a bromeliad grower in New
Zealand.

I came into contact with Muriel
Waterman through an advertisement
she placed in one of our newspapers.
She asked if anyone interested in cacti
and succulents would like to contact
her. As I had just developed a burning
enthusiasm for these plants I at once
sent off a letter. Back came a reply
inviting me to visit her and telling me
she had no telephone as she couldn't
bear the things. In those days it was a
major task to get to her place. I had to
take one bus, then change into another
to reach her district. After getting off
the bus there was then a walk of about
ten minutes.

The house was old, the garden
crammed with beautiful plants, and
Muriel Waterman a charming lady.

She had a great sense of humour and
a beautiful smile and one felt as if they
had known her for years. I saw both
cacti and succulents that I had only
seen pictured in books. I asked her
if she sold any and she said she did.
She showed me where they were and
said all were priced and that she hated
taking money from friends so I was to
total them up and leave the money on
the shelf.

Our association continued and not
long after the bromeliad bug struck.
Soon the garden was more bromeliads
than cacti and succulents. I saw my
first Ochagavia lindleyana in flower,
my first Bromelia balansae and was
enchanted with the brilliant red of the
heart when it was about to flower. All
sorts of wonderful bromeliads were
being imported by Muriel Waterman
now and it was a great thrill to visit her
and see her latest additions.

She had many failures and many
successes but she loved to try the
plants in different places outside. Her

Cont'd P12 11

Bromeliad society of new Zealand – 50th birthday July 2012
When the Bromeliad Society of New
Zealand was formed in 1962 it would
have been wonderful to have her give
us a talk and pass on some of her great
knowledge. She was such a shy person
and was really only happy talking to
two or three people – no more. Her
greatest joy was to get a card from
customs to say there was a parcel of
plants waiting for her. She would rush
over on the next bus and to quote;
'Bring them home clasped lovingly to
my bosom.' Then would come a letter
telling me all about the new bromeliads
– such excitement.
It was a sad day when we heard she was
ill. She died shortly after from a stroke
(1961). She was greatly missed by her
many friends, both here and overseas.
Most of us had Muriel Waterman
stories and many are the times we have
exchanged them. A lovely lady.
She was born in the United States
but spent most of her life here. Her
books were all sold and those who
bought them were ever reminded of
her by the remarks she had left in the
margins – always in green ink. There
would be a plant underlined and in the
margin remarks such as: 'I must have
this', 'this died', 'got this in the last
parcel', etc. – so typical of her great
enthusiasm.
There are many more happy thoughts
about her, but I hope that these few
will make your billbergias just a little
more interesting.
When the Bromeliad Society of New
Zealand was formed in 1962 it would
have been wonderful to have her give
us a talk and pass on some of her great
knowledge. She was such a shy person
and was really only happy talking to
two or three people – no more. Her
greatest joy was to get a card from
customs to say there was a parcel of
plants waiting for her. She would rush
over on the next bus and to quote;
'Bring them home clasped lovingly to
my bosom.' Then would come a letter
telling me all about the new bromeliads
– such excitement.
It was a sad day when we heard she was
ill. She died shortly after from a stroke
(1961). She was greatly missed by her
many friends, both here and overseas.
Most of us had Muriel Waterman
stories and many are the times we have
exchanged them. A lovely lady.
She was born in the United States
but spent most of her life here. Her
books were all sold and those who
bought them were ever reminded of
her by the remarks she had left in the
margins – always in green ink. There
would be a plant underlined and in the
margin remarks such as: 'I must have
this', 'this died', 'got this in the last
parcel', etc. – so typical of her great
enthusiasm.
There are many more happy thoughts
about her, but I hope that these few
will make your billbergias just a little
more interesting.
glasshouse housed the better plants
and it was indeed a thrill to go and
browse in it. As well as working with
the plants she looked after a large
number of bantams and these little
golden and brown pets were a minor
trouble as they tended to get out and do
some damage from time to time.

With the same enthusiasm as she grew
and added more plants to her collection
she worked to get members for The
Bromeliad Society (BSI founded
1950). She was extremely successful
and gathered in quite a number. One
day I saw my first Aechmea 'Fosters
Favorite' and immediately wanted
one. She said she couldn't let me have
it as it was only for the members, but
if I joined I would be able to have one.
I told her it was sheer blackmail, but
she won. As her collection grew she
was able to send out price lists to the
members and I offered to type them for
her. By the name of each plant she put
a short description such as 'beautiful',
'this is just wonderful' etc. Even in the
price lists her enthusiasm overflowed.
When going anywhere by bus she
always took a bromeliad Journal and
sat with it open at a picture and if
anyone mentioned it she was able to
tell them all about bromeliads.

She hated having to go and buy new
clothes and always said she was much
happier in a store that sold tools. In the
winter her favourite dress was an old
quilted dressing gown which she said
was the warmest thing you could wear!
The first time I saw her in it I thought
she had been ill and asked her what
had been the matter.

Bromeliad society of new Zealand – 50th birthday July 2012
Looking back – Dennis Cathcart

Dennis owns 'Tropiflora' in Florida, one of the largest bromeliad nurseries.
He was one of our presenters at the 2003 Auckland conference. This article is
adapted from the 'Tropiflora' website. It provides another interesting look back

in time as we celebrate our 50th birthday.

How much things have changed
in the bromeliad world over
the past forty years. We had
a visitor from San Francisco, Wes
Schilling, who is truly a living link to
bromeliad history.

Speaking with him about his days
working for Mulford Foster and his
frequent visits with Julian Nally, made
me realise that the very roots, the
beginnings of the Bromeliad Society
(BSI) and the interest in bromeliads in
the U.S. was still within living memory
of some of our fellow bromeliophiles.
He spoke of having put on the very
first ever bromeliad show in the U.S.
as a member of the Florida West Coast
Bromeliad Society, the nation's oldest.

Even though I had the great good
fortune to meet Mulford Foster on a
few occasions and knew also Julian
Nally, these names and the times they
represent seem truly long ago. It's all
a matter of perspective. Times have
changed and the bromeliad world, for
good or bad, is much different now.

can remember when bromeliads
first piqued my interest in the early
'70s. Acquiring new bromeliads was
a great challenge. There did not seem
to be any sources and they were rarely
seen for sale in nurseries. Eventually,
I discovered the Florida West Coast
Bromeliad Society which met in the

Saint Petersburg-Clearwater area, a
considerable drive, but well worth it!
For the first time, I realised that I was
not alone in my newfound bromeliad
interest and that there was in fact a large
group of enthusiastic bromeliophiles
that met every month to talk and swap
plants.

In the first few meetings my meagre
collection more than doubled and grew
exponentially thereafter. I would haunt
the sales table and purchase anything
that I didn't already have, and I bought
budget breaking numbers of raffle
tickets for the chance to win even more.
Compared to now, there was almost
nothing available to buy. We would all
be snatching up offsets of plants such
as Aechmea fasciata, lueddemanniana,
weilbachii, 'Foster's Favorite',
Neoregelia 'Meyendorffii', and
carolinae. The occasional Nidularium
innocentii would always cause a stir
of excitement and any vriesea aside
from 'Poelmanii' was a rare find. The
flashy guzmanias that we see today
had not yet been invented and our
selections were pretty much limited
to basic lingulata and, rarely, species
such as wittmackii or sanguinea. Some
of the senior members, like Dr. Morris
Dexter, would bring in their newest
acquisitions like Vriesea splendens and
'Red Chestnut' and the group would
go all green with envy!

A northern 'showcase' garden

– Andrew Devonshire

For years I had heard rumours of
a 'must see' bromeliad garden
just north of Whangarei. I had
missed out on organised Bromeliad
Society visits, but I had seen photos
of the garden and that gave me a taste
of what to expect. So it was a garden
visit at the top of my 'to do' list. Bev
and Brian Hutchings' enthusiasm
for plants, especially bromeliads, is
undeniable. I first had the pleasure of
meeting them during one of their trips
to Auckland when they dropped into
my place for a visit. Within minutes
of meeting them I could tell they were
hard core bromeliad addicts! When
my family planned a weekend trip to
Waitangi recently, I made sure to allow
time to call in on them and look at their
showcase garden. What I found did not
disappoint me.

The entry and front garden creates
a welcoming atmosphere. Mixed
plantings of cycads, palms, aloes,
succulents, and natives set off the
abundant bromeliads. An impressive
Alcantarea 'Totara Orange' is the
focal point of this area. With its tall
flower spike and glowing foliage, it's
a stunning example of this cultivar.
After soaking up the brilliance of the
alcantarea, I look around to see that
the garden is immaculate, each plant is
set off to its best advantage, with not
a weed in sight. Drifts of Neoregelia
'Fireball' hybrids guide the visitor
along the side path and demonstrate
just how effective these plants can be
when grown in groups.

Bev and Brian's property faces north, so
it has the advantage of a warm aspect.
Stone edging is utilised to set off the
garden beds, and large rocks are used
as features around the garden. River
stones are spread within the beds, and
Brian says all this rock helps to hold
heat, creating a warmer micro climate
that help the bromeliads thrive. Old
totara stumps from the farm are put to
good use, and covered with a variety of
bromeliads. A large taraire dominates
the rear of the site and provides berries
for the native wood pigeons. Shade
created by this magnificent tree is put
to good use providing an environment
for shade loving bromeliads. Bev
also has a shade house set up for
propagation and precious plants, plus
I was impressed to see Brian has a
thriving vege garden!

Bev has an eye for vriesea hybrids,
and she has selected some outstanding
specimens. One that stood out for me
was a large, well grown plant, and it
had to be one of the best examples of
a white vriesea hybrid that I've ever
seen! Another plant had the perfect
colouring of autumn leaves, quite
unusual.

This garden has many stand out plants,
so if you're like me, and like garden
visits, then this is one garden visit to
put on your 'to do' list.

Northern 'showcase'

– Photos by Andrew Devonshire
Vriesea 'Dark Knight'

Un-named hybrid

Un-named hybrid

15

With all the interest in New Zealand hybrids, Andrew Devonshire has kindly With all the interest in New Zealand hybrids, Andrew Devonshire has kindly
agreed to start a regular column in the Journal. We will be featuring some of the
New Zealand hybrids that have been named and registered over the last couple
of years.

To start off here are two from my
collection of mini neoregelia
hybrids. In 2008 I had the
opportunity to hybridise with some
of the classic Grace Goode mini neo
hybrids like 'Pheasant', 'Wee Willy',
and 'Alley Cat'. There were two
seedlings that stood out from an early
age, and in 2010 they were named and
registered.

Neoregelia 'Golden Pheasant'. From
the grex of ampullacea x 'Pheasant',
this hybrid was named as a tribute
to Grace Goode's 'Pheasant', with
the 'Golden' prefix added to reflect
its golden colouration. It's an eye-
catching mini that combines bold
markings with wide leaves, and good
form. It is producing pups faster than
its 'Pheasant' parent, so should be
available in the near future.

Neoregelia 'Phoenix'. This plant was
named by my wife, and it is another
from the ampullacea x 'Pheasant'
grex. It has kept the 'Pheasant' type
colouration, but has developed nice
wide leaves that distinguish it from
other mini neo hybrids.

Neoregelia 'Golden Pheasant'

Neoregelia 'Phoenix'

Bromeliads in the Digital Age

– Evan Bartholomew
Evan Bartholomew is the editor of the BSI Journal. He published this informative
article in the Jan – Feb 2011 issue of the Journal.

Technology has changed the way
we do everything in our lives,
affecting the way we shop,
the way we communicate, and most
importantly, the way we seek out and
find information. There are numerous
resources online for the savvy explorer
to find and purchase rare plants, connect
with other collectors, research habitat
and collection data and share images
and cultivation tips from their own
experience. For those without access to
a regional society, online communities
have helped to spread the word about
the beauty of bromeliads. Though
the online landscape is constantly
changing, here are a few of the more
successful and established resources
available:

www.bsi.org

The homepage of the Bromeliad
Society International. This site
contains general information about
the BSI, including membership info,
general bromeliad info, member
services and events calendar. Of great
interest and an invaluable resource is
an online archive of this journal from
its introduction in 1950 to 1989, with
plans to continue the digital archiving
up to the present day.

www.fcbs.org

Homepage of the Florida Council of
Bromeliad Societies, as well as the
homepage of the Cryptanthus Society.
Contains a wealth of information,
including a large database of species

and hybrid photos. A really useful
resource for identifying plants in
a collection, and browsing species
in specific genera. Also contains
information on habitat, biota, taxonomy
and very illuminating articles from
"Uncle Derek" and "Auntie Margaret".
There are photos of entries and winners
of various bromeliad shows, as well
archives of the Cryptanthus Society
Journal.

http://botu07.bio.uu.nl/brom-l

Bromeliad Taxonomists & Growers
Society. Homepage of the Brom-L
e-mail list and archives, which
is a highly recommend resource.
Many growers and taxonomists are
subscribers of the list, and many
questions can be answered by experts.
This website also contains a picture
gallery and a highly recommended
Bromeliad Identification service, as
well as a vast seed exchange.

http://registry.bsi.org

An extension of the BSI website listed
previously, but worth mentioning in
its own right, the Bromeliad Cultivar
Register is a massive database of
registered hybrids. Registrations can be
searched by name, breeder or parents,
which makes this a must-use resource
for anyone interested in bromeliad
hybrids, either as a collector or as a
hybridizer.

Online Forums

There are a number of online forums

Cont'd P18 17

Cont'd from P17 – Bromeliads in the Digital Age

available which provide lots of
information and interactivity with users
in many countries. A selection:

.
http://forums.gardenweb.com/
forums/bromeliad

An international forum with many
users. A great place to ask questions
about cultivation, show off your
collection, and learn from really
talented and knowledgable growers.
This forum can be used to search for
specific issues related to growing
conditions, pest control, hybridizing
and just about any other issue.

.
http://www.bromeliadforum.
za.net/forum/index.php?board=1.0

Though based in South Africa, this
forum is listed as a Global Bromeliad
and Airplant Enthusiast Forum. High
quality forum with many advanced
features for photo uploads and link
placement.

.
http://dyckiabrazil.com

Extremely active forum for terrestrial
bromeliads and those who love them.
Many photos from users, a trading post
and a friendly and vibrant community.
This forum is an extension of http://
dyckiabrazil.blogspot.com, a website
containing a wide array of high quality
terrestrial bromeliad images.

There are other forums online including
regional and society specific forums, as
well as forums for lovers of specific
genera. An internet search for specific
material can bring up many useful
links. If you have a love for a specific
group of bromeliads not represented
online, perhaps it is worth the effort to
explore creating a forum or website for
others to enjoy.

Facebook

Facebook is used primarily as a social
networking tool, and offers a "group"
functionality which allows members
to create groups to organize people
with various interests. Joining a group
gives a user access to discussions in
that group, and enables them to upload
pictures and view and comment on
other users' pictures. It is a great way to
network with other bromeliad people.
There are quite a few bromeliad
specific groups. A few are listed below,
which can be found by searching for
the group name: Bromeliad Society
International, Planet Bromeliad, Planet
Tillandsia, Planet Cryptanthus, Planet
Plant Nursery, Bromeliopolis

www.bromeliopolis.com

(In the interest of full disclosure, I am
also the editor of this website.)
Bromeliopolis is an online magazine
for bromeliad enthusiasts and features
articles on conservation and research,
interviews with hybridizers from many
countries, columns and reviews.

The beauty of the web is that it allows
people to self publish, so while there
may be misinformation from time to
time, most bromeliad resources online
are user-edited, allowing room for
feedback and differing opinions. The
websites listed in this article are just
a selection of the many sites currently
available, so searching for specific
phrases on google can be extremely
helpful in locating information. For
general interaction with other people in
the international bromeliad community,
the Planet series of Facebook groups
are a great place to start.

OFFICERS

Patron: Patricia Sweeney Scientific Officer: Peter Waters 09-534 5616
President: Jocelyn Coyle 09-416 8272 Librarian: Noelene Ritson 09-625 8114
Vice Presidents: Alan Cliffe 09-479 1451 Committee: Graeme Barclay 09-817 4153
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Secretary: Dave Anderson 09-638 8671 David Cowie 09-630 8220
Treasurer: Peter Waters 09-534 5616 Chris Paterson 09-625 6707
Life Members: Dave Anderson, Patricia Perratt, Editor: Murray Mathieson 09-418 0366
Len Trotman, Patricia Sweeney,
Peter Waters

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NZD $45.00. Send all payments to the Treasurer, Peter Waters, 22 Half Moon Rise, Half Moon Bay,
Auckland 2012.

CORRESPONDENCE

All general correspondence should be sent to the Secretary, Bromeliad Society of New Zealand,

P.O. Box 108-168, Symonds Street, Auckland, New Zealand. The opinions expressed in letters or
articles in the Journal are the contributors' own views and do not necessarily express the views or
policy of the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand Inc.
BROMELIAD JOURNAL

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Group News

Far North Bromeliad Group

– Bevlyn Bibby
In June members returned to Ian and
Elaine Wright's lovely garden after
just over a year. It was good to enjoy
the autumn colours. This beautifully
maintained garden has hundreds of
bromeliads, mostly sheltered below a
row of mature phoenix palms. Elaine
also has a large collection of flowering
succulents and numerous camellias
which were just beginning their winter
display. There is a soothing water feature
and the views of Kerikeri and beyond are
expansive. As the property drops away
down a bank it is completely planted
with all manner of shrubs and perennials.
Rex thanked Elaine and Ian, on behalf
of the 41 members present for opening
their garden. In our annual show this
year we are offering two novice classes
to encourage new exhibitors. Rex
demonstrated the types of pots that are
suitable for showing plants.

'Show and Tell': A few vrieseas with
zig-zag patterns were shown including

V. fosteriana 'Red Chestnut', V. 'Kiwi
Lace' and V. 'Stellar Jewell'.
Poppy showed how to remove pups

from vrieseas. Poppy also shared a plant
which she had prepared for Decorative
Container class and the container

Bay of Plenty Bromeliad Group
matched the pink of the Aechmea
orlandiana.
A large variety of plants were offered as
raffle prizes and there was some keen
bidding on magnificent auction plants .

Next Meeting: 12 August. Visitors
welcome – please contact Poppy on
09- 407 9183 .

South Auckland Bromeliad Group

– Marion Morton
We had an excellent turnout for our
July meeting at the Auckland Botanic
Gardens despite the cold but sunny
afternoon. Graham West was not well
enough to attend so Roy Morton ran
the meeting. We hope that Graham will
soon be feeling a lot better. Poppy Fuller
was also unable to attend so David
Brewer from Kerikeri was kind enough
to come down as our guest speaker.
David has been busy making ponga
pots, and planters using polystyrene,
plastic pots, cement/plaster and varying
lengths of ponga in which he has planted
tillandsias, vrieseas and aechmeas. Most
of the items which he brought with him
were auctioned at the end of the meeting.
Margaret Kitcher is now taking names
for our trips to Thames in November,
and Onewhero and Kerikeri in February
next year.

Next Meeting: Sunday, 5 August 2012
at 1:30pm, Auckland Botanic Gardens,
102 Hill Road, Manurewa when Jenny
Gallagher will talk on aechmeas.
Members are requested to bring their
aechmeas and Jenny will answer
questions.

– Jo Elder
There was a good turnout for our June
meeting, and Lynley welcomed members,
visitors and guest speaker Peter Waters
accompanied by Dave Anderson. Lynley
mentioned our very good library and
encouraged members to make use of it.
She also spoke about our 'Plants Wanted

List' available for members to request
plants that they may like to obtain. She
also reminded members to keep the
committee informed of new or changed
email addresses. We now have a good
supply of black table covers, with thanks
to Maxine August and Barry Jones for
purchasing new cloth.

Peter Waters spoke about the genus
Nidularium which consists of 46 species
and are endemic to the Atlantic Forest.
There is a very good article about this
genus written by Peter in our May 2012
Journal.

Plant of the month – Tillandsia:

There were many well grown
plants tabled including T. stricta,
guatemalensis, tenuifolia, ionantha,
'Mexico', lampropoda, duratii, crocata,
erubescens.
Competition: 1st Billbergia 'Hallelujah'

– Graeme Alabaster, 2nd Vriesea 'Elysian
Jade' – Jo Elder, 3rd Aechmea correiaaraujoi
– Gill Keesing.
Tillandsia Competition: 1st T. stricta –
Isabel Clotworthy, 2nd T. tectorum (small
form) – Jo Elder 3rd T. ionantha – Audrey
Hewson.
'Show and Tell': Wilma Fitzgibbons had
a beautiful Dyckia marnier-lapostollei,
also a T. latifolia; Brian Simmonds
needed a name for a billbergia.
8th

Next Meeting: August , Tauranga
Yacht & Power Boat Clubrooms, Sulphur
Point, at 12.30pm. Guest speakers will
be Jocelyn and Peter Coyle from 'Totara
Waters'.

Eastern Bay of Plenty Bromeliad and
sunny afternoon at the Professionals
Real Estate rooms in Whakatane. Guest
speaker was Andrew Flower, the well
known grower of tillandsias, from
Wellington. We had visitors from South
Auckland, Tauranga, and Opotiki join
us for a very informative and interesting
afternoon. Andrew spoke on his travel
overseas, how he propagates and grows
his tillandsias. After listening to him talk
those present were keen to have these
amazing plants in their collection. He
set up a sales table with approximately
35 different species of plants. Members
were able to ask him about caring for
their plants.

We have an upcoming bus trip to
Tauranga to visit gardens and nurseries
in September. We concluded with raffles,
the sales table and afternoon tea.

Next Meeting: August at the Matata
Community Hall. Our guest speaker
will be Tony Mooney, a landscape
gardener.

Orchid Group – Eunice Silvester

Our June meeting was held on a lovely

The role of water in frost protection

– Andrew Maloy
In Whenuapai, west Auckland, we
usually experience 10 or more nights
each winter when the temperature
drops below freezing. Often it is just a
mild frost of -1°C and only for a short
period, but occasionally a -3°C or lower
comes along, hangs around for several
hours and causes a lot of damage to
sensitive bromeliads.

We grow most of our plants in an
unheated twin-skin greenhouse which,
regardless of how cold it is outside,
seldom drops lower than +2°C inside.
However we grow most of our larger
grade Alcantarea imperialis, Alcantarea
vinicolor and many Vriesea stock plants
in a shade house under 30% shade cloth,
which gives no protection from frost.
Up until last winter we covered this
shade house with frost cloth but this had
disadvantages; it shaded the plants so
they lost colour, in strong wind the frost
cloth would come loose and blow all
over the place, and in severe frosts some
plants, especially Alcantarea imperialis,
could still be damaged.

Last winter we installed a frost prevention
controller made by Auckland company,
4U Products. As the temperature reaches
close to freezing (just above 0°C) the
controller triggers the overhead sprinkler
system in the shade house to come on,
so the whole area is sprayed with water.
The sprinklers stay on until the controller
senses the temperature outside the shade
house has risen above freezing then it
turns the water off. Since installing this
system we have had no frost damage to
plants in the shade house.

On Sunday morning, June 17, a

maximum-minimum thermometer some
metres away from the shade house
registered a low of -3°C and at 8.30 am
it looked like the sprinklers had been
going for several hours. There was a
layer of frozen water from the sprinklers
on the side walls of the shade house.
Alcantarea vinicolor at the open end of
the shade house where covered in a layer
of ice. Icicles 6-7 cm long had formed on
the leaves. Some Alcantarea imperialis
nearby had a thin film of ice on their
leaves.

The sprinklers finally stopped spraying
water around 9 am. I checked the plants
again – most in the shade house looked
perfect with no sign of ice on them and
the thermometer in the shade house had
not dropped below +4°C. So a continuous
spray of water had kept the temperature
towards the centre of the shade house
6°C or so above the outside temperature.

The plants towards the open end still had
a 2-3 mm layer of ice on their leaves.
As the sun was rapidly getting brighter
I thought what to do? Leave them and
hope for the best, or try to remove the
ice? I gave one leaf a tentative tap and
the ice simply shattered and dropped off,
leaving the leaf looking good and intact.
So for the next few minutes I busily
tapped away, knocking the ice from the
leaves, removing as much as I could.

A couple of weeks later those plants
that were covered in ice are all in
excellent condition, showing no sign
of any freezing damage. So how does
this work? How can encouraging ice to
form on plants protect them from frost
damage? It seems counter intuitive.

In Principles of Frost Protection, Richard
L Snyder, Extension Biometeorologist
of the University of California explains
that it is due to the latent heat given
off as water freezes. He says, 'When
water condenses, cools, or freezes, the
temperature of the environment around
the water rises because latent [heat] is
changed to sensible heat. Latent heat
is chemical energy stored in the bonds
that join water molecules together and
sensible heat is heat you measure with a
thermometer. When latent heat is changed

The morning of June 17, frost covers the
property. Mist rising from the shade house
shows the frost protection sprinklers are
working.

to sensible heat, the air temperature rises.'
You can read more about this subject at
http:biomet.ucdavis.edu/frostprotection/
Principles%20of%20Frost%20
Protection/FP005.html

The important point to realise is that it is
the water being sprayed on the plants for
the whole time the temperature is below
freezing that protects them from being
damaged. It is not that Alcantarea are
frost tolerant.

Icicles dangling from Alcantarea vinicolor.

What can happen...

Ice has formed on the side walls of the
shade house.

Also in Whenuapai in June – Peter Coyle's
vriesea was hit hard by frost.

23

by Graeme Barclay by Graeme Barclay
This month we look at an often overlooked neoregelia that has some outstanding
qualities as a garden specimen.

Neoregelia 'Royal Hawaiian'

This hybrid has a very uncertain
history, but that does not detract from
its outstanding features and unique
beauty. A best guess would suggest it
has Neoregelia concentrica parentage
somewhere, looking at its overall

now become justifiably popular and
widespread.

What makes this plant so special
is its unblemished, deep burgundy
colouration, shiny wide leaves and
an outstanding shape and form. It
does quite well in our temperate Kiwi
climate, where unlike many

neoregelias it seems to have
a very good resistance to
flowering prematurely due
to the Winter and Spring
'cold snaps' we often
experience. Hence, it's
able to form a nice layered
rosette of leaves, which like
concentrica types, flattens
out at anthesis showing off
the solid burgundy tones and
a flushed crimson centre.

Neoregelia 'Royal Hawaiian'
gets to around 50cm in
diameter and should be grown

form and size, but what else is in the
mix remains a mystery. It is thought
it originated in either USA or Hawaii,
where it was used by Hawaiian
hybridizer Sharon Peterson in 1995
as the seed parent in a cross with
Neoregelia 'Scheherazade' to produce
the large hybrid known as Neoregelia
'The Duke'. Around this time in 1994,
it was imported from Bob Okazaki
in Hawaii by Len Trotman and it has

in very bright light or full sun

areas (apart from midday
summer sun), where the leaves can
maintain their intense burgundy colour
all over and stay as wide as possible.
Interestingly, the desirable features of
this plant have seen it used recently in
a number of new hybrids by Andrew
Devonshire and John Lambert in
Auckland, so keep your eye out for
some stunning plants in future with
Neoregelia 'Royal Hawaiian' as a
parent.

24

 

 

 1
AUGUST 2012
VOL 52 NO 8
NeoregeliaCurmudgeon . Photo by Peter Waters
AUGUST 2012
VOL 52 NO 8
NeoregeliaCurmudgeon . Photo by Peter Waters
2
PHOTO: GRAEME BARCLAY
PHOTO: JOHN LAMBERT
PHOTO: PETER COYLE
2
Even a cold July evening couldn't
dampen the celebration of our
50th. The focus was very much
on our history and some of the plants
that were the favourites of yesteryear.
Members enjoyed a PowerPoint display
from Graeme Barclay and a table
display of memorabilia put together for
the evening by Lester Ching.
It was particularly great to see some of
our 'older' members who don't make
it to meetings so often now. Patron Pat
Sweeney did the honours with some
cake cutting and we all enjoyed some
good food and a good chat.
PHOTO: GRAEME BARCLAY
PHOTO: JOHN LAMBERT
PHOTO: PETER COYLE
2
Even a cold July evening couldn't
dampen the celebration of our
50th. The focus was very much
on our history and some of the plants
that were the favourites of yesteryear.
Members enjoyed a PowerPoint display
from Graeme Barclay and a table
display of memorabilia put together for
the evening by Lester Ching.
It was particularly great to see some of
our 'older' members who don't make
it to meetings so often now. Patron Pat
Sweeney did the honours with some
cake cutting and we all enjoyed some
good food and a good chat.

Bromeliad Society of New Zealand Inc
Bromeliad Journal – August 2012 issue
CONTENTS
Celebrating 50 years 2
President's Page – Jocelyn Coyle 4
Bromeliad Society July meeting news – Dave Anderson 5
Garden Ramble notice 6
Spring Sale notice 6
New hybrids in New Zealand – Andrew Devonshire 7
An inexpensive shade-house – Sonja Wicker 8
Tips on removing pups – Odean Head 10
Society officers, subs and Journal directory 12
In the wild... Bromelia dilatata 13
Three uncommon plants – Peter Waters 14
Group News 15
Guzmania fosteriana – Harry Luther 19
Classic Brom corner – Graeme Barclay 20

The opinions expressed in articles or letters in this Journal are the contributors' own views and
do not necessarily express the views or the policy of the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand

COMING EVENTS

Please see the Group News section starting on page 15 for details of group
meeting times and venues.

AUGUST SEPTEMBER

2nd

26th Northland group meeting South Auckland group meeting
28th 9th

Society monthly meeting at Far North group meeting
Greyfriar's Hall, corner of Mt Eden 12th Bay of Plenty group meeting
and Windmill roads, starting at 7.30pm. 25th Society monthly meeting at
Monthly choice competition: New Greyfriar's Hall, corner of Mt Eden
Zealand hybrids (any). Peter Coyle and Windmill roads, starting at
will talk about some of the bromeliads 7.30pm. Monthly choice competition:
he saw recently in Australia. Tillandsia aeranthos and bergeri.

Lester Ching will talk on tillandsias.

FRONT COVER: This striking Neoregelia hybrid by Chester Skotak called
Neoregelia 'Curmudgeon' is still waiting formal registration.The parents are (('Rafa'
x 'Tiger') x 'Tiger') x 'Tiger'. A mature plant is about 40cm across and 30cm high
with wide leaves some 10cm across. The banding is very distinct which makes it
desirable for those who like spines with their bands.

PRESIDENT'S PAGE

Hello everyone, it is only a
few more days until we can
say 'Spring is here'– and
am I looking forward to that! I have
noticed some rather large pups on my
neoregelias but I like to put off cutting
them until about mid September. It's
just a theory I have that some of them
seem to go straight into flower if I
cut too early. Does anyone have any
thoughts on that?

Our 50th birthday celebrations were
great. I think everyone enjoyed
looking back fifty years and what was
available then, and I wonder who that
young handsome looking guy was in
the shots of the members?

We certainly have a lot more plants to
choose from now and I am sure that
will continue.

On that note some of our NZ registered
bromeliads are in the BSI Journal –
Neoregelia 'Altura', a miniature bred
by Andrew Devonshire and Neoregelia

We have well over 140 registrations already for our March 2013 conference.
Don't forget – if you register before December 31st 2012 the conference fee
is $280. Register after December 31st the conference fee is $300.

To check out conference programme and speakers and/or to register:
Website: www.bsnz.org • email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

UPDate...
'Totara Treasure' bred by Peter Coyle
Also featured were plants by Lisa
Vinzant and Chester Skotak, some of
the world's best hybridisers. Keep up
the good work all you hybridisers, you
never know what you will get out of
the next batch of seed.

Don't forget our November 18th
Garden Ramble, to the Waiuku area
We'll be visiting the gardens of Judy
Graham, Graeme and Ann Thompson
and one more 'mystery garden' yet to
be announced. We will be taking a bus
from Western Springs but for those
who live south and wish to go by car
that's great. Prices will be advised
soon.

At our August meeting Peter Coyle
will show you some of the bromeliads
that we saw on our recent visit to
Australia. See you on the 28th and roll
on the warmer weather!

Cheers,

Jocelyn

Bromeliad Society July Meeting News

– Dave Anderson
Jocelyn chaired the meeting and
welcomed everyone to our 50th
anniversary celebrations. It was
very pleasing to see so many members
attending the meeting on such a cold
wet wintry night. We are planning to
visit gardens in south Auckland on
Sunday 18th November. Firstly we will
visit Judy Graham's garden and then on
to Graham and Ann Thomson's situated
on the Awhitu peninsula. At the August
meeting Peter and Jocelyn Coyle will
show photos from their recent trip to
Queensland. Nancy Murphy won this
month's special raffle prize.

Peter Waters took us through the
'Show and Tell' and the only plant for
display was an Alcantarea vinicolor
that Andrew Maloy had brought in. It
showed that if you have frost protection
as described in the July BSNZ journal,
the plant will not be damaged even
under quite severe frost.

The remainder of the meeting
was spent in celebrating our 50th
anniversary cards and messages were
received from Margaret Draddy in
NSW and from the Bay of Plenty
Bromeliad group who wished us all
the best. Lester, our historian, brought
in memorabilia from the early days of
the society including publications and
various photos. Graeme then had a
PowerPoint display made up from the
early slides. As well as this, there was
a display of various bromeliads that
were available here in the 1960s and
1970s. Before the sumptuous supper
that Jocelyn had organised, we had a

draw for all members to select plants
that had been donated. Finally, our
patron Pat Sweeney cut the anniversary
cake to seal a most successful evening.

COMPETITIONS

Open Flowering: First Peter Coyle
with Tillandsia punctulata – always
looks great when in flower. Judy
Graham was second with Nidularium
fulgens. Also in the competition were
Billbergia nutans and xNeophytum
'Blaze'.

Open Foliage: Peter Coyle was
first with a Vriesea 'Twilight' – this
beautiful plant was made by John
Arden another one of his amazing
hybrids. Second was Michelle Tohi
with xCanmea 'Wild Tiger'. In the
competition were Aechmea 'Fosters
Favorite Favorite'; Neoregelia 'Gold
Explosion', 'Jewellery Shop' and
Vriesea 'Serenity' and 'Philip Foster
Red'.

Tillandsia: Glenys Guild was first
with Tillandsia imperialis another
outstanding species that grows so
well for us in Auckland and looks
spectacular when grown well as this
plant was. This plant was also voted
plant of the month. Second with a
clump of Tillandsia fasciculata was
Lynette Nash. Other plants on the table
were Tillandsia stricta and neglecta.

Neoregelia: First David Goss with
Neoregelia 'Midnight' – one of those
very dark leaved plants that are very
close to black and second was Peter

Cont'd P6

Cont'd from P5 – July Meeting News

Coyle with Neoregelia carolinae
'Princeps' – a very old cultivar that still
holds its own when grown well. Also
in the competition were Neoregelia
'Gespacho' x 'Alkazar', 'Hannibal
Lector' F2, 'Marble Throat', 'Red
River' and 'Screaming Tiger'.

Named Monthly Plant (Mountedbromeliads excl. tillandsias): First
was Judy Graham with a Neoregelia
'Gespacho' & other neoregelias
on driftwood. Peter Waters was

second with Quesnelia marmorata.
In the competition were Aechmea
orlandiana, nudicaulis var aequalis;
Quesnelia marmorata 'Tim Plowman'
and Vriesea 'Tasman Hybrid'.

The Plant of the Month went to Glenys
Guild with Tillandsia imperialis.

Congratulations to all the winners.

NEXT MEETING: Tues 28th Aug.

Mt Eden War Memorial Hall
489 Dominion Road, Balmoral, Auckland
Open to public 9.00am to 3.00pm
sUNDaY OCtObeR 14th
sellers – please contact Dave anderson as soon as possible to reserve
your place. tel (09) 638 8671 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
We're going down to explore gardens in Waiuku:
• Judy Graham
• Graeme and ann thompson
• and a still to be announced 'mystery garden'
sunday 18th November
There will be a bus leaving from Western Springs.
Put this date in your diary now...more details very soon!

This month we feature a couple of interesting hybrids, created by Erwin Lawson, This month we feature a couple of interesting hybrids, created by Erwin Lawson,
and named by Poppy Fuller. Poppy of course has an extensive collection of
bromeliads at Kerikeri and she has had great success at our Bromeliad 'Fiesta'
shows, and also featured in the Journal.

About 4 years ago, Poppy
had the opportunity to buy
Erwin Lawson's bromeliad
collection. Erwin had been hybridising
bromeliads, mainly large neoregelias,
and he had developed a number of nice
plants. Erwin's total collection was
estimated to be some 55,000 plants,
and it took 55 trips to collect them all!

Poppy is using the prefix 'Mohaka' for
these hybrids. 'Mohaka' has special
significance for Poppy as the Mohaka
River area on the East Coast is her
place of birth.

Neoregelia 'Mohaka Poppy'. Erwin
wanted this plant to be named after
Poppy. It's a stunning large neoregelia,
with bold red striations, that must come
from the pollen parent, Neoregelia
'Amazing Grace', while it gets its size
from the mother plant, Neoregelia
'Pink Champagne'. This plant was
featured at the Bromeliad 'Fiesta'
February 2012.

Neoregelia 'Mohaka Geraldine'.

This hybrid is named after Erwin's
wife. It's an attractive plant, with a
nice red flush on flowering. Neoregelia
'Amazing Grace' is the pollen parent, Both of these plants have been
and has passed on its red striations, formally registered, and can be seen on
with Neoregelia carolinae as the the Bromeliad Cultivar Register http://
mother plant. botu07.bio.uu.nl/bcg/bcr/index.php

Neoregelia 'Mohaka Poppy'
Neoregelia 'Mohaka Geraldine'

An inexpensive shade-house – Sonja Wicker

Reprinted from 'The Bromeliad Blade', the newsletter of The San Diego

Bromeliad Society – August 2012

This is about a simple, inexpensive
shade-house that I built myself. I
live in Linda Vista which is fine
for bromeliads but they do need some
added protection. Let me tell you what
I've done. The backyard is small (most
of it consists of a hill full of ice-plant)
and really all I needed was a simple
cover to protect the plants against the
sun which is covering the backyard for
90% of the day.

I'm not into making anything with
wood, so the shade-house had to be
very simple. No plans were needed.
In 2009 I started off by erecting
a free-standing open 'box' which
consisted of ¾" Schedule 40 PVC. It
is inexpensive, needs no saws to cut
and pieces are simply glued together.
I created four vertical poles about 8

feet tall and connected them on the top
and bottom all the way around with
additional PVC poles. Even though
I purposefully built this to 'squeeze'
between the fence and the patio cover,
as an added precaution I drove steel
rebars, the ones used to reinforce
concrete block walls, into the ground
with several feet extending above
ground. Using ziptie straps I anchored
the vertical posts to the rebars. I was
somewhat worried that cats coming
over the fence would topple it. Using
ziptie straps, I anchored the vertical
posts to the rebars. Shade cloth was
attached to the PVC pipes by zipties.
With no benches, the bromeliads are
simply on the ground or, for tillandsias
and other light plants, suspended from
the nearly horizontal roof-cover pipes,
trying to keep them near the corners

where there is more stability.

In 2010 I needed more shade and built
another shade-house on the back side
of the patio cover on the upper tier of
my backyard. The three vertical posts
were placed behind the concrete block
walls on top of 2 foot rebar so they will
not come off and the three horizontal
poles are long enough and just 'lean'
on top of the patio cover. I bought the
50% shade cloth material by the foot
and without the edge binding you can
also buy it with. It comes in 6 and 8
ft widths and you buy how ever many
yards you need. I purchased 20 feet
of each 6 and 8 foot widths. It doesn't
unravel when you cut it to size but it
does curl up so I made a small hem by
folding it over and sewing it down so
it was stronger and thicker on the end
where I attached it to the pools with
the zipties (e.g. there is more than one
layer to thread the zipties through so it
doesn't tear). The outside edges come
finished in such a way that, unlike the
edges you cut, they don't curl up.

The roof poles are joined to the vertical
poles by standard PVC blue glue
and T-joints. It's very simple to put
together. On one side of the house the
cloth is suspended by hooks that can be
removed to let me get in and out.

This year I put together two similar
lean-to structures against sheds in the
garden left). They are similar to the
one described above but where it leans
on top of the shed I connected the
horizontal bars with crossbars instead
of just laying them straight on top of
the shed. I bought 10 foot lengths of
the PVC and cut them to lengths that
were high and long enough to walk

under and lean on the sheds. The poles
need to be close to the same length, but
they don't have to be exact as long and
you can glue all the pieces together and
the structure stays connected. This is
not a high tech operation!

I haven't attached the shade cloth to
these new ones yet but plan to use
zipties.

Blade: How well did it work? Are
the plants doing fine? Do you need
to water more often?
Sonja: Some of the plants I had in the
complete shade are getting brighter
colours because of receiving more
light and ones that didn't have enough
shade and were getting burned are
doing much better. I only water once a
week for everything in the garden.

Blade: Is there a good breeze blowingin your area most of the day?
Sonja: Yes and no. Breeze comes from
the side of the yard where the fence is
that you can see in the first photo, so the
fence blocks that breeze for anything
in that free standing structure. My
plants seem to do well so there must be
enough air circulation.

Blade: How about cost?
Sonja: I didn't keep track and bought
the pieces at different times and
quantities. It was probably around
(US)$150 for all four structures.

Blade: Does it work OK in winter –
anything get blown down by wind?
Sonja: I haven't ever had any of the
structures get blown down by the wind.
The shade cloth does let some rain in,
but not enough to drown them because
of the weave of the fabric.

Tips on removing pups – Odean Head

Reprinted from an article in the August 2011 edition of the Houston Newsletter.

One of the most exciting
memories I have of my early
bromeliad growing was seeing
my favourite plants beginning to form
new pups. One of the first things I did
when I got home from work was to
check for new pups and pup growth.
I was also looking down in the centres
for bloom spikes on the older plants. I
remember that it seemed to take longer
to bloom or pup than it should. Most
plants seem to bloom and pup faster
now than they used to. Guess I was
watching too closely!

Since most bromeliads have a life
cycle that includes blooming only
one time, propagation becomes very
important. The plants make it easy for
us to do that by producing vegetative
offsets, or pups.

When is the best time to remove
pups?

This question raises other questions.
Are they large enough to remove? Are
you more interested in maturing the
pup or propagating the plant? If the
plant is stoloniferous you may prefer
to allow it to form a clump. Pups
should be at least one-third to one-half
the size of their mother. These pups
can be removed and potted at any time
of the year if they have roots. Rooting
pups is not a problem but takes longer
in lower temperatures. The mix tends
to stay wet longer during these times
and with no roots to take the water
into the plant, there is more chance of

rotting – especially with plants that
have tender caudexes such as vrieseas
and guzmanias. I am more cautious
with these pups year round.

First, I usually let them grow a little
longer on their mother, then I let the
removed pup's caudex harden before
I pot it. Some people also treat as an
extra precaution against rotting.

The question of maturing the pup vs.
propagating the plant

They grow faster while on their mother
(some will mature in only one year) and
if they are cut too small, could stunt
their growth. However, if you remove
them as soon as they are large enough
the plant's energy will go toward
producing more pups. If the plant is
stoloniferous (plants formed on the
end of extended caudexes/stems from
the mother) you may prefer to leave
the pups on allowing them to form
a clump. This will create a pleasing
display of your plant when the stolons
are long enough to give them room
to form their normal shape and size.
When the stolons are not long enough,
the fast growth could cause the pup to
become leggy and lose the compact
you would prefer.

Some vrieseas (e.g. Vr. splendens and
its hybrids) may have only one or two
pups which form and come up through
the middle of the mother plant. Since
these are the only pups that the mother
will have and the mother is pretty much

destroyed when removing the pups,
you should allow the pups to grow
full size and remove the mother as her
leaves die. This almost guarantees the
survival of the pup or pups. If more
than one, they can be separated when
their roots are established.

Pup removal

Removing pups can be an easy unless
you have never done it. It is normal to
be a little apprehensive the first few
times you cut a pup, especially when it
is jammed up next to the mother plant.
The pup should be severed somewhere
between the pup's roots and the mother
plant. When the pup is jammed next to
the mother its best to cut as near the

mother plant as possible leaving the
best foundation available for firmly
potting the pup. If I happen to cut into
the soft tissue of the pup I will seal it the plant is so close towith 'Rootone' and let it harden off a

There are times when
its mother that you cannot

little before potting. Roots will form
easily at the base of the plant (between get to it with snippers
the plant and the caudex/stem) if potted and it does not respond
properly.

to the hand method.

I use three different methods for
removing pups. Most of the time

I will use a pair of hand snippers when
they are available and there is plenty
of room between the pup and mother
to make the cut. Sometimes the pup
will just snap off when I place the
thumb of one hand against the base of
the mother plant and apply some side
to side pressure on the pup with the
other hand. Be careful that you do not
apply so much pressure that it breaks
too close to the pup plant. When this
happens, use your rooting hormone to
harden it off before planting.

There are times when the plant is so
close to its mother that you cannot
get to it with snippers and it does not
respond to the hand method. Then you
need a good sharp knife to cut it off. A
serrated knife is usually more effective
when a sawing motion is needed. Take
a long knife with a sharp point and
stick it down into the leaves until the
point of the knife rests on the spot
where the pup connects to the mother.
Apply some pressure and with a little
twisting motion try to pop the pup off.
If it does not pop off after a few tries
you may have to use the sawing motion
to sever it. This procedure would also
apply on many of the large clumps of
tillandsias.

Cryptanthus pups that grow between
the leaf axils on top of the mother
should be removed when of good size.
A little side to side movement will
cause these pups to release when they
are ready. If they do not release easily,
let them grow a little larger before
you try again. Most tillandsias form
pleasing clumps even when the pups
are not stoloniferous. I will usually
wait to split mounted tillandsias until
they get real crowded.

OFFICERS

Patron: Patricia Sweeney Scientific Officer: Peter Waters 09-534 5616
President: Jocelyn Coyle 09-416 8272 Librarian: Noelene Ritson 09-625 8114
Vice Presidents: Alan Cliffe 09-479 1451 Committee: Graeme Barclay 09-817 4153
Don Brown 09-361 6175 Lester Ching 09-576 4595
Secretary: Dave Anderson 09-638 8671 David Cowie 09-630 8220
Treasurer: Peter Waters 09-534 5616 Chris Paterson 09-625 6707
Life Members: Dave Anderson, Patricia Perratt, Editor: Murray Mathieson 09-418 0366
Len Trotman, Patricia Sweeney,
Peter Waters

MEMBERSHIP SUBSCRIPTION

New Zealand:

Ordinary membership NZ $35.00 ($5.00 discount if paid before the end of February).
Dual membership (same household) NZ $45.00 ($5.00 discount also applies as above).

Overseas:

NZD $45.00. Send all payments to the Treasurer, Peter Waters, 22 Half Moon Rise, Half Moon Bay,
Auckland 2012.

CORRESPONDENCE

All general correspondence should be sent to the Secretary, Bromeliad Society of New Zealand,

P.O. Box 108-168, Symonds Street, Auckland, New Zealand. The opinions expressed in letters or
articles in the Journal are the contributors' own views and do not necessarily express the views or
policy of the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand Inc.
BROMELIAD JOURNAL

Deadline:

For all editorial and advertising, the first
Tuesday of publication month

Editorial Committee

Dave Anderson
Murray Mathieson
Peter Waters

Regular Writers

Andrew Devonshire
Graeme Barclay
John and Agatha Lambert

Production

Murray Mathieson

Distribution

Dave Anderson

All enquiries and contributions welcome, please
contact any member of the editorial committee
or send to Peter Waters, 22 Half Moon Rise,
Half Moon Bay, Auckland 2012 or email:
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Display Advertising

Rates are:
Full Page $60.00
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Quarter Page $15.00

'Buy & Swap'

Listings in 'Buy & Swap' are FREE for
members of the Society (max. 30 words).
For advertising enquiries and material, please
contact Murray Mathieson ph (09) 418 0366
or email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

In the wild...

– Adapted from 'The Bromeliad Blade', July 2012 – newsletter of The San Diego
Bromeliad Society.

The Brazilian botanist
and explorer, Eddie
Esteves has provided
us with an article on his
discovery of a new species, the
terrestrial Bromelia dilatata.
The discovery was made some
years ago but not reported.
It will appear this month in
Die Bromelie, the journal
of the German Bromeliad
Society, Deutsche Bromelien-
Gesellschaft e.V. (http://www.
dbg-web.de/home_e.htm).
Bromelia dilatata occurs in the
central west region of Brazil at
altitudes of around 700m plus.

We are fortunate to get access
now to this work. Eddie is not
just a botanist and collector
of bromeliads and cacti; he is
interested in the environment
where he finds them. His
discovery of new species is
important both for science as
well as conservation. Much of
the beef you eat in hamburgers
or at barbecues comes from
cattle that grazed on the lands
of mid-western Brazil. Until
a few years ago great stands
of native vegetation grew
there, including cactus and
bromeliad species. Many have
been lost.

A hummingbird pollinating (presumably)
Bromelia dilatata in the wild.

13

Three uncommon plants – Peter Waters

Vriesea pastuchoffiana
Racinaea crispa
Neoregelia rubrovittata
Vriesea pastuchoffiana

A little known bromeliad from Brazil,
originally found in the city of Rio de
Janeiro and described in 1894 but believed
to have become extinct. However in 1995
two small populations were found in the
same state but several hundred kilometres
away. It is a large plant resembling
Vriesea. with attractive wavy transverse
lines on the leaves and flowers to a
height of about two metres. The flowers
are a yellowish-orange. It is a terrestrial
and grows from 600 to 900 metres high.
Cultivation is easy in Auckland and is
well worth looking out for.

Racinaea crispa

From Ecuador, Colombia and Panama,
this is an intriguing plant. Only 10cms
high it is rather bulbous with shiny
crinkly leaves, and is found from 300 to
2300 metres. It was originally described
in 1887 as a guzmania and then became
a tillandsia before the move to Racinaea.
The inflorescence is bright orange. It has
been found to be difficult to cultivate,
but the secret is to keep the mix wet right
through the growing period.

Neoregelia rubrovittata

This beautiful neoregelia is found close
to Rio de Janeiro and is a member of the
subgenus Longipetalopsis. The petals are
about 10cms long and dark lilac-blue. It
is about 35cm high and has distinctive red
crossbands on the leaves. In the wild it
is an epiphyte and not widely spread. It
is quite easy to grow in cultivation and
seems as if it would be a good parent
for the hybridisers, but as yet appears
relatively unknown.

14

Group News

Far North Bromeliad Group

– Erin Titmus
Our meeting this month again returned
us to a garden we had visited some
time ago. We were delighted to see
the maturing of the plantings at Peter
and Pam Scahill's garden which had
been developed on an originally flat
site. When Peter and Pam bought the
property they did some major works
to create a lower level where their bird
aviaries stand among rock walls and
fine gravel paths.

This area has undergone another
revamp and only two aviaries remain,
the rest being converted into Peter's
"man cave" as Pam calls it. We were
drawn to it like magnets to enjoy choice
plants growing in this open-sided shade
area with drop down plastic enclosure.
Peter has personalised the inside with
touches of garden art in the form of
aboriginal works that he has magpied
across the ditch. Outside, the garden
path has been enhanced with new
areas edged in ponga logs and neos, in
particular, put on a showy display here.
Peter had two vintage cars on display
outside the garage. Members enjoyed

their immaculate presentation and the
sparking of some nostalgic stories
among those of us with memories that

Northland Bromeliad Group
long.

On behalf of the 50 members in
attendance Rex thanked Peter and
Pam and welcomed visitors, several of
whom joined the group.

We discussed the show, 27-29
September, and also Rex gave notice
for us to consider nominations for

vacant positions to be elected for the
coming year soon.

Spot prizes: Congratulations to Mary
Campbell and David Fisher who each
won a Neoregelia 'Burnsies Spiral'
plant donated by Rex.

'Show and Tell': Our theme of
stoloniferous broms was well
represented with the variable Neoregelia
'Marble Throat,' Canistropsis
'Persimmon' and Aechmea 'Foster's
Favorite' all providing springboards
for discussion of form, growing habits
and preferred conditions for them to do
well. Other plants of interest included
an aechmea that was similar to A.
bromeliifolia, a billbergia that may
be B. 'Perriam's Pride' or B. 'Santa
Barbara' and Nidularium camposportoi
which displayed bright leaf tips.

Our regular raffle and auction again
provided some fun and camaraderie
among members.

Next Meeting: 9th September, AGM at
Aroha Island. Visitors most welcome –
please contact Poppy on 09-407 9183
for more details.

– Sandra Wheeler
For our July meeting president Jan
welcomed 26 members at the Reyburn
House Studio on a very wet and windy
afternoon. We were thrilled that the
weather did not deter our guest speaker
Lester Ching from making the trip
from Auckland along with his grandson
Jordan.

Cont'd P16 15

Cont'd from P15 – Group News

Lester spoke of his obvious passion for
tillandsias and warned us that patience
was needed as they were very slow
growing. He showed us two tectorums
that were between 60 and 70 years
old. He explained conditions and care
required when growing tillandsias,
the best fertilisers to use and how to
control pests such as scale. He also
gave us a demonstration on how to
attach tillandsias to wood with a glue
gun. He had bought along plants for
sale and the members were more than
happy to oblige. A most enjoyable and
interesting afternoon.

Competition:

1st Aechmea 'Frederick' – Maureen

2nd

Green, Neoregelia 'Punctate' –
McGregor Smith, 3rd Ananas bracteatus

– Eva Lewis
Next Meeting: Sunday, August26th at Reyburn House studio at the
town basin. Guest speaker – Russell
Fransham.

Bay of Plenty Bromeliad Group
– Jo Elder
President Lynley Breeze welcomed
members to our July meeting and
opened with a discussion on a weather
round-up for the past month as there had
been quite a few frosts. She questioned
how members' plants had coped in the
various areas around Tauranga. Results

– Papamoa: There had been some
severe frosts, including a –10C. Frost
cloth was being used and shade house
for tender plants. It was noted that the
new frost cloth available was not as
good as the old type. Tauranga (The
Lakes area): Again, severe frosts but
no damage as frost cloth had been used.
Te Puke: Did not appear to be as bad
as other areas in Tauranga. Katikati:
Heavy frosts but plants protected by
frost cloth or in shade house.

The guest speaker was Kevin Pritchard.
The subject was use of the internet for
bromeliad growers/enthusiasts. Lynley
will be emailing members a list of all
the web sites viewed and of interest.
YouTube has hundreds of good clips.
In particular Paul T. Isley's clips (60
minutes, 4 parts) where he shows you
around his amazing nursery. Our own
library has two Isley books. There was
also some discussion on internet safety.

The Plant of the month for July
was 'Unusual genera includingbillbergias' There were many plants
tabled, including Dyckia, Neophytum,
Quesnelia, Cryptanthus, Orthophytum,
Hohenbergia, Acanthostachys,
Deuteracohnia and Billbergia.

Competition:

Novice Section: 1st Neoregelia 'Royal
Purple' – Doris Shea, 2nd Neoregelia
'Gold Fever' – Doris Shea

1st

Open: Quesnelia marmorata –

2nd

Graeme Alabaster, Neoregelia
'Purple Star' – Margaret Mangos, 3rd
Neoregelia correia-araujoi, also on the
table were Neoregelia 'Orange Glow',
'Gold Fever', and Guzmania 'Ostara'.
Tillandsias: 1st Tillandsia erubescens

– Wilma Fitzgibbons, 2nd T. ionantha
var stricta – Audrey Hewson, 3rd, T.
viridiflora – Graeme Alabaster, also
tabled T. mauryana, ixioides, crocata,
and stricta (silver).
Next Meeting: 12th September at the
TYPB clubrooms, Sulphur Point, at
12.30pm. The plant of the month will
be Aechmea, the topic for this month:

Members will speak about glasshouses,
shade houses and other structures to
protect sub-tropicals from winter cold
and excessive summer sun.

visit gardens and nurseries. This
will replace our monthly meeting.
For further information please contact
Sue Laurent 07-307 1323, Ross
Ferguson 07-312 5487 or Maureen
Moffatt 07-322 2276.

Eastern Bay of Plenty Bromeliad
and Orchid Group – Eunice Silvester
South Auckland Bromeliad Group
The July meeting was held at the
Professional Real Estate rooms. Our
guest speaker was the very well known
Peter Waters. The topic of his talk
was Nidulariums, and he had brought
a lovely colourful display of plants to
support that. The NZ Journal for May
2012 showed many of the plants he
had on show. Most of the members
present have a least one nidularium
in their collection, and Peter was able
to answer queries they had and give
tips on how to get the best out of their
plants. The upcoming 'Cool Broms'conference in 2013 was discussed,
and Peter spoke about some of the
guest speakers who will be presenting.
Registering and labelling of plant
was important, so that plant could be
correctly identified. Importing plants
and seed was mentioned after a query
from a member. Peter had also brought
along several hanging baskets of
small neoregelias and an unusual and
fascinating little Racinaea crispa – tiny
with red crinkly leaves. He pointed out
that when there is a shortage of space
on the ground the hanging baskets
come in handy.

Raffles were drawn followed by a sales
table. Afternoon tea was served which
gave members a chance to have a chat
with Peter.

Members were reminded of a bus
trip to Tauranga in September, to

– Marion Morton
Another great attendance at our August
meeting at the Auckland Botanic
Gardens.

Unfortunately Graham West was again
unable to attend the meeting as he is
about to undergo heart by-pass surgery
at Mercy Hospital so Roy Morton ran
the meeting. We all hope that Graham
will make a speedy recovery and we
wish him all the best.

Others members who were unable
to attend due to illness were Susann
Winter, Carol Jolly and Nita Peterson.
We also wish them the best for a speedy
recovery.

Our guest speaker at this month's
meeting was Jenny Gallagher, ablyassisted by Marie Healey, on the subject
of aechmeas. Jenny brought along
a variety of her plants, as did Marie
Healey, Margaret Flanagan, Margaret
Kitcher, Nancy Murphy and several
other members who told us about
them and the conditions under which
they were being grown. It was a very
interactive and informative meeting.

Margaret Kitcher advised that our
trips to Thames, Onewhero and
Kerikeri have filled up very quickly,
and payment is now required for the
Thames trip which is $30 per person.

Cont'd P18 17

Cont'd from P17 – Group News

The raffles were won by Gail Anderson,
Tonia Adams and Judy Graham.

Next Meeting: 1:30pm on Sunday, 2nd
September at the Auckland Botanic
Gardens, 102 Hill Road, Manurewa.
'Travelling About' will be the subject
of a talk by Nancy Murphy.

Hawkes Bay Bromeliad Group
– Julie Greenhill
Our June meeting was a little different
from the norm in that we didn't have
a formal meeting as such but instead
held a workshop where everyone
was encouraged to mount various
bromeliads onto materials of their
choice. We have Jenny Plested to
thank for putting so much effort into
the afternoon and arranging to have
plenty of lovely driftwood available
as well as all the other bits and pieces
necessary. Nigel Carston also gave us
a demonstration of the technique he
has perfected for getting his plants to
grow well in live pongas. We had an
informal vote at the end of the session
and Pieter Franklin emerged the clear
winner with his very artistic creation
of driftwood sitting in stones in a nice
container and supporting some lovely
small tillandsias.

For the July get together on Sunday
22nd we were able to sit and watch some
of the interesting scenes and plants that
Colin Anderson encountered when he
was in Peru. At the time Colin was
employed by Kew Gardens and was
sent there to gather particular plant
species. While that was some time
ago now it was none-the-less very
interesting to see the sights, particularly
Machu Picchu and the flora including

several types of bromeliads.

There was also a discussion on the
species Aechmea orlandiana and its
close relatives, led by Julie Greenhill.
We were able to admire and compare
'Ensign',' Reverse Ensign', 'Bert',
'Rainbow' and some other look alikes
and all wished that we could get our
hands on some of the other beautiful
hybrids of this plant.

Competition:
Non-flowering: 1st Aechmea 'Bert' –
Pieter Franklin, 2nd Neoregelia 'Red
River' – Julie Greenhill, 3rd Wittrockia
'Leopardinum' – Margaret Bluck

1st

Flowering: Aechmea 'Bert' –

2nd

Julie Greenhill, Canistropsis
'Persimmon' – Margaret BluckMiniatures: Neoregelia 'Felix' – Julie
Greenhill, 2nd Neoregelia 'Guinea' –
Margaret BluckTillandsias: 1st Tillandsia tricolor –
Pieter Franklin

Guzmania fosteriana Guzmania fosteriana
– Harry E. Luther, writing in the BSI Journal May –June 2011
Guzmania fosteriana was often seen when comparing plants from
discovered in eastern Ecuador the wild with those from horticulture.
by Mulford Foster in 1948. The pictured plant was collected by the
The original specimen had a simple author and photographed at the Marie
(unbranched) inflorescence but often Selby Botanical Gardens by Dr. Phil
vigorous cultivated specimens may be Nelson.
branched. These sorts of differences are

by Graeme Barclay by Graeme Barclay
This plant is a classic example of how a number of hardy Neoregelia species can
combine to create a fantastic garden specimen.

Neoregelia 'Yellow Delicious'

Neoregelia 'Yellow Delicious' was
made 35 years ago by the famous
American hybridist James Elmore of
the USA around 1977. Its parentage
formula is registered as Neoregelia
'Dexter's Pride' x Neoregelia 'Green
Apple', both plants are some of the
earliest neoregelia hybrids ever made
from the 1950s and 60s.

Neoregelia'Yellow Delicious' – lookingrather green, after the New Zealand winter.

Neoregelia 'Yellow Delicious'

Mulford Foster made 'Dexter's Pride'
possibly from crossing the species
fosteriana and spectabilis, while the
parentage of 'Green Apple is much
more sketchy. Neoregelia 'Green Apple'
was supposedly rescued by someone
with a keen eye off Ralph Davis' trash
pile and grown on to reveal a large plant
with outstanding form, similar to clones
of cruenta and concentrica, which
could be likely candidates as parents.
Therefore, being such an old hybrid, it
is possible that 'Yellow Delicious'has at
least four species in its ancestry, which
have passed on many of their best traits.

This plant grows to around 80cm and
is best grown in full sun all year round.
This causes the leaves to develop a
stunning canary yellow colour with
very prominent red tips and subtle red
spotting and banding. As with many large
neoregelias at flowering time the leaves
flatten out to form a compact and evenly
layered rosette that is very reminiscent
of 'Green Apple' – its stunning father.
The photos show specimens grown in
lower light (after winter) looking much
greener, and in full sun looking much
more yellow with the red leaf tips.

It is also a very hardy plant, capable
of withstanding the extremes of full
summer sun, cold winters and mild
frosts with ease. Interestingly, there are
no other registered neoregelia hybrids
with 'Yellow Delicious' listed as a
parent, which is quite surprising given
its ancestry, excellent features and the
time it has been around.

20

 OCTOBER 2012
VOL 52 NO 10
Vriesea philippo-coburgii.
Photo: John Lambert
OCTOBER 2012
VOL 52 NO 10
Vriesea philippo-coburgii.
Photo: John Lambert
• Vrieseas grow well on trees
• Tillandsias struggle on the 'high wire'

Sunday, 4th November
at Totara Waters
from 10:00am
DON'T MISS THIS ANNUAL EVENT!
Come and spend a day at TOTARA WATERS.
Bring a picnic lunch and enjoy a sausage from the BBQ.
Sausages, coffee and tea provided free.
* Workshops * Lots of plants for sale* Auction – including new release plants
Bring a friend, have a great day!
89 Totara Road, Whenuapai, Waitekere City
Phone: 416 8272 Fax: 416 8062
www.totarawaters.co.nz
Presented by Totara Waters in association with the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand
BROMS
in the PARK
2012
Sunday, 4th November
at Totara Waters
from 10:00am
DON'T MISS THIS ANNUAL EVENT!
Come and spend a day at TOTARA WATERS.
Bring a picnic lunch and enjoy a sausage from the BBQ.
Sausages, coffee and tea provided free.
* Workshops * Lots of plants for sale* Auction – including new release plants
Bring a friend, have a great day!
89 Totara Road, Whenuapai, Waitekere City
Phone: 416 8272 Fax: 416 8062
www.totarawaters.co.nz
Presented by Totara Waters in association with the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand
BROMS
in the PARK
2012

Bromeliad Society of New Zealand Inc
Bromeliad Journal – October 2012 issue
CONTENTS
'Broms in the Park' – Sunday November 4th 2
President's Page – Jocelyn Coyle 4
Bromeliad Society September meeting news – Graeme Barclay 5
'Cool Broms' conference update 6
New hybrids in New Zealand – Andrew Devonshire 7
The hazards of life on the high wire – John Barrat 8
Report on the World Bromeliad Conference – Dave Anderson 11
Vrieseas grow well on trees – JAGA 12
Society officers, subs and Journal directory 15
Group News 16
Classic Brom Corner – Graeme Barclay 20

The opinions expressed in articles or letters in this Journal are the contributors' own views and
do not necessarily express the views or the policy of the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand

COMING EVENTS

Please see the the Group News section starting on page 16 for details of group

meeting times and venues.

OCTOBER
23rd Society monthly meeting at
Greyfriar's Hall, corner of Mt Eden
and Windmill roads, starting at 7.30pm.
Monthly choice competition: Plants
with red spots. There will be a talk with
photos about the BSI World conference,
held in Orlando, USA in September.
28th Hawkes Bay Group meeting

NOVEMBER

4th

'Broms in the Park' at Totara
Waters, Whenuapai

4th

South Auckland Group Sale and
Display
14th Bay of Plenty Group meeting
18th Eastern Bay of Plenty Group
Christmas luncheon
18th Society Garden Ramble to south
Auckland gardens – see page 4 for
details
21st Bay of Plenty Group garden visits
26th Society monthly meeting at
Greyfriar's Hall, corner of Mt Eden
and Windmill roads starting at 7.30pm.
Monthly choice competition: Christmas
arrangements. Annual plant auction and
Christmas supper (please bring a plate).

FRONT COVER: Clumps of Vriesea philippo-coburgii look right 'at home' on
John and Agatha Lambert's flowering Kowhai. Their interesting article, and photos,
about growing vrieseas on trees starts on page 12.

PRESIDENT'S PAGE

Has anyone got the 'Spring Fever'
yet? I just wish the wind would
go away, I am forever picking up
plant debris off the garden and driveway.
We have been without our ride-on mower
now for about three weeks so the lawns
are looking like we need to get a herd of
goats in to do their thing. I hope we get it
back soon otherwise we will be making
hay. It is amazing the difference it makes
when the grass is cut.

Did you all enjoy Lester's presentation
on tillandsias from Argentina at our
September meeting? I enjoyed it and
found it really interesting to see the
photos of the different tillandsia flowers
that related to the plants he was talking
about. Thanks Lester.

There will be pots, labels and fertiliser
available at the October meeting so if
this is what you need at present maybe
pop some extra money in your pocket.

A big thank you to everyone who helped
out at the Spring Sale. Many hands make
light work.

If you were awarded a trophy at the end
of 2011 could you please return it this
month.

Peter Waters will be sharing his
experiences from the BSI world
conference in Orlando with us on
Tuesday night so please come along on
October 23 and enjoy our meeting.

Looking ahead to our November
meeting – we'll be running our annual
plant auction. We're looking for
good quality / unusual plants. If you
can help please contact Peter Waters
Tel: 534 5616.

Cheers,

Jocelyn

SUNDAy 18TH NOVEMBEr
(Please note correct date – we had it wrong in in the September Journal)
• Gardenza – David Blundell
450 Glenbrook Beach Rd,
near Waiuku.
Cost – gold coin donation
David is also hosting a Hospice
weekend so please tell the
person on the gate that you
are from the Bromeliad Society.
• Judy Graham
10 Pono Place (off Waitoa Rd,
off Sandspit Rd), Waiuku.
• Ann & Graham Thompson
263 Ponsford Road, (off Awhitu
Rd), Te Toro. Cost $5.00. If you
wish to bring lunch we can
have it in this garden. Please
try to be there at 12.00pm.

Bromeliad Society
September Meeting News – Graeme Barclay

Our president Jocelyn welcomed
everyone and reminded the
meeting of our upcoming
Spring Sale in mid October. If
members could please bring along
any spare pups or unwanted broms to
donate to the conference table – and
also any banana or fruit boxes etc to
add to the pile for purchasers to take,
that would be much appreciated.
Jocelyn also mentioned we have some
new medium sized, shiny black pots
arriving soon that are well priced and
will be available for sale to members
at upcoming meetings.

'Show and Tell' broms were sparse
in September. The only plants bought
in were a nice clump of a Tillandsia
aeranthos hybrid, displaying and
explaining an unusual flowering habit
of very "low down" flowers amongst
the clump that is not often seen. Lastly,
a terrestrial plant (possibly a Dyckia or
Orthophytum species) was also bought
for identification, but it was decided
in the absence of Peter Waters to wait
until next month to try and tackle that
one!

Lester Ching followed with a very
interesting talk on Tillandsia species
from Argentina. He bought in
quite a number of specimens from
his collection and explained their
differences, growth characteristics and
localities in habitat. Several members
participated in discussions on
various plants, which created a most
informative talk for those growing

grey leaved Tillandsia.

Before supper we had a power point
presentation from the ladies from a
new company called Hanging Gardens
(www.hanginggardens.co.nz). They
brought along photos and samples of
their green and charcoal fabric plant
holders, which are designed to mount
on any vertical wall or fence and allow
plants to grow in a vertical space.

Carole Roberts won the special raffle
prize – a nice green Neoregelia 'Garden
Goddess'. This month the door prizes
went to Ross Walker (again!), John
Mitchell and Win Shorrock.

COMPETITIONS
Open Flowering: First was Peter
Coyle, with Tillandsia 'Wildfire' that
had many red flower spikes and looked
stunning – this was also deservedly
voted plant of the month. Second was
David Goss with Aechmea orlandiana
(dark form) – a large clump of
different sized plants, showing great
leaf colour and form after the Winter
months. Also in the competition were
Vriesea 'Hunua Orange Rocket';
Dyckia marnier-lapostollei x 'Silver
King' and three specimens of Aechmea
'Aztec Gold' that looked brilliant with
their red and orange flowering foliage.

Open Foliage: Judy Graham was
first with Neoregelia 'Rosy Morn'
x 'Lambert's Pride' – a very large,
speckled and well coloured hybrid

Cont'd P6

Registrations for our March 2013 Australasian conference are already
over 160 and still almost five months to go. We will be welcoming
bromeliad lovers from South Africa, USA, Ecuador, Brazil, Singapore
and of course Australia and New Zealand.
Don't forget – register before December 31st 2012 and the
conference fee is $280. register after this date and it will be $300.
To check out conference programme and speakers and/or to register
go to our website: www.bsnz.org or email us at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Registrations for our March 2013 Australasian conference are already
over 160 and still almost five months to go. We will be welcoming
bromeliad lovers from South Africa, USA, Ecuador, Brazil, Singapore
and of course Australia and New Zealand.
Don't forget – register before December 31st 2012 and the
conference fee is $280. register after this date and it will be $300.
To check out conference programme and speakers and/or to register
go to our website: www.bsnz.org or email us at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Cont'd from P5 – September Meeting News

that was bred by Gerry Stansfield.
Second was Peter Coyle with a new
Neoregelia 'Gold Explosion' which is
a Margaret Paterson hybrid that was
recently imported. In the competition
were Neoregelia 'Milagro'; Vriesea
'Gold Curls', 'Hunua Purple Haze'
and 'Dark Knight' x 'Snowman'.

Tillandsia: Lester Ching's mounted
flowering clump of Tillandsia 'Strictly
Bourgeoise'was first with second going
to Lynette Nash's Tillandsia ionantha
'Druid', with its unusual yellow tinged
foliage Also on the table were Tillandsia
'Pink Cascade', caerulea, ionantha,
mitlaensis, scaposa, tenuiflora and
another example of the Andrew
Flower hybrid, 'Strictly Bourgeoise'.

Neoregelia: First was Peter Coyle
with Neoregelia 'Jewellery Shop' x
('Avalon x 'Fireball') and Peter was
also second with Neoregelia 'Roseo

Striata' x 'Maya' – both are nicely
coloured new hybrids from crosses
he has recently made. The only
other plant in the competition was
Neoregelia 'Vivacor'x ('Roseo Striata'
x concentrica)... Now that spring is
here, let's have some more neos on
display for our October meeting !

Plant of the month: Tillandsia
aeranthos and bergeri: First was
Judy Graham with a nice clump of
aeranthos, whilst second went to Win
Shorrock, also with a nicely coloured,
large clump of bergeri. The only other
entry in the competition was a clump
of a bergeri hybrid.

The Plant of the Month went to Peter
Coyle with Tillandsia 'Wildfire'.
Congratulations to all the winners.

23rd

NEXT MEETING: Tuesday
October.

UPDATE...

This month we feature a couple of my recently registered neoregelia hybrids.

I have always been fascinated by
the banded (zonated) neoregelia
hybrids, so these plants have been
a focus in my hybridising. Creating
a nice banded hybrid that is different
to what's already available is not an
easy task. Firstly it seems that when
these banded neoregelias are used
in hybridising, they have a default
setting that produces mainly spotted
(maculated) hybrids. Secondly there
are many well known banded plants
already in circulation, so to consider
naming, and registering a new one,
it has to stand out. Here are two that
have been selected from hundreds of
hybrids.

Neoregelia 'Havana' is a hybrid
of 'Punctate' and 'Clarise'. It has
developed very nice form, with a full
rosette of leaves, plus the attractive
banding. The name 'Havana' comes
from one of my favourite brands
of coffee. Havana Coffee Works is
located in Wellington, and they send
their coffee nationwide. Their catch
phrase is "Coffee U feel" and it really
is!

Neoregelia 'Altura' continues the
coffee naming theme, being named
after another favourite coffee brand,
and Altura is also Spanish for 'highest'.
This is a small hybrid, with the parents
of 'Wee Willy' and 'Blushing Tiger'.
In high light the plant develops lime

Neoregelia 'Havana'

Neoregelia 'Altura'

green leaves, overlaid with bright brick
red bands and splashes which give it a
distinctive appearance.

Hazards of life on the high wire...

– John Barrat
Reprinted from the September, 2010 issue of SMITHSONIAN SCIENCE
published by the Smithsonian Institution, as first reprinted in the May/June 2012
issue of SEMBS, Bulletin of the Southeastern Michigan Bromeliad Society.

A common epiphytic plant that conducting a high-wire act in Panama.
pulls the nutrients it needs to Wind-born seeds of the bromeliad
live out of thin air has been Tillandsia flexuosa have long been

Tillandsia flexuosa growing on electrical cables inPanama. Note bird on top wire. Photos: Gerhard Zotz
Tillandsia recurvata on telephone poles, Brazil. From BSI Bulletin V. 4

lodging, sprouting and appearing to
thrive in the grooves of aluminum-
wire wrapped electric power lines.
These plants grow unprotected in
the blazing tropical sun using a thick
layer of water and nutrient-absorbing
scales to pull sustenance from the air.
Their roots hold them fast to the cable
margin.

The botanists take a closer look...

Recently, botanists Gerhard Zotz of
the Smithsonian Tropical Research
Institute and Stefan Wester of the
University of Oldenburg in Germany
decided to take a closer look at these
high-wire bromeliads. They were
interested to find out how the growth
and survival rates of these plants on
electrical cables compared to the
growth and survival of plants of the
same species growing in trees–their
natural environment. During a two-
year study the pair surveyed some
1,400 T. flexuosa specimens living on
1250 meters of electrical cable, as well
as nearby plants of the same species
growing on tree limbs. The cables
were 8.25 millimeters in diameter and
consisted of multiple aluminum wires
woven around a single steel cable,
giving them a rough surface upon which
the seeds and plants can cling. Before
their study the scientists observed that
most of the cable-growing T. flexuosa
lived on cables near roads, leading
them to theorize that the dust kicked-
up by cars and other vehicles provided
adequate nutrients for the plants to
flourish.

A hostile environment...

Although the high-wire T.flexuosa
appeared to be thriving, Sotz and
Webster found the cables were actually
a hostile environment for the plants. T.
flexuosa on power lines grew slowly,
suffered a high mortality rate and were
not very successful in establishing new
recruits. On electric cables the death of
established plants greatly exceeded the
recruitment of new plants from seeds.

For these bromeliads the primary
problem with cable-life, the scientists
found is a lack of water. While
individuals growing on both cables
and trees utilize rainwater, the zero
water-absorbing properties of an
aluminum cable combined with greater
exposure to the sun and wind, make
cable life for bromeliads highly risky.
Even though dust from cars should
provide an abundance of nutrients to
the cable-living bromeliads, lack of
water prevented them from taking
advantage of this benefit. In addition,
the scientists found that even though
the cables had a rough surface, the
plants had a difficult time anchoring
themselves to the cable. Many of the
plants disappeared during the course of
the study, dislodged from the cables by
wind and other natural forces.

The study, the first to examine the
growth and survival of electric-cable
growing bromeliads, was published
recently in the Journal of Tropical
Ecology.

I'd like to add to my
collection of 200+ species
of Tillandsias. Will send lists
of available and wanted ones.

Cor Schipperemail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Wanted to buy for a
New Plymouth garden.
One Vriesea 'Kiwi Cream'.

Phone Graham
on 298 3479

We will publish Buy or Swap notices from
members of the Society. Maximum 30 words.
Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or postto: 14 Matanui St, Northcote, North Shore City.

10

Update from the 20th BSI World
Conference in Orlando – Dave Anderson

The 20th BSI World Conference
was hosted by the Florida
Council of Bromeliad Societies

1st

– September 24th to October .
Betsy McCrory and her conference
committee organised a most
pleasurable and memorable event. It
was very much the friendly conference
and such a pleasure to renew old
acquaintances and friendships with
BSI members from many parts of the
globe.
The Convention Centre at the Caribe
Royale Hotel was a perfect venue. The
rooms were huge which catered well
for the crowded lectures; the bromeliad
competition: the displays and the
sales area. The latter was hosted in a
custom built marquee that was massive

– so large that the area never looked
crowded. It was only when queuing
to pay that you realised how big the
venue was.
We had an afternoon visiting three
local 'yards', (or gardens as we know
them). Thanks to Steve and Tina;
Steven Wagner and Lisa Robinette
who not only opened their gardens
but also provided drinks and fruit that
was most welcome in the heat of the
Florida afternoon.

The displays looked quite impressive.
Of particular note was a display
along the main corridor that had as its
focal point a Tillandsia krukoffiana
in full flower. This dark leaved plant
was approximately 1.8m across and
1.5m high with a flower spike some

2m in height. It is one of those very
large tillandsias and I even heard
some confused people asking which
alcantarea it was not knowing that there
are some very big tillandsia species.
Bordering this display were 20 to 30
plants of the hybrid Billbergia 'Poquito
Mas' – ('Fantasia' x 'Poquito Blanco')
that looked a picture. The nursery had
selectively bred it so that these plants
were double the usual size. Another
display that really caught my eye was
one that had Orlando as its theme. On
display were many different cultivars
of Aechmea orlandiana - hybrids that
had orlandiana, 'Bert' and fosteriana
in their parentage. The plants thrive in
the climate of Orlando and formed a
very colourful grouping.

The lectures were of a high quality.
As Joan and I had just returned from
a tour of south eastern Mexico I was
most impressed by Andy Siekkinen's
talk on the genus Hechtia that only
grow in Mexico. These plants are
very prickly with many people finding
them unfriendly but the photos of them
growing in their natural habitat were
stunning.

There will be photos and a talk about
the conference at our Society's October
monthly meeting.

The next BSI World Conference is
to be held in Hawaii in 2014. No
doubt this will be another wonderful
event. Do refer to the BSI website
www.bsi.org

Vrieseas grow well on trees

– Article and photos by Jaga
The weather has been very wet
and very windy through winter
but we know spring is here when
our kowhai trees come into bloom. On
one of these we attached three separate
Vriesea philippo-coburgii five years
ago. We picked this plant as we had
seen numerous photos of this tough
species growing in their natural habitat
in trees in Brazil and were curious to
see how they would go. As you can see
from the photos, they have gone crazy!
I'm picking it's the original three
plants that are now the ones flowing.
It is also a treat to see tuis attracted to
the nectar.

Almost all bromeliads will grow in
trees that do not have loose or peeling
bark, but bigger bromeliads end up
being a large target for the wind if
they're not in a very sheltered location.
In our case there has been considerable
brom losses. The kowhai with the
brom plants faces the north east and
cops the easterly storms off the sea
so even though we tied the broms on
with rope, to start with we did not have
high hopes they would last long. How
wrong we were!

Vrieseas on the whole tend to cope
better with our conditions and have
been the star genus in our trees. For

anyone wanting to try here's a few
tips from our trials. We use only the
larger pups and only once they have
developed an aerial root system. To
achieve this we treat the pup base with
flowers of sulphur and place in a large
plant pot half-filled with scoria. Then
we fill with broken polystyrene. Once
the roots start, we lift the plant clear
of the scoria so the roots sit in the
polystyrene. This promotes aerial root
growth. We take the plant and select a
spot on a branch or trunk where a brom
may grow naturally and with vrieseas
its not a good idea to nail or staple
them on as your just split the base. We
use cheap nylon garden twine or strips
of fabric and tie them on as tightly as
possible with the roots against the tree
bark.

If you start this process now, by the
end of summer the roots should be
firmly attached and the twine can be
removed. You will need a good ladder
that has its legs on level, stable ground.
Always remember – safety first. It's
best to place the top plant first and
work your way downwards if you
are planning a lot of plants. There are
plenty of vrieseas worth trying and
we're showing you a few that we have
used.

Vrieseas grow well on trees...

Tuis love kowhai trees in flower but this bird seems to prefer the bromeliad!

Vriesea hybrid pup with aerial roots,
all ready for a home.
Vriesea olmosana var pachamamae.
It has been on this branch since 2008.

More on P14 13

Cont'd from P13 – Vrieseas grow well on trees

Vriesea hybrid, again on a tree fern,
mounted three years ago.

Vriesea 'Fire Comet'. This is an Andrew
Maloy hybrid and it has been on this treesince 2011. We left it a little long before

Vriesea hybrid residing on a tree fern.

removing the tie and have noticed theroots have grown around it so we will justlet the tie rot out.

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policy of the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand Inc.
BROMELIAD JOURNAL

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Group News

Bay of Plenty Bromeliad Group

– Jo Elder
Jo Elder welcomed members to the
September meeting as president Lynley
Breeze was away.

With spring being here and the time
for removing and potting of bromeliad
plants and pups being just around the
corner, Barry Jones spoke about the
correct size of pups for removal and the
preparation of those pups for potting up.
There is often a temptation to remove
pups too soon which delays healthy
strong growth. Barry had brought along
a number of plants and was able to
demonstrate the size of pups suitable for
removal.

Roger Allan spoke about shade houses
and shelters and the advantages of
growing plants under cover. He had
brought along several types of shade
cloth and explained the different density
of shade, colour and weave of the cloth.
Roger also spoke about the height of the

structure with a good circulation of air
being important. Very good automatic
watering systems are also an advantage

Hawke's Bay Bromeliad Group
during the summer months.

While we had Roger in front of our
members we asked him to auction a
book, and two plants, well done Roger.
Jo Elder gave a short talk on the Aechmea
genera.

Plant of the month – Aechmea: On the
table were, recurvata 'Tokuri', 'Bert',
'Kiwi', 'Black Jack', 'Mirlo', correiaaraujoi,
orlandiana, 'Mellow Yellow',
flavorosea and many others.

1st

Competition Novice section:

Vriesea gigantea, Maisie Kokshoorn,
2nd Alcantarea vinicolor, Doris Shea, 3rd
Neoregelia not identified, Doris Shea.
Also on the table, Nidularium 'Litmus'

1st

Competition: Neoregelia 'Hot
Gossip, 'Graeme Alabaster, 2nd Aechmea
orlandiana, Gill Keesing, 3rd Neoregelia
'Magnifica' x 'Painted Lady ', Barry
Jones.

1st

Tillandsia: equal, T. ionantha
'Mexico', Bertha Schollum, T. scaposa,

2nd

Audrey Hewson, T. 'Montana',

3rd

Audrey Hewson, T geminiflora,
Jo Elder. Also tabled, T. recurvifolia,
tectorum, ionantha var ionantha,
straminea x cacticola.

Next Meeting: 14th November at
TYPB clubrooms Sulphur Point at
12.30pm.Plant of the month, 'Variegated
Bromeliads' and Roger Allan will speak
about plant propagation methods.

Garden visits: 21st November at 10am,

1. Sharon Foxon, 37 Te Hono St.
Maungatapu, 2. Anne Stacey Te Watai
St. Maungatapu.
– Julie Greenhill
It was lovely to see a few 'old faces'
again at our meeting. We tried a
slightly different format and started
with our 'Show and Tell' and plant
judging. A local orchid supplier has
some interesting containers suitable for
growing bromeliads as well as a great
little mister or sprayer that fits onto a soft
drink bottle.

Final arrangements were discussed for
our day trip to Gisborne followed by a

demonstration on how to remove pups.
Some more difficult vriesea specimens
were used as examples and it was
interesting to hear growers' different
viewpoints on how long the pup should
be left to harden before potting up.

Competition
Flowering: 1st x Neomea ' Strawberry'

– Daniel Franklin, 2nd equal Quesnelia
imbricata – Noel Newman, Aechmea
'Pie in the Sky' – Yvonne Richardson,
Aechmea 'Tokuri' – Julie Greenhill, 3rd
Nidularium fulgens – Pieter Franklin
1st

Non-Flowering: Neoregelia 'van
Dorme' – Wade Smith, 2nd equal
Neoregelia 'Shadow'– Margaret Bluck,
Vriesea 'Jewel' hybrid –Julie Greenhill,

3rd

Neoregelia 'Scarlet Charlotte' –
Pieter Franklin
Miniatures: Neoregelia 'Red Bird' –
Julie Greenhill, 2nd Neoregelia 'Tiger

3rd

Cub' – Wade Smith, Neoregelia
'Gorian' – Denise Dreaver
Tillandsia: 1st latifolia var. divaricata

– Pieter Franklin, 2nd unnamed – Denise
Members showed off their 'Broms in
Unusual Containers'. There were some
very inventive displays. We don't have
competitions – but if we did, my vote
would go to Norma Cook who brought in
her mailbox studded all over with broms.

For those members who are coming
on our trip to Thames on Sunday
11th November the bus will leave the
Auckland Botanic Gardens at 8.15 am;
the Jolly Farmer Drury at 8:30am and
the Caltex Service Station, Bombay at

8:45 am. Morning Tea and Lunch will be
provided by the Thames Group but you
may wish to bring along something to
drink and nibbles for the afternoon.
The raffles were won by Jill Marshall,
Roy Morton and Jim Laughton.

Our Famous Annual Sale and Display

will be held at the Auckland Botanic
Gardens, 102 Hill Road, Manurewa on
Sunday, 4th November 2012. It starts at
9am – see you there.

Dreaver

Next Meeting: October 28th – Instead of
a meeting we will be making a day trip to Orchid Group – Eunice Silvester
Gisborne to visit Justin Swan (bromeliad
grower) together with another couple of During September, 27 of our Eastern
gardens. Bay of Plenty bromeliad stalwarts

Eastern Bay of Plenty Bromeliad and
South Auckland Bromeliad Group
rumbled and bumped our way to Te Puke
and Tauranga in a steamed-up school
bus. Regardless of the very wet day

– Marion Morton
Parking was very much at a premium
at the Botanic Gardens for our October
meeting. We had a larger crowd than
usual and after a cold windy morning,
the sun came out.
A special afternoon tea was provided to
welcome Graham West back after his
absence.

and even though we were not travelling
in our usual comfortable bus, we had a
great day. First stop in Te Puke was the
artistic garden and studio of Pat and
Ron Howie. This was a real collector's
garden with lots of unusual trees, shrubs
and climbers, many of them from South
Africa, displayed very creatively and
often with little bird sculptures amongst
the branches and foliage. An unexpected

Cont'd P18 17

Cont'd from P17 – Group News

bonus was Pat's studio where there were
many colourful acrylic paintings.

Then we reluctantly climbed back into
our own mobile steamed-up hothouse
and set off for 'Trees and More' Nursery
which was the former Aztec garden

centre in Pyes Pa Rd. The current owners
previously developed Aztec 12 years
ago, sold, then recently repurchased it.
It's thriving back under their ownership.
We enjoyed their selection of bromeliads
and palms, and a wonderful display of
well-placed pots.

After a delicious lunch, accompanied
by live music at Palmer's garden centre,
we visited the extensive gardens and
glasshouse of Eric and Vorrie Jones.
Unfortunately it was really raining, but
the sweeping driveways were glistening
with water which created amazing
reflections and resulted in some great
photos.

An unexpected stop at 'Grower Direct'
in Te Puna allowed for some frenzied
buying of plants and many decisions
to return later, as they had a stunning
selection of very reasonably priced pots
in vibrant new colours and designs.

The finale to a very enjoyable day was a
revisit to Jean and Duncan Richardson's
garden in Omokoroa. This garden is
maturing into a very colourful and
interesting property, with a stunning
display of cactus, and also of bromeliads,
among many other trees and plants
of interest. Our thanks go to Jean who
selects the gardens for us to visit in the
western Bay of Plenty and ensures we
always have a fantastic outing.

Next meeting: Our Christmas Luncheon
at Sue and Ken Laurent's garden in

Whakatane on 18th November. Please
bring a plate for a shared lunch, and get
creative for our popular Christmas Hat
Competition.Visitors and new members
welcome.For further information contact
Maureen 07-322 2276, Sue 07-307 1323,
or Ross 07-312 5487.

Thames Valley Bromeliad Group
– Kay Steen
Our Bromeliad group had thought about
having a show for some time, however it
was difficult to decide when and where to
have it. Then the Orchid Group decided
they needed more members and the ideal
way to do that was to have a display. The
upshot was that both groups got together
and a display was born.

Each group had people with special
skills and we utilised them all for the
event. Kate is our floral artist, so with her
talents and the talents of her helpers the
planning began. We had guzmanias and
nidulariums kindly donated by Gellerts
and their flowers were a dazzling display
against the plain wall.

Friday, 21st September dawned, and the
amount of bromeliads that arrived in the
hall was amazing. I thought there would
be no way we could utilize them all, but
we did! It was colourful, entertaining,
and interesting, and many of the public
made use of the chairs to just simply sit
and admire the sight. From the back of
the hall the comments were very positive
and the gasp of delight as the public
entered the hall was joy to our ears.

Tuckers Orchids, who have a personal
connection to our group, supported
the orchid side with a donation of two
beautiful Phalaenopsis (Moth Orchid),

Bromeliads and orchids star at the Thames
Valley Group's display.

and one Paphiopedilum (Slipper Orchid),
for one of the raffles, sales of their own
plants, and they also had a display. The
bromeliads that Don brought down were
an absolute favourite for buyers.

Congratulations to both groups for a
very successful event and special thanks
to those who donated time, plants, and
their best efforts to make this a truly
memorable day.

North Bromeliad Group
– Erin Titmus
The Far North Bromeliad Group joined
with the Bay of Islands Orchid Society
for the third time to put on a stunning
show / display at the Turner Centre.
The new plaza area provided a spacious
venue with good natural light to show off
our colourful plants.

Over 120 bromeliads were judged by Don
Brown and David Brewer and, although
entries were slightly down in numbers,
the quality of plants was excellent.
Competition was close with 17 members
taking home prize certificates. Wendy
Matthews won 'Best in Show' with her

stand-out exhibit, Aechmea nudicaulis
var. aequalis and Jacqui O'Connell won
the 'Most Points in Show' award.

Winners of Classes:

Aechmea: Deb Dozzi – A. caudata
Billbergia: Colleen Pyne – B. 'Hallelujah'
Guzmania: Jacqui O'Connell –

G. 'Ostara'
Miniatures: Dot Leaning – N. pauciflora
Neoregelia: Elaine Wright – N. 'Manoa
Beauty'
Tillandsia: Wendy Matthews –
(unidentified)
Vriesea: Peter Scahill – V. gigantea x V.
'Nova'
Other Species: Dot Leaning – C. 'Dusk'
Novice Foliage: Richard Sherwood –
V. 'Nova Queen'
Decorative Container Plant: Wendy
Matthews – A. nudicaulis var. aequalis
Artistic Arrangement: Sandy Wright –
'Beach to Bark'
Best in Show: Wendy Matthews –
A. nudicaulis var. aequalis
Most Points Overall: Jacqui O'Connell
'Best in Show' in the Far North: Wendy
Matthews' Aechmea nudicaulis var.
aequalis

by Graeme Barclay by Graeme Barclay
This month we look at a famous Tillandsia hybrid that is a 'show stopper' when

in flower.

Tillandsia 'Wildfire'

Tillandsia 'Wildfire' was created
33 years ago by American hybridist
John Arden in Southern California
in 1979. Its parentage formula
is two Central American species
Tillandsia multicaulis x Tillandsia
deppeana, which are two quite similar
looking green-leaved tillandsias
that produce numerous striking
red/orange upright inflorescence
spikes when they come into flower.
John Arden says the entire grex were
identical, due to the primary cross
between two species producing
negligible difference between

Tillandsia 'Wildfire' – photo by Peter Coyle

offspring, which is often the case
when crossing true species. Thus
no selection was made and the
entire grex was named 'Wildfire'
with reference to the multiple coral
red flower scapes that certainly
do mimic flames from a bush fire.

John also says when it flowers one
should expect 21 flower spikes (or
sometimes more) if it is enjoying
ideal growing conditions. Less than
this number, something is wrong or
the climate is not the best for it. It is
very hardy and can grow to around 6070cm
diameter and up to a metre high
when grown well. It should be ideally
situated outdoors in breezy, sunny
conditions with high humidity, where
the lime green leaves can turn reddish/
bronze around the edges, which really
sets the plant alight (excuse the pun!).

Like with most green leaved
tillandsias and vrieseas it will
normally produce multiple pups
around the base after flowering.

Tillandsia 'Wildfire'is a relatively easy
plant to grow in New Zealand. Simply
avoid the midday summer sun scorch
and winter frosts, feed it in Spring as
you would a vriesea and it will thrive
in our gardens and look stunning when
it finally flowers.

 SEPTEMBER 2012
VOL 52 NO 9
Alcantarea extensa (variegated)
SEPTEMBER 2012
VOL 52 NO 9
Alcantarea extensa (variegated)
• Spring is the time for Puya • Queensland Garden 'Expo'1

Mt Eden War Memorial Hall
489 Dominion Road,
Balmoral, Auckland
OpEn tO puBlic
9.00am to 3.00pm
SunDAY OctOBER 14th
nOtE: If anyone wishes to sell
plants or help us out on the day
– please let Jocelyn Coyle know.
Tel (09) 416 8272
Mt Eden War Memorial Hall
489 Dominion Road,
Balmoral, Auckland
OpEn tO puBlic
9.00am to 3.00pm
SunDAY OctOBER 14th
nOtE: If anyone wishes to sell
plants or help us out on the day
– please let Jocelyn Coyle know.
Tel (09) 416 8272
Bromeliad Society of New Zealand Inc

Bromeliad Journal – September 2012 issue

CONTENTS

Spring Sale – Sunday October 14th 2
President's Page – Jocelyn Coyle 4
Bromeliad Society – August meeting news 5
Latin for Bromeliads – Andrew Wilson 6
Puya Time – Andrew Wilson 8
Queensland Garden 'Expo' – Jocelyn Coyle 10
New hybrids in New Zealand – Andrew Devonshire 12
Mounting bromeliads – Nat DeLeon 13
'Waiteys Word' – tips from the Sunshine Coast 15
Group News 16
'Buy & Swap' 18
Society officers, subs and Journal directory 19
Classic Brom corner – Graeme Barclay 20

The opinions expressed in articles or letters in this Journal are the contributors' own views and
do not necessarily express the views or the policy of the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand

COMING EVENTS

Please see the Group News section starting on page 16 for details of group meeting
times and venues.

SEPTEMBER OCTOBER

23rd 7th

Hawkes Bay group meeting South Auckland group meeting
25th Society monthly meeting at 10th Bay of Plenty group meeting
Greyfriar's Hall, corner of Mt Eden 17th Bay of Plenty group garden visits
and Windmill roads, starting at 7.30pm. 23rd Society monthly meeting at
Monthly choice competition: Tillandsia Greyfriar's Hall, corner of Mt Eden
aeranthos and bergeri. Lester Ching will and Windmill roads, starting at 7.30pm.
talk on tillandsias from Argentina and Monthly choice competition: Plants with
this will be followed by a talk by Leigh red spots. There will be a talk with photos
Nicholson on 'Hanging Gardens'. about the BSI World Conference, being

held in Orlando, USA in September.

FRONT COVER: This admired and sought after Alcantarea extensa (variegated)
was photographed by Peter Coyle at the Queensland Garden 'Expo' in Nambour on
the Sunshine Coast in July. There's more about this 'Expo' and more photos on pages
10 and 11.

PRESIDENT'S PAGE

Hello everyone, can we safely
say 'spring is here?' The
ground is drying out and we
can now walk on it without leaving a
trail of where you have been. I think
people and plants have had enough
rain to last for some time, we always
seem to lose some aloes or agaves with
all the rain and this winter we have
definitely lost quite a few alcantareas
to the frost so there is a lot of garden
make overs to be done.

I have just started cutting pups for the
new season and some of them don't
seem to have slowed down any over
the winter. With the warmer weather
they are getting their colour back and
I can almost notice it day by day, the
only thing with some bromeliads is that
with colour you also get flowers. I am

Park' time again. At Totara Waters we
are busy sorting out some new and
interesting plants for you. There will
be quite a few of Margaret Paterson's
'midis' for sale and some new releases
for the auction.

Sunday November 18th is our next
Garden Ramble. If you have room in
your car to take another person (or
two) please let me know as it would be
nice if we could carpool.

See you all on the 25th at our monthly
meeting. Lester will be talking about
tillandsias from Argentina and Leigh
Nicholson will talk to us about
Hanging Gardens.

Take care,

Jocelyn

looking forward to our last importation
of plants colouring up so we can see
their true colours.

A big thank you to John Mitchell for
sharing his 'Good, Bad and Ugly'
results of hybridizing at our August
meeting. It was really interesting.

Sunday October 14th is our Spring Sale

– 9.00am – 3.00pm. If anyone wishes
to sell or help on the day please let me
know. Price tags will be available at
our September meeting. If you have a
plant that you don't want please bring
it along to our next meeting and put it
on the Conference table. This will be
one of the last fundraising activities
that we have for conference.
Sunday November 4th is 'Broms in the

Our Society's
Garden Ramble
to Waiuku gardens on
Sunday October 14th.
Full details of gardens /
addresses available at
our September meeting
or if you're not attending
the meeting please ring
Jocelyn Coyle in early
October for details.
09-416 8272
Don't forget...
Bromeliad Society
August Meeting News – Dave Anderson

Jocelyn chaired the meeting
and welcomed everyone. The
programme for the 'Cool Broms'
Australasian Conference to be held
at the Waipuna Hotel next March is
progressing well. Our annual Spring
Sale and Display will be held on Sunday
14th October. Would prospective
sellers and helpers please contact any
of the committee so that we can plan
accordingly? The upcoming garden
visit to south Auckland in November
will visit Judy Graham, Graham and
Anne Thomson and David Blundell.
However we are unable to hire a bus
for the afternoon so members are asked
to share transport where possible.

Peter Waters took us through the 'Show
and Tell' plants. This month there were
only tillandsias on the table and first up
for display was a Tillandsia chiapensis
in flower that does well in Auckland's
climate if kept out of the cold winter
rains. Next wanting a name was a
plant identified as possibly Tillandsia
purpurea. Peter said that the closely
related species Tillandsia cacticola,
straminea and purpurea are very
difficult to separate. These plants really
need a botanist plus DNA analyses to
do an in depth study of them to try and
sort them out. Also for display was
one of the many forms of Tillandsia
tenuifolia – this one had dark blue
flowers. These species are very similar
to Tillandsia aeranthos with the
latter species having larger blooms.
In flower was the species Tillandsia
achyrostachys that has a lovely upright
pink inflorescence and bright green

petals. Lastly were two forms of the
species Tillandsia rodrigueziana one
plant being much smaller than the
other. It is normally distinguished from
the very similar Tillandsia fasciculata
with this latter species having 6cm
long petals compare to Tillandsia
rodrigueziana that has 4cm long petals.

John Mitchell followed with a most
interesting talk on the positive and
negative aspects of hybridising. One
of his final comments being that you
must have a large compost bin and
be prepared to use it! After this Peter
Coyle gave a PowerPoint presentation
on their recent travels to Queensland
where they visited several bromeliad
growers.

Ross Walker won this month's special
raffle prize. The door prizes went to
Becky Cavit, Ross Walker and Laura
Weber.

COMPETITIONS

Open Flowering: First John Mitchell
with Quesnelia 'Tim Plowman'– a
most attractive species. Peter Coyle
was second with Orthophytum
'Blaze'. Also in the competition were
Neoregelia 'Yellow King' and Vriesea
'Snowman'.

Open Foliage: Michelle Tohi was
first with a Vriesea 'Golden Legend'

– an old favourite that always does so
well in Auckland. Second was John
Mitchell with Aechmea orlandiana
(dark form) – another most attractive
form of this species. In the competition
Cont'd P6

Cont'd from P5 – August Meeting News

were Aechmea 'Xavante'; Billbergia
'Domingos Martins' x 'C'est Bon';
Neoregelia 'Foster's concentrica' x
'Hannibal Lector'; Vriesea 'Vistarella',
'Dark Knight' x 'Snowman' and
Vriesea 'Vista'.

Tillandsia: Lynette Nash was first with

Tillandsia heteromorpha var. rauhii –

the very small form that had flowered
for the first time in 12 years. Second
with a clump of Tillandsia tenuifolia var
strobiliformis also in flower was Lester
Ching. Other plants on the table were
Tillandsia aeranthos, kirchhoffiana,
latifolia, montana, punctulata, and
recurvifolia var subsecundifolia.

Neoregelia: First Alan Cliffe with
Neoregelia 'Garnish' – a perennial
favourite and second was Peter
Coyle with Neoregelia 'Treasure
Chest' x 'Bobby Dazzler'. Also in the
competition was Neoregelia 'Apricot
Nectar' x 'Jewellery Shop'.

Named Monthly Plant (Any NZ
hybrid): First was John Mitchell with
a Vriesea 'Firestorm' – a beautiful
red coloured plant that John had
bred. Judy Graham was second with
Vriesea 'Totara Orange'. This plant
was also voted plant of the month.
In the competition were Billbergia
'Domingos Martins' x 'Estrella',
'Domingos Martins' x 'Hallelujah';
Neoregelia 'Tiger Cub' x 'Ritzy Tiger',
'Apricot Nectar' x 'Jewellery Shop',

Neoregelia (carolinae x concentrica)
x 'Exotica Misty Pink'; Tillandsia
achyrostachys x erubescens, 'Red
Fountain'; Vriesea 'Alexander', 'Artful
Grace' and Vriesea 'Dunedin Star'.

The Plant of the Month went to Judy
Graham with Vriesea 'Totara Orange'.
Congratulations to all the winners.

NEXT MEETING: Tuesday 25th
September.

Latin for Bromeliads
– Andrew Wilson. Adapted from the October 2011 issue of 'The Bromeliad
Blade', the newsletter of the San Diego Bromeliad Society.
Latin for plants is not the same
as the Latin that those of us
educated a hundred years ago
might have learned. It is a language
that evolved from the original to one
that allows botanists from all around
the world to share information. In the
world of plants it is universal, as it
has been for hundreds of years. These
days, apart from providing names to
plants and descriptions of most newly
discovered species, it is rarely used,
and never as a spoken language. So,

I'll limit this outline to its use in the
naming of plants (taxonomy), the
one unifying function it continues to
provide.

Bromeliads, like all other plants
on earth, have names, common or
botanical. The botanical names are
binomial, or two-name, in structure,
just like your own. Thus, you might
be called Francine Turner (Turner,
Francine in the military) and your
favourite plant might be Tillandsia

Looking for bromeliads...

fasciculata. That is a botanical Latin
name and generally written in italics
(after all, Latin did begin in Italy).
Tillandsia was named after the
Finnish botanist Eliaz Tillandsn
and fasciculata means 'bunched',
referring to the way the leaves are
grouped as they arise from the base.
It helps to understand a little botanical
Latin to understand more about our
plants and it often helps in recalling
those names. Tillandsia is a genus
name and fasciculata is a species (or
specific) name. Most bromeliad genus
names end in –a (Vriesea, Pitcairnia,
Aechmea, Tillandsia, Hohenbergia,
Puya, Alcantarea, Dyckia, etc.) and
are considered feminine. As such, they
must have a feminine species name,
usually ending in –a, to go along with
it. For the much fewer masculine
genera the ending is –us. Thus, we
have Cryptanthus marginatus. There
are even neutral genera with the
ending -um, giving us a species such
as Orthophytum sanctum. It's actually
a bit more complicated than this but
you're going to have to read 'Botanical
Latin' by William Stearn to find out
those details.

We saw above where the genus name
Tillandsia came from; most of its
species, defined by the following
adjective do indeed end in –a.
However, some do not. If a species is
named after somebody, the ending of
the adjective usually changes from the
nominative case to the genitive case
because genitive denotes belonging to.
We have T. fendleri and T. gardneri,
named after Messrs. Fendler and
Gardner. The ending -i denotes the
genitive case of those names. However,
if the person after whom the plant is

named is a woman, we must use the
feminine genitive case ending. (At
the last meeting) we saw the species,
Tillandsia edithiae. It was named by
Werner Rauh after a woman named
Edith. When that happens, the genitive
case ending in –ae must be applied.
The same happened for T. pamelae,
named for Pam(ela) Koide, also by
Rauh.

Alas, I must tell you it's not always
so simple! Instead of making the
association of the person and the plant
personal and thereby using the genitive
case, some botanists prefer to keep the
naming more impersonal by creating
a nominative case ending for a new
adjective. So, species named after
Ehlers, Funck and Schied, become

T. ehlersiana, T. funckiana and T.
schiediana, respectively. It would not
matter if these botanists were male or
female because the nominative case
ending is determined by the gender of
the genus, Tillandsia. In fact, Renate
Ehlers was a woman.
This is just a tiny introduction to the
subject. We've talked only about
names and said nothing about verbs.
However, even knowing some of these
names and how they are used will make
it easier to remember and understand
some of the pretty difficult ones given
to our plants. It's worthwhile taking
a look at William Stern's 'Botanical
Latin' to find out about the interesting
history and characters who brought us
the language of botany. It is also the
one, by the way, that became adapted
for naming anatomical parts, species
of animals (including Homo sapiens),
fishes and reptiles, not to speak of
mosses, fungi and bacteria.

Puya Time

– Andrew Wilson, writing in 'The Bromeliad Blade', The San Diego Bromeliad
Society May 2011.
Spring is the time for Chilean Puya species to bloom. Two of the species
have been in bloom over the past month in southern California. One of
these, P. alpestris, comes from the mountains south of Santiago at the
same latitude as that of San Diego while the other, P. berteroana, comes from
the mountains north of there. Both have flowers with a startling, ethereal
appearance.

The mediterranean climate of southern
California, similar to that of central
Chile west of the Andes, allows us to
grow these amazing species.

Like other puyas these bromeliads are
terrestrial and, like other bromeliads
they are monocarpic, the flowering
shoot from the base dying after
blooming but generally replaced
by pups. Like terrestrials such as
dyckias and hechtias, they carry fierce
spination. P. berteroana is the larger
of the two species. The towering
specimen seen at a friend's garden in
Rancho Santa Fe has a flower spike
that terminated at over thirteen feet
above ground level, a truly impressive
sight.

The better known species P. alpestris
also provides a striking sight, is smaller
with a spike rising to about four feet
and is more suitable for garden use.
The specimen on the following page
is in my own garden. Large clumps
of the same species have also been in
bloom for a month at Quail (San Diego
Botanic Gardens).

The colour shades of these plants are
subtle and depend on the direction
relative to the sun at which the flowers

are viewed. Both species have bloom
coloors that seem metallic, due in part
to the shine on their petals. They range
in shades from navy-blue to bright
blue to green. The latter, at least in
cultivation, is less commonly seen.

Puzzling features on their flower-spikes
are the lateral extensions. According to
Benzing these act as perching sites for
birds. The two species described here,
unlike others such as P. venusta, have
short, wide flowers that are accessible
by 'both flying and stationary feeders
alike'. The others have no lateral
extensions and are more attractive
to humming-birds because the floral
structure is long and narrow. If Benzing
is correct they accommodate hummers
everywhere but, except for several
Chilean species, they discourage the
perching birds.

Reaching the flower stage from seed
is rather a lengthy process. This was
the first time for the P. berteroana
specimen to bloom since it was planted
twenty-five years ago. After twelve
years I am still waiting for bulky
specimens of a third Chilean species,
the flesh-tearing P. chilensis to achieve
that dramatic climax. When it occurs
you'll hear about it.

Puya Time...

Green form of Puya berteroana. Photo: Andrew Wilson.

Blue-green form of Puya alpestris.
Photos: Andy Siekkinen.

Our president attends the Queensland
Garden 'Expo' on the Sunshine Coast

Jocelyn and Peter Coyle attended the 'Expo' which is held in Nambour over three
days on the second weekend in July. Below we have a few notes from Jocelyn and
some great photos taken at the 'Expo' and on their visits to individual growers.

The 'Expo' is definitely worth are generally variegated like the mother.
a visit with over 300 stands,
seminars and lots of wonderful After the 'Expo' we visited several
plants and bromeliads. The Friday bromeliad growers in the area and we
seems to be the day when all the mad are featuring here some photos from
keen bromeliad collectors go to try Nigel Thomson's 'Dandaloo Valley'
and get those hard to find plants. On nursery and the Tillandsia house at
the cover of this month's Journal is Margaret and Bill Paterson's. (Nigel
Alcantarea extensa (variegated) – much Thomson will be a speaker at 'Cool
sought after plant where the grass pups Broms' 2013.)

Nigel's neos

Alcantarea 'Silver Plum' Aechmea 'Freckles'

Nigel Thomson – 'Dandaloo Valley' nursery...
At the 'Expo'

'Expo' Neophytums

Neoregelia 'Lime and Lava'

Neoregelia 'Pink Deb'

'Expo' Billbergias

 Inside Margaret and Bill Paterson's
Tillandsia house

This month a couple of neoregelia hybrids from Peter Coyle take centre stage.
Peter is producing a number of very nice neoregelia hybrids, and we will see
many more from this clever Totara Waters hybridiser.

When Chester Skotak created
Neoregelia 'Hannibal
Lector' a pandoras box of
new hybrid potential was unlocked.
Most of the zonated (banded) hybrids
available now have dark chocolate
coloured bands on a green leaf, just like
'Hannibal Lector', so hybridisers have
been working to produce attractive
zonated hybrids, with different leaf
colour. Peter has achieved this with
Neoregelia 'Starling'.

Neoregelia
'Starling' is a 2008 hybrid
that combines Neoregelia 'Blood Shot
Eyes'as the seed parent and Neoregelia
'Clarise' as the pollen parent. This
hybrid has a rich purple leaf colour,
and an attractive gloss on the upper
leaf surface. Peter has carried on the
'Hannibal Lector' naming theme with
this plant, as Jodie Foster's character
in 'The Silence of the Lambs' was the
FBI agent Clarice Starling.

Neoregelia
'Totara Treasure' was
created by Peter in 2007. The plant is
an attractive 'midi'neo, 30cm diameter
by 13cms high. Neoregelia 'Lamberts
Pride' is the seed parent, and has given
this hybrid a touch of red banding,
with the bright colour coming from the
pollen parent, Neoregelia 'Treasure
Chest'. This is a good example of two Neoregelia 'Totara Treasure' was
excellent parent plants combining featured in the March – April 2012
to produce an even better offspring. BSI Journal.

Neoregelia 'Starling'

Neoregelia 'Totara Treasure'

Nat DeLeon talks about
mounting bromeliads

Adapted from an article by Robert Meyer, published in the July 2012
'BromeliAdvisory', the newsletter of The Bromeliad Society of South Florida

Nat DeLeon spoke to the (South opening of wounds in palms increases
Florida) membership about the chances of fungal invasion and
basic concepts for mounting potential loss of a favourite landscape
bromeliads – primarily on trees . The plant which has been in the garden for
illustrations and lecture discussed decades.
more than hardware and angles for use
of the same, but delivered concepts of Employing the use of tool belt was
horticultural symbiotic necessity for also advised. When climbing ladders
the gardener. to reach higher limbs or trunks, the

gardener must carry plant, hammer
Nat initially told the audience that and staple (or other tie on device) –
choice of the tree was a fundamental literally the equivalent to a chore for
demand for good sense. Use the shady three hands. And, when climbing the
trees to deliver shade for the shade ladder, more than one more hand will
loving plants and less shady trees be required. Hence, utilization of the
for the opposite plant. For instance, tool belt frees the hands and allows
Guzmania and Vriesea would adore the gardener to gain heights without
the hammocks of oaks while Tillandsia sacrifice of manual dexterity. Once
could survive the suns of summer high on the tree's side, Nat endorses
under the shade provided by a narrow using staples and he dislikes the
palm,. galvanized nails as they glitter long

after their employment and distract
Nat also told us that after mounting from the plant's natural habitat. Nat
on the shady or sunny habits, the plant also asserts that the staple should not

– whether in the winter dry season be placed at a 90 degree angle from
or otherwise – would still need some the vertical base, but rather likes a
attention from the sprinklers or hoses 45-degree angle for the staple. This
as water would be demanded at some angle allows each side of the staple to
time. Mother Nature would not be able touch the plant and dissuades slipping.
to take care of the plants each day of The less a plant slips, the quicker the
a year. roots grow according to Nat. Hence,
tightly placed and angled staples will
Dicots versus monocots was another provide the best results.
concern. Thicker barked trees like
the oaks can accept deeply embedded If clumps are large, Nat asks that the
nails or staples, while palms and other gardener break them up, staple them
thinly surfaced trees should be devoid piece by piece to the tree – but each
of hammered in nails or staples. The tightly against the other. When the

Cont'd P14 13

Cont'd from P13 – Mounting bromeliads

project is completed, the clump appears
to have been revived and the naked eye
will not perceive the cluster as pieces,
but rather to be like the original – one
large clump.

Nat allows fertilizer regimes – but
forewarns that utilization of same
requires watering regimes. So, grower
beware.

Nat also discussed using the procedure
for driftwood. Because the same is

more likely than not a rotted wood,
do not bang heartily with the hammer.
Instead, get the drill out and lightly
put holes in it. Some holes can be
used to draw through fishing line. Or,
use the holes as guides for the staples
and lightly punch the heads into the
manmade slots.

Nat's experience of more than five
decades was eagerly received by a
crowd of 50.

'Waiteys Word'...
tips from the Sunshine Coast

Len Waite is a well known grower in Upper Caboolture and he is a committee
member of the Sunshine Coast Bromeliad Society. His 'Waiteys Word' column
regularly appears in their Society's newsletter. These tips are from the July/

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August issue.

1

Potting mix is an interesting subject to
talk about because we use many varied
recipes to plant our bromeliads in.
Firstly, if what you're using is working
for you don't change. With the mix we
use we keep it in containers. If you do
the same just keep it slightly moist (not
saturated) to keep it from becoming
dusty and also give it some airflow to
stop it becoming musty.

2

Fertiliser is another much talked
about subject. We keep it as simple
as possible. When we plant offsets we
use a low nitrogen, high potassium
osmocote (slow release). For
Neoregelias we fertilise when we plant
and don't do anything else until they
reach maturity. This method can be
used on all broms. I also keep in stock
a higher nitrogen based osmocote
to fertilise plants I want to push a
little faster, like Dyckias, Vrieseas,
Guzmanias and Cryptanthus. With
rest, less is more.

3

Pests and diseases – I personally don't
believe in a regular spray programme
because we can kill all the good
bugs as well as the bad ones. Yes,
I do spray but only when I think it's
necessary. Prevention is a better way

to go, like having good air circulation
and cleaning old dead leaves off your
plants. This gives scale etc less places
to hide.

4

Most important of all – go out and
'smell the roses'. By this I mean enjoy
what you do or don't bother doing it.
Don't take it all too seriously. Happy
growing.

Cheers, Waitey.

Group News

Bay of Plenty Bromeliad Group

– Jo Elder
It was another damp day for our
August meeting but that did not deter
a very good turnout of members who
were welcomed by Lynley.

The club is taking a bus trip to Totara
Waters on the 4th of November and to
another garden yet to be decided. The
cost will be $45.00 per seat.

Guest speakers for this meeting
were Jocelyn and Peter Coyle from
Totara Waters. Peter spoke about
the formation of their wonderful
garden and the way it has evolved
over the years. He is now very keen
on hybridising and has made some
beautiful plants and many of them
have been registered. He spoke about
the hardiness of vrieseas and how they
could be grown in full sunshine so long
as it was not all day, either morning
or afternoon was suitable. Peter and

Shea and 3rd Neoregelia unknown –
Doris Shea.

1st

Open: Aechmea orlandiana Jo
Elder, 2nd equal Vriesea 'Red Chestnut'
Graeme Alabaster, Neoregelia 'Dr.
Oeser' (variegated) and Margaret
Mangos. 3rd Aechmea 'Fosters Favorite
Favorite' Barbara Nalder.

1st

Tillandsias: Tillandsia
guatemalensis – Kevin Pritchard, 2nd

T. erubescens – Jo Elder, 3rd equal T.
erubescens var erubescens – Wilma
Fitzgibbons and T. tectorum
Next Meeting: 10th October at TYPB
clubrooms Sulphur point at 12.30pm.
The Plant for the month is 'Green
and patterned vrieseas', the topic –

'If I could have only one Bromeliad
it would be...' There will be garden
visits on 17th October at 10.00am.

1. Margaret & Leo Mangos 11 Linley
Tce. Brookfield. 2. Molly Coughlin,
18 La Cumbre Close, La Cumbre and
3. Lois Brown, 6 Ladera Mews, La
Cumbre.
Jocelyn donated two plants and these
were ably auctioned by Peter.

South Auckland Bromeliad Group
The plant of the month was Guzmania.
Tabled were Guzmania wittmackii,
'Soledo' 'Ostara' 'Fiesta' lingulata
(variegated). Tabled for our 'Show and
Tell' were Vriesea heterandra and also
a tillandsia requiring a name. It was
recognised as T. latifolia.

Competition:

1st

Novice section: Vriesea 'Philip
Foster Red' – Maisie Kokshoore 2nd
Neoregelia 'Noble Descent' – Doris

– Marion Morton
Despite the fact that it was Fathers'
Day we had a good turnout for our
September meeting at the Auckland
Botanic Gardens. Roy Morton ran the
meeting as Graham West was again
unable to attend, but he is very bright
and progressing well after his heart bipass
surgery and we look forward to
his speedy recovery.

Regretfully we advised the group that like as many people as possible to
Howard Plank had just lost his wife participate as we would like to show
and Nita Petersen her husband. We off your efforts in a display at our
send our condolences to both. November sale.

Our guest speaker was Nancy Murphy
on the subject of 'Travelling about'.

Eastern Bay of Plenty Bromeliad
Nancy is well known and highly
regarded in the Floral Art world and
her services as a judge are much in
demand both here and overseas. She
is also a very entertaining speaker. She
has just returned from overseas where
she had attended the World Association
of Floral Art (WOAFA) Seminar
in Ireland for judges and teachers.
These seminars are held 3 yearly and
about 35 countries participate. The
creations that Nancy put together were
just stunning and she mentioned that
wool, paper and cardboard are now
very popular components in floral
arrangements. On her trip she visited
gardens in Ireland which she said were
very similar to New Zealand gardens,
and on her return journey visited the
Floriade – the international exhibition
of flowers and gardening, held every
10 years in the Netherlands, plus the
Chelsea Flower Show. Our thanks
to Nancy for a most informative and
entertaining presentation.

The raffles were won by Tony Pell,
Lynne Laughton and Norma Cook.

Next Meeting: Sunday, 7th October
at 1:30pm at the Auckland Botanic
Gardens, 102 Hill Road, Manurewa.
The subject will be 'Bromeliads in
Unusual Containers', so let your
imagination run free and bring along
your amazing creations. We would

and Orchid Group – Eunice Silvester

Thirty-four members, including three
guests, enjoyed our August meeting
at Matata. As our guest speaker was
unable to attend, four of our own
members held impromptu workshops
which were appreciated and greatly
enjoyed by all.

Trevor and Pam Signal demonstrated
re-potting of miniature orchids, which
were later included in the raffles. Ross
Fergusson showed us how to split up
vriesea root balls, then showed us how
to attach (tie, tack, or glue) broms to
driftwood. The separated plants were
raffled, and the large and dramatic
driftwood arrangement was later Silent
Auctioned.

Sue Laurent talked about which
vrieseas would grow in full sun, and
showed some beautiful and tempting
plants which later went into the
raffles or onto the sales table. Sue
also displayed some nidulariums
and demonstrated the difference
between bracts and flowers, and the
classification of the flowers according
to colour. This was a follow-on from
Peter Waters visit last month.

Finally, with the 'Cool Broms'
conference coming up in 2013,
Maureen Moffatt demonstrated how

Cont'd P18 17

Cont'd from P17 – Group News

Patron: Patricia Sweeney
President: Jocelyn Coyle 09-416 8272
Vice Presidents: Alan Cliffe 09-479 1451
Don Brown 09-361 6175
Secretary: Dave Anderson 09-638 8671
Treasurer: Peter Waters 09-534 5616
Life Members: Dave Anderson, Patricia Perratt,
Len Trotman, Patricia Sweeney,
Peter Waters
Scientific Officer: Peter Waters 09-534 5616
Librarian: Noelene Ritson 09-625 8114
Committee: Graeme Barclay 09-817 4153
Lester Ching 09-576 4595
David Cowie 09-630 8220
Chris Paterson 09-625 6707
Editor: Murray Mathieson 09-418 0366
OFFICERS
MEMBERSHIP SUBSCRIPTION
New Zealand:
Ordinary membership NZ $35.00 ($5.00 discount if paid before the end of February).
Dual membership (same household) NZ $45.00 ($5.00 discount also applies as above).
Overseas:
NZD $45.00. Send all payments to the Treasurer, Peter Waters, 22 Half Moon Rise, Half Moon Bay,
Auckland 2012.
CORRESPONDENCE
All general correspondence should be sent to the Secretary, Bromeliad Society of New Zealand,
P.O. Box 108-168, Symonds Street, Auckland, New Zealand. The opinions expressed in letters or
articles in the Journal are the contributors' own views and do not necessarily express the views or
policy of the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand Inc.
BROMELIAD JOURNAL
Deadline:
For all editorial and advertising, the first
Tuesday of publication month
Editorial Committee
Dave Anderson
Murray Mathieson
Peter Waters
Regular Writers
Andrew Devonshire
Graeme Barclay
John and Agatha Lambert
Production
Murray Mathieson
Distribution
Dave Anderson
All enquiries and contributions welcome, please
contact any member of the editorial committee
or send to Peter Waters, 22 Half Moon Rise,
Half Moon Bay, Auckland 2012 or email:
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Display Advertising
Rates are:
Full Page $60.00
Half Page $30.00
Quarter Page $15.00
'Buy & Swap'
Listings in 'Buy & Swap' are FREE for
members of the Society (max. 30 words).
For advertising enquiries and material, please
contact Murray Mathieson ph (09) 418 0366
or email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
I'd like to add to my
collection of 200+ species of
Tillandsias. Will send lists of
available and wanted ones.
Cor Schipper.
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
We will publish Buy or Swap notices from
members of the Society. Maximum 30 words.
Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or postto: 14 Matanui St, Northcote, North Shore City.
to prepare broms for competition so
convincingly that we all agreed to start
our 2013 Brom year with a competition
in February!
This was a very entertaining afternoon.
We not only learned heaps, but
members went home with unexpected
raffle prizes, and many unplanned
purchases.
Next Meeting: 16th September – a bus
trip to visit Tauranga gardens. This
is always a fabulous day away, and
visitors and new members are very
welcome. For further information
phone Sue Laurent 07-307 1323, Ross
Fergusson 07-312 5487, or Maureen
Moffatt 07-322 2276.
Hawke's Bay Bromeliad Group
– Julie Greenhill
A short housekeeping session started
our August meeting, with most of the
discussion centred around our day
trip to Gisborne in October. We are
also looking forward to having Poppy
Fuller speak to us in November and
we're sure this will be a real treat.
Like the rest of the country we have
had so much rain and everyone is
looking forward to some sunny spring
weather and getting out amongst our
bromeliads to depup and repot. To help
guide and refresh us as we go into this
new season Wade gave an informative
presentation regarding potting mixes
and the ingredient choices available,
their properties and his preferences.
Hawke's Bay does not seem to have
perlite available, something we would
like to try in our mixes if we could
access it. Wade also spoke about
fertilising alternatives and his personal
practice of regular foliage feeding.
Competition:
Flowering: 1st Dyckia brevifolia –
Julie Greenhill, 2nd equal Nidularium
fulgens – Yvonne Richardson,
Aechmea pineliana – Margaret Bluck.
Non-Flowering: 1st Neoregelia
'Predator' – Bill Young, Neoregelia
'Fosperior Perfection' – Denise
Dreaver, 3rd Neoregelia 'Highway
Beauty' – Margaret Bluck.
Tillandsias: 1st Tillandsia aeranthos
– Denise Dreaver, 2nd Tillandsia
leonamiana- – Pieter Franklin.
Miniatures: 1st Neoregelia ampullacea
– Denise Dreaver, Aechmea recurvata
– Yvonne Richardson, 3rd Neoregelia
'Cat Call' – Julie Greenhill.
Next Meeting: September 23rd at
St Johns Hall, Taradale 2pm.
Discussion and workshop – Removing
pups, especially difficult ones.
18 19

by Graeme Barclay by Graeme Barclay
This month we feature a small plant with a big reputation.

Neoregelia 'Blushing Tiger'

Neoregelia 'Blushing Tiger' is a
medium sized hybrid – bred by
well known hybridiser Lisa Vinzant
of Hawaii in 1996, released at the
BSI Conference in 1998, and first
imported into New Zealand in 2004

– so it's a relatively recent classic.
The parents are Neoregelia carolinae
'Perfecta' x ('Marnier-Lapostolle'
F2), with the latter being a second
generation (F2) hybrid between the
Neoregelia 'Blushing Tiger' – blushing at
flowering. Photo: Graeme Barclay

two species ampullacea and zonata.
This pollen parent was a dark, heavily
banded specimen, also grown by Lisa
from self-set seed from 'Marnier-
Lapostolle'.

From the resultant seedlings of the
grex, only one of many developed
prominent banding, no doubt due to
the 'Marnier-Lapostolle' genes. The
seedling was then nurtured through to
flowering, where it developed a dark
pinkish-red centre blush, obviously

this time from the carolinae genes

– hence the name 'Blushing Tiger'
was born. This great looking hybrid
is yet another fabulous example
how two entirely different looking
plants -with three species involved
in the ancestry – have combined
to produce a stunning prodigy.
As with many neos, 'Blushing Tiger'
can look different when grown under
varying conditions. It grows to around
30cm diameter and must be given
high levels of light and warmth to
accentuate the crimson zonations and
contrast these bandings well on both
sides of the bronze-golden coloured
leaves. Not enough light and the leaves
tend more green, can become strappy
and some of the banding can be lost.
Other great features are a fast growth
habit and ability to 'pup' profusely,
especially if well fed around and
after flowering. It's ideal for growing
in clumps, feature pots or using to
fill small, sunny spots in the garden
beneath larger broms and shrubs.
Also, like its father ('Marnier-
Lapostolle'), 'Blushing Tiger'
readily sets its own seed (known as
a 'selfer') and is an interesting brom
for beginner hybridisers to try sowing
seed from. Many of the seedlings
will also be zonated and look quite
similar to 'Blushing Tiger', though
this second F2 generation tends to lose
the blushing feature at flowering. One
of these F2 seedlings has since also
been registered by Lisa Vinzant as
Neoregelia 'Unblushing Tiger'.

 

 OCTOBER 2012
VOL 52 NO 10
Vriesea philippo-coburgii.
Photo: John Lambert
OCTOBER 2012
VOL 52 NO 10
Vriesea philippo-coburgii.
Photo: John Lambert
• Vrieseas grow well on trees
• Tillandsias struggle on the 'high wire'

Sunday, 4th November
at Totara Waters
from 10:00am
DON'T MISS THIS ANNUAL EVENT!
Come and spend a day at TOTARA WATERS.
Bring a picnic lunch and enjoy a sausage from the BBQ.
Sausages, coffee and tea provided free.
* Workshops * Lots of plants for sale* Auction – including new release plants
Bring a friend, have a great day!
89 Totara Road, Whenuapai, Waitekere City
Phone: 416 8272 Fax: 416 8062
www.totarawaters.co.nz
Presented by Totara Waters in association with the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand
BROMS
in the PARK
2012
Sunday, 4th November
at Totara Waters
from 10:00am
DON'T MISS THIS ANNUAL EVENT!
Come and spend a day at TOTARA WATERS.
Bring a picnic lunch and enjoy a sausage from the BBQ.
Sausages, coffee and tea provided free.
* Workshops * Lots of plants for sale* Auction – including new release plants
Bring a friend, have a great day!
89 Totara Road, Whenuapai, Waitekere City
Phone: 416 8272 Fax: 416 8062
www.totarawaters.co.nz
Presented by Totara Waters in association with the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand
BROMS
in the PARK
2012

Bromeliad Society of New Zealand Inc
Bromeliad Journal – October 2012 issue
CONTENTS
'Broms in the Park' – Sunday November 4th 2
President's Page – Jocelyn Coyle 4
Bromeliad Society September meeting news – Graeme Barclay 5
'Cool Broms' conference update 6
New hybrids in New Zealand – Andrew Devonshire 7
The hazards of life on the high wire – John Barrat 8
Report on the World Bromeliad Conference – Dave Anderson 11
Vrieseas grow well on trees – JAGA 12
Society officers, subs and Journal directory 15
Group News 16
Classic Brom Corner – Graeme Barclay 20

The opinions expressed in articles or letters in this Journal are the contributors' own views and
do not necessarily express the views or the policy of the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand

COMING EVENTS

Please see the the Group News section starting on page 16 for details of group

meeting times and venues.

OCTOBER
23rd Society monthly meeting at
Greyfriar's Hall, corner of Mt Eden
and Windmill roads, starting at 7.30pm.
Monthly choice competition: Plants
with red spots. There will be a talk with
photos about the BSI World conference,
held in Orlando, USA in September.
28th Hawkes Bay Group meeting

NOVEMBER

4th

'Broms in the Park' at Totara
Waters, Whenuapai

4th

South Auckland Group Sale and
Display
14th Bay of Plenty Group meeting
18th Eastern Bay of Plenty Group
Christmas luncheon
18th Society Garden Ramble to south
Auckland gardens – see page 4 for
details
21st Bay of Plenty Group garden visits
26th Society monthly meeting at
Greyfriar's Hall, corner of Mt Eden
and Windmill roads starting at 7.30pm.
Monthly choice competition: Christmas
arrangements. Annual plant auction and
Christmas supper (please bring a plate).

FRONT COVER: Clumps of Vriesea philippo-coburgii look right 'at home' on
John and Agatha Lambert's flowering Kowhai. Their interesting article, and photos,
about growing vrieseas on trees starts on page 12.

PRESIDENT'S PAGE

Has anyone got the 'Spring Fever'
yet? I just wish the wind would
go away, I am forever picking up
plant debris off the garden and driveway.
We have been without our ride-on mower
now for about three weeks so the lawns
are looking like we need to get a herd of
goats in to do their thing. I hope we get it
back soon otherwise we will be making
hay. It is amazing the difference it makes
when the grass is cut.

Did you all enjoy Lester's presentation
on tillandsias from Argentina at our
September meeting? I enjoyed it and
found it really interesting to see the
photos of the different tillandsia flowers
that related to the plants he was talking
about. Thanks Lester.

There will be pots, labels and fertiliser
available at the October meeting so if
this is what you need at present maybe
pop some extra money in your pocket.

A big thank you to everyone who helped
out at the Spring Sale. Many hands make
light work.

If you were awarded a trophy at the end
of 2011 could you please return it this
month.

Peter Waters will be sharing his
experiences from the BSI world
conference in Orlando with us on
Tuesday night so please come along on
October 23 and enjoy our meeting.

Looking ahead to our November
meeting – we'll be running our annual
plant auction. We're looking for
good quality / unusual plants. If you
can help please contact Peter Waters
Tel: 534 5616.

Cheers,

Jocelyn

SUNDAy 18TH NOVEMBEr
(Please note correct date – we had it wrong in in the September Journal)
• Gardenza – David Blundell
450 Glenbrook Beach Rd,
near Waiuku.
Cost – gold coin donation
David is also hosting a Hospice
weekend so please tell the
person on the gate that you
are from the Bromeliad Society.
• Judy Graham
10 Pono Place (off Waitoa Rd,
off Sandspit Rd), Waiuku.
• Ann & Graham Thompson
263 Ponsford Road, (off Awhitu
Rd), Te Toro. Cost $5.00. If you
wish to bring lunch we can
have it in this garden. Please
try to be there at 12.00pm.

Bromeliad Society
September Meeting News – Graeme Barclay

Our president Jocelyn welcomed
everyone and reminded the
meeting of our upcoming
Spring Sale in mid October. If
members could please bring along
any spare pups or unwanted broms to
donate to the conference table – and
also any banana or fruit boxes etc to
add to the pile for purchasers to take,
that would be much appreciated.
Jocelyn also mentioned we have some
new medium sized, shiny black pots
arriving soon that are well priced and
will be available for sale to members
at upcoming meetings.

'Show and Tell' broms were sparse
in September. The only plants bought
in were a nice clump of a Tillandsia
aeranthos hybrid, displaying and
explaining an unusual flowering habit
of very "low down" flowers amongst
the clump that is not often seen. Lastly,
a terrestrial plant (possibly a Dyckia or
Orthophytum species) was also bought
for identification, but it was decided
in the absence of Peter Waters to wait
until next month to try and tackle that
one!

Lester Ching followed with a very
interesting talk on Tillandsia species
from Argentina. He bought in
quite a number of specimens from
his collection and explained their
differences, growth characteristics and
localities in habitat. Several members
participated in discussions on
various plants, which created a most
informative talk for those growing

grey leaved Tillandsia.

Before supper we had a power point
presentation from the ladies from a
new company called Hanging Gardens
(www.hanginggardens.co.nz). They
brought along photos and samples of
their green and charcoal fabric plant
holders, which are designed to mount
on any vertical wall or fence and allow
plants to grow in a vertical space.

Carole Roberts won the special raffle
prize – a nice green Neoregelia 'Garden
Goddess'. This month the door prizes
went to Ross Walker (again!), John
Mitchell and Win Shorrock.

COMPETITIONS
Open Flowering: First was Peter
Coyle, with Tillandsia 'Wildfire' that
had many red flower spikes and looked
stunning – this was also deservedly
voted plant of the month. Second was
David Goss with Aechmea orlandiana
(dark form) – a large clump of
different sized plants, showing great
leaf colour and form after the Winter
months. Also in the competition were
Vriesea 'Hunua Orange Rocket';
Dyckia marnier-lapostollei x 'Silver
King' and three specimens of Aechmea
'Aztec Gold' that looked brilliant with
their red and orange flowering foliage.

Open Foliage: Judy Graham was
first with Neoregelia 'Rosy Morn'
x 'Lambert's Pride' – a very large,
speckled and well coloured hybrid

Cont'd P6

Registrations for our March 2013 Australasian conference are already
over 160 and still almost five months to go. We will be welcoming
bromeliad lovers from South Africa, USA, Ecuador, Brazil, Singapore
and of course Australia and New Zealand.
Don't forget – register before December 31st 2012 and the
conference fee is $280. register after this date and it will be $300.
To check out conference programme and speakers and/or to register
go to our website: www.bsnz.org or email us at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Registrations for our March 2013 Australasian conference are already
over 160 and still almost five months to go. We will be welcoming
bromeliad lovers from South Africa, USA, Ecuador, Brazil, Singapore
and of course Australia and New Zealand.
Don't forget – register before December 31st 2012 and the
conference fee is $280. register after this date and it will be $300.
To check out conference programme and speakers and/or to register
go to our website: www.bsnz.org or email us at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Cont'd from P5 – September Meeting News

that was bred by Gerry Stansfield.
Second was Peter Coyle with a new
Neoregelia 'Gold Explosion' which is
a Margaret Paterson hybrid that was
recently imported. In the competition
were Neoregelia 'Milagro'; Vriesea
'Gold Curls', 'Hunua Purple Haze'
and 'Dark Knight' x 'Snowman'.

Tillandsia: Lester Ching's mounted
flowering clump of Tillandsia 'Strictly
Bourgeoise'was first with second going
to Lynette Nash's Tillandsia ionantha
'Druid', with its unusual yellow tinged
foliage Also on the table were Tillandsia
'Pink Cascade', caerulea, ionantha,
mitlaensis, scaposa, tenuiflora and
another example of the Andrew
Flower hybrid, 'Strictly Bourgeoise'.

Neoregelia: First was Peter Coyle
with Neoregelia 'Jewellery Shop' x
('Avalon x 'Fireball') and Peter was
also second with Neoregelia 'Roseo

Striata' x 'Maya' – both are nicely
coloured new hybrids from crosses
he has recently made. The only
other plant in the competition was
Neoregelia 'Vivacor'x ('Roseo Striata'
x concentrica)... Now that spring is
here, let's have some more neos on
display for our October meeting !

Plant of the month: Tillandsia
aeranthos and bergeri: First was
Judy Graham with a nice clump of
aeranthos, whilst second went to Win
Shorrock, also with a nicely coloured,
large clump of bergeri. The only other
entry in the competition was a clump
of a bergeri hybrid.

The Plant of the Month went to Peter
Coyle with Tillandsia 'Wildfire'.
Congratulations to all the winners.

23rd

NEXT MEETING: Tuesday
October.

UPDATE...

This month we feature a couple of my recently registered neoregelia hybrids.

I have always been fascinated by
the banded (zonated) neoregelia
hybrids, so these plants have been
a focus in my hybridising. Creating
a nice banded hybrid that is different
to what's already available is not an
easy task. Firstly it seems that when
these banded neoregelias are used
in hybridising, they have a default
setting that produces mainly spotted
(maculated) hybrids. Secondly there
are many well known banded plants
already in circulation, so to consider
naming, and registering a new one,
it has to stand out. Here are two that
have been selected from hundreds of
hybrids.

Neoregelia 'Havana' is a hybrid
of 'Punctate' and 'Clarise'. It has
developed very nice form, with a full
rosette of leaves, plus the attractive
banding. The name 'Havana' comes
from one of my favourite brands
of coffee. Havana Coffee Works is
located in Wellington, and they send
their coffee nationwide. Their catch
phrase is "Coffee U feel" and it really
is!

Neoregelia 'Altura' continues the
coffee naming theme, being named
after another favourite coffee brand,
and Altura is also Spanish for 'highest'.
This is a small hybrid, with the parents
of 'Wee Willy' and 'Blushing Tiger'.
In high light the plant develops lime

Neoregelia 'Havana'

Neoregelia 'Altura'

green leaves, overlaid with bright brick
red bands and splashes which give it a
distinctive appearance.

Hazards of life on the high wire...

– John Barrat
Reprinted from the September, 2010 issue of SMITHSONIAN SCIENCE
published by the Smithsonian Institution, as first reprinted in the May/June 2012
issue of SEMBS, Bulletin of the Southeastern Michigan Bromeliad Society.

A common epiphytic plant that conducting a high-wire act in Panama.
pulls the nutrients it needs to Wind-born seeds of the bromeliad
live out of thin air has been Tillandsia flexuosa have long been

Tillandsia flexuosa growing on electrical cables inPanama. Note bird on top wire. Photos: Gerhard Zotz
Tillandsia recurvata on telephone poles, Brazil. From BSI Bulletin V. 4

lodging, sprouting and appearing to
thrive in the grooves of aluminum-
wire wrapped electric power lines.
These plants grow unprotected in
the blazing tropical sun using a thick
layer of water and nutrient-absorbing
scales to pull sustenance from the air.
Their roots hold them fast to the cable
margin.

The botanists take a closer look...

Recently, botanists Gerhard Zotz of
the Smithsonian Tropical Research
Institute and Stefan Wester of the
University of Oldenburg in Germany
decided to take a closer look at these
high-wire bromeliads. They were
interested to find out how the growth
and survival rates of these plants on
electrical cables compared to the
growth and survival of plants of the
same species growing in trees–their
natural environment. During a two-
year study the pair surveyed some
1,400 T. flexuosa specimens living on
1250 meters of electrical cable, as well
as nearby plants of the same species
growing on tree limbs. The cables
were 8.25 millimeters in diameter and
consisted of multiple aluminum wires
woven around a single steel cable,
giving them a rough surface upon which
the seeds and plants can cling. Before
their study the scientists observed that
most of the cable-growing T. flexuosa
lived on cables near roads, leading
them to theorize that the dust kicked-
up by cars and other vehicles provided
adequate nutrients for the plants to
flourish.

A hostile environment...

Although the high-wire T.flexuosa
appeared to be thriving, Sotz and
Webster found the cables were actually
a hostile environment for the plants. T.
flexuosa on power lines grew slowly,
suffered a high mortality rate and were
not very successful in establishing new
recruits. On electric cables the death of
established plants greatly exceeded the
recruitment of new plants from seeds.

For these bromeliads the primary
problem with cable-life, the scientists
found is a lack of water. While
individuals growing on both cables
and trees utilize rainwater, the zero
water-absorbing properties of an
aluminum cable combined with greater
exposure to the sun and wind, make
cable life for bromeliads highly risky.
Even though dust from cars should
provide an abundance of nutrients to
the cable-living bromeliads, lack of
water prevented them from taking
advantage of this benefit. In addition,
the scientists found that even though
the cables had a rough surface, the
plants had a difficult time anchoring
themselves to the cable. Many of the
plants disappeared during the course of
the study, dislodged from the cables by
wind and other natural forces.

The study, the first to examine the
growth and survival of electric-cable
growing bromeliads, was published
recently in the Journal of Tropical
Ecology.

I'd like to add to my
collection of 200+ species
of Tillandsias. Will send lists
of available and wanted ones.

Cor Schipperemail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Wanted to buy for a
New Plymouth garden.
One Vriesea 'Kiwi Cream'.

Phone Graham
on 298 3479

We will publish Buy or Swap notices from
members of the Society. Maximum 30 words.
Email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or postto: 14 Matanui St, Northcote, North Shore City.

10

Update from the 20th BSI World
Conference in Orlando – Dave Anderson

The 20th BSI World Conference
was hosted by the Florida
Council of Bromeliad Societies

1st

– September 24th to October .
Betsy McCrory and her conference
committee organised a most
pleasurable and memorable event. It
was very much the friendly conference
and such a pleasure to renew old
acquaintances and friendships with
BSI members from many parts of the
globe.
The Convention Centre at the Caribe
Royale Hotel was a perfect venue. The
rooms were huge which catered well
for the crowded lectures; the bromeliad
competition: the displays and the
sales area. The latter was hosted in a
custom built marquee that was massive

– so large that the area never looked
crowded. It was only when queuing
to pay that you realised how big the
venue was.
We had an afternoon visiting three
local 'yards', (or gardens as we know
them). Thanks to Steve and Tina;
Steven Wagner and Lisa Robinette
who not only opened their gardens
but also provided drinks and fruit that
was most welcome in the heat of the
Florida afternoon.

The displays looked quite impressive.
Of particular note was a display
along the main corridor that had as its
focal point a Tillandsia krukoffiana
in full flower. This dark leaved plant
was approximately 1.8m across and
1.5m high with a flower spike some

2m in height. It is one of those very
large tillandsias and I even heard
some confused people asking which
alcantarea it was not knowing that there
are some very big tillandsia species.
Bordering this display were 20 to 30
plants of the hybrid Billbergia 'Poquito
Mas' – ('Fantasia' x 'Poquito Blanco')
that looked a picture. The nursery had
selectively bred it so that these plants
were double the usual size. Another
display that really caught my eye was
one that had Orlando as its theme. On
display were many different cultivars
of Aechmea orlandiana - hybrids that
had orlandiana, 'Bert' and fosteriana
in their parentage. The plants thrive in
the climate of Orlando and formed a
very colourful grouping.

The lectures were of a high quality.
As Joan and I had just returned from
a tour of south eastern Mexico I was
most impressed by Andy Siekkinen's
talk on the genus Hechtia that only
grow in Mexico. These plants are
very prickly with many people finding
them unfriendly but the photos of them
growing in their natural habitat were
stunning.

There will be photos and a talk about
the conference at our Society's October
monthly meeting.

The next BSI World Conference is
to be held in Hawaii in 2014. No
doubt this will be another wonderful
event. Do refer to the BSI website
www.bsi.org

Vrieseas grow well on trees

– Article and photos by Jaga
The weather has been very wet
and very windy through winter
but we know spring is here when
our kowhai trees come into bloom. On
one of these we attached three separate
Vriesea philippo-coburgii five years
ago. We picked this plant as we had
seen numerous photos of this tough
species growing in their natural habitat
in trees in Brazil and were curious to
see how they would go. As you can see
from the photos, they have gone crazy!
I'm picking it's the original three
plants that are now the ones flowing.
It is also a treat to see tuis attracted to
the nectar.

Almost all bromeliads will grow in
trees that do not have loose or peeling
bark, but bigger bromeliads end up
being a large target for the wind if
they're not in a very sheltered location.
In our case there has been considerable
brom losses. The kowhai with the
brom plants faces the north east and
cops the easterly storms off the sea
so even though we tied the broms on
with rope, to start with we did not have
high hopes they would last long. How
wrong we were!

Vrieseas on the whole tend to cope
better with our conditions and have
been the star genus in our trees. For

anyone wanting to try here's a few
tips from our trials. We use only the
larger pups and only once they have
developed an aerial root system. To
achieve this we treat the pup base with
flowers of sulphur and place in a large
plant pot half-filled with scoria. Then
we fill with broken polystyrene. Once
the roots start, we lift the plant clear
of the scoria so the roots sit in the
polystyrene. This promotes aerial root
growth. We take the plant and select a
spot on a branch or trunk where a brom
may grow naturally and with vrieseas
its not a good idea to nail or staple
them on as your just split the base. We
use cheap nylon garden twine or strips
of fabric and tie them on as tightly as
possible with the roots against the tree
bark.

If you start this process now, by the
end of summer the roots should be
firmly attached and the twine can be
removed. You will need a good ladder
that has its legs on level, stable ground.
Always remember – safety first. It's
best to place the top plant first and
work your way downwards if you
are planning a lot of plants. There are
plenty of vrieseas worth trying and
we're showing you a few that we have
used.

Vrieseas grow well on trees...

Tuis love kowhai trees in flower but this bird seems to prefer the bromeliad!

Vriesea hybrid pup with aerial roots,
all ready for a home.
Vriesea olmosana var pachamamae.
It has been on this branch since 2008.

More on P14 13

Cont'd from P13 – Vrieseas grow well on trees

Vriesea hybrid, again on a tree fern,
mounted three years ago.

Vriesea 'Fire Comet'. This is an Andrew
Maloy hybrid and it has been on this treesince 2011. We left it a little long before

Vriesea hybrid residing on a tree fern.

removing the tie and have noticed theroots have grown around it so we will justlet the tie rot out.

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Len Trotman, Patricia Sweeney,
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Auckland 2012.

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P.O. Box 108-168, Symonds Street, Auckland, New Zealand. The opinions expressed in letters or
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policy of the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand Inc.
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Group News

Bay of Plenty Bromeliad Group

– Jo Elder
Jo Elder welcomed members to the
September meeting as president Lynley
Breeze was away.

With spring being here and the time
for removing and potting of bromeliad
plants and pups being just around the
corner, Barry Jones spoke about the
correct size of pups for removal and the
preparation of those pups for potting up.
There is often a temptation to remove
pups too soon which delays healthy
strong growth. Barry had brought along
a number of plants and was able to
demonstrate the size of pups suitable for
removal.

Roger Allan spoke about shade houses
and shelters and the advantages of
growing plants under cover. He had
brought along several types of shade
cloth and explained the different density
of shade, colour and weave of the cloth.
Roger also spoke about the height of the

structure with a good circulation of air
being important. Very good automatic
watering systems are also an advantage

Hawke's Bay Bromeliad Group
during the summer months.

While we had Roger in front of our
members we asked him to auction a
book, and two plants, well done Roger.
Jo Elder gave a short talk on the Aechmea
genera.

Plant of the month – Aechmea: On the
table were, recurvata 'Tokuri', 'Bert',
'Kiwi', 'Black Jack', 'Mirlo', correiaaraujoi,
orlandiana, 'Mellow Yellow',
flavorosea and many others.

1st

Competition Novice section:

Vriesea gigantea, Maisie Kokshoorn,
2nd Alcantarea vinicolor, Doris Shea, 3rd
Neoregelia not identified, Doris Shea.
Also on the table, Nidularium 'Litmus'

1st

Competition: Neoregelia 'Hot
Gossip, 'Graeme Alabaster, 2nd Aechmea
orlandiana, Gill Keesing, 3rd Neoregelia
'Magnifica' x 'Painted Lady ', Barry
Jones.

1st

Tillandsia: equal, T. ionantha
'Mexico', Bertha Schollum, T. scaposa,

2nd

Audrey Hewson, T. 'Montana',

3rd

Audrey Hewson, T geminiflora,
Jo Elder. Also tabled, T. recurvifolia,
tectorum, ionantha var ionantha,
straminea x cacticola.

Next Meeting: 14th November at
TYPB clubrooms Sulphur Point at
12.30pm.Plant of the month, 'Variegated
Bromeliads' and Roger Allan will speak
about plant propagation methods.

Garden visits: 21st November at 10am,

1. Sharon Foxon, 37 Te Hono St.
Maungatapu, 2. Anne Stacey Te Watai
St. Maungatapu.
– Julie Greenhill
It was lovely to see a few 'old faces'
again at our meeting. We tried a
slightly different format and started
with our 'Show and Tell' and plant
judging. A local orchid supplier has
some interesting containers suitable for
growing bromeliads as well as a great
little mister or sprayer that fits onto a soft
drink bottle.

Final arrangements were discussed for
our day trip to Gisborne followed by a

demonstration on how to remove pups.
Some more difficult vriesea specimens
were used as examples and it was
interesting to hear growers' different
viewpoints on how long the pup should
be left to harden before potting up.

Competition
Flowering: 1st x Neomea ' Strawberry'

– Daniel Franklin, 2nd equal Quesnelia
imbricata – Noel Newman, Aechmea
'Pie in the Sky' – Yvonne Richardson,
Aechmea 'Tokuri' – Julie Greenhill, 3rd
Nidularium fulgens – Pieter Franklin
1st

Non-Flowering: Neoregelia 'van
Dorme' – Wade Smith, 2nd equal
Neoregelia 'Shadow'– Margaret Bluck,
Vriesea 'Jewel' hybrid –Julie Greenhill,

3rd

Neoregelia 'Scarlet Charlotte' –
Pieter Franklin
Miniatures: Neoregelia 'Red Bird' –
Julie Greenhill, 2nd Neoregelia 'Tiger

3rd

Cub' – Wade Smith, Neoregelia
'Gorian' – Denise Dreaver
Tillandsia: 1st latifolia var. divaricata

– Pieter Franklin, 2nd unnamed – Denise
Members showed off their 'Broms in
Unusual Containers'. There were some
very inventive displays. We don't have
competitions – but if we did, my vote
would go to Norma Cook who brought in
her mailbox studded all over with broms.

For those members who are coming
on our trip to Thames on Sunday
11th November the bus will leave the
Auckland Botanic Gardens at 8.15 am;
the Jolly Farmer Drury at 8:30am and
the Caltex Service Station, Bombay at

8:45 am. Morning Tea and Lunch will be
provided by the Thames Group but you
may wish to bring along something to
drink and nibbles for the afternoon.
The raffles were won by Jill Marshall,
Roy Morton and Jim Laughton.

Our Famous Annual Sale and Display

will be held at the Auckland Botanic
Gardens, 102 Hill Road, Manurewa on
Sunday, 4th November 2012. It starts at
9am – see you there.

Dreaver

Next Meeting: October 28th – Instead of
a meeting we will be making a day trip to Orchid Group – Eunice Silvester
Gisborne to visit Justin Swan (bromeliad
grower) together with another couple of During September, 27 of our Eastern
gardens. Bay of Plenty bromeliad stalwarts

Eastern Bay of Plenty Bromeliad and
South Auckland Bromeliad Group
rumbled and bumped our way to Te Puke
and Tauranga in a steamed-up school
bus. Regardless of the very wet day

– Marion Morton
Parking was very much at a premium
at the Botanic Gardens for our October
meeting. We had a larger crowd than
usual and after a cold windy morning,
the sun came out.
A special afternoon tea was provided to
welcome Graham West back after his
absence.

and even though we were not travelling
in our usual comfortable bus, we had a
great day. First stop in Te Puke was the
artistic garden and studio of Pat and
Ron Howie. This was a real collector's
garden with lots of unusual trees, shrubs
and climbers, many of them from South
Africa, displayed very creatively and
often with little bird sculptures amongst
the branches and foliage. An unexpected

Cont'd P18 17

Cont'd from P17 – Group News

bonus was Pat's studio where there were
many colourful acrylic paintings.

Then we reluctantly climbed back into
our own mobile steamed-up hothouse
and set off for 'Trees and More' Nursery
which was the former Aztec garden

centre in Pyes Pa Rd. The current owners
previously developed Aztec 12 years
ago, sold, then recently repurchased it.
It's thriving back under their ownership.
We enjoyed their selection of bromeliads
and palms, and a wonderful display of
well-placed pots.

After a delicious lunch, accompanied
by live music at Palmer's garden centre,
we visited the extensive gardens and
glasshouse of Eric and Vorrie Jones.
Unfortunately it was really raining, but
the sweeping driveways were glistening
with water which created amazing
reflections and resulted in some great
photos.

An unexpected stop at 'Grower Direct'
in Te Puna allowed for some frenzied
buying of plants and many decisions
to return later, as they had a stunning
selection of very reasonably priced pots
in vibrant new colours and designs.

The finale to a very enjoyable day was a
revisit to Jean and Duncan Richardson's
garden in Omokoroa. This garden is
maturing into a very colourful and
interesting property, with a stunning
display of cactus, and also of bromeliads,
among many other trees and plants
of interest. Our thanks go to Jean who
selects the gardens for us to visit in the
western Bay of Plenty and ensures we
always have a fantastic outing.

Next meeting: Our Christmas Luncheon
at Sue and Ken Laurent's garden in

Whakatane on 18th November. Please
bring a plate for a shared lunch, and get
creative for our popular Christmas Hat
Competition.Visitors and new members
welcome.For further information contact
Maureen 07-322 2276, Sue 07-307 1323,
or Ross 07-312 5487.

Thames Valley Bromeliad Group
– Kay Steen
Our Bromeliad group had thought about
having a show for some time, however it
was difficult to decide when and where to
have it. Then the Orchid Group decided
they needed more members and the ideal
way to do that was to have a display. The
upshot was that both groups got together
and a display was born.

Each group had people with special
skills and we utilised them all for the
event. Kate is our floral artist, so with her
talents and the talents of her helpers the
planning began. We had guzmanias and
nidulariums kindly donated by Gellerts
and their flowers were a dazzling display
against the plain wall.

Friday, 21st September dawned, and the
amount of bromeliads that arrived in the
hall was amazing. I thought there would
be no way we could utilize them all, but
we did! It was colourful, entertaining,
and interesting, and many of the public
made use of the chairs to just simply sit
and admire the sight. From the back of
the hall the comments were very positive
and the gasp of delight as the public
entered the hall was joy to our ears.

Tuckers Orchids, who have a personal
connection to our group, supported
the orchid side with a donation of two
beautiful Phalaenopsis (Moth Orchid),

Bromeliads and orchids star at the Thames
Valley Group's display.

and one Paphiopedilum (Slipper Orchid),
for one of the raffles, sales of their own
plants, and they also had a display. The
bromeliads that Don brought down were
an absolute favourite for buyers.

Congratulations to both groups for a
very successful event and special thanks
to those who donated time, plants, and
their best efforts to make this a truly
memorable day.

North Bromeliad Group
– Erin Titmus
The Far North Bromeliad Group joined
with the Bay of Islands Orchid Society
for the third time to put on a stunning
show / display at the Turner Centre.
The new plaza area provided a spacious
venue with good natural light to show off
our colourful plants.

Over 120 bromeliads were judged by Don
Brown and David Brewer and, although
entries were slightly down in numbers,
the quality of plants was excellent.
Competition was close with 17 members
taking home prize certificates. Wendy
Matthews won 'Best in Show' with her

stand-out exhibit, Aechmea nudicaulis
var. aequalis and Jacqui O'Connell won
the 'Most Points in Show' award.

Winners of Classes:

Aechmea: Deb Dozzi – A. caudata
Billbergia: Colleen Pyne – B. 'Hallelujah'
Guzmania: Jacqui O'Connell –

G. 'Ostara'
Miniatures: Dot Leaning – N. pauciflora
Neoregelia: Elaine Wright – N. 'Manoa
Beauty'
Tillandsia: Wendy Matthews –
(unidentified)
Vriesea: Peter Scahill – V. gigantea x V.
'Nova'
Other Species: Dot Leaning – C. 'Dusk'
Novice Foliage: Richard Sherwood –
V. 'Nova Queen'
Decorative Container Plant: Wendy
Matthews – A. nudicaulis var. aequalis
Artistic Arrangement: Sandy Wright –
'Beach to Bark'
Best in Show: Wendy Matthews –
A. nudicaulis var. aequalis
Most Points Overall: Jacqui O'Connell
'Best in Show' in the Far North: Wendy
Matthews' Aechmea nudicaulis var.
aequalis

by Graeme Barclay by Graeme Barclay
This month we look at a famous Tillandsia hybrid that is a 'show stopper' when

in flower.

Tillandsia 'Wildfire'

Tillandsia 'Wildfire' was created
33 years ago by American hybridist
John Arden in Southern California
in 1979. Its parentage formula
is two Central American species
Tillandsia multicaulis x Tillandsia
deppeana, which are two quite similar
looking green-leaved tillandsias
that produce numerous striking
red/orange upright inflorescence
spikes when they come into flower.
John Arden says the entire grex were
identical, due to the primary cross
between two species producing
negligible difference between

Tillandsia 'Wildfire' – photo by Peter Coyle

offspring, which is often the case
when crossing true species. Thus
no selection was made and the
entire grex was named 'Wildfire'
with reference to the multiple coral
red flower scapes that certainly
do mimic flames from a bush fire.

John also says when it flowers one
should expect 21 flower spikes (or
sometimes more) if it is enjoying
ideal growing conditions. Less than
this number, something is wrong or
the climate is not the best for it. It is
very hardy and can grow to around 6070cm
diameter and up to a metre high
when grown well. It should be ideally
situated outdoors in breezy, sunny
conditions with high humidity, where
the lime green leaves can turn reddish/
bronze around the edges, which really
sets the plant alight (excuse the pun!).

Like with most green leaved
tillandsias and vrieseas it will
normally produce multiple pups
around the base after flowering.

Tillandsia 'Wildfire'is a relatively easy
plant to grow in New Zealand. Simply
avoid the midday summer sun scorch
and winter frosts, feed it in Spring as
you would a vriesea and it will thrive
in our gardens and look stunning when
it finally flowers.

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