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2013

2013 Journals

January 2013 February 2013 March 2013 April 2013 May 2013 June 2013 July 2013 August 2013 September 2013 October 2013 November 2013

1Neoregelia 'Red River – photo by Peter Waters.
November 2013
VOL 53 NO 11
'Learning about the genera'... TillandsiaNeoregelia 'Red River – photo by Peter Waters.
November 2013
VOL 53 NO 11
'Learning about the genera'... Tillandsia

Another successful
'Broms in the Park'...

Sunday November 3rd at Totara
Waters in Whenuapai with hosts
Jocelyn and Peter Coyle. The
magic formula of stunning gardens,
beautiful bromeliads, good 'bromeliad
talk' and the opportunity to catch up
with friends worked a treat again and
a great day was enjoyed by all those
who attended.

We were particularly pleased to be
able to welcome many out of Auckland
bromeliad groups – thank you for
coming and adding so much to the
excitement and success of the day.
Here's a few photos taken by Peter
Coyle...

Aechmea blanchetiana, with its lovelycolour, is a standout plant.

Graeme Barclay with one of Peter Coyle's
new hybrids, Neoregelia 'Totara Hot As'.

. Members, Julia and Ross Walker, enjoy
a quiet moment.
One of many bromeliad gardens ondisplay.

Bromeliad Society of New Zealand Inc
Bromeliad Journal – November 2013 issue
CONTENTS
'Broms in the Park' 2013 – photos from Peter Coyle 2
President's Page – Jocelyn Coyle 4
Start planning for 'Fiesta' 2014 5
Bromeliad Society October meeting news – Dave Anderson 6
'Learning about the genera' – Dave Anderson on Tillandsia
8
Notes about 'Fiesta' trophies... what's coming up in early 2014 and
a 'thank you' from the editorial team 11
Hybridising... a personal journey – Andrew Devonshire 12
Far North Show results and photos – Erin Titmus 14
Society officers, subs and Journal directory 15
Group News 16
Spring Sale and Show photos – Dave Anderson 19
'Classic Brom corner' – Graeme Barclay 20

The opinions expressed in articles or letters in this Journal are the contributors' own views and
do not necessarily express the views or the policy of the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand

COMING EVENTS

Please see the Group News section starting on page 16 for details of group meeting

times and venues.

NOVEMBER
24th Eastern BOP Group meeting
24th Northland Group meeting
26th Society monthly meeting at
Greyfriar's Hall, corner of Mt Eden and
Windmill roads, starting at 7.30pm. The
Monthly Choice competition: 'Christmas
theme' bromeliad arrangement. There
will be a presentation of trophies won
during 2013, a special plant auction
and we will all enjoy our pre-Christmas
supper and social get-together. Please
remember to bring a plate!

DECEMBER

1st

South Auckland Group meeting
11th Bay of Plenty Group meeting,
Christmas lunch and garden visit

JANUARY
28th Society monthly meeting at
Greyfriar's Hall, corner of Mt Eden
and Windmill roads, starting at 7.30pm.
The Monthly Choice competition:
New Zealand hybrids. Karen Lowther,
manager of Eden Garden will be our
guest speaker.

FRONT COVER: Neoregelia
'Red River' is a hybrid made by Shane Zaghini. It
is the result of combining 'Marble Throat' with 'Yelllow Sand'. 'Yellow Sand' was
made by crossing 'Barbarian' with 'Gold Fever'. Neoregelia
'Red River' is arguably
the best of the 'Marble Throat' hybrids with a stunning array of colours when grown
in good light. Photo and notes by Peter Waters.

PRESIDENT'S PAGE

Well it's that time again when
the end of another year is
fast approaching and with all
the rain and warm sunshine everything
is just growing like crazy. What is it
that has caused all our alcantareas to
flower? We have about fifteen in the
garden that are all sending up flower
spikes. They will look impressive
over the summer months but will need
replacing after that and you never
seem to have good sized plants to
replace them with. A lot of our agaves
are also sending up flower spikes and
these plants are not so easy to replace
with those lovely spiky leaves.

'Broms in the Park' on Sunday 3rd was
another great day for our members and
friends. It was great to catch up with
friends who had travelled from out of
town to Totara Waters to join us for the
day. The auction went well with a few
people taking away plants that haven't
been available before.

I want to tell you a bit about 'The
Bromeliad Glade' at the well known
inner city Eden Garden. Back in the
early 1970s Peter Waters approached
Jack Clark (one of the Eden Garden
founders) about creating a glade of
bromeliads there. Members donated
plants and spent many hours designing
and planting that area of Eden Garden.

Over the years we have had working
bees to keep the garden up to scratch
until a few years ago when the
gardeners there took it over.

We have now been approached by the
Eden Garden Manager, Karen Lowther,
to give help and advice on how best to
rejuvenate and add new plants to 'The
Bromeliad Glade', and next year we
will be holding a few working bees
once again to improve this area. Karen
will be our guest speaker in January
to give us some of the history of Eden
Garden – a wonderful place to visit and
take in the surroundings. There is also
a great café there!

November 26th is our last Bromeliad
Society meeting for the year. Of
course it's also our special Christmas
meeting so, come on, get busy with
those Christmas arrangements. They
do seem to get better every year!

We will also be running our annual
plant auction so, if you have a plant
you would like to put in the auction,
please phone Peter Waters. The other
thing to remember please – is a plate
for supper. THANKS.

See you then.

Jocelyn

Tues
26
Nov
Our last society monthly meeting for 2013...


Special
Plant
Auction...
please
contact
Peter
Waters
if
you
wish
to
enter
a
plant

Bring
along
your
Christmas
arrangement
for
the
competition

And
please
remember
to
bring
a
plate
for
our
Christmas
supper

2014 Bromeliad
It's time to start planning
for our big show...
BROMELIAD SHOW & SALE
Saturday 22nd and Sunday 23rd February
Mt Eden War Memorial Hall
489 Dominion Road, Balmoral, Auckland
•Pleasestartselectingandpreparingyourplants•Plantsellers...pleasecontactpresidentJocelynCoyleassoonaspossibletodiscussyourspacerequirements.
Phone09-4168272.
•CompetitionrulesandclasseswillbepublishedinourJanuaryjournal2014 Bromeliad
It's time to start planning
for our big show...
BROMELIAD SHOW & SALE
Saturday 22nd and Sunday 23rd February
Mt Eden War Memorial Hall
489 Dominion Road, Balmoral, Auckland
•Pleasestartselectingandpreparingyourplants•Plantsellers...pleasecontactpresidentJocelynCoyleassoonaspossibletodiscussyourspacerequirements.
Phone09-4168272.
•CompetitionrulesandclasseswillbepublishedinourJanuaryjournal

Bromeliad Society October

Meeting News –
Notes
and
photos
by
Dave
Anderson

President Jocelyn welcomed
everyone and we discussed the
current business, starting with
the Spring Sale and Display which was
a great success. Thanks to everyone,
especially Noelene Ritson and Laura
Weber who put together another
magnificent display. The annual 'Broms
in the Park' will be held at Totara Waters
on the 3rd of November. The day will
start between 10.00 and 10.30 with a
midday lunch followed by the rare plant
auction. A main feature of the day will
be a display of bromeliad species. At the
November meeting we have the annual
auction of rare bromeliad plants that are
always sought after. Please contact Peter
Waters if you have a plant that you want
to put in the auction. At the end of the
evening we have our annual Christmas
supper so would everyone attending
please bring a plate. Jocelyn asked us to
start preparing our plants for the Fiesta
Show and Sale. This will be held on the
weekend of February 21st, 22nd and 23rd
next year at the Mt. Eden War Memorial
Hall.

Peter discussed the 'Show and Tell'
plants. First up for display was the
hybrid Aechmea
nudicaulis
'Frosty the
Snowman' with its parents Aechmea
nudicaulis
cv
'aequalis' and Aechmea
nudicaulis
'Silver Streak'. The hybrid
was made by Hawaiin hybridiser Lisa
Vinzant and has frosted green foliage as
the name suggests. Next and wanting a
name was a plant that has been around
for many years and thought to be
Aechmea
'Fosters Favorite' or one of
the many hybrids that have been made
from it. Lastly and also wanting a name
was a small grey tillandsia with the blue,

slightly crinkled petals that could be a
Tillandsia
bergeri
hybrid or alternatively
a Tillandsia
recurvifolia.

Hawi Winter then gave a PowerPoint
presentation showing photos from
the Werner Rauh Conservatory in
Heidelberg Germany.

John Muddiman won this month's raffle
prize. The door prizes went to Chris
Paterson, Diane Timmins and Barbara
Leeming.

COMPETITIONS

Open Flowering: First was Bev Ching
with xNeophytum
'Galactic Warrior'–
"A sport of xNeophytum
'Ralph Davis'

– In 1987 Dr. Tom Montgomery gave
Jimmy Antle a 'Ralph Davis' w/about
1/4 of its leaves showing variegation -
Antle worked at pupping the variegated
portion and 'Galactic Warrior' resulted
– a perfect white marginated cultivar
blushing red at blooming time and
carrying a red blush at all times in strong
light -will pup a high percentage of
stable duplicates." Michelle Tohi was
second with a xCanmea 'Wild Tiger'.
Also in the competition were
Aechmea
zebrina, nudicaulis
'Xavante'; Alcantarea
'Red Ensign';
Canistropsis
'Black'; Hohenbergia
correia-araujoi; Billbergia
'Muriel
Waterman'; Neoregelia
'Empress';
Vriesea
poenulata, 'White Lines', 'Red
Chestnut' x 'Lucky 13', 'Raspberry
Crush' x 'Vista', 'Coral Lord' and 'Kiwi
Delight F2' x 'Midnight Splendor'.
Open Foliage: First was Peter Waters
with Billbergia
'Raspberry Cheesecake'.
Second was Peter Coyle with Vriesea

'White Cloud' – "a white form of
erythrodactylon. Grown under the right
conditions the centre leaves are totally
white except for a black base. The other
leaves are green with generally faint
variegations."
In the competition were Aechmea
'Ensign'; Billbergia
'El Jefe'; xCanmea
hybrid – Aechmea
correia-araujoi
x
Canistrum
seed; Neoregelia
'Johannis
Rubra', carcharodon
'Rainbow' x
'Silver'; Vriesea
ospinae
var
gruberi
and 'Elysian' hybrid.
Tillandsia: Lynette Nash's Tillandsia
duratii
var
saxatilis
was first with second
also going to Lynette Nash's Tillandsia
recurvifolia
var.
subsecundifolia. There
were on the table Tillandsia
bulbosa,
carlsoniae,
fasciculata,
floribunda,
ixioides,
karwinskyana,
recurvifolia
(wrongly still named meridionalis), and
tenuifolia.
Neoregelia: Peter Coyle was first with
Neoregelia
'Pink Deb' – a very attractive
hybrid. Peter Waters was second with a
Neoregelia
'Bam'. In the competition
were Neoregelia
'Avon Ryan 195',
'Barbarian', 'Coppelia' x 'Black Tiger',
'Empress', 'Kings Ransom', 'Michie'
and 'Tiger Cub' x 'Regalia'.

Named Monthly Plant (Canistrum):

First was Alan Cliffe with a Canistrum
triangulare. Second was Diana Holt also
with a Canistrum
triangulare. In the
competition were Canistrum
fosterianum
(red form), alagoanum, auratum, and
auratum 'Vania Leme'.

The Plant of the Month Trophy went to
Lynette Nash with Tillandsia
duratii
var
saxatilis.

Congratulations to all the winners.
NEXT MEETING: Tuesday 26th
November. Please remember to bring a
plate for the Xmas supper.

xNeophytum 'Galactic Warrior'– First in
Open Flowering section (Bev Ching)

Billbergia'Raspberry Cheesecake' – First
in Open Foliage section (Peter Waters)

Vriesea'White Cloud' – Second in Open
Foliage section (Peter Coyle)

Neoregelia'Pink Deb' – First in Neoregelia
section (Peter Coyle)

Learning about the genera: Tillandsia
(green leafed)
–DaveAndersonLearning about the genera: Tillandsia
(green leafed)
–DaveAnderson
In our second article of the new series,
Dave Anderson tackles the prolific
Tillandsia genus. Because of the sheer
number of species in the genus, Dave
has opted to cover it with two articles

– this one is all about green leafed
tillandsias and a following article will
focus on the grey leafed plants.
Tillandsia deppeana
DAVe ANDeRSON
Tillandsia multicaulis
Tillandsia imperialis
Tillandsia lampropoda
BRiAN CHuDLeiGH BRiAN CHuDLeiGH BRiAN CHuDLeiGH
Tillandsia orogenes
DAVe ANDeRSON

The genus Tillandsia was named
in honour of the Swedish
botanist Elias Tillands (d 1693)
by Linnaius. The genus belongs to the
sub-family Tillandsioidiae and is made
up of approximately 700 species with
more being discovered. This genus
forms the largest in the bromeliad
family growing from the southern USA
through Central and South America.
Some grow terrestrially, however most
grow epiphytically on trees, cactus, rock
or sand. The most popular tillandsias
grow as true air plants – xeric; with
others growing in wet habitats – mesic.
The important recognition points for a
tillandsia are:
. Leaves never with spines, often
covered with a trichome (scale) mantle
and therefore silver-grey or white in
appearance;
. Petals separate, with no scales at the
base (contrasting to the closely related
genus Vriesea, whose petals have scales
at the base);
. Ovary superior;
. Fruit is a capsule;
. Seeds have a parachute attached to
the base.
However it is the mesic or green leafed
plants that will be discussed further in
this article. These plants have smaller
more widely dispersed trichomes than
the grey leafed xeric tillandsias. Many
but not all the green leafed tillandsias
grow in the rainforests or other mesic
shady areas where they form tank rosettes
and luxuriant flower spikes. Other green
leafed species grow as epiphytes or even
on rocks out in the open. They all have
beautiful flowers both in their intensity
and richness with colours of blue, purple,
red, pink, yellow and green, many of
which are fragrant.

After blooming; from 1 to 12 offsets
form from the vase of the flower, many

from the leaf axils and some on the
inflorescence. It can take many years for
these pups to become adult and bloom.
A few tillandsias produce very large
blooms and do not have any pups.
Tillandsias will grow, albeit very slowly,
without any fertilising. However, to
obtain larger more vigorous plants that
flower in a shorter time they should
be fed regularly through the warmer
months with a complete fertiliser. This
can be accomplished by watering them
regularly with one teaspoon of fertiliser
dissolved in 10 litres of water.
The following is a list of green leafed
plants that grow well in the Auckland
climate. The list is split into those that
have narrow leaves and those with
broader green leaves.

Narrow leafed tillandsias:

The following plants do well outside all
year in Auckland provided the area is
frost free.
Tillandsia
lindenii
– A plant with dark
green leaves. The large blossoms are
predominantly blue with a white centre
at the base of each petal – quite striking.
Tillandsia
umbellata
– A species that is
endemic to Ecuador. It has 20cm long
leaves with large flowers that are an
exquisite blue colour. It has been found
naturally only in Loja, a small region of
southern Ecuador (Rauh, 1981). It grows
between 2000 and 4000m altitude, and
seems to prefer shady, moist conditions
in cultivation. It has been called the iris-
like tillandsia, and has the brightest blue
flower of the tillandsias.
Tillandsia
lampropoda
– A species with
many narrow upright leaves. The sword
like inflorescence with its yellow flowers
resembles a vriesea.

The following plants need protection and
warmer conditions through the winter
months in Auckland.

Cont'd
P10

Cont'd
from
P9

Learning
about
the
genera:
Tillandsia
(green
leafed)

Tillandsia
acosta-solisii
– A species that
is endemic to Ecuador. Its natural habitats
are subtropical or tropical moist lowland
forests and subtropical or tropical moist
montane forests. The plant produces
most attractive clear white flowers.
Tillandsia
cyanea
– Commonly known
as the 'Pink Quill' plant. A stemless
plant approximately 25cm in height
when in flower. It has numerous narrow
recurved leaves with fine red lines and
paddle-shaped spikes of 20 pink bracts
with violet flowers.

Broader leafed tillandsias:

The following plants do well outside all
year in Auckland provided the area is
frost free.
Tillandsia
deppeana
– This species
has numerous thin green leaves. The
inflorescence can be up to 1m high
producing many rosy coloured spikes.
Tillandsia
leiboldiana
– A smallish
plant with leaves up to 20cm long. The
inflorescence has deep red primary bracts
that last for some months. When grown
outdoors in Auckland this beautiful little
plant clumps up well.
Tillandsia
imperialis
– When in flower
this medium sized species certainly
looks imperialistic. The spadix shaped
inflorescence has intensely red bracts.
The concealed spikes produce long
violet petals.
Tillandsia
hamaleana
– This species is
endemic to Ecuador and northern Peru,
where it grows epiphytically at 2600
meters. One of a number of tank-type
tillandsias from Peru which adapt readily
to pot culture. This tillandsia grows
faster and larger in a pot, with an acidic,
well-drained compost.

Tillandsia
yunckeri
– This very beautiful
tillandsia is one of Guatemala's rare
gems. It grows as an epiphyte in dense wet
forests of central Guatemala at altitudes

ranging from 1,000 to 2,300 metres.
It is a fair sized bromeliad with leaves
that may reach over 30cm in length, the
plant when in flower reaching 50cm in
height. In many respects it resembles the
familiar Mexican Tillandsia
imperialis,
with its soft green foliage and stout
glabrous inflorescence of striking red,
but its scape is slimmer, the leaves more
succulent, and the plant as a whole more
graceful.

Tillandsia
lucida
– This species is
endemic to Mexico and Honduras where
it grows at elevations of 900 – 1,400m.
Another tillandsia with a beautiful red
branched inflorescence.
Tillandsia
multicaulis
– This species
grows in the mist forests from South
Mexico to Panama. The many paddle
shaped inflorescences develop from the
leaf axils having shiny red floral bracts
and blue petals. The flowers make a very
striking show when in full bloom.
Tillandsia
viridiflora
– This species
comes from Mexico to Nicaragua where
it grows at 800 – 1,800m. It grows up
to 1m tall when in flower has broad,
flexible, green leaves that are purple on
the underside. The pretty greenish white
flowers are short lived.
Tillandsia
macropetala
– This species
comes from Mexico in the state of
Oaxaca and seems most closely related
to T.
viridiflora, to which it bears a close
resemblance. It's slightly larger in size
and is epiphytic.
Tillandsia
standleyi
– It is found in
mixed oak-pine forests of the Sierra de
las Minas in Guatemala at elevations
ranging from 1,450 to 1,500 meters.
These forests are situated in the zone
of clouds where the climate remains
fairly cool and moist with rather uniform
temperatures averaging 15 to 18°C
throughout the year. A striking plant
and when seen growing, the drooping

spray of flowers from a long curving
inflorescence with its prominent bright
red bracts.

Tillandsia
orogenes
– It was first
described in Ceiba in 1953, is rarely
seen in cultivation. It is an attractive,
medium-sized species from Mexico. Its
green leaves, about 30cm in length, have
brown to dark violet sheaths. These form
an open rosette from which arises the tall
inflorescence with its coral-red bracts
and violet petals crowned with golden
stamens.

Tillandsia
gymnobotrya
– It is endemic

to the southern Mexican rain forest areas
near Orizaba and grows at an altitude
of 900 – 2,400m. It is a medium sized
plant with a most attractive red branched
flower spike some 50cm high.
Tillandsia
foliosa
– Arobust species from
Mexico with its tall slim inflorescence
with bright red bracts and long violet
petals.
Tillandsia
flabellata
– It is endemic to
Mexico, Guatemala and El Salvador
growing from 100m – 1,300m altitude.
The red leaf variety is found mostly in
the sun and the green form in the shade
on lower limbs, ground and rocks.

Coming up in early 2014... Please bring 'Fiesta' trophies
At our January monthly society meeting
the competition will be New Zealand
hybrids. Karen Lowther, Manager of
Eden Garden in Auckland, will give a
talk on the well-known garden, which
has a 'Bromeliad Glade'.
At our February meeting the competition
will be for billbergias. We will also
review and discuss 'Fiesta' winning
plants and check on the progress of
Neoregelia
'Africa' F2 seedlings – one
year on.

Thanks from the editorial team...

Dave Anderson, Peter Waters and Murray
Mathieson would like to thank all those
society members – from Auckland and
from the various bromeliad groups
around the country – who have taken the
time to research and supply good original
material for publishing in our Journal
during 2013. Thanks also to our faithful
writers of group notes. And please...
keep the material coming in 2014! If you
have an idea for an article and you're not
quite sure how to develop it or how it
might fit in – please discuss with one of
the editorial team. We're happy to offer
you any help we can.

back in January...

We would like members currently
holding 'Fiesta' show trophies to return
them at our January monthly society
meeting please. Thanks.

Hybridising... a personal journey


Andrew
Devonshire
When I started on my
hybridising journey, I was
fortunate to know most of the
local hybridisers, as well as some based
overseas. As I was new to the process, I
asked plenty of questions. From all the
advice I was given, there were a couple
of guidelines that most hybridisers
agreed on:
• Always have clear goals.
• Always aim to create new and unique
hybrids – don't just copy what has
already been done.
While it's good to have guidelines, they
are just that, 'guidelines.' Hybridising
can be such a long process, that you
really want to enjoy the journey, so do
what you feel compelled to do.

I had always liked the banded / zonated
neoregelias, and when I first saw
Chester Skotak's hybrid Neoregelia
'Tunisia' I was sold! During 2007 Peter
Waters had brought along to a meeting
a selection of 'Tiger' type neoregelia
hybrids including 'Tunisia'. Most of
the banded hybrids he had on display
had 'Tiger', or 'Hannibal Lector' in the
mix. Peter had recently imported them,
and they were all very new to us. I liked
the Grant Groves hybrid which is now
called 'Groves Red Tiger', but 'Tunisia'
was the stand out for me. The reddish
colouration of these hybrids, combined
with attractive banding really appealed
and I knew I had to make some of these
as soon as I got the chance.

The chance presented itself early in
2009 when I had Neoregelia
'Clarise'
come into flower.

The Bromeliad Cultivar Register
records Skotak's 2002 hybrid 'Tunisia'
as Hannibal Lector crossed with
'Punctate'. (I assume the 'Punctate'
is what we call 'Punctate Red'). My
'Punctate Red' was not flowering, but I
had saved some pollen from Neoregelia
'Purpurea', a very attractive reddish
clone of ampullacea. So I went about
pollinating the flowers of 'Clarise'
with my 'Purpurea'. This was not the
ideal way to do the cross as 'Hannibal
Lector' types are known to be potential
self-pollinators. A 'self-pollinator' is a
plant that readily accepts its own pollen
and can set its own seed, cancelling out
the efforts of the hybridiser. However as
'Tunisia' was created by Skotak using
'Hannibal Lector 'as the seed mother,
I figured I'd give it my best shot. If a
self-pollinator is to be used as seed
mother, its propensity to self-pollinate
can be mitigated by removing its own
pollen as early as possible. So my early
morning routine was to emasculate the
opening flowers of 'Clarise'. Then by
mid-morning I'd pollinate using my
saved pollen of 'Purpurea'. I would
then mark the flowers. I repeated this
day after day...

The 'Hannibal Lector' types of
neoregelias are quick at producing ripe
seed, so around three months later I was
able to harvest a good amount of seed
from my 'Clarise'.

Here are my three favourite plants that
resulted from this cross, with one being
my 'Tunisia' look-a-like.

Neoregelia 'Clarise' x 'Purpurea'

13

Showtime in Far North


Notes
and
photos
from
Erin
Titmus
The Far North Bromeliad Group again
combined with the Bay of Islands Orchid
Society to put on a stunning display
at the Turner Centre in Kerikeri on 11th–12th
October. Don Brown from Auckland and
David Brewer of Kerikeri judged approx 140
entries over the ten classes. The entry numbers
were down slightly, but the good standard of
the previous year had improved more. Don
enjoyed seeing the maturity of plants grown in
slightly higher temperatures noting that they
add more layers of rosette before flowering.

ShOW RESUlTS / WINNERS:
Best in Show:
Dot Leaning – Neoregelia
pauciflora
Most Points in Show: Chrissie Stephens
Aechmea: Chrissie Stephens
– Aechmea 'Bert' (variegated)

Billbergia:

Chrissie Stephens
– Billbergia
amoena (rubra)
Guzmania:
Peter Scahill – Guzmania
'Empire'
Miniatures:
Dot Leaning – Neoregelia
pauciflora
Neoregelia: Elaine Wright
– Neoregelia 'Manoa Beauty'
Other Species:
Dot Leaning – Cryptanthus 'Maggie'
Tillandsia:
Iris Symonds – Tillandsia
leonamiana
Vriesea: Peter Scahill
– Vriesea
gigantea x 'Red Chestnut'
Decorative Pot: Chrissie Stephens
– Guzmania
wittmackii
Artistic Arrangement: Shirley May
– Driftwood with Neoregelia
olens
x'Vulcan' and tillandsia

Dot Leaning with Neoregeliapauciflora – 'Best in Show'

Chrissie Stephens won the
Aechmea and Billbergia categories
and 'Most points in Show'

The judges: Don Brown (left) and
David Brewer

OFFICERS

Patron: Patricia Sweeney Scientific Officer: Peter Waters 09-534 5616
President: Jocelyn Coyle 09-416 8272 Librarian: Noelene Ritson 09-625 8114
Vice Presidents: Alan Cliffe 09-479 1451 Committee: Graeme Barclay 09-817 4153

Don Brown 09-361 6175 Lester Ching 09-576 4595
Secretary: Dave Anderson 09-638 8671 David Cowie 09-630 8220
Treasurer: Peter Waters 09-534 5616 Chris Paterson 09-625 6707
Life Members: Dave Anderson, Patricia Perratt, Editor: Murray Mathieson 09-418 0366

Patricia Sweeney, Peter Waters

MEMBERSHIP SUBSCRIPTION

New Zealand:

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Overseas:

NZD $45.00. Send all payments to the Treasurer, Peter Waters, 22 Half Moon Rise, Half Moon Bay,
Auckland 2012.

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All general correspondence should be sent to the Secretary, Bromeliad Society of New Zealand,

P.O. Box 108-168, Symonds Street, Auckland, New Zealand. The opinions expressed in letters or
articles in the Journal are the contributors' own views and do not necessarily express the views or
policy of the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand Inc.
BROMELIAD JOURNAL

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Group News

Bay of Plenty Bromeliad Group

– Jo
Elder
A wild and windy day did not deter a
very good attendance at our October
meeting. Lynley welcomed members
and visitors and especially our guest
speaker for the day, Dave Anderson who
had travelled down from Auckland with
his wife Joan. Lynley thanked all of the
members who had been involved in the
'Sale and Display' at the orchid show
in September. The weekend sales were
very good and the display of bromeliads
was praised by many.

Dave Anderson gave a most interesting
talk and slide show of a trip that he and
Joan had made in Mexico last year. He
spoke about the tillandsias that they had
seen growing on the trees and rock faces
and tillandsias in general.

Plant of the month – Tillandsia: Tabled
were, Tillandsia
lajensis,
floribunda,'
Creation,' carlsoniae,
cacticola,
and
mauryana.

'Show and Tell': Several plants were
presented that needed identification. A
well grown green tillandsia was thought
to be T.
deppeana, a grey leafed plant
identified as Vriesea
cereicola,
and a
neoregelia with the name Skotak on the
label, all belonging to Kevin Pritchard.
Diana Durrant had brought along an
aechmea which was thought to be

Aechmea
lueddemaniana,
Tillandsia

'Wildfire', an unknown nidularium,
and a plant named Aechmea
'Fosperior
Perfection'. Dave identified this as
Neoregelia 'Perfection'

1st,,

Novice Section: a beautifully
coloured Aechmea
recurvata, Maisie

2nd

Kokshoorn, Alcantarea
vinicolor,
Diana Fiford.

1st

Open competition: Aechmea

2nd

recurvata
'Tokuri' Gill Keesing,

3rd

xCanmea
'Wild Tiger' Jo Elder,
Neoregelia
'Orange Crush' Graeme
Alabaster, also tabled were Neoregelia
'Raphael' 'Princess Caroline Superb'

Tillandsia competition: 1st, Tillandsia
2nd

gymnobotrya, Audrey Hewson, ,

T.
streptophylla, Bertha Schollum,
3rd,

T.
ionantha, Wilma Fitzgibbons.
Also tabled were Tillandsia
scaposa,
geminiflora,
argentina
and ionantha
'Druid'.
Next Meeting: 11th December,
Christmas 'pot luck' lunch, at the home
of Brian and Natalie Simmonds, 130
Pyes Pa Road. Plenty of off road parking.
Bring a plant or gift for continuous raffle
and finger food to share.

Garden Visit: 11th December, from
10am at 'Trees and More' Nursery, 520
Pyes Pa Rd, prior to the Christmas lunch.

Eastern Bay of Plenty Bromeliad and
Orchid Group –
Alison
Iremonger

An expansive garden ramble was held
across the Whakatane district for our
October meeting. We started at the home
of Dave and Alison Iremonger. Their
small coastal garden was started some
eight years ago in a new subdivision

– no trees, no windbreak from the sea
and lots of sand. However, over time,
the palms, bromeliads and orchids have
adapted to the conditions. This garden
gives them a lot of pleasure and a talking
point with visitors to the beach.

Our second garden belonged to Dave
and Delwyn Trubshoe. This is a parklike
garden on a large rambling section.
Lifesize giraffes, elephants, goats, sheep
and poultry nestle among the trees
and shrubs...a surprise around every
corner! This garden is open to the public
by appointment and has won garden
awards.

Our third garden treat was 'Sweet
Magnolia Estate', an events garden,
owned by Wendy Kingsbury, and open
to the public for functions. A stream
runs through the property and the large
garden is filled with hostas, clivias,
irises, bromeliads, wisteria, roses and
many more colourful plants.

Our final garden belonged to another
member, Margaret MacDonald. Her well
established garden is set in farmland and
she has used old farm machinery as a
backdrop for many of her plantings.
Balls of tillandsias hang from old cart
wheels, the eaves of her home and in the
fork of trees. They look stunning. We
held our meeting at Margaret's home,
with Sue welcoming all those present.
She reminded members of the upcoming
trip to Auckland, and our Christmas
meeting was discussed. 'Show and Tell'
had Ross showing us six bromeliad pups
he had potted in different medium. All
pups were same size when planted, but
when he tipped them out of their pots the
root system on each plant was slightly
different.

Raffles were drawn and the members
purchased from the sales table. After
afternoon tea members enjoyed another
wander around Margaret's garden.

Next Meeting: 24th November at
Bubbles Rivett's, and Sue and Ken

Laurent's combined gardens. It will be
our Christmas meeting, so please bring
a present, and if you like a Christmas hat
and decoration.

Visitors are always welcome. Contact:
Maureen Moffat 07-322 2276, Ross
Fergusson 07-312 5487, Sue Laurent
07-307 1323.

South Auckland Bromeliad Group


Marion
Morton
We had a beautiful sunny day for our
November meeting at the Auckland
Botanic Gardens and again the car
parks were at a premium. Marie Healey
welcomed all members and visitors
to the meeting, and advised that our
Waikato trip was a great success and
most enjoyable.

She told us that, sadly, one of our longterm
members, Dot Turner, had recently
passed away. Norma Cook said that
she had known Dot and her family for
some 20 odd years and she had a natural
ability to greet people and make them
feel welcome. Dot was a very talented
lady and her gardens were always open
to friends. She will forever remain in our
hearts and we offer our condolences to
her family.

Our guest speaker was Roy Morton
who gave us an informative talk on
the European tour he had made with
his wife, Marion, to England, France,
Switzerland and Italy. Following the talk
Roy and Marion were presented with
gifts and a 50th wedding anniversary
cake kindly made by Margaret Kitcher.
The raffles were won by Judy Small,
Roy Morton and Delma Pell.

Cont'd
P18
17

Cont'd
from
P17

Group
News

Next Meetings: Sunday, 1st December
at 1:30pm at the home of Robert and
Margaret Flanagan, Flanagan Road,
Drury. Please bring a plate of finger
food, a chair and a cup. This is our final
meeting of the year and we will have a
fun auction as well as sale of plants.

Our first meeting in 2014 is Sunday,
2nd February at 1:30pm in the Hamilton
Estate Community Hall, Hamilton
Drive, Waiuku. (Adjacent to Margaret
and Brian Kitcher's home at 13 Hamilton
Drive, Waiuku). Please bring a chair and
a cup. Following the meeting members
are invited to visit the gardens of Norma
Cook at 14a Kauri Drive, Waiuku and
Judy Graham at 10 Pono Place, Waiuku.

Northland Bromeliad Group


Sandra
Wheeler
We held our October meeting at Labour
weekend with a smaller number of
members present than usual. Stacy
welcomed 22 with nine apologies.
Welcome to new member Jenny
Lawrence. What a treat for us as we
visited the home of Katherine Kozel and
Matthew Hennessey in Manganese
Point Road named L.I.F.E. House.
Stacy thanked them for their hospitality
and invited them to tell us about their
beautiful garden.

Katherine and Matt have transformed a
thirty year old overgrown section into
the beautifully cared for and planted
garden we saw, with interesting paths
taking us on a walk among the collection
of superb bromeliads.

Five large bins were required to remove
all the unwanted greenery that had been
allowed to flourish over many years.

Now, three years late, it is a credit to
them and all their hard work. Many of
the bromeliads had been brought from
their previous home. We were impressed
by the huge alcantareas surrounded
by Vriesea
philippo-coburgii
and
Alcantarea
vinicolor.
Being in full sun
they were deeply coloured. One seven
year old vinicolor
hybrid had a tall
flower spike that appeared to sway to
the path of the sun. A zigzag path led us
down to the beach at the bottom of the
garden.

Fertilising bromeliads was discussed and
Katherine had learned that re-potting
vrieseas into large pots produced better
specimen plants and her Vr. 'Joyful

Charm' taking first prize attested to this.

Reports from the bus trip to the Mt Eden,
Auckland Spring Sale and display were
very positive with the bus and trailer
packed to capacity on the homeward
journey. 'Pots Galore' at Panmure was
a popular stop off that contributed to the
overflowing bus.

Competition : 'Show and Tell'

Large Category:

1st

Katherine Kozel – Vriesea
'Joyful
Charm'; 2nd Maureen Green –Neoregelia
'Desert Rose'; 3rd Pat Vendt – Neoregelia
'Moonlight Lady'
Small category:

1st

Maureen Green – Neoregelia

2nd

'Blushing Tiger'; Pat Vendt –
Neoregelia
'Avalanche'; 3rd equal Lorna
Maton – Neoregelia
un-named mini and
Lyn White – Neoregelia
'Marble Throat'
x 'Gespacho'

Next Meeting: Sunday November 24th
at Reyburn House Studio. Dianne Holt,
hybridiser and well-known grower, will
be our speaker.

Heaps of great colour in Kevin
Pritchard's Bay of Plenty garden...

Bay of Plenty Group members enjoyed a recent visit to Kevin's prolific garden.
Photos: Jo Elder
Spring Sale and Display in October...

Good attendance, great plants, excellent sales. A special thanks to Noelene
Ritson and Laura Weber who created this splendid entry display.
Photos: Dave Anderson

19

ByGraemeBarclayByGraemeBarclay
After
two
years
of
looking
at
'Classic
Brom'
hybrids,
we
finish
this
series
with
a
lovely
Kiwi
bred
neoregelia
that
is
an
excellent
large
garden
plant.
Next
year
we
will
have
a
new
series
on
'Special
Species'.
I
will
focus
on
some
of
the
stand-out
speciesandcultivars,withemphasisonplantsthatgrowreallywellinNewZealand.

Neoregelia 'Carnival'

This plant is considered to
be one of the late Gerry
Stansfield's finest hybrids. It has
outstanding colour, size, form and does
exceptionally well in the garden and it
can now be classed as a 'NZ classic'.

Gerry and his hybridising colleague
from Whangarei, Avon Ryan, often
used their own hybrids as parents in
creating new plants. The seed parent
of Neoregelia
'Carnival' is Neoregelia
'Pink Champagne', a very large, wide-
leaved brom that flushes pinky-peach
tones in high light situations. Neo.
'Pink Champagne' is an Avon Ryan
hybrid, likely made in the late 1980s,
from Neoregelia
cruenta
x Neoregelia
'Rosy Morn', so you can see where
it obtains its large size and colour

PHOTO: GRAeMe BARCLAY
Neoregelia 'Carnival'

attributes. It was named and registered
by Gerry, who along with Avon, had
used it many times mainly as a seed
parent to eventually create well over
20 other notable registered hybrids.

One 2000 cross Gerry made was
Neoregelia
'Pink Champagne' x
Neoregelia
'Sharlock'. It produced a
grex of heavily spotted, red and golden-
yellow coloured seedlings that grew to
a large diameter, no doubt due to the
genes of the parents. Gerry selected
three plants from the grex to register
and named them Neoregelia
'Carnival',
'Golden Carnival' and 'Carnival Fair'.
The latter two have much more yellow
in the leaves than Neo.'Carnival' - if
anyone grows them please let me
know, as I have not seen them around
anywhere to date and I'm unsure if
they were ever released by Gerry.

Neoregelia
'Carnival' grows to around
1 metre in diameter and flattens out
into a stunning, colourful rosette when
flowering. If placed in very high light
or even full sun, it will brighten to a
brilliant scarlet all over, accentuating
the golden spots and it will often
appear to 'glow' with morning sun
shining through the leaves. It is a fast
grower, pups well and is hardy in cold
conditions. Ideal for large splashes of
red all year round in the garden.

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