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2016

2016 Journals

January 2016 February 2016 March 2016 April 2016 May 2016 June 2016July 2016 August 2016 September 2016 October 2016 November 2016

July 2016VOL 56 NO 7
Neoregelia ‘Spines’ x ‘Skotak’s Tiger’.
Photo: Graeme Barclay
• Learning about the genera: Vriesea (part two)
• BSI World Conference... ‘Bromeliads Texas Style’
• Tillandsias adapting to ‘harsh’ urban conditions

New from New Zealand
– By Graeme Barclay
Our two new hybrids this month come with a special bonus. One of each will be
included in the BSNZ Online Auction starting on May 15th next year. They are

fantastic collector plants.

Neoregelia ‘Mai Heart Burn’
Andrew Devonshire – 2010 (Reg: Feb 2016)

Mature open rosette to 30cm diameter.
In strong light, lime green leaves striated

cream and flushed pink. Foliage is also
flecked/splashed red with red leaf tips and a
rosy red/scarlet-bracted nest at blooming.

The parentage formula is Neoregelia
‘Tascha’ x Neoregelia ‘Heart’s Blood’.

It is great to see results starting to flow
from Andrew’s extensive work in breeding
neoregelia variegates. This first involves
careful selection of a seed mother parent
that will pass on variegation to many
of its seedlings. Then, it’s all about
careful selection, nurturing and culling,
as variegated seedlings often grow quite
differently to normal green seedlings. The
result here is a midi sized plant with great
colour and the ability to change its look
depending on how it is grown and how
much light it gets. The genes mean it will
be a compact, hardy plant, ideal for high
light positions in the garden, in hanging
baskets, or as an epiphyte.

Neoregelia ‘Mai heart Burn’

PhoTo ANDREW DEVoNShIRE

Neoregelia ‘Jag’s Dragon Attack’
John Lambert – 2010 (Reg: April 2015)

Mature open rosette to 25cms. diameter x

25cms. high. In strong light, lime green/
yellow leaves tipped red with irregular
russet red cross banding/splattering and

red spines.

The parentage formula is Neoregelia
zonata x Neoregelia ‘Heart’s Blood’.

I chose to feature this plant of John’s
because you will notice the pollen parent
is the same as Andrew’s plant above. It
is interesting to see how different traits
combine with different parents and also
how dominant traits, such as the red
pigmentations from Neoregelia ‘Heart’s
Blood’, come to the fore, particularly with
the speckling, red edged leaves and blushed
centres. Neoregelia ‘Jag’s Dragon Attack’
is a lovely, compact, banded plant that
will also grow exceptionally well in high
light positions. Due to its tough Neoregelia
zonata genes, it will be especially well
suited for clumping up in pots, or using as
an epiphyte.

Neoregelia ‘Jag’s Dragon Attack’
PhOTO JOhN LAMBERT

Bromeliad Society of New Zealand Inc

Bromeliad Journal – July 2016 issue

CONTENTS
‘New from New Zealand’ – new hybrids – Graeme Barclay 2
President’s Page – Graeme Barclay 4
Society officers, subs and Journal directory 5
Bromeliad Society June meeting news – Dave Anderson 6
Learning about the genera – Vriesea (part two) – Peter Waters 8
BSI World Conference... ‘Bromeliads Texas Style’ – Graeme Barclay 11
Tillandsias adapting to ‘harsh’ urban conditions – Lloyd Godman 14
‘Special Species Spotlight’ – Graeme Barclay 17
Group News 20
‘Tell the difference’ – Peter Waters 24

The opinions expressed in articles or letters in this Journal are the contributors’ own views and
do not necessarily express the views or the policy of the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand.

COMING EVENTS

Please see the Group News section starting on page 20 for details of group meeting
times and venues.

JULY
24th Northland Bromeliad Group AUGUST
meeting 7th South Auckland Group meeting
26th Society monthly meeting at 10th Bay of Plenty Group meeting
Greyfriar’s Hall, corner of Mt Eden and 14th Tillandsia Group Auckland meeting
Windmill roads, starting at 7.30pm. The 23rd Society monthly meeting at
monthly choice competition: Vriesea – Greyfriar’s Hall, corner of Mt Eden
up to 25cm high. Graeme Barclay will and Windmill roads, starting at 7.30pm.
present a PowerPoint on the BSI world The monthly choice competition and
conference, held in June in Houston, discussion topic: mounted tillandsias.
USA...’Bromeliads Texas Style’.

FRONT COVER: Neoregelia ‘Spines’x ‘Skotak’s Tiger’. Photo by Graeme Barclay
Breeding two Neoregelia carcharodon species together has produced some
outstanding plants with HUGE teeth! This one is a cross made by Peter Tristram in
NSW and grown from seed by Graeme Barclay in Auckland.

PRESIDENT’S PAGE

Hi everyone. I hope you
are surviving the ‘Winter
Blues’ and your gardens and
broms are faring well. I was lucky
to spend three weeks in Texas and
Florida last month. The 35 degree
temperatures and high humidity was
only JUST bearable outside, but I
believe certainly more enjoyable
than the dismal weather that lingered
in Auckland during my absence. As
mentioned last month, I attended the
22nd Bromeliad Society International
World Conference in Houston, it was
my first world conference and a very
enjoyable occasion overall. I have
included a brief report elsewhere in this
Journal and will be putting together a
PowerPoint presentation of many nice
pictures for the coming meeting.

At our Auckland June meeting and
annual mid-winter supper, I am told
our VP, Jocelyn Coyle, did a
commendable job (as usual) running
the meeting – and I was not missed
one bit! Thanks to Jocelyn and all
those who helped set up the hall and
assist with the supper. We have a full
agenda for the remaining months this
year, with some interesting speakers
coming up, so please do come along
and enjoy the coming meetings. The
monthly competition plants have
been of an exceptional standard lately,

there are some very lovely (and often
very rare) broms to see each month

– so don’t be shy bringing along
any of your ‘good-lookers’ to add to
the spectacle. We are also trying to
ensure we have good quality raffle
and sale plants each month, so please
remember your pocket money too.
On behalf of editor Murray Mathieson
and the BSNZ committee, special
thanks to those folks that have
contributed recent articles to the
Journal. I understand my letter a
few months ago to all the regional
Bromeliad Groups has been well
received and we are now starting to
see articles and photos roll in more
regularly. Special mentions and many
thanks to Nancy Murphy (South
Auckland), Ross Fergusson (Eastern
Bay of Plenty), Diana Durrant and
Jo Elder (Bay of Plenty) and Lucy
Timmins (Auckland) for their great
efforts. Every article helps and without
this input we would be running short
of new and interesting material to
print. Remember, a few good photos
with some short paragraphs is perfect,
just use your imaginations and lets
keep the Journal looking fantastic.

Stay warm and well,

Graeme Barclay

OFFICERS

Patron: Patricia Sweeney
President: Graeme Barclay 09-817 4153
Vice Presidents: Jocelyn Coyle 09-416 8272
Chris Paterson 09-625 6707
Secretary: Bev Ching 09-576 4595
Treasurer: Peter Waters 09-534 5616
Life Members: Dave Anderson, Patricia Perratt,
Patricia Sweeney, Peter Waters

Scientific Officer: Peter Waters 09-534 5616
Librarian: Noelene Ritson 09-625 8114
Committee: Dave Anderson 09-638 8671
Don Brown 09-361 6175
Lester Ching 09-576 4595
Alan Cliffe 09-479 1451
David Cowie 09-630 8220
Diane Timmins 09-415 9066
Editor: Murray Mathieson 09-418 0366

MEMBERSHIP SUBSCRIPTION

New Zealand

Ordinary membership NZ $35.00 ($5.00
discount if paid before the end of February).
Dual membership (same household) NZ $45.00
($5.00 discount also applies as above).

Overseas

NZD $45.00. Send all payments to the Treasurer,
Peter Waters, 22 Half Moon Rise, Half Moon
Bay, Auckland 2012.

Correspondence

All general correspondence should be sent to the
Secretary, Bromeliad Society of New Zealand,

P.O. Box 108-168, Symonds Street, Auckland,
New Zealand. The opinions expressed in letters
or articles in the Journal are the contributors’
own views and do not necessarily express the
views or policy of the Bromeliad Society of
New Zealand Inc.
Society Website

www.bsnz.org – For past Journal archive –
growing tips – articles – sales information

BROMELIAD JOURNAL

Editorial Committee

Dave Anderson
Murray Mathieson
Peter Waters

Production

Murray Mathieson

Distribution

Don Brown

All enquiries and contributions welcome, please
contact any member of the editorial committee
or send to Peter Waters, 22 Half Moon Rise,
Half Moon Bay, Auckland 2012 or email:
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Deadline

For all editorial and advertising, the first
Tuesday of publication month

Display Advertising

Rates are:
Full Page $60.00
Half Page $30.00
Quarter Page $15.00

‘Buy & Swap’

Listings in ‘Buy & Swap’ are FREE for
members of the Society (max. 30 words).
For advertising enquiries and material, please
contact Murray Mathieson ph (09) 418 0366
or email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Bromeliad Society June Meeting News

– Dave Anderson
Jocelyn Coyle chaired the meeting
and welcomed everyone on a cold
winter’s night. She mentioned that as
we were having a mid-winter supper the
usual break was kept to a minimum. Also
Peter and Jocelyn Coyle had very kindly
donated 50 or so bromeliad seedlings
with one given out to all those present.
Dave Anderson took us through the ‘Show
and Tell’ plants. First up and wanting
a name was Billbergia sanderiana – a
plant that has been in NZ for several
decades, originally misnamed here as
Billbergia elegans. Next for display was
a clump of the smallish species Vriesea
bleherae with 6 flowers out. The yellow
flowers contrast well with the dark red
and green leaves. Also wanting a name
was the plant Neoregelia ‘Black Beauty’
F2 – one of the seedlings that Peter Coyle
gave away at a meeting a couple of years
ago. This particular plant was quite badly
quilled, a sign that it had been kept too
dry for some time.
John Mitchell then gave a very interesting
talk on using a portable drill with a spade
bit to take the centre out of bromeliad
plants to increase their probability of
sending out pups. This was particularly
appropriate for those species that are
‘monocarpic’.
David Goss won this month’s special
raffle prize – Vriesea ‘Arcadian Jewel’.
The door prizes went to Margaret
Bramley and Genneth Marshall-Inman.

COMPETITIONS

Open Flowering: First John Mitchell
with a clump of Aechmea recurvata
var benrathii – a most attractive small
plant especially when blooming. Chris
Paterson was second with Tillandsia
‘Wildfire’. In the competition were
Aechmea ‘Ensign’, ‘ Ensign reverse’,

orlandiana (dark form), weilbachii,
bleherae and Vriesea elata.

Open Foliage: John Mitchell was first
with Vriesea ‘Vistarella’ x ‘Tango Lace’.
Second was Judy Graham with Vriesea
‘Star Hybrid’. In the competition were
Aechmea ‘MEND’, Billbergia ‘Carrison
on a Wing’, Neoregelia ‘Banshee’ and
Vriesea ‘Lace’ hybrid.
Tillandsia: Lynette Nash was first with
a clump of Tillandsia stricta in flower.
Second was Dave Anderson with
Tillandsia aguascalientensis. Other
plants on the table were Tillandsia
crocata, humilis, orogenes, stricta and
viridiflora.

Neoregelia: First Peter Coyle with
Neoregelia ‘Emma’s Dream’. Second
also was Peter Coyle with Neoregelia
‘Absolutely Fabulous’. Also in the
competition were Neoregelia ‘Exotica
Red Prince’, ‘Tara Tiger’, ‘Milagro’,
‘Perfection x ‘Fool’s Gold’, ‘Wild Tiger’
x ampullacea, ‘Treasure Chest’ and
‘Baker’s Tiger’.

Named Monthly Plant (Neoregelia
midi): First was Peter Coyle with a
Neoregelia ‘Small World’. Second
was David Goss with Neoregelia ‘Pink
Spider’. Other plants on the table were
Neoregelia olens ‘Vulcan’, ‘Strawberry
Lace’ x ‘Gold Lotto’, ampullacea x
lilliputiana, ‘Wee Willie’ x (‘Tiger Cub’
x ‘Oeser’s Black Knight’), (‘Tiger Cub’ x
‘Oeser’s Black Knight’) x ‘Wee Willie’,
chlorosticta x ‘Fairy Paint’, ‘Flama’,
‘Gold Lotto’ and ‘Bam’.

The Plant of the Month went to Peter
Coyle with Neoregelia ‘Emma’s Dream’.
Congratulations to all the winners.

NEXT MEETING: Tues 23rd August.

PhOTOS fROM OuR JuNE

mEETINg... By PETER CoyLE

AND DAVE ANDERSON

Tillandsia stricta. (Lynette Nash).
First in tillandsia section.
John Mitchell.
Precision
with the

power drill.

Neoregelia ’Emma’s Dream’. (Peter Coyle).
First in neoregelia section and ‘Plant ofthe month’.
Aechmea recurvata var benrathii. (Johnmitchell). First in open flowering section.
Vriesea ‘Vistarella’ x ‘Tango Lane’
(John Mitchell).
Neoregelia ‘Small World’ (Peter Coyle).
First in named monthly plant section(Neoregelia midi).

Learning about the genera : Vriesea
(part two)
– Peter Waters
Last month Peter covered the vriesea species in section Xiphion. Now, in
part two, he continues and covers the species in section Vriesea.

Vriesea rubyae. PhoTo JohN mITChELL

Vriesea saundersii. PhOTO PETRO ERASMuS

Vriesea guttata. PhoTo mCgREgoR SmITh

Vriesea simplex. Vriesea erythrodactylon.

PhoTo hAWI WINTERPhoTo PETER TRISTRAm

Vriesea flammea.
PhoTo ANDREW DEVoNShIRE

The majority of species in section
Vriesea are found in Brazil in
the Atlantic Forest, but a few are
scattered through the Andes and into
Central America and Venezuela. They
usually have colourful inflorescences
with red, orange or yellow bracts and
yellow or white petals. An added
feature is that the stamens are exserted
or protrude beyond the petals. Foliage
is usually green but there are some with
red, purple or spotted leaves. There are
about 40 species in this section that you
may come across. The following are
some of the most common:

• schwackeana a largish species with
green leaves speckled with red spots.
Not seen much these days but was one
of the earliest introductions to NZ.
• friburgensis has dark green leaves
and an impressive tall, red and yellow,
lax inflorescence. There are several
varieties, the most common seen here
are var. paludosa and var. tucumanensis.
From southern Brazil and Argentina,
naturally grows well here.
• rodigasiana is a smallish species
with narrow leaves, dark purple at the
base. Thin delicate inflorescence of red
and yellow. This plant and the previous
one have the most infuriating habit that
when the outer leaves die back they are
difficult to remove and need to be cut
instead of pulled off.
• saundersii has dull leathery leaves
densely spotted with red. It has yellow
bracts and petals.
• botafogensisfor many years confused
with saundersii which it resembles, but
now a species in its own right. Small
differences in the inflorescence.

• rubyae is a lovely small plant with
dusty green leaves, purplish black at
the base and an unusual orange-red,
pendent inflorescence.
• erythrodactylon like the next two
species was one of the earliest imports,
a small green rosette with a black base
and a wide flat inflorescence. Suits
growing epiphytically and soon clumps
up.
• inflata as the name suggests has an
very fat inflorescence of red and yellow
coming out of a smallish green-leafed
plant.
• heterostachys has either green
or reddish leaves, with the latter
sometimes called heterostachys

(rubra) and a rather inflated spike of
orange bracts and yellow petals. As it
somewhat resembles a goldfish it has
been called the ‘goldfish plant’.

• splendens is from Venezuela,
Trinidad and the Guianas and lives in
the wettest part of the forest often on
the ground. It is difficult to cultivate in
NZ although the cultivar ‘Splenriet’ and
the hybrid with glutinosa, ‘Splendide’
are somewhat easier. Both splendens,
and glutinosa from Section Xiphion
will soon be transferred to a new genus
as they are closely related. The fact
that they are in two different sections
because of the length of the stamens
shows how arbitrary the present
classification is. Vriesea splendens has
a spectacular sword-like inflorescence
that is colourful and longlasting and
combined with the banded foliage is
regarded as one of the bromeliad jewels.

Cont’d P10

Cont’d from P9 – Learning about the genera

• carinata is a small green plant with
red and yellow flat spike that is easy to
grow and clumps readily.
• sucrei is a small to medium plant
with dark green leaves and reddish
beneath. The spike is long and colourful
with orange-red and yellow.
• bleherae is another small plant
with very dark leaves, almost black
underneath and a bright yellow
inflorescence.
• guttata is a small blue-green leaved
plant with many maroon spots and a
striking pink bracted pendent spike
with yellow flowers. Easy to grow and
there are several clones, some more
spotted than others.
• pardalina is a slightly larger plant
with a similar inflorescence. Much
fewer maroon spots on the leaves.
• capixabae has been confused with
guttata because of its spotted leaves,
but the inflorescence is more lax, with
the flowers further apart and the stem
visible.
• simplex is a fairly common small
plant with a pendent flower spike with
widely spaced red and yellow flowers.
Leaves may be green, reddish or a
combination. Habitat is from Trinidad
to Brazil.
• scalaris from southern Brazil is very
similar to simplex and differs only in
some flower details. In simplex the
floral bracts overlap while in scalaris
they just meet around the sepals.
• philippo-coburgii is a large plant and
has been a favourite because it grows
so well in NZ. A beautiful tall lax
spike of red bracts and yellow flowers
contrasting with the bright green leaves
and black leaf-tips which turn yellow
and purple in full sun.

• vagans was originally considered
a variety of philippo-coburgii until
becoming a species in 1966. It is just
a stoloniferous and miniature philippocoburgii.

• flammea is a small thin leaved plant
with a bulbous base and an inflorescence
of red bracts and white petals. The
leaves are a dull greyish-green. This
species is shy flowering until a clump
has formed.
• lubbersii is somewhat similar to
flammea but doesn’t have the bulbous
shape. Its inflorescence is lax and
bears red bracts and yellow flowers.
It has been in NZ for many years as
corcovadensis which however has
a different inflorescence. There are
several distinct clones of lubbersii
available but according to Elton Leme
there are many hybrids between these
similar species found in the wild so it is
not totally clear as to what we have. All
we can say at the moment is that if you
have a Vriesea corcovadensis then you
should change the name to lubbersii.
All of these species are available, some
more than others, but all are worth
collecting. I know that in latter years
there has been a tendency towards
the flashy colourful hybrids, but there
is nothing as satisfying as growing a
clump of the original species, just as
they grow in nature.

BSI World Conference...
‘Bromeliads Texas Style’

– Article and photos by Graeme Barclay
The Bromeliad Society of Houston
in association with Bromeliad
Society International, hosted
the 22nd World Bromeliad Conference
– ‘Bromeliads Texas Style’– in the
Galleria Hotel in Houston from June
13th to 19th. There were around 170
registrants from all over the world,
including four Kiwis – Peter Waters,
Dave and Joan Anderson and myself.

Everything is BIG in America – the
hotel had several very large conference
rooms with ample space for the
competitive plant show, seminars and
plant sales. It was also adjoined to
the Galleria Shopping Mall – one of
the largest in the USA – so there were
quite a few happy ladies!

main 'Bromeliads Texas Style' Display.

The conference opened at Wednesday
lunch-time followed by an optional bus
tour an hour south towards Galveston
to Jimbo’s Nursery, where we enjoyed
viewing their bromeliads and a
fantastic catered Texas BBQ dinner
and drinks. Thursday morning started
early with a bus tour to the estate
grounds of the Klein family in Spring,
northern Houston. David and Mary
Klein have an extensive bromeliad,
cactus and succulent collection housed
in two large tropical greenhouses
that were very interesting to explore.
Meanwhile, the competitive show and
plant sale taking place in the hotel
were both exceptional, with many
amazing plants on display – and even
more amazing plants for sale!

Cont’d P12 11

Cont’d from P11 – BSI World Conference... ‘Bromeliads Texas Style’

Thursday afternoon saw the first of
eight quality seminars, with a number of
world leading bromeliad experts such
as Elton Leme, José Manzanares, Dr.
Gregory Brown, Dr. Thomas Givnish,
Bruce Holst, Pamela Koide-Hyatt and
Eric Gouda – covering a diverse range
of topics including: explorations in
habitats of Peru and Belize; bromeliad
molecular systematics and evolutionary
relationships; tillandsia collecting in
Mexico and tillandsia hybrids; new
studies and reconfigurations of the
genera cryptanthus, orthophytum and
mezobromelia. There was certainly
‘something for everyone’ and each
speaker was very well received. The
rare plant auction was held on Friday
evening and included many books
and other bromeliad memorabilia
with over 50 silent auctions.
To finish off the conference, garden
tours were organised early on Saturday
morning that visited three member’s
suburban gardens. One was the home
of Carole and Rick Richtmyer, Carole
is a well known cryptanthus hybridiser
and they had many interesting species
in their collection. The final banquet

Jimbo’s Nursery Display.
Best Vriesea in show – Vriesea ‘El Dorado’
(David Fell).
The Klein's tropical greenhouse.

Colourful neos for sale.
BSI Show Champion –The Richtmyer's terrestrial bromeliad garden.

Orthophytum benzingii

(John Schmidt).

was held that evening, with Elton Leme BSI World Conference will be held in
delivering a most interesting keynote May 2018 in San Diego, at a very nice
address on bromeliad conservation seaside resort across the road from Sea
and exploration experiences in Brazil. World. If you like the sound of what
Conferences are fantastic places to happens above, I encourage you to
meet like-minded bromeliad folks think about making the trip – it will
from all around the world, make new certainly be a wonderful location and
friends and learn new things. The 23rd conference.

13

How tillandsias adapt to survive and
integrate into the urban environment

– Adapted from notes by ecological artist Lloyd Godman
Lloyd Godman – ecological artist

Lloyd Godman’s twin careers, of serious and successful organic gardener
and practising artist of great creative energy, converge in new and constantly
surprising ways to make art about the ecological concerns that underly his
gardening. Over almost three decades his art has widened out from relatively
traditional landscape photography to include elements of performance, audience
participation art and multimedia installation to explore the tensions between

electronic consumer society and the ecosystem.

Artlink magazine – Ecology: Everyone’s Business - Vol 25 no.4 - Dec - Jan 2006

14
Trichome cells on
Tillandsia crocata.
Trichomes even form
on the flower bracts of
tillandsias.
Tillandsia SWARm
Eureka Tower tillandsia sites.
Installing a tillandsia cage at the top of Ch2 –
Note the dead foliage of a climbing plant on themesh.

In terms of plant evolution, the
bromeliads we grow and treasure,
first appeared relatively recently,
about 70-50 million years ago.

About the same time as our ancestral
forebears, the early apes, evolved on the
planet, (15 – 30 million years ago) the
massive Andes mountain range thrust
upward from intense tectonic activity. In
the geological upheaval, countless life
forms became stranded by high, rocky
peaks, or deep valleys. Increasingly,
each species was exposed to a ‘rapidly’
changing climate – mostly dryer, colder,
and hotter. Relatively quickly (over
a few million years), species either
became locally/permanently extinct or
evolved as a means of adapting to the
new conditions.

More than any, our silver friends,
tillandsias, diversified and about 1000
species evolved in an extremely short
period of time. The success of their
profound resilience was founded
on adaptive evolution where they
developed and refined a complex series
of biological systems and growth habits
that spawned a multitude of weird and
eccentric plant forms that are often
called air plants that many of us grow.
One species of Tillandsia, tectorum has
been recorded growing in conditions of
75°C temperature change in a single day
(-20°C to 55°C).

Many evolved a xerophytic habit
(needing little water), became epiphytic
growing on trees or other plants, or
saxicolous attaching to rocks or sheer
cliffs. While the roots only became a
means of holding the plant firm, their
trichome cells (special cells on the leaf)
gained efficiency and in some plants able

to absorb all moisture and nutrients from
the atmosphere. (Some species have
grown in areas where no rain has fallen
for more than 20 years) As a climatic
defence, these silver cells reflect about
93% of the radiation from the sun. Like
many bromeliads, tillandsias dispensed
with traditional photosynthetic methods
and used a CAM cycle to biologically
store energy from the sun, then grow
at night taking in CO2 and releasing
oxygen in darkness, thereby reducing
transpiration which would dehydrate
other plants grown in a similar harsh

climate.

Working with tillandsias

Tillandisas are among the amazing
bromeliad plants that from 1996 have
become a signature in my work as an
ecological artist,. (My early work with
bromeliads can be viewed in this book
http://lloydgodman.net/Publications/
books_Plants.html )

Tillandsia SWARM

In one of my current bromeliad projects,
Tillandsia SWARM, small mesh cages
with selected species have been placed
on varied locations within Melbourne
city, with no auxiliary watering system
and left to their own biological devices.

Eureka Tower

Initially, at the first location, Eureka
Tower, plants were installed at 4 sites,
levels 92, 91, 65 and 65 in June 2014.
This is the tallest building in the world
with plants on. And papers on the work
were recently published in the Tall
Building Urban Habitat Council Journal

– http://www.lloydgodman.net/Cv/
Press/TBUH1.pdf and also the Green
Building Council Journal – http://www.
lloydgodman.net/Cv/Press/JGB.pdf
Cont’d P16 15

Cont’d from P15 – How tillandsias adapt to survive...

CH2 Building

December 2015, saw plants installed at 4
sites on CH2 building where over more
than 8 years vertical garden systems
have failed to establish. One SWARM
site is mounted on the animated wooden
sun screens which rotate to control
sunlight and heat entering the building.

Essendon Field (airport)

February 2016, tillandsia cages were
mounted at 5 sites at Essendon.

The process is a form of Green tagging

– this is not a sculptural work in the
traditional sense of the word – but a
conceptual social sculpture where the
plants occupy an ever greater space
within the city. Other sites are in
planning and the project can be viewed
at: http://lloydgodman.net/suspend/
swarm/index.html
This map is a guide to the sites: http://
lloydgodman.net/suspend/swarm/map.
html

While it might appear the title SWARM,
references the expansion of tillandsia
colonies throughout the city in the
way bees swarm, it also relates to
swarm intelligence and the way plants

communicate.

http://www.americanscientist.org/
science/pub/-1480

It poses a question... if these remarkable
plants have disposed of their roots and
rely on the trichome leaf cells, perhaps
they also use the highly developed
trichome cells to communicate via
airwaves?

The plants on Eureka have now been

installed for 22 months and have
withstood record heat and dry spells,
cold salt laden winds over 200km and
proved resilient to the severe climate of
a high rise building. The success of their
resilience in such adverse conditions is
underpinned by their adaptive growth
habit.

In a nursery the plants grow larger
and greener but in the extreme climate
of Eureka the plants produce more
trichomes, becoming more silver in
colour to reflect radiation and collect
as much moisture as possible, while
the growth habit is more compact. The
plants also produced many more pups
or off-shoots (7-10 compared with 2-4
in a nursery) which acts as a biological
insurance, creating a colony much
quicker than in a milder climate. So if a
one pup perishes there are others to carry
forward the plant. Compact growth and
multiple pups are bio-strategies which
help to create shifting shade patterns
which protects the colony from the
adverse climate.

So, when exposed to harsh conditions,
resilience in tillandsias is evidenced
by both, evolution over millennia
through species diversity, and growth
habit over periods of just a few years.
Climate change is the stimuli for
change and scale of time dictates the
biological mechanism adopted. In an
environment of predicted rapid climate
change through high CO2 levels, these
remarkable plants, tillandsias, offer a
bio-model for effective adaption.

These experiments demonstrate how
the tillandsias we grow are perfectly
suited to integrate into the urban
environment.

Tillandsia cage mounted on the perimeter fence at
Essendon Airport.

Airborne – rotating tillandsia sulptures in melbourne CBD with Eureka Tower in
background.

Our spotlight this month is on a colourful species cultivar that often blooms
during the colder months of the year.

Aechmea ‘Paraguay’

Almost every Kiwi bromeliad grower well-known special cultivars and several
has one or more forms of the commonly different botanical varieties that make
cultivated species Aechmea recurvata. It this species interesting and well worth
is one of the hardiest and best landscape collecting. One such cultivar is Aechmea
bromeliads we grow as it handles the ‘Paraguay’ which is a relatively recent
cold weather with ease and never fails addition to our range of Aechmea
to put on a long-lasting colourful show recurvata forms.
when blooming. There are a number of

Cont’d P18 17

Cont’d from P17 – Special Species Spotlight

Aechmea ‘Paraguay’ in bloom.
Aechmea ‘Paraguay’ large seed pods.
As with other species such as Aechmea
nudicaulis, the geographic distribution
of the most common variety, Aechmea
recurvata var. recurvata, is also

widespread. It grows mainly in full sun
positions as an epiphyte in many regions
of south-eastern Brazil, Paraguay,
Uruguay and northern Argentina,
from sea level up to around 2000
metres elevation. This diverse range of
habitats has no doubt been a factor in
evolving different clones of this species,
which adapt in size, colour and other
morphologies to their local growing

conditions.

Aechmea ‘Paraguay’ in berry.
PhoToS JohN mITChELL

Sometimes we are lucky when a plant
or seed from a special clone is collected
from such habitats, which then of course
allows a new clone to be introduced into
cultivation. It is unclear exactly when, or
by whom, this plant entered cultivation,
but in September 2000, the late Gerry
Stansfield (well known hybridiser and
life member of the BSNZ), obtained and
grew some seed from the BSI seed bank
that was labelled as ‘Aechmea recurvata
(ex Paraguay)’. These seedlings
developed into robust and colourful red/
orange plants, that appeared to retain
their coloured leaves from pup stage
right throughout the life-cycle. Unlike
some other clones of Aechmea recurvata
that were in cultivation in New Zealand
at the time, which are primarily green
in colour, this clone proved to be quite
different. Also, when most other forms
of Aechmea recurvata bloom, the central

or top leaves and bracts around the
inflorescence often flush red, whereas
with Aechmea ‘Paraguay’ the whole
plant is red/orange, which intensifies
even further at blooming. Another
difference is it will often readily set seed
and produce very large, black seed pods,
whereas some other forms of Aechmea
recurvata either do not set seed so often,
or the seed pods are smaller. Therefore
this clone that Gerry grew had some nice
traits and so it was eventually registered
in 2005 as Aechmea ‘Paraguay’ in
recognition of its supposed origin.

A question often asked by growers is;

“How do you tell the difference between
the Aechmea recurvata forms?” Of the
four official varieties, only three are
common in cultivation, with differences
listed as follows:

Aechmea recurvata var. recurvata

Leaves and bracts strongly serrate.
InfLorescence completely exserted above
the leaf-sheaths. Floral bracts serrate.

Aechmea recurvata var. ortgiesii

Leaves strongly serrate.
InfLorescence almost or wholly included
by the leaf sheaths. Floral bracts
strongly serrate.

Aechmea recurvata var. benrathii

Leaves entire or nearly so.
InfLorescence almost or wholly included
in the leaf sheaths. Floral bracts entire
or nearly so.

As can be seen, the key differences are
whether the inflorescence is positioned
either above or within the leaf sheaths,
and also whether the leaves and bracts
are serrated (spinous), or not. In the
case of Aechmea ‘Paraguay’, it is most
likely a form of Aechmea recurvata var.

recurvata due to its raised inflorescence
and Paraguayan provenance. However,
in the photos it is interesting that the
somewhat sunken inflorescence shows
it also has similar traits to Aechmea
recurvata var. ortgiesii. Whether this
feature is due to climatic factors,
growing conditions or variation growing
from seed is impossible to say, but it
certainly highlights that variation within
many species is a common phenomenon
that can make positive identification a
challenge.

Also, Aechmea recurvata forms have
been extensively hybridised over many
years, especially in the USA and New
Zealand, so there are a large number of
‘mixture’ plants around too, possibly
crosses involving all three varieties.
Hence, a plant may not always exactly
fit a particular description or key,
complicating positive identification.

Aechmea ‘Paraguay’ is one of the

larger and more ornamental forms of

Aechmea recurvata, reaching a sturdy
size up to 30cm high when mature. It
will grow exceptionally well in full sun
year round either as a potted specimen,
in the garden, or on rocks and trees. It
has pups on short stolons and will form
a robust clump over time, creating a
colourful feature. As with all forms of
Aechmea recurvata, it is best kept on
the dry side if possible to prevent rotting
out. The leaf rosette is perfectly designed
to capture and conserve water, so it
never needs anything more than natural
rainfall. It should also be grown ‘starved
and stressed’ when nearing maturity, in
order to maintain a compact form with
the bright leaf colourations and to ensure
pups emerge looking just as good.

Group News

Bay of Plenty Bromeliad Group

– Jo Elder
Jo Elder was standing in for Lynley
Breeze and welcomed 60 members to
our June meeting. She mentioned it was
time to protect our bromeliads if they
are growing in a frost prone area and
also it iss best not to remove pups at this
time of year.

Our speaker was David Brown who has
a Vireya Rhododendron nursery here
in Tauranga. David explained that the
vireya is a tropical plant which flowers
all year and therefore needs feeding all
year round. Many plants are fragrant but
like our bromeliads they are frost tender
and may need protection in the winter
months. David was kept very busy
answering our members’ questions!

Plant of the Month –Albo-marginated

Neoregelia: 1st Dean Morman with
Neoregelia ‘Groucho’, 2nd Gill Keesing
with Neoregelia ‘Sunset’, 3rd Margaret
Mangos with Neoregelia ‘Firewheel’.
Also tabled were Neoregelia ‘Annick’,
‘Aussie Dream’, ‘Pink Delight’ and
‘Robin’.

Open Competition: 1st Helen Morman
with Aechmea recurvata var, 2nd Colin
Sutherland with an un-named guzmania,
and 3rd Barbara Nalder with Aechmea
recurvata var. benrathii. Also tabled:
Neoregelia ‘Fire Plum’, Neoregelia
cyanea, and Aechmea ‘Bert’

Tillandsia Competition: 1st Gwen
McCallum with Tillandsia stricta, 2nd
Jo Elder with Tillandsia montana, and
3rd Bertha Schollum with Tillandsia

caput-medusae x capitata. Also tabled:
Tillandsia roseiflora and Tillandsia
ionantha.

Novice Section: 1st Margaret Lafaele
with a very nice clump of Tillandsia
punctulata.

Next Meeting: Wednesday 10th August

12.30 at the Yacht Club, Sulphur Point.
The speaker will be Peter Waters who is
always interesting to hear. The plant of
the month is Aechmea recurvata.
Northland Bromeliad Group

– Nancy Peters
Our June meeting was held at the
clubrooms of the Kamo Bowling Club
and our guest speaker was Don Brown,
BSNZ committee member, from
Auckland, who gave a presentation
on billbergias. Don brought along an
impressive number of billbergias of his
own and also some hybrids from Peter
Coyle of Totara Waters

Don gave us an excellent background
about the Billbergia genus – named
after the Swedish botanist Gustav
Billberg who discovered them in 1821.
Billbergias were first brought into
New Zealand by Muriel Waterman
in the 1960s. They are epiphytes and
especially love growing on ponga logs.
The flower spikes last approximately
3 weeks. Billbergias are susceptible
to frosts, they like humidity and don’t
like to be fed, but do feed the soil with
a slow release fertiliser before planting.
Don suggested a low nugget orchid mix
50/50 soil and nuggets.

Don also shared some tips on how to
make the most use of a small garden
by growing vertically. He has had to be
innovative to fully utilise space for his
ever expanding collection at his inner
city Auckland home.

‘Show & Tell’ competition winners:

1st Lynsie McMahon – Billbergia
‘Hallelujah’, 2nd Graham Smithyman –
Billbergia vittata, 3rd Sandra Wheeler –
Billbergia ‘Kahibah’.

Next Meeting: Sunday July 24th at
1.30pm at Reyburn House Studio.
Guest speaker: Dorothy Leaning on

Cryptanthus.

South Auckland Bromeliad Group

– Hawi Winter
At our July meeting in the Drury
School Hall president Nancy Murphy
introduced the new ‘Silent Auction’
table as well as the new ‘Skite and Vote
Table’. A challenge to our members was
put in place – to bring plants and vote
for the best. The bringing of a plant
will score one point, best plant will
get 3 points and second best will get 2
points. The points will be added up to
a member’s point total account and at
the Christmas function the winner will
get a $25.00 voucher for our bromeliad
trading table.

The speaker of the day was Dave
Anderson, stepping in for Graeme
Barclay who had only just returned
from the World Bromeliad Conference a
few hours previously. Dave’s theme was
‘San Diego Gardens’ and things we
learned about the very southwest of the

USA were:

• San Diego, the second largest city
in California will host the 2018 World
Bromeliad Conference.
• Its latitude of 32°N is closer to the
equator than NZ. Its climate is therefore
warmer (frost free), but also dryer (less
rain, but more fog).
• This makes it very suitable for a
great range of bromeliads with special
mentions for tillandsias (tectorum),
dyckias, neoregelias, aechmeas
(blanchetiana), xNeophytum ‘Galactic
Warrior’ and hechtias.
• They find it difficult to grow
alcantareas and vrieseas in San Diego.
The winner of the ‘Skite Table’ was
John Mitchell with his Vriesea ‘Jags
Hunua Fire’ and second was Judy
Graham with a Vriesea gigantea hybrid.
Raffles winners were Jenny Gallagher,
Lois Phillips and Nancy Murphy.

Next Meeting: Sunday Aug 7th at Drury
School Hall starting at 1:30 pm. Our
guest speaker will be Dr Hawi Winter, on
the ‘edutainment’ topic of ‘Adaptations
of Bromeliads’.

Tillandsia Group Auckland

– Nancy Murphy
Our June meeting was held at Jocelyn
and Peter Coyle’s ‘Totara Gardens’ at
Whenuapai. The numbers were down a
little this month due to some members
attending the World Conference in
Houston, USA, and also the winter
exodus to the Northern Hemisphere.We
look forward to welcoming them back
to the next meeting and to hearing about
their experiences.

Cont’d P22 21

Cont’d from P21 – Group News

After our discussion on species and
hybrids beginning with ‘F’ and the
‘Show and Tell’ plants we had the
opportunity to view Peter’s private
collection. Like all tillandsia fanciers
his collection is growing and he has
beautiful plants and species to delight the
eye. We enjoyed seeing the spectacular
success he is enjoying with the black
orchid pots he has obtained from a
supplier of orchid accoutrements. It was
felt we could make a combined order if
enough members are interested. Peter’s
plants are enjoying being planted in soil
with ample air being supplied through
the pot lattices.

Next Meeting: August 14th at 1.30pm
at Dave and Isobelle Dawson’s garden,
77 Millen Ave Pakuranga 2010. Please
bring a chair, species beginning with
‘G’, ‘Show and Tell’ plants and a friend
to share our enthusiasm. That will be
great!

Eastern Bay of Plenty Bromeliad and
Orchid Group – Alison Iremonger

The sun was out for our monthly
meeting, as we visited three gardens.
Two of the gardens were at adjoining
townhouses, owned by friends who
are members of our group. Although
the gardens have been established for
many years, it is only over the past
five years that Robyn and Annabelle
have been bitten by the ‘Bromeliad
Bug’. On small sections, the display
of bromeliads is eye catching, with so
many vibrant colours, shapes and sizes.
Robyn is a ‘rock, stone’ collector, and
picks up interesting bits and pieces
whenever she travels. Her plants thrive
in a section that, at this time of the year,
is quite shaded. Annabelle has also got

a collection of bromeliads, and like
Robyn’s they all look so good, either
planted in the ground, up in pongas, in
baskets, or in pots. Together, they prove
that you can have a fabulous garden on

a small section.

The third garden belonged to Jeanette.
A small courtyard means you can easily
sit and enjoy her garden. Once again,
bromeliads were planted in the ground
and also spread around the garden in
pots. A large Alcanterea imperialis
(rubra) took pride of place along the
side of her home. Stunning.

The meeting followed the garden visit,
and Ross welcomed those present and
thanked Annabelle, Robyn and Jeanette
for sharing their gardens with us.

The speaker for our next meeting will
be Hawi Winter. Several members had
participated in the recent BSNZ Online
auction, purchasing some lovely plants.
Ross reminded members about the
BSNZ monthly Journal, and pointed out
the article re the local District Council
building indoor garden make over.

‘Show and Tell ‘gave members the
opportunity to see some of the plants
that had been purchased at the Online

auction.

Competition:
Bromeliad foliage – 1st G. Anderson,
2nd R. Fergusson, 3rd A. Iremonger
Bromeliad flowering – 1st B. Rogers,
2nd A. Iremonger, 3rd G. Fergusson
Non variegated bromeliad –
1st W. Fitzgibbons, 2nd A. Iremonger,
3rd O. Ross
Orchid –1st M. MacDonald,
2nd P. Signal, 3rd W. Fitzgibbons.

23
Robyn’s garden. Jeanette’s garden. Annabelle’s garden.
Sunday 6th November starting 10.00am
Presented by Totara Waters in association with the Bromeliad Society of
New Zealand. It’s sure to be another great day – mark your diary now!
• Lots of new releases
• Plant auction... a chance to pick up some ‘beauties’
• Neoregelias (including midis and minis), alcantareas, billbergias,
vrieseas and more!
• BBQ lunch and a great garden atmosphere with ‘brom lovers’ everywhere
Broms in the Park 2016
89 Totara Road
Whenuapai
Auckland
Phone 09-416 8272
Fax 09-416 8062
www.totarawaters.co.nz
BRING A FRIEND AND JOIN THE FUN!
Eastern Bay of Plenty garden photos...

TELL THE DIFFERENCE...
a regular column from Peter Waters
Tillandsia standleyi and Tillandsia orogenes

These two tillandsias, with similar
inflorescences, have been
confused with each other and it
is no wonder as they are very similar
in most respects. Medium sized with
green leaves and unusual cascading
inflorescences of brilliant red bracts
and violet petals, there is not much to
distinguish the two species.

Tillandsia standleyi comes from

Guatemala and Honduras and was
first described in 1931 while orogenes
is found in Mexico, Honduras and
Nicaragua and described in 1953. Both
grow between 1400 and 2200 metres
and are denizens of the cloud forest,
thriving in very moist conditions.

The key to differentiating these two
species lies in the flower spikes
enfolded by the large primary bracts.
Each spike has between 5 and 8 flowers.
In Tillandsia standleyi the spike is
20mm wide and in Tillandsia orogenes
only 8mm wide. There are other minor
differences, e.g. the primary bracts are
longer in standleyi, but the width of
the spikes is the easiest distinguishing
feature to check upon.

They could be expected to be difficult
to cultivate, but they seem to thrive
in New Zealand and make a stunning
display if grown epiphytically as they

do in nature.

Tillandsia orogenes. Showing the 8mmwide spike under the primary bract.
PhoTo PETER WATERS
Tillandsia standleyi.
PhoTo gRAEmE BARCLAy
24

 August 2016VOL 56 NO 8
A green Anole Lizard (anolis carolinensis)
catches a snack. Photo by Graeme Barclay.
Explaining the colours in neoregelias
A rare aechmea blooms in Auckland

New from New Zealand
– By Graeme Barclay
Our two featured plants this month are excellent examples of how astute hybrid
planning with the right parent mix, can deliver great results.

xCanmea ‘Hunua Serpent’John Mitchell – 2010 (Reg: Jan 2015)

Mature, open, funnel-form rosette 39cms.

diameter x 30cms. high, flaring at the

top. Matte green leaves with irregular,
dark brown cross-banding. The erect

inflorescence to 60cms. high has coral pink

scape bracts, pale green sepals and creamy

yellow flowers.The name ‘Serpent’ refers
to the foliage’s snake-skin pattern as well
as the cultivar’s stoloniferous, clambering

growth habit.

The parents are Aechmea correiaaraujoi and Canistrum seidelianum.
This new xCanmea is a bigeneric primary
hybrid (species x species) that has beenreleased as a grex cultivar, meaning all
released seedlings from the grex are near
enough to identical, due to their primary
hybrid genetic purity. Highly prominent
mottled leaf markings and long stolons,
coupled with an extremely vigorous
growth habit, form an excellent cultivar
that also seems to be slightly more cold-
hardy than its parents. Superb for growingin a hanging basket in a high light position,
where the plants can clamber downwards
around the pot and quickly form a large
clump.

xCanmea ‘Hunua Serpent’
PhOtO JOhN MItChELL
Billbergia ‘Totara Crossfire’

Peter Coyle – 2011 (Reg: July 2014)

Mature tubular rosette to 32cms. tall,

flaring at the top.

The parents are Billbergia ‘DomingosMartins’ x Billbergia ‘Beadleman’.
Peter has chosen this very nice, darkbillbergia to highlight his quest breeding
a very dark coloured, hopefully black
billbergia. While we know B. ‘DomingosMartins’ is a small, dark clone of Billbergia
vitatta, the pollen parent B. ‘Beadleman’
is a hybrid also made from B. ‘DomingosMartins’ x B. ‘Hellfire’. The ancestrycontains all relatively dark leaved plants,
so combining their genes can increase
the chances of producing even darkerseedlings. Billbergia ‘Totara Crossfire’ was
a dark, faintly silver-banded seedling that
stood out when maturing and blooming.
Like all B. ‘Domingos Martins’ hybrids,
it is a hardy garden or pot plant, that will
look best when grown hard in high lightand left to form a compact clump.

Billbergia ‘Totara Crossfire’

PhOtO PEtER COYLE

Bromeliad Society of New Zealand Inc

Bromeliad Journal – August 2016 issue

CONTENTS
‘New from New Zealand’ – new hybrids – Graeme Barclay 2
President’s Page – Graeme Barclay 3
A rare aechmea blooms in Auckland – Graeme Barclay 5
Bromeliad Society July meeting news – Dave Anderson 6
Coming up at our Society monthly meetings... 9
A crab that dines out exclusively on broms – Brazilian Society 9
The colour in neoregelias – John Catlan 10
Group News 12
Patience needed (Puyas) – Andrew Wilson 16
Society officers, subs and Journal directory 17
‘Special Species Spotlight’ – Graeme Barclay 18
‘Broms in the Park’ in November 20

The opinions expressed in articles or letters in this Journal are the contributors’ own views and
do not necessarily express the views or the policy of the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand.

COMING EVENTS

Please see the Group News section starting on page 12 for details of group meeting
times and venues.

AUGUST SEPTEMBER
23rd Society monthly meeting at 4th South Auckland Group meeting
Greyfriar’s Hall, corner of Mt Eden 15th Bay of Plenty Group meeting
and Windmill roads, starting at 7.30pm. 22nd - 25th New Zealand Orchid Society
The monthly choice competition and Show (with bromeliads) at ASB
discussion topic: mounted tillandsias. Showgrounds.

25th Hawkes Bay Group meeting
27th Society monthly meeting at

Greyfriar’s Hall, corner of Mt Eden
and Windmill roads, starting at 7.30pm.

The monthly choice competition and
discussion topic: Cryptanthus and
Orthophytum.

FRONT COVER: A Green Anole Lizard (anolis carolinensis) catches a snack

aboard a clump of variegated neoregelia at Jimbo’s Nursery, Houston, USA. These
lizards are very common there, with bromeliads a favourite hunting ground. Photo

Graeme Barclay.

PRESIDENT’S PAGE

Hi everyone – well, I am

pleased to say the last month
of winter is all but over and

spring is beckoning – hooray! I

know my plants (and myself) cannot
wait for warmer days to arrive so
we can reinvigorate ourselves and
get cracking in the garden again.

I hope the frost damage has not been

too severe on those of you in low-lying

areas again this year. Remember, a

good trim up and dose of Seasol can do
wonders reviving tatty looking broms.

Next month September 22nd - 25th
the BSNZ is putting on a Society
bromeliad display in the Orchid
& Flower Show held at the ASB
Showgrounds in Greenlane. This will

be an ‘unmanned’ display, but we will

be advertising the society and our
upcoming sales and ‘Fiesta’ show with
signs and brochures. Tickets are $10 if

you are thinking of going along, please

feel free to chat to people looking at
the display and hand them a brochure

– all visitors and new members are
welcome at our meetings.
Speaking of meetings, as I write it is
early August and I am traveling up

to Kerikeri on the 14th to speak at the

Far North Group’s meeting. I enjoy

visiting our regional group meetings

when able, but would also like to

invite any ‘out-of-towners’ that may
be in Auckland for our Tuesday night

monthly Society meetings, to please

feel free to come along and see how
we do things too. You are also most
welcome to bring along a friend or two

and enjoy the evening – and even buy

(or sell) plants as a BSNZ member!

A few final reminders – we have a
good selection of pots, hangers and

bags of bromeliad fertiliser for sale
at good prices at our Society monthly
meetings. Now is a good time to check
what you need for the coming warmer
seasons. Spring Sale October 16th – we
need the usual helpers on the day and
sellers please check if you need more
sales tag stickers. Peter Waters will
have packs of stickers for sale at the
August and September meetings. We
will also be handing around our helpers
and sellers clip-boards at the next two

meetings too, so please check if you are

free and able to participate on that date.

Stay well and warm and roll on spring!

Cheers

Graeme Barclay

New Zealand Orchid Society is staging their

ORCHID AND FLOWER SHOW
September 22nd to 25th
at the ASB Showgrounds, Greenlane. Entrance $10.00

Our Society will also have a special display of bromeliads.

A rare aechmea blooms in Auckland

– Graeme Barclay
This nice green form of Aechmea
lamarchei is blooming, for
the first time, in my Auckland
greenhouse this month. This plant
was formerly known as Aechmea
chlorophylla until 2009, when the
Aechmea sub-genus Macrochordion
was revised* and it was synonymized
with Aechmea lamarchei. The primary
bracts are a brilliant scarlet and the
foliage remains green, unlike other
forms of Aechmea lamarchei seen in
cultivation here, which often have
reddish leaves.

*Reference: Faria, Wendt & Brown 2009

Aechmea lamarchei

PhOtOS GRAEME BARCLAY

5

JULY MEETING PHOTOS... BY DAvE ANDERSON

Ursulaea macvaughii (Graeme Barclay).
First in open flowering section and‘Plant of the Month’.
Vriesea ‘Rosita’ (Peter Coyle).
First in named monthly plant section.
Vriesea ‘Hunua Embers’ x ‘Snowman’

(John Mitchell). First in open foliagesection.

Neoregelia ‘Ironside’ (Peter Coyle).
First in neoregelia section.
Tillandsia tenuifolia ‘Emerald Forest’
(Lynette Nash). First in tillandsia section.

Bromeliad Society July Meeting News

– Dave Anderson
Graeme Barclay chaired the
meeting and welcomed
everyone on a very cold winter
night.

We are always looking for articles
for the Journal so if you are able to
write about a garden or something on
bromeliads please contact the editor

Murray Mathieson on 09-418 0366

or email mathieson.marketing@xtra.
co.nz.

Dave Anderson took us through
the ‘Show and Tell’ plants. First
up and wanting a name was an

aechmea, thought to be an Aechmea
apocalyptica hybrid especially as

the flowers were a dirty grey/blue

colour. Next for display was Vriesea
vagans with the black colouration to
the base of the leaves that is similar to

Vriesea erythrodactylon. In fact they

are so similar that they are extremely

difficult to tell apart until they flower.

Another plant for display was a clump
of the species Tillandsia scaposa just
coming into flower. Lastly there were

two different and uncommon forms
of the species Vriesea lubbersii – the

first a very large form with leaves

over 300mm long with the second

having the usual 250mm long leaves,

however these had a red colouration to

them. It is to be noted that this plant

(Vriesea lubbersii) has been in NZ for
many years wrongly named as Vriesea
corcovadensis.

The following extract from an article

about Vriesea corcovadensis and
Vriesea lubbersii from the Far North
Coast Bromeliad Study Group N.S.W.

journal December 2014 makes for very

interesting reading:

“Another similar plant shown and
worth growing is Vriesea ‘Snow

White’ which doesn’t quite fit within

the corcovadensis complex neatly
with Vriesea corcovadensis or Vriesea
lubbersii, this had Derek Butcher

asking many questions when his plants

first began to flower for him eventually
deciding on a cultivar naming. Elton
Leme commented to Derek, “You

cannot imagine how many different

plants of this group I have collected,
all of them with specific discrepancies,
which make identification inaccurate.
At this very moment, I have some of
them flowering and I gave up trying
to identify most of them. Apparently,

few of them are new. Others look to be

just variations of different populations.
I agree with you that your plant looks
closer to Vriesea corcovadensis, and
I would not be much concerned with

the rosette conformation at this point
of the available knowledge. There is a
PhD student trying to understand this

group right now, so we wait to see

what conclusions she makes.

This information made Derek decide
to bite the bullet because it is better
to identify this clone with a cultivar

name than just Vriesea sp. Margaret

came up with ‘Snow White’. Anyone
who knows their Nursery stories will

Cont’d P8

Cont’d from P7 – Bromeliad Society Meeting News

know that Snow White had white skin
and dressed in white (white petals) had

ruby lips (red floral bracts) and black

hair (colour of the leaf sheaths). Plant

20cm diameter, x 15cm high, flowering

to 30cm high. We will be linking this
name to both Vr. corcovadensis and
Vr. lubbersii in the Cultivar Register
for possible amendment in the future.”

Graeme Barclay then showed a
PowerPoint presentation of the recent

BSI Conference held in Houston

together with some gardens that
conferences visited.

Jocelyn Coyle won this month’s

special raffle prize. The door prizes
went to Bill Ironside, Ed Foot and

Ross Walker.

COMPETITIONS

Open Flowering: First Graeme Barclay
with Ursulaea macvaughii – a quite

spectacular plant when in flower that
won plant of the month. John Mitchell

was second with Guzmania sanguinea

‘Tricolor’. In the competition were
Aechmea caesia, Dyckia ‘Ata Rangi’,
Vriesea ‘Hunua Ranges’ and another
Guzmania sanguinea ‘Tricolor’.

Open Foliage: John Mitchell was
first with Vriesea ‘Hunua Embers’

x ‘Snowman’. Second was Peter
Coyle with Neoregelia ‘Shelldance’.
In the competition were Billbergia
‘Domingos Martins’; Dyckia hybrid;
Vriesea ‘Galaxy’, ‘Vivid Vista’ and

‘Angela’ x ‘Hunua Embers’.

Tillandsia: Lynette Nash was first
with Tillandsia tenuifolia ‘Emerald
Forest’ – a beautifully mounted clump
on driftwood. Second with a clump
of Tillandsia ‘Houston’ was Peter
Coyle. Other plants on the table were
Tillandsia erubescens and ‘Tutti
Frutti’.

Neoregelia: First Peter Coyle with

Neoregelia ‘Ironside’ – a stunning

plant with green leaves marginated

cream with red/sepia broken cross-

banding. Second was Judy Graham
with Neoregelia ‘Chiquita Linda’. Also
in the competition were Neoregelia

‘Jewellery Shop’, ‘Sunfire Pheasant’
and ‘Exotica Grandiose’.

Named Monthly Plant (Vriesea
species to 250mm): First was Peter
Coyle with a Vriesea ‘Rosita’.

Second was John Muddiman with

Vriesea bleherae. Other plants on the
table were Vriesea sucrei, philippocoburgii x vagans, poenulata (dark
form), lubbersii (rubra), racinae,
erythrodactylon ‘White Cloud’ and
‘Snow White’ – see article about this
last from FNCBSG above.

The Plant of the Month went to Graeme

Barclay’s Ursulaea macvaughii.

Congratulations to all the winners.

NEXT MEETING: Tuesday 23rd
August.

COMING UP AT OUR
SOCIETY MONTHLY MEETINGS...

We have a full and interesting programme scheduled for the rest of 2016.

August

Monthly choice competition: Mounted tillandsias

Lester Ching will talk on mounted tillandsias

September

Monthly choice competition: Cryptanthus and Orthophytum
Dot Leaning will talk on these two genera

October

Monthly choice competition: Hanging baskets

Diane Timmins will talk on pup cutting and propagation

November

Monthly choice competition: Christmas arrangements

Annual plant auction and Christmas supper

An unusual discovery... a crab that
dines out exclusively on broms!

– Extract of information from the Bulletin of the Brazilian Bromeliad
Society, May 1997
Asmall crab only 3cm long that climbs

4 metres up a tree just to feed on

bromeliads was discovered by

researchers from the University of Campinas
(Unicamp) at Juréia on the southern coast of

São Paulo state. This crab has a special taste

for bromeliad leaves, in contrast to its

relatives who prefer the leaves of mangrove trees or organic detritus.

Certain species are becoming endangered because this voracious animal
eats only bromeliad leaves. Population numbers are falling due to this

factor and also because of habitat destruction. Eric Fischer, Andrea Araújo

and Luiz Duarte made this unusual discovery and are studying the effect

of this crab on plant reproduction. Scientifically known as Metasesarma
rubripes, it prefers the flower petals, stigma and pollen and feeds for an

average of 40 minutes.

The colour in neoregelias...

– John Catlan, from “Under the Mango Tree” – adapted from ‘Bromlink’,
Gold Coast Succulent and Bromeliad Society Inc. 2000
1. Bract colour: The centre of
neoregelias produce a flush of colour

which begins with the initiation of

flowering. The colour ranges from
green, white and various shades of

red through to purple. With some the
colour fades rapidly while others last
twelve months or more.

2. Light blushing: The top layer of
cells in the foliage of plants of the
Neoregelia carolinae complex and
others have the ability to flush with

colour. This is governed by light

intensity, day length and nitrogen

levels.

3. Temperature variation. Especially
during spring, with fluctuating periods
of temperature, in neoregelias such
as Neoregelia ‘Bob & Grace’ and
Neoregelia ‘Lambert’s Pride’ the green

banding is initiated. Increased fertiliser

may increase the banding but there is a

limit. I believe the discolor-syndrome

layer of cells is laid down during its
growth and as the growth exceeds the
normal rate it leaves gaps in the colour.

All these plants are subject to sun

tanning.

4. Sun tanning: Is associated with
the top layer of chlorophyll cells.
The same as light blushing. The
difference - light blushing will fade in

decreased light -sun tanning is fixed.
Once it happens, it is there forever.
The neoregelias N. ‘Charm’, N.

‘Gold Fever’, N. ‘Gespacho’, N. ‘Red
Planet’, etc. are subject to sun tanning

and hide the variation of colour in the

lower layer of cells forever; turn the
leaf over and you will find the spotting
has not changed. In some Neoregelia
concentrica hybrids sun tanning may
affect 25 cm to three-quarters of the

leaf and is normally black and is fixed

and in the top layer of cells. On a dark

night, shine a torch from beneath the
leaf, through the black sun tanning,
and find little green flecks—cells that

did not tan. Also you can see ring spot
in the lower layer of the cells that the
sun tanning has hidden. Sun tanning
starts from the tip of the leaf and works
down.

5. Ring spot: Caused by evaporation
of water from the meniscus of the cup
water and droplets. The cooling effect
of evaporation is so sudden that the
cells on the leaf surface cannot cope and
rupture. They then cease to function,

allowing sunlight to tan the lower
layer of cells. This happens winter or

summer, shade or bright conditions.

The variation in temperature begins
the effect. Open conditions and low
humidity in winter allow more rapid
cooling.

6. Discolor syndrome: In a dense
forest, the foliage can restrict the light
that reaches the forest floor to as low
as one percent. The majority of this
light is red and plants with discolor

foliage have developed this adaptation
to absorb the maximum red light
available. The green top layer absorbs

the blue light, the red light is absorbed
and reflected by the bottom layer of red
cells. The light that is reflected back

through the green cells gives these cells
a second chance to absorb the light.
When you see discolor bromeliads you
know they require low light.

Neoregelia ‘Charm’, N. ‘Gold Fever,

N. ‘Gespacho’, N. ‘Bobby Dazzler’,
etc., all have these red cells in the
middle layer of cells. I believe they are
an adaptation to take advantage of low

light. As this does not fit the meaning
of discolor, I refer to it as discolor

syndrome. These plants are green
spotted and look and perform better at
lower light levels. They have a safety
factor against high light intensity.

The top layer of cells is subject to sun
tanning. In the red spotted layer the
colour is fixed and it doesn’t matter
how low the light level gets, within
reason, as the colour remains.

7. Chlorophyll: Comes in various
strengths from yellow in Neoregelia
‘Gold Fever’ to green in Neoregelia
‘Charm’. The yellow chlorophyll
allows the reds to have a clear,
iridescent colour, while green

chlorophyll darkens the red. Fertiliser
will darken the chlorophyll cell and
consequently darkens the red.

8. Variegation: This is stripes that run
the length of the leaf and may be white,
yellow, red, and anything in between.

The only comment is that in neoregelias
that have the discolor syndrome that

are variegated, the chlorophyll cells in

the top layer turn white and the bottom
layer stays red. Because the green

disappears altogether, the red glows

with a clarity that is stunning.

9. Fingernail markings: These red
tips to the leaves are intriguing in very
bright light. They darken in colour
and in low light they glow. Neoregelia
spectabilis has these striking fingernail
markings and a green centre. Why?

I was told that it was to attract birds
for pollination. Then I thought about
it. The fingernail colour lasts from

the beginning to the end of the plant.

So for four to five years birds visit

this species in anticipation of a four
week window of opportunity to obtain
nectar. Not very cost effective!

10. Speckling: Neoregelia ‘Barbarian’
has fine speckled markings. These
plants are subject to sun tanning but

leaves the centre speckled.

11. Fertiliser: Very mild fertiliser
stress will enhance colour. Too little

and any excessive stress, light, heat,

cold or lack of humidity will damage
plants. Too much and green will be
your favourite colour!

12. Blood water: If you tip the water
out of some bromeliads you will find
it tinged red. An explanation is that
neoregelia growers drip their blood
into the bromeliad cups to enhance

the colour! I’ve tracked this bromeliad
myth down to a few tillandsia,

guzmania and vriesea growers who are

jealous that neoregelias are colourful

throughout their life span while their

silver or green plants have to flower

before becoming interesting.

Group News

South Auckland Bromeliad Group

– Hawi Winter
At our meeting on Sunday, August 7th in
the Drury School Hall about 40 members
braved the low temperatures. President

Nancy Murphy announced the recent

committee decision to donate $250.00 to
the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand
to contribute to the publication of the
monthly Journal. She also informed that

last month’s speaker, David Anderson,

had donated his mileage money to our
South Auckland Group.

The Christmas party was announced

to be held at the Murphy residence in

Waiuku (please bring a plate). There will

be a Mystery Trip on February 5th 2017,

a bus trip to Thames at the beginning of

March (tbc) and our SABG sale day on
9th April 2017.

The speaker of the day was Hawi
Winter on the theme ‘Adaptations of
bromeliads’. The one hour long slide
show covered most of the special tricks
that bromeliads use in order to be more
successful in their respective habitats:

• structural, functional and
physiological adaptations

• water and nutrient absorption and
conservation

• advantages in shapes of plants and
their flowers
• food-chains in tank bromeliads
• tank forming bromeliads versus
succulent bromeliads

• how trichomes work and what they
do

• functionalities of stolons, spines
and different seed dispersal modes

• photosynthesis and CAM
photosynthesis

Winner of the Skite Table was

John Mitchell with his Guzmania
sanguinea, 2nd place was evenly
split between John Mitchell, John
Muddiman and Judy Graham.
Raffle winners: 1st Gaye Trembath,
2nd Richard & Delia Ackland,
3rd Betty Townley and 4th Irene Clarke.

Next meeting: Sunday September 4th at
Drury School Hall starting at 1:30 pm.

Our guest speaker will be Don Brown,

on wittrockias and small garden design.

Hawkes Bay Bromeliad Group

– Julie Greenhill
There was an unusually long time
between our end of July meeting and
the previous one on May 1st. We were
fortunate to have Don Brown come
down from Auckland and speak at our

May meeting on billbergias. He had

some lovely show plants with him and
it was a very successful afternoon with
some good discussion. We were very
grateful to Don for his time and effort in
getting down to Napier and for sharing
his knowledge.
At the recent July meeting we had
some frost and cold damaged plants to

compare. It seems that those of us who

have our plants in areas with little air

movement find that they are a lot more

prone to damage even if they have a
protective frost cloth cover. And it seems

I am going to have to install a small fan

in my plastic house!
A session looking at the various websites
online and what they have to offer in
terms of bromeliad information took
up the rest of the discussion part of the
meeting. Pieter had collated a list of his

favourite sites. Members were able to

share experiences with others and advise
of good trades and not so good ones.

Competition results
Flowering: 1st Vriesea ‘Angela’ –Wade
Smith, 2nd Aechmea ‘Anton’ –Julie
Greenhill
Non flowering: 1st Vriesea ‘Dark Knight’

– Wade Smith, 2nd equal Neoregelia
‘Milagro’ – Wade Smith and Aechmea
orlandiana ‘Ensign’ –Julie Greenhill
Next meeting: September 25th at St John
Hall at 2.00pm.

Bay of Plenty Bromeliad Group

– Lynley Breeze
Lynley welcomed 41 members and 4
visitors to the July meeting. We noted
that we have not had many frosts this

winter but a lot of rain. Dean Morman

said that there had been several frosts

at Papamoa, though not severe. Diana

Durrant is organising a bus trip to some

lovely Eastern Bay of Plenty gardens
on Sunday 27th November. The cost is
$30.00 per seat.
We donated $150.00 to the Bromeliad
Society of New Zealand as an
appreciation for the excellent Journal
and the wonderful colour photos.
Our club will have a tent at the Lakes
Pavilion over the period of the NZ
Garden and Art Festival (17th – 20th
November). We will display plants and

bromeliad information, as well as a few

sales plants.
Dave Anderson showed photos and
described his trip through the Florida

Everglades and showed further photos

of bromeliad gardens near San Diego.

It was lovely to see the summer

conditions! There were many questions

and comments and Dave encouraged
members to think about attending the

next Bromeliad International Conference

to be held in San Diego.
Dave led the discussion on the plants and
added a lot of interesting information.

Competition results
Plant of the month-Tillandsia: There
were many beautiful plants tabled in

this section, Tillandsia gymnobotrya,

ionantha, tectorum, roseiflora, stricta,

cereicola, lepidosepala, erubescens.

Open competition: 1st Dean Morman
with Vriesea ‘Quincy Rose’, 2nd Gill
Keesing with Aechmea orlandiana, 3rd
Dean Morman with Vriesea ‘Flare’.
Also tabled were Guzmania ‘Irene’
xNiduregelia ‘Something Special’.
Tillandsia competition: 1st Audrey
Hewson with Tillandsia seleriana,
2nd Bertha Schollum with Tillandsia
reducta, 3rd Bertha Schollum with
Tillandsia ‘White Star’. Also on the table
were Tillandsia complanata, ehlersiana
and seleriana.

Novice section: 1st Diane Vucich with
Neoregelia ‘Hot Gossip’.

Next meeting: 14th September. Sandra
Simpson will discuss her trip along the
coast of Canada to Alaska. Plant of the

month – mounted bromeliads, excluding

tillandsias.

Northland Bromeliad Group

– Nancy Peters
Our July meeting was held at the

Reyburn House Studio, Whangarei.

Dot Leaning gave us an interesting
presentation on the genus Cryptanthus.
She had brought along an impressive
number of plants and those not for sale

Cont’d P14 13

Cont’d from P13 – Group News

she donated to our raffle table for five
lucky winners. Her first plants had been
bought off Maureen Green.

Cryptanthus is native to Brazil but there
were not many still left in the wild. Dot
had found it hard to get tips on growing
the genus and information from the

United States or from Google was

American based and not applicable here.
They don’t like being outside in New
Zealand and she grows hers in a tunnel
house as they get frost in their valley.
She had found them hard to propagate

as some flowers were all male and some

all female and it was hard to tell the

difference. They like to be planted in soil,

so for potting up she uses a seed mix and
has found cuttings have to be kept damp

i.e. watered twice a day. They don’t have
to have roots, just remove the bottom
leaves. It was important to discover

what light they like to grow in as colours
change depending on light levels. Too
much light can burn the colours out.
Dot shared with us her recipe for making

liquid fertiliser, where possums were an

important ingredient in the brew! Her
husband Bill had been known to shoot

them from the bedroom window, but they

also had many traps on their property
which was bordered by thousands of
acres of native bush reserve.

‘Show & Tell’ competition
Open section:

1st Maureen Green – Vriesea (unnamed),
2nd equal Diana Smithyman Neoregelia
(unnamed) and Graeme Smithyman

Billbergia amoena (red), 3rd Pat Vendt –

Neoregelia ‘Apricot Nectar’ x ‘Jewellery
Shop’.

Cryptanthus section:

1st Pat Vendt, 2nd Laura Maton, 3rd Lynsie
McMahon.

Next meeting:

Our August meeting will be held at
Reyburn House Studio. Our topic will be
‘unusual or problem plants’.

Eastern Bay of Plenty Bromeliad and
Orchid Group – Alison Iremonger

Ross welcomed those present to our July

meeting held in the Kingsley Scout Hall,

and to our guest speaker Dr. Hawi Winter.
We have had the pleasure of hearing

Hawi speak at a previous meeting,
enjoying it so much we invited him

back. This time he spoke on ‘Adaptions
of bromeliads’. After his presentation

he answered questions. Many thanks to
Hawi. It is always interesting to have

speakers visit us from other bromeliad
groups.
Trips away include a visit to Tauranga on
16th October, a visit to Auckland on the
5th – 6th November taking in ‘Broms in

the Park’. A trip to Northland in March

next year is also on the list.
Afternoon tea was served and then the
‘Show and Tell’ part of our meeting was
held. Hawi answered more questions
from the members and Ross gave a talk
on vrieseas (our plant of the month). He

had a display of vrieseas. Raffles were

drawn and then we had the sales table.

Competition results
Bromeliad foliage: 1st R. Fergusson, 2nd

A. Iremonger, 3rd A. Iremonger
Bromeliad flowering: 1st R. Fergusson,
2nd A. Iremonger, 3rd B. Rogers
Vriesea: 1st equal R. Fergusson and A.
Iremonger, 3rd G. Anderson
Orchid: 1st A. Iremonger
Next meeting: 21st August, at Ross and
Gail’s home. It is going to be a working
bee and Maureen will give a talk on mini

neoregelias.

Dr Hawi Winter
and Ross
Fergussonat the Julymeeting inWhakatane.
SPRING SALE

Sunday October 16th
at Mt Eden War Memorial Hall, Balmoral.
9.00am to 3.00pm.
Admission is free.

• Buy some great plants that have been grown
‘with love’ by our Society members.

• An opportunity to talk to the growers about
plant growing conditions and requirements.
If you’re planning to be a seller please note that

Peter Waters will have sellers’ sales tag stickers

available at our August and September monthly

meetings.

Patience needed

– Andrew Wilson. ‘The Bromeliad Blade’
(San Diego Bromeliad Society newsletter) May 2016.
Andrew’s Puya alpestris.
This year has seen
the Chilean puyas
bloom again in San
Diego county. We should
know why, but we don’t.
We had fair rain but not
above average; it was a
mild winter not a cold
one. The last time my P.
alpestris bloomed was
in 2008. The same story
holds true for a friend of
mine (Ron Chisum) in
Escondido. According to
Dan Kinnard blooms have
appeared for the first time
in years at Kent’s in Vista.

Some plants have flowers

that approach green and
others that have blue. You
can see different hues
depending on the time of
day and the angle you view

the flowers. The flowers are
full of nectar, as Ron found

out when he cut the spike
and turned it over – his

hands were flooded with

the amount that poured out.

Huntington Gardens claims
their Chilean puyas bloom
each year. That does not
seem to be the case in San
Diego county.

16

OFFICERS

Patron: Patricia Sweeney
President: Graeme Barclay 09-817 4153
Vice Presidents: Jocelyn Coyle 09-416 8272
Chris Paterson 09-625 6707
Secretary: Bev Ching 09-576 4595
Treasurer: Peter Waters 09-534 5616
Life Members: Dave Anderson, Patricia Perratt,
Patricia Sweeney, Peter Waters

Scientific Officer: Peter Waters 09-534 5616

Librarian: Noelene Ritson 09-625 8114

Committee: Dave Anderson 09-638 8671
Don Brown 09-361 6175
Lester Ching 09-576 4595
Alan Cliffe 09-479 1451
David Cowie 09-630 8220
Diane Timmins 09-415 9066

Editor: Murray Mathieson 09-418 0366

MEMBERSHIP SUBSCRIPTION

New Zealand

Ordinary membership NZ $35.00 ($5.00
discount if paid before the end of February).
Dual membership (same household) NZ $45.00
($5.00 discount also applies as above).

Overseas

NZD $45.00. Send all payments to the Treasurer,
Peter Waters, 22 Half Moon Rise, Half Moon
Bay, Auckland 2012.

Correspondence

All general correspondence should be sent to the

Secretary, Bromeliad Society of New Zealand,

P.O. Box 108-168, Symonds Street, Auckland,
New Zealand. The opinions expressed in letters
or articles in the Journal are the contributors’
own views and do not necessarily express the
views or policy of the Bromeliad Society of

New Zealand Inc.

Society Website

www.bsnz.org – For past Journal archive –
growing tips – articles – sales information

BROMELIAD JOURNAL

Editorial Committee

Dave Anderson

Murray Mathieson

Peter Waters

Production

Murray Mathieson

Distribution

Don Brown

All enquiries and contributions welcome, please

contact any member of the editorial committee

or send to Peter Waters, 22 Half Moon Rise,
Half Moon Bay, Auckland 2012 or email:
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Deadline

For all editorial and advertising, the first

Tuesday of publication month

Display Advertising

Rates are:
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‘Buy & Swap’

Listings in ‘Buy & Swap’ are FREE for

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For advertising enquiries and material, please
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The warmer seasons are on their way, when the neoregelias begin to colour
up and look their best. This month we look at a variegated form of a
common species that is sure to become a garden favourite in years to come.

Neoregelia ‘Jaline’

In the January 2015 article of ‘Special
Species Spotlight’ we looked at
Neoregelia ‘Goldilocks’ - a centrally
variegated form of the large and

commonly cultivated species,
Neoregelia cruenta. In that article I

mentioned there were other variegated

clones around, to be discussed at a

late date. This plant is one of them

– Neoregelia ‘Jaline’ – which is a
marginated form with creamy-white
edges to its leaves.
This plant was reportedly collected
in the wild of Brazil by well known

Brazilian collector Pedro Nahoum,

most likely in a coastal area around Rio

de Janeiro. There, numerous differing
forms of N. cruenta flourish in the pure
sand of beach and dune areas, where
they act as “pioneer plants”, helping

establish islands of vegetation and
shrubs on the bare sand. A variegated
clump of this marginated clone with its

fire-red leaf tips would have no doubt
been an amazing sight in the wild,

which is probably the reason for it
being noticed by Nahoum and collected
for cultivation. Like the other special
forms of N. cruenta, it eventually
made its way into nurseries in Florida,
probably sometime in the mid 2000’s,

where it was eventually registered in
2010 with the name Neoregelia ‘Jaline’

– the name of Pedro Nahoum’s wife.
Unfortunately, like many other
variegated bromeliads, Neoreglia

‘Jaline’is sometimes prone to producing

pups that are more striated, or randomly
variegated, rather than uniformly
albomarginated. Strictly speaking,

these are ‘sports’ of the mother plant

and should be called something else,
however, in this case we do not know

how stable the original collected clone

was, or even what it exactly looked like
variegation wise. Hence, these different

looking variegates are all still known
as Neoreglia ‘Jaline’, though as also
mentioned in the earlier Neoregelia

‘Goldilocks’ article, there is a centrally

variegated form of N. cruenta around
too. This could well have been a relative
or pup from what became Neoregelia

‘Jaline’, but this plant does not yet seem

to be registered with a cultivar name.
The photo (bottom next page) illustrates
how two forms of Neoregelia ‘Jaline’
can easily arise due the occurrence of
such vegetative ‘sports’.

Whilst on the subject of Neoregelia
cruenta, a question often asked is;
“How do I tell if my Neoregelia
cruenta is the true species ?” While
the aforementioned variegated forms

are easy to spot, the plain green clones

can be harder to identify. The easiest

features to look at are the leaves, which
are always extremely stiff, thick and

almost succulent, especially when

young as emerging pups – so much so
that you can hardly bend them. The leaf
undersides are also normally noticeably
banded in whitish scurf rings. The
leaves should also have reddish spines

and be tipped in red, though the amount

of this tip colour can vary between

clones. Another thing to look for, is

that the leaves do not have any other

recognisable coloured patterning, spots
or bands, so if your N. cruenta has such
markings, it is most likely a N. cruenta

hybrid and is not the true species.

I am happy to say that a plant or two

of Neoregelia ‘Jaline’ is now well
established in New Zealand and that
one day pups will become available

to spread around. The green, red and
bronze forms of Neoregelia cruenta,
as well as the golden-variegated

Neoregelia ‘Goldilocks’, are all
excellent growers here and Neoregelia
‘Jaline’ will be no different. The thing

I love about this species – and this

variegated clone in particular – is that
it normally always looks good under a
range of different growing conditions.

In low, or medium-high light with
moderate feeding when young, it will
grow to a good size with longer leaves,

but still display its signature red leaf
tips that sets the variegated rosette
off. Planted in the ground in full sun

and somewhat starved, it will grow
smaller and much more compact, with
wider, shorter leaves and develop even
more accentuated red leaf tips, as seen
in the photo. It is therefore very well

suited to full sun locations and high

wind conditions, making it an excellent

choice as a trouble-free landscape
feature plant.

Neoregelia ‘Jaline’ grown in medium light.
PhOtO GRAEME BARCLAY
Neoregelia ‘Jaline’ blooming and grown in
high light. PhOtO JAPIE EStERhuYSEN
Neoregelia ‘Jaline’ showing two
forms. PHoTo RuSSEl loW

Sunday, 6th November
starting at 10:00am
Presented by Totara Waters in association
with the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand.
It’s sure to be another great day
– mark your diary now!
• Lots of new releases
• Plant auction... a chance to pick up
some ‘beauties’
• Neoregelias (including midis and minis),
alcantareas, billbergias, vrieseas and more!
• BBQ lunch and a great garden
atmosphere with ‘brom lovers’ everywhere
Broms
in the
Park
2016
89 Totara Road, Whenuapai, Auckland
Phone: 416 8272, Fax: 416 8062
www.totarawaters.co.nz
BRING A FRIEND AND JOIN THE FUN!

 September 2016VOL 56 NO 9
Absolutely stunning. Cryptanthus Absolute Zero’.
Photo Graeme Barclay
• Learning about the genera: Cryptanthus… the ‘Earth Stars’
Get ready for our Spring Sale… Sunday Oct 16th

Sunday October 16th
at Mt Eden War Memorial Hall, Balmoral.
9.00am to 3.00pm.
Admission is free.
• Buy some great plants that have been grown
‘with love’ by our Society members.
• An opportunity to talk to the growers about
plant growing conditions and requirements.
If you’re planning to be a seller please note that
Peter Waters will have sellers’ sales tag stickers
available at our September monthly meeting.
SPRING SALE
Sunday 6th November starting 10.00am
Presented by Totara Waters in association with the
Bromeliad Society of New Zealand. It’s sure to
be another great day – mark your diary now!
• Lots of new releases
• Plant auction… a chance to pick up some ‘beauties’
• Neoregelias (including midis and minis), alcantareas,
billbergias, vrieseas and more!
• BBQ lunch and a great garden atmosphere with
‘brom lovers’ everywhere
Broms in the Park 2016
89 Totara RoadWhenuapaiAucklandPhone 09-416 8272Fax 09-416 8062www.totarawaters.co.nz

Bromeliad Society of New Zealand Inc

Bromeliad Journal – September 2016 issue


CONTENTS
Bromeliad Society August meeting news – Bev Ching 4
‘Tell the difference’ – Peter Waters 6
Annual Spring Show in the Far North 7
Society Garden visits coming up in November 7
‘New from New Zealand’ – new hybrids – Graeme Barclay 8
President’s Page – Graeme Barclay 9
Group News 10
‘Hanging’ or ‘flying’? – Margaret Bramley 13
Sweet tooth destruction in Whakatane – Ross Fergusson 13
‘Special Species Spotlight’ – Graeme Barclay 14
More great photos from the BSI World Conference – Graeme Barclay 16
Learning about the genera: Cryptanthus – Dot Leaning 18

The opinions expressed in articles or letters in this Journal are the contributors’ own views and
do not necessarily express the views or the policy of the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand.

COMING EVENTS

Please see the Group News section starting on page 10 for details of group meeting

times and venues.

SEPTEMBER
25th Hawkes Bay Group meeting
27th Society monthly meeting at

Greyfriar’s Hall, corner of Mt Eden

and Windmill roads, starting at 7.30pm.
The monthly choice competition:
Cryptanthus and Orthophytum. Dot
Leaning will be talking to us about the
genus Cryptanthus.

OCTOBER

2nd South Auckland Group meeting
9th Tillandsia Group – Auckland meeting
12th Bay of Plenty Group meeting
14th - 15th Far North Group Annual Show
16th Society Spring Sale at Mt Eden
War Memorial Hall, 9.00am to 3.00pm
25th Society monthly meeting at

Greyfriar’s Hall, corner of Mt Eden and

Windmill roads, starting at 7.30pm. The
monthly choice competition: Hanging
Baskets. Diane Timmins will talk on pup
cutting and propagation.

FRONT COVER: Cryptanthus ‘Absolute Zero’ displayed by Ruby Adams in the

BSI World Conference show in Houston, June 2016. This is a lovely wide-leaved
hybrid made by Florida grower Jim Irvin. The silver-banded species Cryptanthus
zonatus features heavily in the ancestry. Photo: Graeme Barclay.


Bromeliad SocietyAugust Meeting News – Bev Ching

Vice-President Jocelyn Coyle

chaired the meeting this month
as President Graeme Barclay

was in bed with a bad bout of flu. We had

44 members, including a new member
and visitors. We hope you enjoyed the
meeting and we look forward to seeing
you again next month.

The sales table is full of items to help
with your bromeliads, including books,
price tags, pots etc. With spring arriving
and cutting and potting pups on the
agenda, these items are most important.
There was also Derek Butcher’s DVD on
tillandsias for sale at $10.00.

Our talk in September will be by Dot
Leaning on the genus Cryptanthus.

October will be Diane Timmins showing
you how to cut off pups.

Door prizes were won by Isla McGowan,
John Muddiman and Simon Kriehn. The
main prizes went to Rhonda Maloy and

Carolle Roberts.

Lester Ching gave a talk about mounting
tillandsias on different media, like
driftwood, ponga, stone, and scoria.
Lester demonstrated how he uses
kindling wood from the supermarket
(like Len Trotman used to do), uses No
Nails glue (water based), and sometimes
a staple to stabilise the plant. These will
grow happily and the roots will establish
themselves to whatever they are growing
on. Some varieties will grow more
vigorously than other mounted plants.
Our native ponga is very good for the
mounting of plants and the roots establish

themselves very quickly. Tillandsia
duratii looks good on a round piece
of plastic netting. Tillandsia latifolia
and varieties also look good on a large

piece of driftwood. When flowering has
finished, cut the flower spike off, tie it

up and it should keep producing pups.
(Don’t forget the watering!).

COMPETITION

Open Flowering: First was John

Muddiman with a flowering xNeophytum
‘Ralph Davis’, second John Mitchell
with a flowering Hohenbergia leopoldo
horstii. Also on the table was Vriesea


‘Angela’ x ‘Hunua Embers’.
Open Foliage: First was John Mitchell


with a Vriesea ‘Tickled Pink’ hybrid,
and he was also second with Vriesea
‘Vistarella’ x ‘Tango Lace’.
Tillandsia: First was Lynette Nash with
Tillandsia aeranthos and Dave Anderson
was second with Tillandsia recurvifolia
var subsecundifolia. Also on the table
were Tillandsia kautskyi and Tillandsia
atroviridipetala var longepedunculata

and a tillandsia hybrid.

Monthly Choice: mounted tillandsias:

First was John Mitchell with Tillandsia
punctulata, and second was Lynette
Nash with Tillandsia ionantha. Also
on the table were Tillandsia tectorum
(stem) and Tillandsia recurvifolia var
subsecundifolia.
Plant of the month: This month went to
John Mitchell’s Vriesea ‘Tickled Pink’
hybrid.
Congratulations to all the winners.

NEXT MEETING: Tuesday 27th
September 2016 at 7.30pm.


August meeting
photos by
Dave Anderson…



Tillandsia aeranthos (Lynette Nash).
First in Tillandsia section.
Tillandsia punctulata (John Mitchell).
First in Monthly Choice competition –
mounted tillandsias
Vriesea ‘Tickled Pink’ (John Mitchell).
First in Open Foliage section and overall‘Plant of the Month’.
Up close with Vriesea ‘Tickled Pink’.

xNeophytum ‘Ralph Davis’
(John Muddiman).
First in Open Flowering section.

TELL THE DIFFERENCE…
a regular column from Peter Waters
Tillandsia ionantha and Tillandsia scaposa

The commonest tillandsia in
cultivation is probably Tillandsia
ionantha and it is seen in quite
a few different clones. Because it is
widespread throughout Central America
it has evolved into these varying forms
to adapt to variations in habitat. It was
described originally in 1855 and in
1941 Lyman Smith added the variety
Tillandsia ionantha var scaposa from
Guatemala discovered by botanist
Paul Standley. Since then, this variety
has been found in Honduras and San
Salvador also, usually at high elevations
in cooler moist cloud forest.

In 1999 Renate Ehlers decided that it
was sufficiently different to ionantha to
warrant being a species in its own right,
so Tillandsia scaposa was published.
This species is fairly common in
New Zealand but can be confused
with ionantha. The inflorescence in
each consists of several spikes each

consisting of a single flower arranged
in a circle. In scaposa there is a short
peduncle or scape of about 1 to 3 cms,

while in ionantha this is absent and the

inflorescence appears to come from the

base of the plant. While scaposa has a
more erect, narrower rosette with softer
leaves than ionantha it is not easy to

distinguish when not flowering.

Another species that has been confused
with ionantha and scaposa, is Tillandsia
kolbii. Originally published in 1981 it
was not generally accepted as separate
from scaposa until 2006. Strangely
enough it is quite distinct with a smaller,
secund (leaning to one side) rosette

with generally white flowers from a
distichous spike (flowers arranged on

opposite sides of scape in a single plane).
I have had several Tillandsia kolbii from
different sources, but in every case they
have turned out to be scaposa. I am
almost certain that the true species is not
in New Zealand.

As mentioned above scaposa comes
from a much cooler climate than
ionantha and you should be careful to
cultivate it accordingly.

Tillandsia ionantha
Photo: PeteR WateRs
Tillandsia scaposa
Photo: PeteR WateRs
Tillandsia kolbii
Photo: Renate ehLeRs

Sunday November 20th
10.00am to 1.00pm
The gARdeNS:
• diana and Ian McPherson
20 Park hill Road, Birkenhead• Joy and Bob doran
25 Island Bay Rd, Beachhaven• Jenny and Tony green, and Regina Wai
2 Valhalla drive, BeachhavenThe Bay of Islands Orchid Society
and the Far North Bromeliad Group
proudly present their
AnnuAl Spring Show
Friday 14th October 9.30am to 4.30pm
Saturday 15th October 9.30am to 3.30pm
The Plaza, The Turner Centre,
Cobham Road, Kerikeri.
Admission : Adults $4.00.
Children under 12 years old accompanied
by an adult, are free.
ENJOY SOME GREAT PLANTS!

New from New Zealand
– By Graeme Barclay
Starting with this Journal, in order to extend this series of articles and allow
larger or multiple photos, we will be featuring only one Kiwi hybrid each
issue.

Neoregelia ‘Shark Fest’ | Graeme Barclay – 2011 | Reg: Feb 2016

Mature rosette to 80cm diameter with
distinctive upward-curving leaf blades
creating a crateriform rosette. Golden-

olive green, finely spined leaves overlaid

with irregular red striations and solid
red variegated sections on both sides.

The parents are Neoregelia ‘Roseo
Lineata’ and Neoregelia ‘Rainbow
Carcharodon’.

The goal with this cross was to make
a ‘red striped carcharodon’, something
that was not registered at the time the
cross was made in 2011. Neoregelia
‘Rainbow Carcharodon’ is a relative
newcomer on the scene and hence
had not been used to make many
hybrids, so when the opportunity
arose to use some of its pollen, several
crosses were made onto various seed
mothers. Neoregelia ‘Roseo Lineata’

is a red lineated, medium sized plant,
the traits of these red stripes and the
distinctive upturned leaf blades of
Neoregelia ‘Rainbow Carcharodon’
have combined perfectly to produce a
unique shaped, colourful hybrid that
glows in the sun. A number of different
size and shape seedlings eventuated
from the grex, one was much larger
than the others and possessed a very

irregular, striated leaf pattern. It

developed wide, solid red stripes on
most of the leaves early on, creating an
interesting and random look on each
leaf blade.

This plant is the first to be named

from this grex and is yet to bloom.
Hopefully when it does, it will also
possess a scarlet centre blush, which
will be another positive trait gained
from the seed mother genetics.

Neoregelia ‘Shark Fest’
Photo: GRaeMe BaRCLaY

PRESIDENT’S PAGE

What a great feeling when the

first days of spring finally
tick over! I am sure I can see

my broms smiling and it is amazing
how quickly they begin to regain some
colour with the longer days and higher
light intensity. Remember to carefully
check those plants that are due for a
feed – namely your foliage vrieseas,
guzmanias and alcantareas. Now is
the time to apply slow release pellets
and/or start foliar feeding again, as it
can make a real difference on many
of these plants by the time summer
is in full swing. We have small 500g
and 1kg bags of slow release fertiliser
especially suited for bromeliads for
sale at our coming BSNZ meetings,
so be sure to check what you have and

stock up now. If any of the regional

bromeliad groups would like to buy
some bags of this bromeliad fertiliser,
please contact us and we can work out
payments and how to get some to you.

In mid August I had the pleasure of

speaking at the Far North Bromeliad

Group’s meeting near Kerikeri. It was

great to visit and spend time with such
a friendly group, sharing photos and
stories from my recent trip to the USA
and the Bahamas. Special thanks to
Peter Scahill and Laura Thomson for
the hospitality and invitation – and
remember you are all most welcome
to attend any of our monthly BSNZ
meetings in Auckland, as are any
members from around the country.

I am sorry to report that due to a number

of ongoing communication issues with
organisers of the Orchid and Flower
Show being held at the Auckland
Show Grounds, September 22nd -25th,
our Society display committee has
decided to cancel our BSNZ bromeliad
display for the show. The details and
effort involved were proving too much
of a risk, so we will therefore now
put all our energies into our Spring
Sale day on October 16th. Sellers and
helpers – please remember to put your
names down on the clipboards at the
September 27th meeting if you haven’t

already done so. I look forward to

seeing plenty of members and the
public at the sale this year – as well
as a good turnout to hear our guest
speaker from Northland, Dot Leaning,
talk about growing Cryptanthus on the
27th – see you there.

Finally, a last reminder to finalise your

trip to the ‘Sunny Broms’ Australasian

Conference being hosted in March

2017 by the Sunshine Coast Bromeliad
Society in Caloundra, Queensland.

If you haven’t done anything about it
yet – do it NOW! It is shaping up to

be a great event in a superb location
with lots to see and enjoy. Go to
www.sunnybroms.com for all the

information – flights have never been

cheaper and it’s still not too late to
register.

Cheers,

Graeme Barclay


Group News

Far North Bromeliad Group

– Erin Titmus
We held our winter meetings at
flourflower, a local venue that provides
a great environment with good kitchen
facilities for our shared winter lunches.

In June our short meeting spontaneously
had a focus on tillandsia as Iris Symonds

had brought a stunning basketful

displaying eight flowering plants. We

adjourned early to Rex Pyne’s place to
remember Colleen, walk her garden and
meet folk from other groups Colleen was
involved with. Colleen had passed the
previous month and was a much loved

member of our group, well-respected for

her generous contribution of time and
knowledge and her passion for growing
broms. We miss her.

Our July meeting was our traditional
‘Soup Day’ and we discussed two new
classes for our show this year: hanging
basket and decorative hanging basket.
Thanks to Bevlyn Bibby and Dot
Leaning for bringing examples for us to
see how entries in these classes should
look.

‘Curry Day’ warmed our August meeting
before we were treated to a wonderful
presentation by BSNZ President, Graeme
Barclay. We saw exotic plants from his
recent trip to the world conference in
Houston, Texas and also the Bahamas.
Thanks, Graeme, for an inspiring time
together.

Our annual show, in conjunction with
the local orchid group is to be held on
14th –15th October at the Turner Centre.
We invite members of other groups.
Please make yourself known to us when

you visit. Phone Dot 09-405 7607 for

more information.

Bay of Plenty Bromeliad Group

– Lynley Breeze
Lynley welcomed members and six
visitors, including Ross and Gail

Fergusson from the Eastern BOP group,

and guest speaker, Peter Waters, from
Auckland, to our August meeting.

It was good to have Ross Fergusson

there to describe the gardens we will

visit in the Eastern BOP on Sunday 27th

November. Seats on the bus are in high
demand.

The club will have a display and sales
tent at the Lakes Pavilion over the
period of the NZ Garden and Art Festival
(17th – 20th November).

Peter Waters explained the correct
way to label bromeliad plants, correct
pronunciation and a little about how

plants get reclassified into new or

different genera. Peter also showed some
new books and the German Bromeliad
Society magazine. There will be at least
eight new genera of bromeliads emerging
soon as a result of DNA analysis and

further reclassification work by botanists
such as Elton Leme.

There was discussion about whether
to use marker pens for writing labels.

Kevin Pritchard endorsed the use of a

marker pen from Whitcoulls and Wilma
Fitzgibbons recommended one available
at the orchid show sales tables. Peter uses
3B or higher B pencils for labels and has
a number for each plant on a computer


list, in case labels fade.

We sold a lot of labels which the club
provides at cost to members at $1 for 15
labels.

Peter Waters led the discussion on the
plants at the meeting and added a lot of
additional information. Club members
were very careful with pronunciations
after Peter’s talk!

Competition Results:
Plant of the month -Aechmea
recurvata: 1st Graeme Alabaster with
Aechmea ‘Covata’, 2nd Margaret Mangos
with Aechmea ‘Paraguay’ and 3rd Ross
Fergusson with Aechmea ‘Aztec Gold’.
Open: 1st Jo Elder with Billbergia
‘Domingos Martins’ 2nd Ross Ferguson
with Aechmea ‘Ensign’ (a beautiful large
clump presented in a basket) and Kevin
Pritchard with Vriesea ‘Misty Taupo’.
Also tabled Neoregelia ‘Manoa Beauty’
and a beautiful neoregelia presented
as ‘DeRolf’. but it was thought to be
another hybrid.
Tillandsia: 1st Ross Fergusson with a
large clump of Tillandsia streptophylla
mounted on driftwood, 2nd Jo Elder with
Tillandsia bulbosa, 3rd Kevin Pritchard
with Tillandsia lindenii. Also tabled
were Tillandsia matudae, guatemalensis,
gymnobotrya, and purpurea.

Next meeting: 12th October. John Beech,
director of the 2016 NZ Garden and Art
Festival will be our speaker.

Northland Bromeliad Group

– Nancy Peters
Our August meeting was held at the
Reyburn House Studio, Whangarei.

‘Show and Tell’ - Interesting and/or
problem plants (none of which are
bromeliads):

• Graeme Smithyman showed us his
Sansevieria parva which grows in the

deserts of Kenya. This is a relation of the
Mother-in-Laws Tongue. He grows this

inside.

• Diana Smithyman’s Elephant’s Foot
(Dioscorea elephantipes) is a native of

South Africa. It is a member of the yam

family and her plant was 40 years old
and about the size of a large dinner plate.

It was used as food during famines by

the local Hottentots.

• Diana showed us a 20 year old
Pregnant Pancake plant (Gerrardanthus
macrorhizus) from Eastern Africa. This

is a member of the cucumber family and
the leaf can grow vines to 10 metres.

• Lynsie brought along her Euphorbia
woodii. This unusual plant grows from
the centre of the plant out on a hot bank.
She also showed us an Anoplia – which
is a zipper plant with a purple flower.

• Jill is a member of the cacti and
succulent club and had brought along
some very unusual examples. Graeme
passed around a Rumpled Foreskin
Echeveria which he warned the ladies not
to touch. Another was an Astrophytum
(Bishop’s Cap) and Lilhops saliola.

• Laura showed us a plant from the
Cactus House called a Bowiea volubilis
or Sea Onion. Grow inside in poor soil
with no watering in summer.
• Sandra and Graeme showed us how to
divide broms and split off frost damaged
plants.

August ‘Show and Tell’ competition
winners:

1st Don Nicholson – unnamed
nidularium, 2nd Stacy Ellison – unnamed
vriesea, and 3rd Lynn White – Tillandsia
imperialis. Thanks to everyone who

Cont’d P12 11


Cont’d from P11 – Group News

brought along plants and congratulations
to the winners.

Tillandsia Group – Auckland

– Nancy Murphy
Our August meeting was held at Dave

and Isobelle Dawson’s garden. It was
pleasing to finally see sunshine making
dancing reflections on the estuary. The

garden is at the water’s edge and Dave
has cleverly left this vista unimpeded
and the interesting borders skirt this
central axis.

Dave is a very clever plantsman and his
glass and plastic houses are crammed
full with rare plants. Tillandsias adorn
the trees and it is obvious that he has
been a collector for many years as these
clumps are literally gigantic.

The meeting and chat about the ‘G’
species, as always, turns up some
beautiful plants. A small collection
of books, from a deceased estate,
were offered for sale and some were
purchased for the Bromeliad Society

library collection and these will benefit

our group hugely. Thank you to the
Society.

Next meeting: At Lynette Nash’s
garden, 11 Westbury Cres, Remuera,
1011 at 1.30pm on 9th October. Please
bring tillandsias for ‘Show and Tell’ and
species beginning with ‘H’. We hope
to see lots of members and interested
friends are always welcome.

South Auckland Bromeliad Group

– Hawi Winter
With our meeting on Sunday September
4th in the Drury School Hall we
concluded the indoor meeting season for
the year. Our next meetings will all be

garden visits until the AGM on 7th May

2017, when we will be back at the Drury
School Hall.

The speaker of the day was Don
Brown on two themes… ‘small
garden design’ and ‘wittrockias’.
He showed slides from both his home
garden in Freemans Bay and his
retirement bach garden in Thames. Both
properties have limited garden space
and the logical solution was tiers of
hanging pots and, at Thames, terracing

with support walls. In the second part
of his talk Don reflected on the small

genus Wittrockia. All three members
of the genus are present in NZ, and at
least one of the cultivars, Wittrockia
‘Leopardinum’, as well. Don had brought
along all specimens except for Wittrockia
gigantea and his talk was supported by

some slides of the flowering plants by

Hawi Winter.

It was revealed that our mystery trip on
February 5th will be to Graeme Barclay’s
place in West Auckland.

Winner of the Skite Table: 1st Margaret
Flanagan, 2nd John Muddiman.

Our raffle winners were 1st Bruce
Johnstone, 2nd Deane Oliver, 3rd Gay
Ludlow.

Next meeting: Sunday October 2nd at
Delma and Tony Pell’s place at 14 Arkley

Avenue, Farm Cove, Manukau starting at

1:30pm then proceeding to Pamela and

John Muddiman’s place at 1 Keswick
Close, Northpark, Manukau. In spite of

what was said at the last meeting, there
will be a sale of plants at the Pell’s place.


13
Eastern Bay of Plenty Bromeliad and
Orchid Group – Alison Iremonger
Our meeting was a working bee,
preparing plants for an upcoming craft
market stall. 25 people attended at the
home of Ross and Gail Fergusson.
A Voluntary Service Award 2016
certificate had been received from the
Whakatane District Council, thanking the
group for the work done in beautifying
the Council internal garden. In lieu of
our October meeting there will be a bus
trip to Tauranga. The trip to Auckland
in November is full, and names can be
given for the trip to Whangarei next year.
After watching two pineapples
slowly ripening for ages,
I went to check them, full
of anticipation, and, lo and behold,
some rat or possum had beaten me
to them. At least I have been able to
save the pups! – Ross Fergusson
Talk about hanging plants,
I thought it was amusing
when tidying up my Lily of
the Valley shrub that I found this.
I now have a ‘hanging plant pot’,
but the pot is only attached to
broms! – Margaret Bramley
‘Hanging’or ‘flying’?
Sweet tooth
destruction in
Whakatane…
The ‘Show and Tell’ section of the
meeting covered types of bromeliads
that grow a trunk; don’t write off plants
that look ‘dead’, and why do some

bromeliads not flower?

Competition:
Mounted Bromeliad: 1st G. Fergusson,
2nd A. Iremonger, 3rd G. Anderson.
Orchid: 1st G. Fergusson, 2nd B. Rogers,
3rd A. Iremonger and R. Fergusson.
Flowering Bromeliad: 1st R. Fergusson,
2nd A. Iremonger and G. Fergusson.
Foliage Bromeliad: 1st R. Fergusson, 2nd


A. Iremonger, 3rd G. Fergusson.

This month’s plant is an unusual centrally variegated vriesea, that has a
special tie with New Zealand.

Vriesea ‘Eden Glade’

This special plant was found
growing as a sport mutation
at Eden Garden in Epsom
back in 1992, almost 25 years ago.
At that time, Society members were
cleaning up plants during a working
bee in the ‘Bromeliad Glade’, an area
allocated to the BSNZ to maintain
a living collection of bromeliads.
That day, the late Laurie Dephoff and
our current treasurer, Peter Waters,
were working on a large clump of
Vriesea platynema var. variegata,
when Laurie noticed a small pup with

a subtle wide golden stripe down the
centre of each leaf. Laurie had actually
donated and planted the original plant

in Eden Garden some years earlier, so
it was fitting he found this new ‘sport’
growing there. At first he did not want

to remove it, but Peter convinced him
it would become a very unique and
desirable plant if it stabilised, so they
cut it off and Laurie took it home to
nurture. A couple of years later Peter
received a pup and it began to be
spread around other members too.


Vriesea ‘Eden Glade’ rosette.

Photo: GRaeMe BaRCLaY


In June 2001, the late Gerry Stansfield

wrote a short article for our Journal,
introducing this striking new cultivar
as Vriesea ‘Eden Glade’, accompanied
with a photo of a clump in full
bloom. The name was decided by
Laurie and Peter in honour of its
origin and the following month in
July 2001, it was formally registered

with the BSI Cultivar Registry.

While this plant is able to produce
a unique sight with its centrally
variegated, golden stripes, it is also
somewhat temperamental in being able
to achieve this. Like many variegated
bromeliads, it often produces leaves
that have poor variegation, or none at
all, especially on the central, newer
leaves. However, the variegations
always seem to improve to some degree
as the leaves age and do not disappear

altogether. It does not commonly

produce NOVAR (no variegation)
pups like many other variegates do.

Some Vriesea ‘Eden Glade’ plants
show variegation that is sometimes
not prominent, or faded, but they are
certainly present if you look closely.
The photos are a good illustration of
this, the blooming clump has highly
visible gold stripes, versus the rosette
photo with much fainter variegation
in the new leaves. This is quite often
evident in yellow variegates, as unlike
white variegated plants, the yellow
portion of the leaf still contains small
quantities of green chlorophyll, that
can sometimes change colour and
fade into the green margins. This
phenomenon normally happens due to

cultural and light factors. If the plant is

grown more stressed and in high light,


Vriesea ‘Eden Glade’ blooming.

Photo: GeRRY stansfieLd

the variegations will normally be more

prominent. If grown in shadier positions

with more water and food sources, it
is likely to be greener and hence have
less prominent yellow variegations.

Vriesea ‘Eden Glade’ will grow to

an identical size and shape as its
parent species Vriesea platynema var.
variegata, to 50-60cm diameter when

mature. Like most foliage vrieseas,
it is easy to grow in New Zealand
conditions and if slowly acclimatised,
will take full sun without burning where
it will grow more compact with highly
accentuated, burgundy coloured leaf
tips. For the reasons mentioned above,

Vriesea ‘Eden Glade’ is certainly a

special cultivar worth obtaining and
then trying pups in different positions
in the garden to determine the best way
to maintain and show off the striking
golden stripes.


More ‘Bromeliads Texas Style’

Adding to the BSI conference in Houston report from our July issue,

Graeme Barclay has supplied some more great photos.


xNeophytum ‘Burgundy Thrill’ Encholirium horridum


Orthophytum sanguinea


Dyckia goehringii

Vriesea ‘Glow Plug’


Hohenbergia castellanosii (variegated)

16


OFFICERS


Patron: Patricia Sweeney
President: Graeme Barclay 09-817 4153
Vice Presidents: Jocelyn Coyle 09-416 8272
Chris Paterson 09-625 6707
Secretary: Bev Ching 09-576 4595
Treasurer: Peter Waters 09-534 5616
Life Members: Dave Anderson, Patricia Perratt,
Patricia Sweeney, Peter Waters


Scientific Officer: Peter Waters 09-534 5616
Librarian: Noelene Ritson 09-625 8114
Committee: Dave Anderson 09-638 8671
Don Brown 09-361 6175
Lester Ching 09-576 4595
Alan Cliffe 09-479 1451
David Cowie 09-630 8220
Diane Timmins 09-415 9066
Editor: Murray Mathieson 09-418 0366

MEMBERSHIP SUBSCRIPTION


New Zealand

Ordinary membership NZ $35.00 ($5.00
discount if paid before the end of February).
Dual membership (same household) NZ $45.00
($5.00 discount also applies as above).

Overseas

NZD $45.00. Send all payments to the Treasurer,

Peter Waters, 22 Half Moon Rise, Half Moon

Bay, Auckland 2012.

Correspondence

All general correspondence should be sent to the
Secretary, Bromeliad Society of New Zealand,

P.O. Box 108-168, Symonds Street, Auckland,
New Zealand. The opinions expressed in letters
or articles in the Journal are the contributors’
own views and do not necessarily express the
views or policy of the Bromeliad Society of

New Zealand Inc.

Society Website

www.bsnz.org – For past Journal archive –
growing tips – articles – sales information

BROMELIAD JOURNAL

Editorial Committee

Dave Anderson

Murray Mathieson

Peter Waters

Production

Murray Mathieson

Distribution

Don Brown

All enquiries and contributions welcome, please
contact any member of the editorial committee

or send to Peter Waters, 22 Half Moon Rise,
Half Moon Bay, Auckland 2012 or email:

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Deadline

For all editorial and advertising, the first

Tuesday of publication month

Display Advertising

Rates are:
Full Page $60.00
Half Page $30.00
Quarter Page $15.00

‘Buy & Swap’

Listings in ‘Buy & Swap’ are FREE for

members of the Society (max. 30 words).
For advertising enquiries and material, please

contact Murray Mathieson ph (09) 418 0366

or email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.


Learning about the genera : Cryptanthus
– Dot Leaning
Cryptanthus is a genus in the botanical family Bromeliaceae. The genus

name is from the Greek ‘cryptos’ (hidden) and ‘anthos’ (flower). The name
is not completely accurate as the small, white, stemless flowers perched in
the middle of a relatively flat plant are far from hidden. The common name

for any cryptanthus is ‘Earth Star’. Most are small monolayered plants with
little leaf overlap and they look like ‘twinkling stars’.

They were first discovered in

eastern Brazil about 1831. There

are over 70 named species and
there are more being found and named.
The latest discoveries have extended the
natural range of these plants in Brazil.
Many are also near extinction, due to
their endemic habitats being utilised
for other purposes and/or unthinking
plant collectors removing them. The
genus was more or less ignored until
the 1970s when Hummel in the USA
and Grace Goode in Australia kicked
off a hybridising frenzy that continues
to this day.

In their natural habitat the plants

are true terrestrials (growing in the
ground) and a few are saxicolous
(growing among rocks). They have
never been observed as epiphytes
(living in trees). Cryptanthus should

not be under-potted. They develop root

systems at least equal to the size of the
plant — commonly it is recommended

that they be grown in a five or six inch

plastic pot to help conserve the needed

moisture. I have found (thank you to

Andrew Steen) that the pot needs to be
wider than deep and for the root system
to grow laterally to match the size of
the plant. 25ml plastic pot saucers have

proven to be optimal for me in my area
of Northland (Hokianga). Don’t forget

to drill drainage holes. I use a good

quality seed mix potting medium.
Regardless of the mix, it must be kept
damp for best growth and they need
to be fed regularly (twice /month in

summer and 1/month in winter). I use
fish fertiliser at half the recommended

dose. Cryptanthus do well being misted
over the hottest months in summer and
if like me you do not have a misting
system, then a light spray with the hose
will be appreciated by your plants;
shown by excellent growth.

Generally, there are plants which will
grow in every light condition you may
have. C. beuckeri which likes lowlight
and many of its progeny (hybrids)
like to be shaded, moist and humid.

Hybrids such as ‘Cascade’, ‘Marian

Oppenheimer’ and ‘Dusk’ can take full

sun, but you will find most plants do

better with diffused light. For maximum
colour bright diffused light is essential.
Too much light will cause bleached
spots on the foliage or a leathery,
stressed look to the plant. At the other
extreme, weak foliage and greening
of colour suggests that the plant needs
more light. For New Zealand, some


experimentation is good practice and
through careful observation of similar
plants in different light conditions,

you will find where they thrive and
give the best colour. I grow mine in an

unheated plastic house that is covered

in a light-diffusing plastic skin which

also provides a high degree of uv
protection.

Some of the well known species:

acaulis; bivittatus; beuckeri;
fosterianus and zonatus and sun
lovers, bahianus; caracensis;
coriaceus; glaziovii; incrassatus;
leopoldo-horstii; maritimus;
schwackeanus; seidelianus; warasii
and warren-loosei.

Since, I have developed a passion for
growing Cryptanthus, I have found

that there is only a limited number of

species or hybrids in the country. My

research from records suggests that the
number is greater, but many may have
been lost or are just sitting in the back
of someone’s bromeliad collection.

If you think you are this ‘someone’,
please get in touch. I am willing to
beg, borrow or pay. Send me an e-mail

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

REFERENCES

• Bromeliads of Australia
http://bromeliad.org.au/
• Bromeliad Cultivar Register
http:// botu07.bio.uu.nl/bcg bcr/?
genus=CRYPTANTHUS&id=
1530#1530
• Bromeliad Society of Houston
http://bromeliadsocietyhouston.
org/genera-intro/cryptanthus/
• Cryptanthus Society http://fcbs.
org/cryptanthussociety/
culturalinfo.html
Cryptanthus species…

Cryptanthus beuckeri
Photo: andReW devonshiRe
Cryptanthus zonatus
Photo: andReW devonshiRe
Cryptanthus bivittatus
Photo: dot LeaninG

Cryptanthus hybrids…
Cryptanthus ‘Zebrinus’ Cryptanthus ‘Red Bird’

Photo: andReW devonshiRe Photo: dot LeaninG


Cryptanthus ‘Glad’

Photo: dot LeaninG

Cryptanthus ‘it’

Photo: dot LeaninG


Cryptanthus ‘Fine Feathers’ Cryptanthus ‘Café au Lait’

Photo: dot LeaninG Photo: dot LeaninG

20


 November 2016
VOL 56 NO 11
Puya chilensis.
Photo: Margaret Flanagan
• Learning about the genera: Hechtia
• Quesnelia augusto-coburgii... a rare species in bloom in Auckland
• Bromeliads in Barcelona

Quesnelia augusto-coburgii –
a rare species in bloom in Auckland

– Words and photos by Graeme Barclay
Quesnelia augusto-coburgii close-up.
This rare species from Brazil

was first described in 1880

by Czech-Austrian botanist
Heinrich Wawra. It was found in Minas
Gerais State in Brazil and like most
other Quesnelia species, grows as an
epiphyte up to 1000 metres elevation.
It has also been found in more recent
times growing in neighbouring Rio
de Janeiro State. This particular clone
came from the Vienna Botanical
Gardens, so it is highly possible
a descendant of the original type
specimen that would have been taken
back to Austria by Wawra over 130
years ago. The leaves are very long,
minutely serate in a tubular habit. The
pendulous inflorescence hangs 4050cm below the base of the plant, with
long, cobalt blue, recurved flowers
blooming over 2 to 3 weeks – a simply
beautiful sight. It is fast growing, suits

Quesnelia augusto-coburgii.
our temperate local conditions and

is ideal for a hanging basket or tree

mounting in a semi-shaded spot.

It has bloomed for me for the first

time and I will be putting a pup in
our Christmas auction.

Bromeliad Society of New Zealand Inc

Bromeliad Journal – November 2016 issue

CONTENTS

Quesnelia augusto-coburgii – Graeme Barclay 2
President’s Page – Graeme Barclay 4
Bromeliad Society October meeting news – Bev Ching 5
‘FIESTA’ 2017 is coming! 6

Society officers, subs and Journal directory 8

Tillandsias in Barcelona – Robert Kopfstein 9
‘Broms in the Park’ 2016 12
Society Garden Visits in November 13
Puya chilensis – Margaret Flanagan 14
Bay of Plenty ‘blokes display’ 14

Group News 15
Learning about the genera: Hechtia – Andrew Devonshire and Robert Kopfstein 18

‘Special Species Spotlight’ – Graeme Barclay 22
‘New from New Zealand’ – new hybrids – Graeme Barclay 24

The opinions expressed in articles or letters in this Journal are the contributors’ own views and

do not necessarily express the views or the policy of the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand.

COMING EVENTS

Please see the Group News section starting on page 15 for details of group meeting
times and venues.

NOVEMBER NOVEMBER (cont’d)
20th Society garden visits on Auckland’s 27th Bay of Plenty Group bus trip to

North Shore. See details on page 13 Whakatane
22nd Society ‘Christmas meeting’ at 27th Northland Group Christmas
Greyfriar’s Hall, corner of Mt Eden and luncheon
Windmill roads, starting at 7.30pm. The
Monthly Choice competition: Christmas DECEMBER
arrangements. We will also have our 4th South Auckland Group and
annual Rare Plant Auction and enjoy a Tillandsia Auckland Group Christmas
Christmas supper together. Please bring meetings
a plate to share. 14th Bay of Plenty Group Christmas

luncheon

FRONT COVER: This impressive Puya chilensis is in Margaret Flanagan’s garden.
More photos on page 14.

PRESIDENT’S PAGE

Festive greetings everyone,

Another year is nearing its end,
the longer days have finally arrived and
the broms are now well along the way
to colouring up. Now is the time to start
casting your eye around and deciding
your likely candidates for entering into
our annual show competition at ‘Fiesta’
in February. It would be wonderful to
see some more entries in many of the
classes next year. Remember, all out-
of-Auckland members are also most
welcome to participate, so don’t be
shy, come along and give it a go, you
might be surprised!

We had another wonderful ‘Broms

in the Park’ day at Totara Waters
on Sunday 6th November with great
weather and the usual friendly folks
turning up. A huge thanks once again
to Peter and Jocelyn Coyle for all their

hard work to make the day enjoyable
for everyone. We have a selection of

photos in this Journal that will capture

some of the atmosphere of the day.

I also hope those folks who are hosting
and attending the Society’s North
Shore Garden Visit day on the 20th
November are going to have a great

time too. No doubt we will have more
about the garden visits in our next
Journal, which will be the January
issue.

On Wednesday 9th of this month,
I attended the Bay of Plenty Bromeliad

Group’s monthly meeting in Tauranga,
as guest speaker. What a fabulous
venue in the harbourside Yacht Club
and great to see such a well run and
attended meeting. Thank you once

again president Lynley Breeze and

your team for welcoming me, it was

most enjoyable to participate and see

you all in action.

For those around Auckland, don’t
forget to come along to our last
Christmas Supper meeting of the year

on the 22nd. Please bring a small plate

of finger food to share and enjoy the
‘Rare Plant Auction’. It still isn’t too
late to enter something in the auction,
remember you will get 80% of the price

attained. Please give Peter Waters a call
on 09-534 5616 no later than Monday
night 21st, if you have a special plant or
bromeliad book to enter.

Finally, on behalf of the BSNZ
committee, I wish you all a safe

and happy holiday season – and a

prosperous 2017. Take care in the sun
and make sure you enjoy Christmas
and New Year with your families,

friends... and broms!

Cheers,

Graeme Barclay

Bromeliad SocietyOctober Meeting News – Bev Ching

President Graeme Barclay

welcomed members including new
members who signed up at our

recent ‘Spring Sale’ day. The sale was a
great day event with lots of bargains for

members and the public. It was the usual

Aechmea ‘Roberto Menescal’
– Graeme Barclay. First in
Open Foliage section andPlant of the Month.
Aechmea chantinii x retusa
– Peter Coyle. First in OpenFlowering section.
rush to buy as soon as the doors opened
at 9.00am. Plants sales were up on last

year. We now need members to ‘spread

the word’ about the upcoming ‘Fiesta’ in
February.

Cont’d P6

Tillandsia ‘Cupcake’ – Lynette Nash.
First in Tillandsia section.
Neoregelia ‘Bottoms Up’
– Peter Coyle. First in Neoregelia section.
xCanmea (Canistrum triangulare x
Aechmea ‘Bert’) – John Mitchell.
First in Monthly Choice section.

Cont’d from P5 – Bromeliad Society Meeting News

Graeme advised that if anyone needs a

new name tag – just see him at a monthly
meeting and it would be printed there

and then. Please don’t forget the garden

visits at Birkenhead on Sunday 20th
November. Details are in this Journal.

Lester talked about checking growing
conditions for your tillandsias carefully
for best results.

‘Show and Tell’

Peter Waters took us through the

interesting plants on the table. First
was Tillandsia eizii, a species from
Guatemala and Mexico. This is a large
plant when fully grown and has long
pendulous flower spike. Next was the

species Deuterocohnia longipetala

from Argentina, Bolivia and Peru, with
flowers of white or green. Next a Vriesea

tuerckheimii a species from Dominion

Republic and Haiti and yellow flowers.

Next Quesnelia augusto-coburgii which

was almost finished flowering. It has red
bracts with blue petals. It was a really
stunning plant. Next a Neoregelia ‘Giant’
x ‘Tiger’, an urn shaped plant with
nice colouring. Tillandsia globosa and
geminiflora, brought in for comparison

as was Tillandsia recurvifolia and
bergeri. A small fine leafed tillandsia
was ionantha var stricta.

Peter mentioned that nine new genera

have been announced and these will be
detailed shortly in our Journal. (Probably
January issue). Please check the names
and change your plant labels accordingly.

Diane Timmins gave an interesting talk

2017 Bromeliad

BROMELIAD SHOW & SALE

Saturday 18th and Sunday 19th February

Mt Eden War Memorial Hall
489 Dominion Road,
Balmoral, Auckland
9.00am – 3.00pm both days

• We hope you are preparing your plants.
• Plant sellers... if you haven’t already done so, please
contact president Graeme Barclay to discuss your space
requirements. Phone 09-817 4153.
• Competition rules and classes will be published in our
January Journal.

on cutting off vriesea pups. This was of
particular interest to new members and
included tricks to do this safely without
damaging the pups. Diane uses an ARS
scissors and a very fine knife to cut the
pups off, and a fertiliser of NPK of 1111-18 to start the pups on their way.

COMPETITON

Open Flowering: First was Peter Coyle
with a flowering Aechmea chantinii x
retusa. Second was John Muddiman
with flowering Tillandsia ‘Wildfire’
with its many flowering heads. Also

on the table were Canistrum ‘Big
Emma’, Hohenbergia ‘Karla’, Vriesea
‘White Line’, Neoregelia ‘Tara Bella’,
Neoregelia ‘Kona Gold’, Aechmea
‘Sangria’, Neoregelia burle-marxii’,
Aechmea recurvata ‘Cardinalis’,
Aechmea ‘Aztec Gold’, Neoregelia
‘Johannis Rubra’ x ‘Rio Ochre’, Dykia
‘Delicata’ x fosteriana.
Open Foliage: First and second was
Graeme Barclay with Aechmea ‘Roberto
Menescal’, and Hohenbergia ‘Capricorn
Don’ F2. Also on the table was Vriesea
‘Hunua Twilight’, and Vriesea ‘Kiwi
Dusk’ x ‘Snowman.’

Tillandsia: First and second in the
Tillandsia section was Lynette Nash with

Tillandsia ‘Cupcake’, one of Andrew
Flower’s hybrids, and a flowering

Tillandsia fuchsii forma gracilis. Also
on the table was Tillandsia aeranthos,
a flowering Tillandsia imperialis,
a flowering bulbosa (large form),
flowering Tillandsia recurvifolia var
subsecundifolia, flowering Tillandsia
‘Cootharaba’, a very nice Tillandsia
streptophylla, Tillandsia rodrigueziana
with nice leaf colouring.

Neoregelia: First in this section was
Peter Coyle with Neoregelia ‘Bottoms

Up’, named of course for the colouring
under the leaves. Second was Andrew

Devonshire with one of his unnamed
hybrids Neoregelia ‘(cxc) x BH x
S.Tiger’ x ‘Hannibal Lector’, this was
a beautiful plant. Also on the table were
Neoregelia ‘Tawa Fantasy’, Neoregelia
‘Punctate’ x ‘Midnight’, Neoregelia
‘Shamrock’, Neoregelia ‘Rainbow’
x ‘Tiger’, Neoregelia ‘Macpink’ x
‘Spines’. Interesting that there were
no neoregelia species on the table this
month.
Monthly Choice: First on this table

was John Mitchell with xCanmea
(A cross of Canistrum triangulare x
Aechmea ‘Bert’), second was Andrew
Devonshire with Neoregelia ‘Tasha’ x
(‘Clarice’ x ampullacea). Also on the
table were Neoregelia ‘Ritzy Tiger’,
Neoregelia (ampullacea x ‘Pheasant’) x
lilliputiana, ampullacea x (‘Fireball’ x
‘Avalon’), Vriesea simplex, Neoregelia
pauciflora, Neoregelia ‘Hot Embers’,
Aechmea triangularis, Tillandsia hybrid,
Tillandsia straminea.
Plant of the Month: The winner this
month was Graeme Barclay with
Aechmea ‘Roberto Menescal’.

It was good to see the table full of plants
this month, keep up the good work as

many new members have not seen a lot
of these plants before. Remember who

buys the most plants – new members.

The main raffle prizes went to Diane
McPherson, and Pas Southon. The door
prizes to Olivia Sami, Pas Southon and
Vicky Carr. Congratulations to all the

winners.

Next meeting: Tuesday 22nd November
7.30pm is our final meeting for the
year. There will be the usual Rare Plant
Auction, it would be good to see more

members bidding on these special plants.

Please bring a plate for supper.

OFFICERS

Patron: Patricia Sweeney
President: Graeme Barclay 09-817 4153
Vice Presidents: Jocelyn Coyle 09-416 8272
Chris Paterson 09-625 6707
Secretary: Bev Ching 09-576 4595
Treasurer: Peter Waters 09-534 5616
Life Members: Dave Anderson, Patricia Perratt,
Patricia Sweeney, Peter Waters

Scientific Officer: Peter Waters 09-534 5616
Librarian: Noelene Ritson 09-625 8114
Committee: Dave Anderson 09-638 8671

Don Brown 09-361 6175
Lester Ching 09-576 4595
Alan Cliffe 09-479 1451

David Cowie 09-630 8220

Diane Timmins 09-415 9066

Editor: Murray Mathieson 09-418 0366

MEMBERSHIP SUBSCRIPTION

New Zealand

Ordinary membership NZ $35.00 ($5.00
discount if paid before the end of February).
Dual membership (same household) NZ $45.00
($5.00 discount also applies as above).

Overseas

NZD $45.00. Send all payments to the Treasurer,
Peter Waters, 22 Half Moon Rise, Half Moon
Bay, Auckland 2012.

Correspondence

All general correspondence should be sent to the
Secretary, Bromeliad Society of New Zealand,

P.O. Box 108-168, Symonds Street, Auckland,
New Zealand. The opinions expressed in letters

or articles in the Journal are the contributors’

own views and do not necessarily express the
views or policy of the Bromeliad Society of
New Zealand Inc.

Society Website

www.bsnz.org – For past Journal archive –

growing tips – articles – sales information

BROMELIAD JOURNAL

Editorial Committee

Dave Anderson

Murray Mathieson

Peter Waters

Production

Murray Mathieson

Distribution

Don Brown

All enquiries and contributions welcome, please

contact any member of the editorial committee

or send to Peter Waters, 22 Half Moon Rise,
Half Moon Bay, Auckland 2012 or email:
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Deadline

For all editorial and advertising, the first
Tuesday of publication month

Display Advertising

Rates are:
Full Page $60.00
Half Page $30.00
Quarter Page $15.00

‘Buy & Swap’

Listings in ‘Buy & Swap’ are FREE for
members of the Society (max. 30 words).
For advertising enquiries and material, please
contact Murray Mathieson ph (09) 418 0366
or email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Tillandsias in Barcelona

– By Robert Kopfstein. Reprinted from the September 2016 issue of ‘the
Bromeliad Blade’ – the newsletter of the San Diego Bromeliad Society
It is always refreshing to encounter
someone who is just starting out
as a fan of bromeliads. All of us
can likely remember what it was that
tripped something in our brain that
registered delight and fascination,
later possibly to morph into obsession,
with the family bromeliaceae. In my
case it was a Billbergia pyramidalis
that I had bought from a small nursery
that specialized in unusual plants.
I had absolutely no idea what the
inflorescence looked like until one
day I went out on the patio and there
was the most striking bloom that I had
ever seen; and this was on a plant from
which I had expected very little.

I was instantly hooked, but had no idea

where to go or whom to talk to in order
to get more information—and indeed

more plants. Eventually, quite by
accident, I discovered the Saddleback
Bromeliad Society and BSI, both of

which more than cooperated in aiding
and abetting my epiphytoaddiction.

This last summer we accompanied my
son Paul, his wife Christine and their
two boys on a five week vacation to
France and Spain. Just before we left,
Dan Kinnard and Eloise Lau, who had
just returned from Barcelona, Spain
told us of an encounter they had with
a young fellow named Oscar Llovera
Lopez. They were put in contact with
Oscar by Lynn Hudson, who lives in
Cairns, Australia (such is the wonder
of the internet...)

Both Dan and Eloise told me

how enthusiastic Oscar was about
bromeliads, and how anxious he was
to get more information in hard copy:

apparently Oscar prefers the printed

page to staring at a computer screen.
This detail certainly caught the interest
of this old retired reading teacher, so
I suggested that I could bring Oscar
some back issues of the BSI Journal.

Meanwhile Eloise sent along via mail
several bromeliad books.

When we finally arrived in Barcelona
(via Moscow and Madrid) I telephoned
Oscar to let him know that the Journals

had arrived. We agreed to meet at a
well known coffee shop on the Placa

Catalunya downtown.

Oscar is in his mid twenties, wears
his hair in a ponytail, and waxes
enthusiastic when he talks of
bromeliads, and especially tillandsias.
He lives with his parents in a top floor

apartment in central Barcelona. That

the apartment is on the upper floor
is important because that gives them

access to the roof. Most of Oscar’s
collection of tillandsias and other

broms makes up a bromeliad garden
on the top of a multi story building in

the heart of the city.

After coffee we agreed to meet Oscar
the next day at the Poble Espanyol

[Pueblo Espanol in Spanish] where he
volunteers helping with the landscaping

and also teaches a class in gardening

Cont’d P10

Cont’d from P9 – Tillandsia in Barcelona

to handicapped adults. The Poble
Espanyol (the Catalan name) is a
village that was constructed for a
1929 exposition, giving examples
of all of the architectural styles one
can see traveling through Spain. It
reminded me of our own Balboa

Park here in San Diego.

Oscar showed us how he had used

some existing chains hanging on a
wall to create a vertical tillandsia
garden.

Oscar in his rooftop garden.

Existing chains hanging on a wall were usedto create a vertical tillandsia garden.

The competition is Christmas arrangements.
We will have our annual RARE PLANT AUCTION
FOLLOWED BY OUR CHRISTMAS SUPPER...
please bring a plate to share!
Let’s make our November
‘Christmas meeting’ a beauty...
Tuesday November 22nd
10

Afterward we went on the Metro to

his parents’ apartment (Oscar has no
car – in Barcelona you do not need
one). It was easy to see that Oscar
was absolutely hooked on tillandsias.
He told us that he was moving his
collection to a rental shade structure
near Girona, a city midway between

Barcelona and the French border. With
more space there will be room for
more plants...

Oscar’s plans are to start a plant

business, and given the fact that many
Europeans live in apartments with
perhaps only a small deck or balcony,
tillandsias seem a good botanical fit.

Before we left I urged Oscar to

consider starting a bromeliad society.
As near as I know there is none in

Spain (or Portugal or France for that
matter). The Costa Brava and Costa
Dorada have a Mediterranean climate,
as does the south coast of France. The
Atlantic coast of Portugal is also mild.

Recently BSI has welcomed several
new societies to its roster.

BSI should consider actively
cultivating the formation of additional
bromeliad societies in Europe and
elsewhere. Australia and New Zealand
have very active groups. South Africa
has begun to develop brom groups (The
current president of BSI is from South
Africa). What about Thailand? The
Philippines? Taiwan? More of South
America besides Brazil? Mexico?

There is a genuine excitement and
enthusiasm in witnessing others
becoming aware of the multitude
of possibilities, not to mention the
satisfying pleasure, of growing and
promoting this most wonderful plant

family.

As we left Oscar I mentioned to him

that he should consider attending the
World Bromeliad Conference in 2018

in San Diego.

For our sake I hope he makes it.

2017 Bromeliad

BROMELIAD SHOW

Please note that the information regarding the competition rules and

details of all the classes you can enter will be published in the January
issue of the Journal.

Any queries in the meantime, please contact our president, Graeme

Barclay. Phone 09-817 4153

Broms in the Park 2016
NOVEMBER 6th

Another great day out at Whenuapai...

Agreat garden atmosphere, of ‘Broms in the Park’... now firmly
stunning plants, an excellent established as a major New Zealand
plant auction, lots of good bromeliad occasion.
‘brom talk’. The Auckland weather
even managed to join the party. Thank you to all our members and

particularly the many out of town
Thank you Peter and Jocelyn Coyle visitors who made the event so
for once again being generous hosts successful.

Photo selection from John Mitchell and Peter Coyle...

12

Sunday November 20th • 10.00am to 1.00pm

• Diana and Ian McPherson – 20 Park Hill Road, Birkenhead
• Joy and Bob Doran – 25 Island Bay Rd, Beachhaven
• Jenny and Tony Green, and Regina Wai – 2 Valhalla Drive,
Beachhaven
And there’s a lot of other things to see and do in the historic
Birkenhead area while you’re here...

Great cafes at Highbury and Verran’s Corner. A magnificent new
viewing platform at 33 Birkenhead Ave with views out over native
bush to the Waitemata and the city. Charming bush walks and the
opportunity to visit the old Chelsea refinery. ENJOY!

13

Puya chilensis...
Spectacular photos from the South
Auckland garden of Margaret Flanagan.
14
The ‘blokes’
display at the
Tauranga Orchid
Show...

The Bay of Plenty Bromeliad

Group has a good rapport with

the Tauranga Orchid Club and
we support them by having a bromeliad
display and sales table at their annual
orchid show. At the recent Orchid Show
in September, the ‘blokes’ (Roger Alan,
Kevin Pritchard and Dean Morman),
kindly offered to do the display. They
brought in the plants, arranged the
setting and did such a splendid job they
may have earned themselves a role
forever!

Group News

Eastern Bay of Plenty Bromeliad and
Orchid Group – Ross Fergusson

In lieu of our normal monthly meeting
26 members travelled to Tauranga to
visit nurseries, gardens and cafes. On the
way we stopped for a coffee at ‘Four14

espresso’ in Pyes Pa Road and enjoyed

a wonderful nursery set out amongst

large palms and bromeliads. We then

travelled to Oropi to Kereu Nursery
where everything is priced at $ 4.50. Next

it was across town to Palmers Garden

Centre in Bethlehem for more buying
and lunch. After lunch we travelled to Te
Puna to Browns Nursery. They are very

experienced vireya growers and were

happy to share their knowledge with us.

We then went on to Carine Garden Centre

& Water World – an excellent garden
and landscape centre that also has a huge
selection of tropical fish.

Thanks to the folks at Carine for the
donation of a pink nemisia for a spot

prize, which was won by Shelia Russell.

We were then back to Matua to visit two
immaculate and fantastically presented

gardens belonging Lynley Breeze and

Isabel Hammond. Thank you for having
us.

It seems our members are more than
bromeliad collectors judging by the
number of plants, trees and shrubs,
palms, vireyas, hosta and succulents that
were unloaded out of two mini vans.
The economy of Tauranga had received
a boost! Thanks to Maureen Moffatt and
Jean Richardson for organising a great
day out.

Tillandsia Group Auckland

– Nancy Murphy
The October Meeting was held at Lynette
Nash’s garden on a damp afternoon.
Lynette’s garden is always a joy and

the plastic house was abundant in well-
tended plants, beautifully mounted and
bursting forth into flower.

My favourite neoregelias are the mini
forms (I realise this is a Tilly group!)

and I was taken with her innovative
use of Neoregelia lilliputiana edging.
Discussion time was informative.

Lynette happily shared some ideas on

mounting using different media – this talk

extended Lester Ching’s demonstration

on mounting given at a recent BSNZ

meeting.

Next meeting: Christmas – will be held
at Larry and Nancy Murphy’s garden
at 104 McGowan Road, Waiuku on 4th

December at 11.00am. PLEASE NOTE

change of date and time as the South
Auckland Group have invited us to join
them for lunch. I feel sure it would be
appropriate to bring a plate of finger food
to help with lunch. Please bring a chair,

sales plants and show plants. Margaret

Flanagan suggests we do a display of

Tillandisa ionantha.

Northland Bromeliad Group

– Nancy Peters
Our October meeting was held at the
home of Diana and Graeme Smithyman,
Waipu (just under the Brynderwyn hills).

Sandra welcomed 25 members and 2
visitors.

Cont’d P16 15

Cont’d from P15 – Group News

Diana and Graeme’s garden was started
14 months ago after they had shifted

24 double trailer and car loads up from
their Auckland property. Photos taken
at the time of planting in beds set out in
the former cow paddocks, testify to the
amazing amount of work they have put

in and the incredible growth of the garden

in that short time. The Smithymans first
took up residence in the refurbished
cow shed while their house was built
and it wasn’t long before their treasured
collection of bromeliads and succulents
were rehoused under shade cloth and in

additional barns.

Diana’s mosaics and Graeme’s building

skills have added many decorative and

aesthetic touches to this growing garden.
Our members had a marvellous time

Christmas shopping.

October ‘Show & Tell’ Competition
Winners: 1st Don Nicholson – Billbergia
‘Foster’s Striate’, 2nd equal – Sue Hunter
Vriesea ‘Margot’, 2nd equal Pat Vendt –
Neoregelia ‘Nerissa’, 2nd equal Graeme
Smithyman – Tillandsia deppeana,

2nd equal Lynsie McMahon – Vriesea
(unknown)

Next meeting: Christmas luncheon at
the Northland Club, Porowini Avenue,
Whangarei on Sunday 27th November
at 12 noon. Please phone Decima

Severinsen 435-1008 if you have not yet

registered. Door prizes and a bromeliad
gift for everyone.

Far North Bromeliad Group

– Erin Titmus
Our 2016 SPRING SHOW...

Our group joined with the Bay of Islands
Orchid Society to put on a stunning
display for the public at the Turner
Centre, Kerikeri, on 14th - 15th October. A
new layout in the plaza area allowed each

group to show off their plants to better
advantage, with a combined display at

the entrance. Many visitors took the

opportunity to take home new plants.

Judges Don Brown, of Auckland, and
David Brewer noted that although entries
were slightly down in numbers the
quality of plants was excellent, requiring

hard decisions at times. Two new classes

showing the use of bromeliads in hanging
baskets proved popular with both entrants

and visitors.
‘Best in Show’ was awarded to Trevor
Ross with his shimmering example of

Tillandsia seleriana. Congratulations to
Peter Scahill whose outstanding plants

earned him the award for Most Points
Overall.

Winners of Classes:

• Aechmea
Peter Scahill – A. fasciata (variegated)

• Billbergia
Peter Scahill – B. ‘Hallelujah’

• Guzmania
Peter Scahill – G. ‘Orangeade’

• Neoregelia
Peter Scahill – (red hybrid)

• Tillandsia
Trevor Ross – T. seleriana

• Vriesea
Peter Scahill – V. ‘Tasman’ hybrid

• Miniatures
Dot Leaning – Neoregelia ‘Tara Tiger’

• Other Bromeliad Species
Dot Leaning – Cryptanthus ‘Carnival del
Rio’

• Decorative Container Plant
Amber Bishop – Neoregelia ‘Wild Tiger’

• Artistic Arrangement
Laura Thomson – ‘Waterfall’

• Hanging Basket
Audrey Kent – Neoregelia

• Decorative Hanging Basket
Audrey Kent

• Best in Show
Trevor Ross – T. seleriana

• Most Points Overall – Peter Scahill

Bay of Plenty Bromeliad Group

– Lynley Breeze
Lynley welcomed members and visitors,
including John Beech, director of the

Garden and Arts Festival to the October

meeting. We were sad to note the sudden
death of Lynley Wilson, one of our club

members.

John Beech showed us photos of the

Garden and Arts Festival to be held 17th

– 20th November. There are many new
gardens and an exciting programme of
speakers and displays for the venue at the

Lakes. The event attracts many visitors.

Extra volunteers will be required for our

bromeliad display and sales area.

COMPETITION RESULTS
Plant of the month – Spotted Vriesea: 1st
Helen Morman with Vriesea guttata, 2nd
Dean Morman with Vriesea racinae and
3rd Kevin Pritchard with Vriesea racinae.
Vriesea ‘Hoelscheriana’was displayed by
a new member Ralph Starck.
Open competition: 1st Dean Morman
with Vriesea ‘Highway Beauty’ 2nd
Colin Sutherland with Neoregelia

‘Rosea Striata’ and 3rd Dean Morman
with Vriesea ‘Frosty Fever’. Also tabled
were Neoregelia ‘Tartan Princess’ and
Neoregelia ‘Yellow King’.

‘Show and Tell’: On the table were

Neoregelia ‘Small World’ ‘Angel Face,
and xNeophytum ‘Ralph Davis’

Tillandsia Competition: 1st equal Gill

Keesing with Tillandsia imperialis
and Kevin Pritchard with Tillandsia

‘Wildfire’, 2nd Audrey Hewson with

Tillandsia kautskyi. Also on the table were
Tillandsia ionantha ‘Druid’, fasciculata,
gardneri, and argentina.

Next events:

Our bus trip to the Eastern Bay of Plenty
will be on Sunday 27th November.
Our next meeting will be our Christmas

Lunch, Wednesday 14th December to be
held at Diana and Cam Durrant’s home,
47 Junction Rd, Minden, Te Puna starting

at 11.00am. There will be no garden visits
prior as Diana’s garden is so large and
will take time to appreciate everything.

Please bring finger food to share, and a
plant for the continuous raffle.

South Auckland Bromeliad Group

– Nancy Murphy
The 6th November was a great day; first at
‘Broms in the Park’ then back to Lynfield
for our group day and three gardens to
visit. Our home base for continuous
afternoon tea and club notices was at

Betty Townsend’s. Thanks Betty.

These homes and gardens are situated
on hillsides overlooking the Manukau
Harbour. The views are spectacular and

all the gardens have paths criss-crossing

similar environments, perfect situations
for tucking in many broms. Betty’s
garden meanders down the bush clad

hillside. Carolle’s drive sweeps down
alongside an amazing wall sectioned off

with espalier-like plantings and large blue
pots and a magnificent urn-pot centralised
as the focal point. Wow! Joan’s garden

accommodated broms and many other

interesting plants. Thank you for opening
and sharing your delightful gardens with
us.

Next meeting: Our Christmas meeting

is 4th December at 11.00am at Larry and

Nancy Murphy’s garden, 104 McGowan
Rd Waiuku, Please note the earlier

commencement time. Please bring a plate

of finger food for lunch, a chair, skite
plant, plant sales and one auction plant if
you so choose. The meeting may close at

2.00 pm to help members with motorway
traffic. We’ve invited the Tillandsia
Group to join with us.

Learning about the genera : Hechtia
– The first section of this article is by Andrew Devonshire. The balance of the
article is by Robert Kopfstein and is reprinted from a 2010 issue of the San
Diego Society’s ‘Blade’.
Hechtia is a genus from the subfamily Pitcarnioideae. They are resilient
terrestrial bromeliads that can be found thriving in harsh conditions where
other plants struggle to grow. The Hechtia (pronounced Hek-ti-a) genus has
over 60 species, with the majority being endemic to Mexico. Their range
is from southern Texas, right through Mexico, down into Guatemala and
Honduras. The genus is named for Julius Gottfried Conrad Hecht (17711837), German counsellor to the King of Prussia.

Hechtias grow in a typical rosette
formation and the leaves are
usually very well armed with
spines. This can cause confusion
with bromeliads like Dyckia and
Encholirium as they have a superficial
similarity. What is unique is that the
Hechtia genus has two different modes
of flowering. Many species produce
the flower stalk from the centre of the
rosette, while others will produce the
flower stalk from the side of the plant.

Hechtia marnier-lapostollei: This
species is really the only one seen
in New Zealand collections. Its

plump, succulent leaves are covered
in trichomes, giving the whole plant
the appearance of being dusted in

silver. This plant is named after avid

botanist Julien Marnier-Lapostolle. It

is a desirable specimen plant that can

be grown in a large pot, or planted out
in a full sun and well drained garden
situation.

Most hechtias are dioecious – that is
they are either male and have flowers
that produce only pollen (stamenate),
or they are female and the flowers
are exclusively pistilate (having
only ovaries). Most bromeliads have
‘perfect’ flowers – that is, they have

both stamens and pistils. Hechtias are

not the only dioecious bromeliads,
Androlepsis (which has only two
species) and some of the catopsis
species are dioecious as well. Another
feature of hechtia inflorescences is

that they are also dimorphic – the

shape of the male inflorescence is
different from its female counterpart.
This has caused some problems for
taxonomists because many of the
herbarium specimens used for formal

descriptions are based on only one

plant’s inflorescence.

Because hechtias often are very ‘spiny’,
and because the flowers are typically

very small – and often white – and to

Cont’d P21

A selection of hechtia photos...

Hechtia rosea x marnier-lapostollei.

PHOTO ANdREw dEvONSHiRE

Hechtia marnier-lapostollei.

PHOTO JOHN MiTCHELL

Hechtia guatemalensis.

PHOTO ANdy SiEkkiNEN

Flowers.

PHOTO ANdy SiEkkiNEN

More photos on P20 19

More hechtia photos...

Hechtia ‘wildfire’ Hechtia epigyna.
(A hybrid created by Andy Siekkinen) PHOTO ANdy SiEkkiNEN
PHOTO ANdy SiEkkiNEN

Hechtia argentea at San diego
Botanic Garden.
PHOTO ROBERT kOPFSTEiN

Hechtia sphaeroblasta ‘Mr Freckles’.
A selected clone.
PHOTO ANdy SiEkkiNEN

20

Cont’d from P18 – Learning about the genera: Hechtia

grow them well they need to be in a

large (and often heavy) container, the
genus Hechtia has been relegated to
the status of ‘collector’s plants.’ There
is not much of a popular market for

these plants and there has been little

research done on them. As example, in
the 50 Year Index of the BSI Journal
there are 65 entries for Hechtia, and 30
of these are listed as a ‘mention’.

Most hechtias grow among and on
rocks in seasonally dry regions with

calcarious substrates (very much
like many agaves). Often they can be
found on cliffs overhanging rivers –
the plants probably benefit from the
constant humidity. Most hechtias (like
the dyckias) are prolific clumpers,
but there are exceptions: Hechtia
argentea seems not to produce offsets.
Size varies according to the species,
but most seem to be anywhere from
ten inches to two feet in diameter:
this feature would seem to make
them suitable as landscape plants.
Colour also varies. Some species are
very scurfy which produces a silvery
appearance to the leaves. Some, like

H. epigyna, are softer leaved and
lime green. There are spotted hechtias

(H. rosea) and some whose leaves
colour up red to maroon, especially in
warmer weather.

In cultivation hechtias are relatively
easy to maintain. But unlike the

epiphytic broms that don’t mind being

pot bound, they need a generous pot.
If hechtia roots are cramped, and the

pot dries out, the result is leaf tip
browning. It’s important to use a rapid

draining potting mix – don’t be stingy

with the perlite or pumice. Slow release

fertilizer is one of the easier ways to

feed the terrestrial bromeliads, but
organics like fish emulsion, compost
tea, or worm castings also function

very well.

Dividing hechtias in cultivation is

probably the biggest problem. Most

hechtias have relatively wicked spines,
and usually the offsets are tightly
clustered around the mother plant,

making separating them a potentially
bloody affair. A good pair of leather

gloves is a must. And unlike dyckias,
hechtia pups do not usually produce

roots while they are attached to the
mother plant. A sharp serrated knife

is an essential tool to cut away just
enough of the base of the mother plant
so that the pup has at least some root
tissue attached. If the pup has no roots
at all, it still can be rooted in a very
porous mix, but this process could

take a few months. With even a few

roots a separated pup will begin to

grow almost immediately; with no

roots, the process of growth is delayed,
sometimes for as much as one year.

Hechtias have been the neglected
stepchildren in the world of

bromeliads. But for brom enthusiasts
who have experimented growing them,

the hechtias are proving to be striking

accent plants adding to the forms,
shapes, and colours of the garden.

Our final plant in the spotlight this year is a beautiful variegated

hohenbergia – a ‘one of a kind’ plant in more ways than one.
Hohenbergia ‘Karla’

From the moment I saw this plant

in the flesh I fell in love, as do

most people who end up getting
close enough.The sculptural form of
the scurfy, heavily spined olive-green
leaves, marginated in cream, provides
a wonderfully unique combination that
captures the eye.

Interestingly, there are currently only
twenty hohenbergia cultivars registered

in the BCR. Nineteen of these are man-

made hybrids, while the only species
cultivar and the only variegated plant is

Hohenbergia ‘Karla’. As we have seen
with many other special variegated

species, this plant also has an extensive

history and an interesting story behind
it. It was developed in the early 1990s
by well known German bromeliad

collector, Mr. Hermann Prinsler. Upon
registration with the BCR in 2013,

Hermann wrote an article for the

German Bromeliad Society Journal,
‘Die Bromelie’ outlining the full story
behind it. This is what he wrote...

‘In 1987 I saw some nice looking tank-
type bromeliads on a shelf at the Femo
Tillandsia nursery in Langenfeld,
Germany. Mr. Mowinski told me that
these plants were collected by Prof.
Werner Rauh and the Brazilian cactus
specialist Leopoldo Horst on a trip in
Brazil. I was able to buy all the plants
at that time.

At home the plants were sorted and
potted and put into my bromeliad
collection. There were three different
types. Whether they were three
different species, was not known at that
time. I found out that they belong to the
genus Hohenbergia. One species was
determined by me to be Hohenbergia
leopoldo-horstii. In the next few years
I began to propagate the plants to build
a stock of them. I hit on the idea of
cultivating them more like succulents
because of their greyish scales that
made them look like they were covered

with flour, their large teeth and hard

leaves. The plants got more light and a
less humus-rich substrate. Under these
conditions the leaves coloured light
grey and the shape of the plants got
more bulbous.

A few years later the stock of these
plants had grown and I gave away

the first plants to people who were

interested in them. One day I saw on
one of the plants a leaf which had a
white longitudinal stripe. The following
year I took off the pups from this plant.
The pup that had been growing in the
axil of the striped leaf already showed
some leaves with white variegation. In
the following years, the progeny of this
one was propagated and a type with
uniform white marginal variegation
was selected.

After a long time,
25 years by now,
I have a stock of 150
uniformly variegated
plants. I am very
happy about my
success since in my
collection I already
grow many species
and hybrids with
white variegation and
I always had an eye
out for these.

Three years ago, Uwe
Scharf from Leipzig
German,y told me
that my Hohenbergia
leopoldo-horstii
was actually a
Hohenbergia
magnispina. I got a
true Hohenbergia
leopoldo-horstii from

him.

The plant I am introducing here is
named for my wife Karla: Hohenbergia
magnispina ‘Karla’. The two other
types of Hohenbergia that I bought
long ago are Hohenbergia utriculosa
(det. W. Till 2007) on the one hand and
a Hohenbergia sp, that still has to be

identified, on the other hand. All three
types have similar inflorescences.

Sometime in the future a scientist
must determine if these three types
are really three different species. The
plants should be grown quite bright.
The substrate should not be too
humus-rich but more like a substrate
for succulents. This is closer to their
terrestrial life habit in their natural
environment. After hardening the

plants off in spring they can be grown
outside in full sun during the summer.’

It remains to be seen whether this

cultivar will be an ‘outside’ plant year
round for us in New Zealand. Perhaps
with some careful adapting, minimal

watering in winter and positioning in

a warm and sheltered location, it will
hopefully become a an outdoors plant
of exceptional form and beauty.

ReFeReNce: ‘die Bromelie’ 2013(2)
Page 60-61– A new white-variegated
bromeliad – Hohenbergia magnispina
‘karla’ – Hermann Prinsler

New from New Zealand
– By Graeme Barclay
Our featured plant this month is another ‘top shelf’ beauty adding to this

Kiwi hybridiser’s impressive catalogue of ‘marmazon’ neoregelia hybrids.

Neoregelia ‘Sunfire Tiger’

Andrew Devonshire – 2011 | Reg: Nov 2015

Mature cup-shaped rosette to 30cm.
diameter x 25cm. high. In strong light,

black-spined, wide, flame red leaves

with close, punctated lime green
cross-banding and cusped, cherry red

leaf tips. Grex sibling = N. ‘Sunfire

Pheasant’

The parentage formula is Neoregelia
‘Golden Pheasant’ x Neoregelia
‘Skotak’s Tiger’.

Back in April we featured this plant’s
grex mate, Neoregelia ‘Sunfire

Pheasant’. The term ‘marmazon’ was
not explained back then. It has been
coined to describe hybrids with both

Neoregelia ‘Sunfire Tiger’
PHOTO: ANdREw dEvONSHiRE
spotting (marmoration) and bandings
(zonation) and that combine to produce
colourful and consistent leaf patterns.
These patterns are often multi-layered,
mostly in green, yellow and red
colours. As we can see in this hybrid,

the bright green ‘marmazonations’

upon the red leaves are extremely thin
and well defined, giving the leaves a
very unique and striking appearance.
The result is a wonderful combination
of colour, with wide leaves and nicely
spined margins, all attractive traits of

both parents.

This beautiful new Kiwi creation

is certain to become another highly

sought after cultivar of Andrew’s
around the world. It is widely

considered to be one of the best
‘marmazon’ hybrids registered to date.
It is also a great example of how second

generation breeding using Andrew’s
own outstanding Neoregelia ‘Golden
Pheasant’ as the seed mother, can
produce different, but also exceptional
new hybrids. Like Neoregelia ‘Sunfire
Pheasant’, it will also be an excellent
candidate for sunny positions in the
garden, or raised in ponga or hanging
pots, where the sunlight can accentuate
the colours by shining through the
leaves – hence the name ‘Sunfire’.

 October 2016
VOL 56 NO 10
A large orange-flowered form of Tillandsia crocata.
Photo Peter Waters
Remembering Roberto Burle Marx...
landscape architect, painter, sculptor,
ceramicist and visionary botanist and ecologist

TELL THE DIFFERENCE...
a regular column from Peter Waters
Tillandsia harrisii and Tillandsia hondurensis

These two tillandsias are often
confused in cultivation because
of their somewhat similar types
of inflorescence and their very silvery
foliage. Tillandsia hondurensis as the
name suggests, comes from Honduras
and was described in 1981 by Werner
Rauh. Tillandsia harrisii described by
Renate Ehlers in 1989 was found in
Guatemala. There really should be no
trouble telling them apart as they differ
in several obvious respects.

Tillandsia harrisii is much larger than
hondurensis, twice the size in habitat,
although it never seems to attain that
in cultivation. It can be up to 35cms

in diameter while hondurensis is
not more than 15cms. The leaves of
harrisii are much longer and narrower
than those of hondurensis which are
wider, shorter and softer. Tillandsia
hondurensis does look much like a
larger Tillandsia edithae.

The flower spike on harrisii can be
over 20cms long and is narrower with
reddish bracts, while hondurensis is
nearer 10cms long, slightly thicker
and more rose-pink in colour. The
distinguishing character is that harrisii
has glabrous (shiny) floral bracts and
hondurensis has lepidote (furry) floral
bracts.

Tillandsia harrisii
Photo FRoM DEREK BUtChER
Tillandsia hondurensis
Photo FRoM DEREK BUtChER

Bromeliad Society of New Zealand Inc

Bromeliad Journal – October 2016 issue

CONTENTS
‘Tell the difference’ – Peter Waters 2
President’s Page – Graeme Barclay 4
Society officers, subs and Journal directory 5
Bromeliad Society September meeting news – Bev Ching 6
Group News 9
Society Garden visits in November 11
Remembering Roberto Burle Marx – Herb Plever 12
‘Special Species Spotlight’ – Graeme Barclay 16
‘New from New Zealand’ – new hybrids – Graeme Barclay 20

The opinions expressed in articles or letters in this Journal are the contributors’ own views and
do not necessarily express the views or the policy of the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand.

COMING EVENTS

Please see the Group News section starting on page 9 for details of group meeting

times and venues.

OCTOBER
25th Society monthly meeting at

Greyfriar’s Hall, corner of Mt Eden and
Windmill roads, starting at 7.30pm. The
monthly choice competition: Hanging
baskets. Diane Timmins will talk on
vriesea pup cutting and propagation.

NOVEMBER
6th ‘Broms in the Park’ at Totara

Waters, Whenuapai. Details on page 8.
6th South Auckland Group garden
visits to West Auckland.
9th Bay of Plenty Group meeting.

NOVEMBER (cont’d)
12th Bay of Plenty Group display and
sales day.
20th Society garden visits on Auckland’s
North Shore. See details on page 11.
22nd Society ‘Christmas meeting’ at
Greyfriar’s Hall, corner of Mt Eden and
Windmill roads, starting at 7.30pm. The
monthly choice competition: Christmas
arrangements. We will also have our
annual Rare Plant Auction and enjoy a
Christmas supper together. Please bring
a plate to share.
27th Bay of Plenty Group bus trip to
Whakatane.

FRONT COVER: The front cover is a plant believed to be a large orange-flowered
form of Tillandsia crocata. There is some doubt though and it might be a hybrid. It
has been in New Zealand for some time and probably came from USA. The flowers
are highly fragrant and up to 2cms across. Photo and note by Peter Waters.

PRESIDENT’S PAGE

Hi everyone, hopefully you are
reading this either just before,
or during Labour Weekend –
and the weather is behaving and you
are able to get outside to enjoy the
long weekend. Last year it seemed
like all the alcantareas were blooming
in spring, this year it’s the turn of the
vrieseas – they are sprouting flower
spikes everywhere for me. It has
always fascinated me why certain
genera seem to bloom en masse
all around the same time. Could it
be light frequency, temperature or
radiation from the sun? We may have
to investigate this further to find out, as
it seems such patterns are increasing.

I hope those of you who attended our
‘Spring Sale’ on the 16th to sell or buy
plants had a great time and went home
with a few new treasures. The Society

needs to increase plant sales and

participation at both of our major sale
events each year. It is critical we get
more patrons through the door to buy
plants and hopefully fall further in love
with bromeliads. We need more visitors
and new members that are keen to buy
plants, leading to increased revenues
for the Society. Without this, our bank
balance is slowly declining, due to the
rising costs of running our sales and
publishing our wonderful monthly
Journal. Therefore, please give some
serious thought as to how you can help

– perhaps encourage one or two new
people to come along to a meeting,
or attend the upcoming Totara Waters
‘Broms in the Park’ and pay a visit to
the 2017 ‘Fiesta’. Every little bit helps.
It’s a busy end to the year. A few
reminders for upcoming events:

1. BSNZ Auckland meeting on
Tuesday October 25th. Committee
member and Aztec Bromeliads Nursery
owner, Diane Timmins, will be giving
a hands-on demonstration of handling
vriesea pups – a talk definitely not to
be missed.
2. The annual ‘Broms in the Park’
event at Totara Waters on Sunday
November 6th – always a great day
with fantastic new plants on offer and a
top-shelf auction of rare and beautiful
plants.
3. North Shore Garden Visit Day to
three member’s gardens on Sunday
November 20th. Detailed information
in this Journal. Friends and family
are welcome, as long as they are
accompanied by a BSNZ member.
4. BSNZ Auckland ‘Christmas
meeting’ on Tuesday November
22nd. Please bring a plate for a shared
supper... and your piggy bank so you
can take part in the Christmas Rare
Plant Auction! We desperately need
quality auction plants, so please have a
look what nice things you can part with.

Finally, if you have a Society monthly
competition trophy or end-of-year
award trophy, please bring it to the
October meeting so we can have them
ready for our November final prize
giving.

Take care,

Graeme Barclay

OFFICERS

Patron: Patricia Sweeney
President: Graeme Barclay 09-817 4153
Vice Presidents: Jocelyn Coyle 09-416 8272
Chris Paterson 09-625 6707
Secretary: Bev Ching 09-576 4595
Treasurer: Peter Waters 09-534 5616
Life Members: Dave Anderson, Patricia Perratt,
Patricia Sweeney, Peter Waters

Scientific Officer: Peter Waters 09-534 5616
Librarian: Noelene Ritson 09-625 8114
Committee: Dave Anderson 09-638 8671
Don Brown 09-361 6175
Lester Ching 09-576 4595
Alan Cliffe 09-479 1451
David Cowie 09-630 8220
Diane Timmins 09-415 9066
Editor: Murray Mathieson 09-418 0366

MEMBERSHIP SUBSCRIPTION

New Zealand

Ordinary membership NZ $35.00 ($5.00
discount if paid before the end of February).
Dual membership (same household) NZ $45.00
($5.00 discount also applies as above).

Overseas

NZD $45.00. Send all payments to the Treasurer,
Peter Waters, 22 Half Moon Rise, Half Moon
Bay, Auckland 2012.

Correspondence

All general correspondence should be sent to the
Secretary, Bromeliad Society of New Zealand,

P.O. Box 108-168, Symonds Street, Auckland,
New Zealand. The opinions expressed in letters
or articles in the Journal are the contributors’
own views and do not necessarily express the
views or policy of the Bromeliad Society of
New Zealand Inc.
Society Website

www.bsnz.org – For past Journal archive –
growing tips – articles – sales information

BROMELIAD JOURNAL

Editorial Committee

Dave Anderson
Murray Mathieson

Peter Waters

Production

Murray Mathieson

Distribution

Don Brown

All enquiries and contributions welcome, please
contact any member of the editorial committee
or send to Peter Waters, 22 Half Moon Rise,
Half Moon Bay, Auckland 2012 or email:
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Deadline

For all editorial and advertising, the first
Tuesday of publication month

Display Advertising

Rates are:

Full Page $60.00
Half Page $30.00
Quarter Page $15.00

‘Buy & Swap’

Listings in ‘Buy & Swap’ are FREE for
members of the Society (max. 30 words).
For advertising enquiries and material, please
contact Murray Mathieson ph (09) 418 0366
or email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Bromeliad SocietySeptember Meeting News – Bev Ching

President Graeme Barclay chaired

the meeting. The sales table carries

lots of plant requirements including,
books, plant labels, pots in three sizes
and fertiliser. A new arrival to the table
was long tweezers that David Cowie had
managed to source, a good tool for getting
the leaves out of plants.

Noelene Ritson asked for sellers at the
Spring Show on October 16th to please
bring three plants for the display. The hall
opens at 7.00am when the committee will
be getting everything ready before you
bring your plants in so please allow time
for this. If you come early be prepared to
help.

On the silent auction table the only plant
was Vriesea ‘Eden Glade’– a lovely plant
to have in the garden.

David Cowie will bring his machine to the
meeting next month for those members
who do not have, or have lost a name tag.
Please see David when you arrive. No
charge.

The garden visits in November on
Auckland’s North Shore are arranged (see
page 11). Around next March we plan
to visit three gardens out west including
Graeme Barclay’s.

‘Show and Tell’. Peter Waters took
us through the many plants on the
table tonight. First was Neoregelia
macwilliamsii, a stoloniferous species
from Brazil. No spines. This plant is
related to Neoregelia compacta but
somewhat larger. It can take off when
planted in a tree like compacta does. Nice
centre colouring. Next was a flowering
Tillandsia stricta x aeranthos with dark

blue petals and red bracts. This is always
a showy plant. Then we had a keen
discussion on Tillandsia recurvifolia.
First was Tillandsia recurvifolia var
recurvifolia which has red bracts and
white petals. Another was possibly

Tillandsia recurvifolia or Tillandsia
leonamiana with faintly blue petals
(described as pale lavender) on red bracts.

There is also Tillandsia recurvifolia var
subsecundifolia with orange bracts and
white petals. Next was a tillandsia with
flat looking flower spike which turned
out to be Tillandsia vernicosa, with red
bracts, white flowers and stiff leaves. Judy
Graham brought in a plant badly damaged
from hail. Her Neoregelia ‘Tawa Tiger’
had leaves that were shredded.

Door prizes were won by Sue Town,
Andrew Maloy and Nancy Murphy. The
main raffle went to David Cowie.

Our talk of the evening was Dot Leaning
from Hokianga talking about Cryptanthus.
The plants Dot brought in to talk about
were beautifully presented. Remembering
that they are Brazilian tropical plants, they
like humidity, and like to be damp but not
sitting in water. Dot grows them in 5-6
inch pots. Cryptanthus are prone to mealy
bug and she uses meths on cottonbuds.
She waters by hand and fertilises every
week in summer and once a month in
winter. Too much sun and the leaves will
get burnt. Cryptanthus are getting harder
to find in NZ, especially different species
that Dot is after. If you can help her find
others, please contact Graeme so we can
pass the information on. There are not
many members growing them now.

When you are entering plants in the
monthly competition, please ensure your

Aechmea recurvata ‘Paraguay’
(Diana holt). First in open
Flowering section.
Neoregelia totara Painted Sun’ (Peter
Coyle). First in open Foliage section.
name and plant name is clearly written on
the board. Place a number or letter in front
of your plant. Plants should be on the
table no later than 7.20pm.

COMPETITION

Open flowering: First was Diana Holt
with Aechmea recurvata ‘Paraguay’
a cultivar of recurvata. This plant
had stunning foliage and flower head.
Second was Graeme Barclay with a
lovely Quesnelia augusto-coburgii
a species from Brazil. Also on the
table were Vriesea simplex, Billbergia
‘Estrella’, xCanmea ‘Hunua Ork Prince’,
Hohenbergia correia-araujoi, Vriesea
hybrid, Tillandsia punctulata.

Open Foliage: First was Peter Coyle with
Neoregelia ‘Totara Painted Sun’, second
was Graeme Barclay with Vriesea ‘Jungle
Jazz’ hybrid, an Andrew Maloy hybrid.
Also on the table was Vriesea ‘Supreme’,
Vriesea ‘Hokey Tokey’, xCanmea ‘Hunua
Serpent’, Neoregelia ‘Pink Spider’,
Neoregelia ampullacea x carolinae
‘Tricolor’.

Tillandsia: First and second was
Lynette Nash with Tillandsia duratii,
and Tillandsia ionantha ‘Druid’. Also
on the table were Tillandsia kautskyi,
Tillandsia stricta, Tillandsia recurvifolia

var subsecundifolia, Tillandsia scaposa,
Tillandsia aeranthos hybrid.

Neoregelia: First was Peter Coyle
with Neoregelia ‘Lorena Lector’,
second was Graeme Barclay with
Neoregelia ‘Mufasa’. Also on the table
were Neoregelia lilliputiana x ‘Felix’,
Neoregelia ‘Tiger Cub’ x ‘Oeser Black
Knight’, Neoregelia ‘Tara Little Freckly’,
Neoregelia ‘Lintum’ x ‘Marble Throat’,
Neoregelia ‘Hannibal Lector’ x ‘Fosters
Pink Tip’, Neoregelia ‘Amentis’.

Monthly Choice: First was Peter Coyle
with Cryptanthus acaulis, second
was Cryptanthus ‘Arlety’ belonging
to Dave Dawson. Also on the table
were Orthophytum ‘Copper Penny’,
xNeophytum ‘Gary Hendrix’, Cryptanthus
‘Sanctum’, 2 x Orthophytum gurkenii,
Cryptanthus ‘Arlety’.

Plant of the Month: This month went
to Peter Coyle with Neoregelia ‘Lorena
Lector’.
Also, a correction from last month:
Tillandsia competition was won by
Lynette Nash with Tillandsia aeranthos.
Congratulations to all the winners.

NEXT MEETING: Tuesday 25th October
2016 at 7.30pm.

More photos on P8

Cont’d from P7 – More meeting photos...

Neoregelia ‘Lorena Lector’ (Peter Coyle).
Plant of the Month.

Cryptanthus acaulis (Peter Coyle).
First in Monthly Choice section(Cryptanthus and orthophytum).
Tillandsia
duratii
(Lynette
Nash).
First in
tillandsia
section.

Vriesea
‘Jungle Jazz’
(GraemeBarclay).
Second in
open Foliage
section.

Sunday 6th November starting 10.00am
Presented by Totara Waters in association with the
Bromeliad Society of New Zealand. It’s sure to
be another great day – mark your diary now!
• Lots of new releases
• Plant auction... a chance to pick up some ‘beauties’
• Neoregelias (including midis and minis), alcantareas,
billbergias, vrieseas and more!
• BBQ lunch and a great garden atmosphere with
‘brom lovers’ everywhere
Broms in the Park 2016
89 Totara Road
Whenuapai
Auckland
Phone 09-416 8272
Fax 09-416 8062
www.totarawaters.co.nz

Group News

Bay of Plenty Bromeliad Group

– Lynley Breeze
Roger Allen kindly led the meeting in
Lynley’s absence. Great credit is due
to the team of people who helped out at
the orchid show, on the sales table and
arranging our splendid display.

Sandra Simpson was our meeting
speaker and showed some magnificent
photos of her recent trip to the western
seaboard of North America. Naturally, a
great focus of her visit was gardens and
plants.

Competition results:
Plant of the month – mounted
bromeliads: 1st Dean Morman with
Neoregelia ‘Donger’, 2nd Dean Morman
with Vriesea ‘Pixie Razzle’.
Open Competition: 1st equal Dean
Morman with Vriesea ‘Bossa Nova’ and
Neoregelia ‘Altura’.

Tillandsia Competition: 1st Wilma

Fitzgibbons with Tillandsia cacticola,
2nd Wilma Fitzgibbons with Tillandsia
chiapensis, 3rd Wilma Fitzgibbons with
Tillandsia juncifolia.

Next meeting and upcoming events:

Meeting: Wednesday 9th November
12.30pm – 2.30pm at The Yacht Club,
Sulphur Point.
Guest speaker: Graeme Barclay,
President of BSNZ. Plant of the month:
miniature neoregelias (12.5cm or
smaller).

Our annual Matua Hall display and sales
day: Saturday 12th November, 8.00am –

12.00 midday. Sellers need to register
names with Maxine.
We will also be participating in the
Tauranga Garden and Arts festival at
the Pavilion at the Lakes, 17th – 20th
November with a display and sales
plants. The Garden and Art Festival will
be a great focus for a visit to this area.

Our bus trip to Whakatane is on Sunday
27th November – there’s still a few seats!

Eastern Bay of Plenty Bromeliad and
Orchid Group – Alison Iremonger

On a wet Sunday afternoon in September
we met high above Whakatane, at Sue
and Ken Laurent’s magnificent garden,
with views out to sea of Whale and White
islands. Ross Fergusson welcomed 28
members and one new member.

The people who helped on our stall at the
Ohope craft market were thanked. We
sold a lot of the plants and it was a great
forum to promote broms.

We discussed our trip to Tauranga and
also our proposed trip to Northland next
year.

Our guest speaker was our host Ken
Laurent who spoke on his and Sue’s
volunteer work with both the Manawahe
Kokako trust and the Whakatane Kiwi
Trust. Both groups do a lot of predator
control (rats, stoats, weasels, possums)
through trapping and poisoning. The
Kiwi work involves finding kiwi nests
and eggs. incubating the eggs and then
taking the chicks out to Whale Island
which is predator free. When they reach
a certain size they are relocated into bush
reserves around Ohope and Whakatane.

Cont’d P10

Cont’d from P9 – Group News

After a cuppa,voting on the competition
plants took place, In the ‘Show and Tell’
Sue showed a ten year old Tillandsia
‘Creation’ which was flowering for the
first time. Sheila brought a Billbergia
pyramidalis with spotting on the leaves.
Ross gave a short talk on billbergias.

After the raffles and the sale of plants the
rain stopped and we were able to wander
and enjoy Sue and Ken’s large, stunning
garden.

Competition:
Foliage: 1st Bubbles Rivett – Vriesea
‘Pixe Razzell’, 2nd Ross Fergusson – with
a neoregelia hybrid, 3rd Gail Anderson –
Neoregelia fosteriana ‘Princess’.
Flowering:1st Ross Fergusson –
Aechmea ‘Blue Rain’.

Billbergia (Plant of the month):

1st Ross Fergusson – Billbergia amoena,
2nd Gail Fergusson – Billbergia amoena
(red form).
Orchid: 1st Elisa Mcguigan – Dediobem
nobilis, 2nd Gail Anderson – unknown
plant.

South Auckland Bromeliad Group

– Hawi Winter
Our first garden visit meeting on Sunday
October 2nd started with the wonderful
garden of Delma and Tony Pell, followed
by the garden and plant collection of
Pamela and John Muddiman. Thank you
for inviting us!

The short meeting at the Pell’s place was
started with the sad news of the passing
of our long-time member Eric Ashton.
We observed a minute of silence in
Eric’s remembrance. The speeding up
of pupping and pup growth by adding
grains of slow release fertiliser into

the leaf axils of tank bromeliads was
discussed. This was in response to a
posting on the Kiwi Bromeliad Group
on Facebook. The slow release fertiliser
was available for sale.

The raffle winners were: 1st Margaret
Flanagan, 2nd Don Brown, 3rd Delma
Pell.

Next garden visits: On Sunday 6th
November we will have a variety of
destinations we can visit in any order.
Totara Waters ‘Broms in the Park’,
is starting at 10:00 am. Jocelyn and
Peter Coyle have invited all bromeliad
friends to call in at their annual event
at 89 Totara Rd, Whenuapai. There
are wonderful bromeliads for sale
and we recommend going there first.
Then there are three gardens to visit in
West Auckland – open from 1.00pm
onwards.

1. Betty Townley’s garden at 16 James
Tyler Crescent, Lynfield. This is also
where the coffee/tea will be organised
by Margaret Flanagan and helpers.
2. Carolle Roberts’ garden at 24 Niagara
Crescent, Lynfield.
3. Joanne Hooper’s garden at
39C Cape Horn Rd, Lynfield.
There will be no formal meeting and due
to the size of the gardens we will have no
plant sale. (You will have no money left
anyway after Totara Waters!).
Northland Bromeliad Group

– Nancy Peters
Sunday dawned dark and misty on the
first day of daylight savings, for our trip
from Whangarei to Auckland to visit
Peter and Jocelyn Coyle at Totara Waters
and also Graeme and Jeanene Barclay

at their Titirangi garden. The weather
forecast was bad but we set off with the
positive attitude that gardeners aren’t
afraid of rain.

In pouring rain we arrived at Totara
Waters on the banks of the upper
Waitemata harbour in time for a generous
morning tea prepared by Jocelyn. Once
refuelled we then got into some serious
spending, choosing from a great selection
of beautiful plants. Peter gave us a talk
on tillandsias and showed us special
plants he grows in his glasshouse. We
explored the two acres of grounds which
they have been developing since 1999.
In their huge bird house, a very cheeky
and beautiful parrot was very keen to say
‘hello’ to all.

At Titirangi, with the road gutters
running like raging streams, Graeme
Barclay met us with a welcome mat at
the bottom of his drive. The mat was to
stop us slipping down the rain slicked

surface while we admired his recent
work on the driveway banks which he
had planted in magnificent bromeliads
amid impressively huge driftwood.
Thankfully his large deck was covered,

so after admiring the collection of

bromeliads in his shade house, we sat
down for lunch and a very welcome
hot drink. His wife Jeanene had made
us cream sponge cakes and biscuits so
we were well fortified for a wet wander
around his garden and for what was to
come on the way home. This journey
home took us 5 hours, due to an accident
and several detours.

Next meeting: Graeme and Diana
Smithyman’s garden, 39 Tiria Lane,
Waipu. Directions: Travel south on
SH1 to Waipu. Take the third road past
the black vets’ building on right hand
side. This is Books Road. The first left
on Brooks Road is Tiria Lane. Plenty of
parking by the cowshed. Ph 09-4320291
or 021-2455 556. Plants for sale.

GARDEN VISITS COMING UP IN NOVEMBER ON AUCKLAND’S NORTH SHORE...

Sunday November 20th • 10.00am to 1.00pm

• Diana and Ian McPherson – 20 Park Hill Road, Birkenhead
• Joy and Bob Doran – 25 Island Bay Rd, Beachhaven
• Jenny and Tony Green, and Regina Wai – 2 Valhalla Drive, Beachhaven
And there’s a lot of other things to see and do in the historic
Birkenhead area while you’re here...

Great cafes at Highbury and Verran’s Corner. A magnificent new viewing
platform at 33 Birkenhead Ave with views out over native bush to the
Waitemata and the city. Charming bush walks and the opportunity to visit
the old Chelsea refinery. ENJOY!

Remembering Roberto Burle Marx
(1909-1994)

From the New York Bromeliad Society ‘Bromeliana’ October, 2016

– Herb Plever
The stimulus for this article was a retrospective,
month-long exhibition of the paintings and gardens of
Roberto Burle Marx at the Jewish Museum in New York.

The Museum’s brochure noted that
Burle Marx ‘was one of the most

influential landscape architects

of the twentieth century, yet he is not

a familiar figure outside of his native

Brazil. He is best known for his iconic
seaside pavements on Rio de Janeiro’s
Copacabana Beach, and for his abstract,
geometric garden designs. But his work
encompasses an enormous range of
artistic forms and styles: Burle Marx
was a painter and sculptor; a designer
of textiles, jewellery, theatre sets, and
costumes; a ceramicist and stained-
glass artist. He was an avid art collector,
a talented baritone, a consummate cook,
and a visionary self-taught botanist and
ecologist. For him, all these endeavours
were equally important, facets of one
another.’

The Museum omitted one very important
aspect of his work and interests. He was
the first landscaper to use plants native
to Brazil to populate his gardens. He
acquired a coffee plantation in Sao
Antonio de Bica on the outskirts of Sao
Paulo and converted it to a large estate
of many acres on which he created a
beautiful, naturalistic landscape filled
with plants he collected from the
Brazilian rainforests, savannahs, rocks,
cliffs and mountains.

Burle Marx grew and studied collected
bromeliads, philodendrons, ferns, water

lillies, orchids, and other tropical plants
until he was expert in their biology and
horticulture. That estate was donated by
Roberto to the Brazilian government and
it became a protected national monument
called Sìtio Burle Marx with more than
3,500 species of plants. He amassed a
very large collection of bromeliads, and
became the dean of the great Brazilian
bromeliad experts such as Roberto
Menescal, Roberto Kautsky, Luiz
Correia de Araujo, Renato Bello, Elton

M. C. Leme and Luiz Felipe Nevares de
Carvalho (who recently died).
Brom growers will recognize Roberto’s
name because burle-marxii is the name
of a species in 10 genera: Aechmea,
Dyckia, Alcantarea, Cryptanthus,
Neoregelia, Hohenbergia, Neoglaziovia,
Pitcairnia, Orthophytum and Tillandsia.

Early in 1990, a friend, who had just
visited Burle Marx, reported that he was
in poor health and seemed to be getting
weaker. I was concerned because I had
always wanted to get the BSI to honour
Roberto at a World Conference. The
1992 conference would be hosted by
the Bromeliad Society of Tampa Bay.
I collared Tom Wolfe, then President of
that Society, and asked him to consider
inviting Burle Marx as keynote speaker
of the conference. Tom said he would be
happy to propose it to his Board if I could
get Burle Marx to come. I called Roberto

An inflorescence brings a smile. A section of Biscayne Boulevard, Miami, FL.

Costume design for the balletMagazine cover designed by Burle Marx.
Petrushka (Fokine/Shostekovich).

in Brazil and invited him to come. He
said he was honoured but would have to
decline because his doctor had ordered
him to cut down on travelling. I kept

trying and called him again and then

asked Elton Leme in Brazil to visit him
and try to persuade him to come. Happily
Roberto Burle Marx did come to Tampa
and the BSI World Conference was a
great success. We were able to honour a
great man during his lifetime.

Coincidentally, the erudite Floridian
Jose (‘Pepe’) Denayre and I both saw the
Burle Marx exhibition at the Museum
of Modern Art in New York called ‘The

Unnatural Art of the Garden.’Among the
art works, Roberto had supervised the
installation of a very tall, abstract display
of more than 100 bromeliads. Pepe was
working at the United Nations at the
time and says that when he saw that
display he was turned on to bromeliads
and became a grower and bromelphile.

In a career that spanned almost 60 years,
Roberto Burle Marx created nearly 3000

landscape gardens and terrace and roof

top gardens for public and commercial
buildings, parks and private homes in
20 countries around the world. Those of
you who watched the Brazilian cultural

Cont’d P14 13

Cont’d from P13 – Remembering Roberto Burle Marx

exhibition at the Olympic Games in Rio,
know that Burle Marx is honoured as
one of three great heroes of Brazil, not
only for his artistic contributions but
also for his lifelong work to prevent the
destruction of the rainforests.

In addition to creating thousands
of paintings and sculpture, Roberto
designed walkways and garden plots
to beautify the avenues of many cities
of Brazil and other countries. The most

famous of these is the Copacabana

Promenade – three miles of three different

mosaic tile walks on Atlantic Avenue
along Copacabana Beach in Rio de
Janeiro. Roberto is celebrated in Miami,
Florida for his tile design on ten blocks
of walkways on Biscayne Boulevard.
To mark the 25th anniversary of Burle
Marx’s design of this Miami streetscape,
the Consulate General of Brazil, and
Passport Miami, sponsored a celebratory
reception in downtown Miami where

Vargem Grande, Arieas.
Broms in Sìtio Burle Marx.

a plaque was unveiled to permanently
commemorate his achievement. He also
excelled in the visual arts, transferring
some of his major design works to
colourful paintings and tapestries as he
developed his signature gardens of bold
curved forms mixing plants and local
materials.

To accompany Burle Marx’s exhibition
at the New York Museum of Modern
Art in 1991, William Howard Adams
published a booklet with 90 photos in
which he recognized ‘Burle Marx’s
affinity for the sensibilities of such 20thcentury artists as Calder, Léger, Miro,
and Picasso, and his unique ability to
apply their vocabularies in eloquent
compositions of earth and plant.’ Adams
described the evolution of Burle Marx’s
art, his close collaborative relationships
with such architects as Le Corbusier,
Oscar Niemeyer, Lucio Costa, and Rino
Levi, and his long-standing efforts to
save the Brazilian rain forests.

Brasilia, in central Brazil, has been its
capital since 1960. It is a very modern
city that arose from a desert area where
there had been no structures. Brazilian
architects, especially the great Oscar
Niemeyer created a city of futuristic
public and commercial buildings
and private homes all surrounded by

landscape gardens and terrace and roof

gardens designed by Roberto Burle
Marx.

Of course, there are also many hundreds
of Burle Marx designed landscape

gardens and terrrace and roof gardens in

Rio de Janeiro, Sao Paulo, Petropolis and
other Brazilian cities. In the conservatory
of the famed Longwood Gardens in
Kennett Square, PA, Burle Marx created
a permanent bromeliad display with
sprays of water cascading into clear

pools. The bromeliads are mounted on
the vertical rock walls of the greenhouse.
Roberto used hundreds of plants, 35
tons of rock and 3,000 feet of heating
cable to create today’s Cascade Garden.
Burle Marx designed some breathtaking
gardens for the private estates of wealthy
clients. For me, the most spectacular
garden was one Roberto designed for
Odette Montiero. It was later redesigned
by Burle Marx for a new owner of the
property.

For about 100 years following 1830, the
‘Coffee Barons’ in Brazil had made huge
fortunes, growing and selling coffee
(‘Black Gold’) in the Paraiba Valley
of eastern Sao Paulo. One of them had
owned the Vargem Grande Coffee Farm
in Arieas. A descendent undertook to
convert that huge coffee plantation into
an estate. He hired Burle Marx and his
associates to landscape it. It was such
a huge a project that it took Roberto 10
years to complete it! Of course, he used
lots of bromeliads.

The Cavenelas residence in an estate
near Petropolis had been demolished in
the 19th century. When it was purchased
by Gilberto Strunk, he hired the architect
Oscar Niemeyer to rebuild the residence
and Roberto Burle Marx to landscape
the estate grounds with gardens. The
team of Niemeyer and Burle Marx were
the choice for many famous government,
commercial and private buildings.

Roberto Burle Marx died on June
4, 1994 at the age of 84 years in a
farmhouse in Bara de Guarativa.
It is important that from time to
time we acquaint new members and
remind ourselves of the illustrious
contributions this great artist and
humanist made to our world.

While we still have the stunning Aechmea ‘Paraguay’ fresh in our minds
from the July Journal, I thought it would be nice to look at another excellent
clone of Aechmea recurvata that is normally blooming around this time of
year.

Aechmea ‘Aztec Gold’

As we have seen with many

of the ‘Special Species’

plants featured over the
past three years, they often appear
as unexpected surprises. Vegetative
sports and seedling mutations worthy
of propagation are not that common,
where they normally produce a good
looking, variegated clone. We are
lucky to have many astute growers
and breeders all around the world
to thank, as, without their keen
observations and skill in bringing
these plants to maturity, we would
not have them to grow and enjoy.

Aechmea ‘Aztec Gold’ is one such
plant, with an interesting story that is
the subject of a great article written
by Queenslander John Catlan, who
is the author of the well-known book

–‘Bromeliads Under the Mango Tree’

published in 1992. It is well worth
reprinting here for you to enjoy...

Aechmea recurvata ‘Aztec Gold’

– By John Catlan
‘Aztec Gold’ is really the story of
trying to produce a desirable plant
by swinging the odds in the grower’s
favour by manipulation of growing
conditions. One day in 1981, a friend

of mine found a plant in a group of my
Aechmea recurvata plants with a good
clear yellow stripe on one of its leaves.
The variegated leaf appeared on a
fully mature plant that had failed to
flower that year. It was the unanimous
lament that plants of friends as well as
our own had shown partial variegation
that had not been passed onto the
pups. The low averages to almost

non-existent were definitely against

success, but with this plant we hoped
it was possible as the variegated leaf
was low down on the butt of the plant
where the pups originate.

After researching the material
available, looking for a magic wand
I found that there was none, or more
precisely, none that I could find. Now
was the time to put into action three
lessons learnt while observing our
plants. One day while sitting on an old
stump, with a shovel in one hand and
a cup of coffee in the other, trying to
get inspiration to clean up and level
off our rubbish dump, I noted just how
hardy bromeliads really were. There
were dozens of discarded plants lying
on their sides with their pups happily
sitting up ready to grow into new
clumps.

Lesson 1: If a plant falls over and
then a pup forms, nine times out of
ten the pup will start on the top side
of the plant.

Like most bromeliad growers with
more plants than room, I would take
pups off and sit them in a pot of very
open mix to keep them upright until
potting up time. If you were too long,
you would wind up with a solid ball
of roots. This resulted in tearing them
apart and damaging the roots when
potting. Gradually it dawned on me
that the root system initiated from
one side of the pup, the opposite side
from the heel piece that was attached
to the mother plant. The rule became:
face the round side to the centre of the
pot. The roots all grow to the outside
of the pot and are easier to separate.
This explained to me why in a clump
of bromeliads the pups are generally
grown on the mother plant furthest
from the grandmother. I reasoned that
the roots on that side absorbed the
nourishment and gave slightly more
food to that side of the plant. I foliar
fed the plants on one side only and this
resulted in a very high percentage of
pups from that side.

Lesson 2: If you liquid feed a plant
by foliar feeding it on one side, you
increase your chances of getting a
pup from that side.

I remembered one year, there being
not enough bench space for all the
plants, that some were placed under a
bench. Being winter, the sun was low
in the sky and light penetrated very
well in under the bench as it faced
north. Spring arrived and busy-busy

busy then well into summer. Lo and
behold! There were the bromeliads
with all their pups, like soldiers, facing
the path. At that time I thought it was
rather convenient for the removal of
the pups. Remember light is a source
of food for plants and in a clump of
bromeliads the outer-side of a plant
should be receiving more light than the
side facing the clump.

Lesson 3: If the plant is denied light
on one side, it will throw its pups on
the side facing the light source.

The time had come to ‘bite the bullet’.
We laid the plant at an angle of 45
degrees facing away from the sun with
the leaf with the yellow stripe being on
top facing the sun. A few weeks later
at an angle of 90 degrees to the yellow
stripe appeared a green pup. This
pup was removed with a sharpened
screwdriver. Our theory was that
the pup had started its growth cycle
prior to our meddling with nature. Be
patient and wait. Success immediately
followed by disaster. The pup was there
but it was pure yellow. We had only one
variegated leaf and the pup was right
under it. So all we could do was leave
it as an interesting experiment.

A few months later when the pup had
grown and we looked and wondered,
for there on the upper side of the
leaves was a solid green stripe. A
phenomenon of this plant is: all pups
appear as plain yellow, but as the plant
develops the green stripe improves and
it turns into a sturdy, vigorous grower
for a variegate. To promote the growth
of ‘Aztec Gold’ we left it attached to

Cont’d P18 17

Cont’d from P17 – Special Species Spotlight

its parent. This promoted vigorous
growth resulting in a mature plant that
produced ten pups over three years.
Any pups appearing on the green
parent were cut off so that ‘Aztec Gold’
received all the energy.
We were aware that with some
variegated bromeliads that too much
fertiliser had the ability to cause a plant
to lose its variegation, for just prior
to ‘Aztec Gold’ we had over-fertilised
some variegated neoregelia seedlings
and the variegation disappeared for
ever! So this time we took fertilising
very cautiously with our original
plant. Some variegated plants can take
fertiliser and some can’t and there are
variegated plants that only seem to

flourish when they are fertilised well

and on a regular basis.

‘Aztec Gold’ was grown in 170mm
hanging baskets potted in a very open
mix and hung 18cm from the roof.
They had plenty of light and nine-
month Osmocote as fertiliser. They
were watered regularly, but they were
very well drained and had plenty of
air movement. The growers who have
had trouble growing ‘Aztec Gold’ are
probably giving it too much water and
not enough light and air movement to
keep up with the watering.

When the pups were taken off the
original ‘Aztec Gold’ they were given
the code A, B, C, D, E, F, etc. When
plant A threw its pups they were
numbered A1, A2, A3, etc. When plant
A1 threw its pups they were numbered
A1A, A1B, A1C, etc. When plant A1A
threw its pups they were numbered
A1A1, A1A2, A1A3, etc. All this

information was written up into a book
so you had a complete family tree of
the descendants of ‘Aztec Gold’. By
looking up the family tree you knew
what to code the pup and you entered
it into the family tree. The plants were
kept all mixed up in one area and all
watered and fertilised the same.

‘Aztec Gold’ ‘E2’ bred like a rabbit.
Its descendants dominated the whole
breeding programme. For months we
looked at ‘E2’ and its descendants
but they all looked the same to me
and everyone else who was asked. I
then separated ‘E2’ descendants and
put them on the one bench. It was
immediately obvious the central green
stripe although it was the same width
was a slightly deeper green and the
yellow a touch more golden and this
made the difference, more food faster
and more pups. Pure white is the only
colour in a bromeliad leaf that does
not manufacture food – from sunlight.
Yellow is in fact able to manufacture
food as it has chlorophyll in its cells,
which to us appears yellow.

What a fantastic amount of ‘Gold’
information (excuse the pun) divulged
there! As mentioned earlier, John’s

article clearly highlights the processes

and time involved in bringing such
special plants into widespread
cultivation. His ‘Three Lessons’ are
certainly food-for-thought when
managing bromeliad pup propagation
and thinking about fertilising etc.

Aechmea ‘Aztec Gold’ is a sport from
Aechmea recurvata var. recurvata, and

like all clones of this species, it should

be grown in full sun and on the dry side
in order to look its best. It grows to
around 20-25cm tall and does not mark
or die back in cold winter conditions.
It enjoys a very free draining, coarse
bark mix, or being mounted on a stump
or log, where it will form a pleasing
clump within a few years.

REFERENCES:

• Aechmea recurvata ‘Aztec
Gold’ – John Catlan
• ‘Bromeliaceae’, Bulletin of
the Bromeliad Society of
Queensland – May/June
1992
• J Brom. Soc. 1995
• ‘Bromlink’ Newsletter – Jul/
Aug 1997
Aechmea ‘Aztec Gold’ in bloom.

Photo: LLoyD GoDMAN

Aechmea ‘Aztec Gold’ clumping.

Photo: LLoyD GoDMAN

New from New Zealand
– By Graeme Barclay
Our featured plant this month isn’t completely ‘new’, but it is a very nice
recent registration that was seen for sale at our September meeting.

Neoregelia ‘Tara Drama’ | Diana Holt – 2007 | Reg: Feb 2013

Mature rosette to 33cms diameter x
23cms high. Dark red and golden cross-
bands and blotches, red outer tips.

The cross is Neoregelia ‘Gold Fever’ x
Neoregelia ‘Tigrina’.

This cross of Diana’s is an interesting
one, because the pollen parent is a
much smaller plant than the seed
parent. Often, such crosses are not
successful, simply because the sexual
reproduction parts of a small plant’s
flowers are generally smaller. This
means the pollen tubes that grow when
placed on the stigma are short (small)
and thus cannot reach far enough down
into the ovary of the seed mother.
Hence, fertilisation and subsequent
seed production is not able to occur.
However, in this case, Neoregelia.
‘Tigrina’ (which is a clone of the
species Neoregelia ampullacea) has

quite longish flowers for a small plant,
so it is often able to pollinate much
larger plants than itself. Diana has used
Neoregelia ‘Gold Fever’ in three plants
registered to date. It is an excellent
garden plant with bright, golden
speckles and glossy leaves. This trait
is very evident in Neoregelia ‘Tara
Drama’, where the golden markings
are wonderfully accentuated by the
darker foliage. Another interesting
feature is that this plant seems to have
two quite different looks, depending
on how it is grown and the amount of
light it gets. Peter Coyle’s photo shows
the plant at the recent meeting, where

it appeared slightly more compact and

much darker, especially in the centre,
whereas Diana’s registration photo
shows it with more reddish leaves.
Both looks are lovely and this plant
is sure to become a popular garden
specimen, just like the parents.

Neoregelia ‘tara Drama’. Photo: PEtER CoyLE Neoregelia ‘tara Drama’. Photo: DIANA hoLt

 

January 2016VOL 56 NO 1
Ursulaea macvaughii blooming in Northland.
Photo by Erin Titmus
• Learning about the
genera: Ursulaea
• ‘Fiesta’ 2016 coming
soon… details inside
• We start a new series
on NZ hybrids
 
New series
New from New Zealand
– By Graeme Barclay
Vriesea ‘Hunua Limelight’
Neoregelia ‘Totara Flamin Hot’
This month we are re-inventing the ‘From the Registrar’ articles from past journals,
highlighting hybrids that are exclusively made in New Zealand. This series will
showcase plants registered in recent times by our band of excellent Kiwi hybridists.
We hope you enjoy learning more about many of the fantastic new broms being made
close to home.
 
Vriesea ‘Hunua Limelight’
John Mitchell – 2007 (Reg: Nov 2014)
 

Mature rosette to 85cm diameter x
43cm high. Shiny, creamy lime green
leaves with darker green, filagree-like
cross-banding. Erect, branched spike to
 
1.1 metre tall. The parents are Vriesea
heiroglyphica x Vriesea ‘Vista’. John has
used both of these parents extensively in
his hybridizing, the result here is very
 
pleasing with the heiroglyphica large
 
size and leaf width, combining perfectly
 
with the white windows of ‘Vista’ to
produce a crisp looking plant with
excellent form and shiny leaves.
 
Neoregelia ‘Totara Flamin Hot’
Peter Coyle – 2012 (Reg: Dec 2015)
 
Mature open rosette to 40cm diameter x
18cm high. In strong light, lime green/
yellow inner portion of leaves, blending
into streaked/pinpointed vermilion
 
pigments on the outer foliage. At
blooming the central leaves turn speckled
hot pink and white. The parents are
 
Neoregelia ‘Gold Jewellery’x Neoregelia
‘Jewellery Shop’, both are hybrids from
Margaret Paterson. Peter has used a
number of Margaret’s hybrids to create
 
new generations of Neoregelia. This one
has a lovely and unusual combination
of colours and is sure to become
another excellent garden plant.
 

Bromeliad Society of New Zealand Inc
 
Bromeliad Journal – January 2016 issue
 

CONTENTS
New from New Zealand… new hybrids feature – Graeme Barclay 2
President’s Page – Graeme Barclay 4
Bromeliad Society November meeting news – Bev Ching 5
2016 ‘Fiesta’ Show competition classes and rules 8
2015 trophy and monthly competition winners 10
Group News 11
Learning about the genera – Ursulaea – Graeme Barclay 13
Photos from our groups 16
Society officers, subs and Journal directory 17
‘Special Species Spotlight’ – Graeme Barclay 18
‘Fiesta’ 2016 20
 
The opinions expressed in articles or letters in this Journal are the contributors’ own views and
 
do not necessarily express the views or the policy of the Bromeliad Society of New Zealand.
 
COMING EVENTS
 
Please see the Group News section starting on page 11 for details of group meeting
 
times and venues.
 
JANUARY
24th Northland Group meeting
26th Society monthly meeting at
 
Greyfriar’s Hall, corner of Mt Eden and
Windmill roads, starting at 7.30pm. The
Monthly Choice competition: Aechmea
nudicaulis and cultivars. Graeme
Barclay will talk on Aechmea nudicaulis
 
and Dave Anderson will also talk about
 
what judges look for when they judge
bromeliads in competition.
 
FEBRUARY
10th Bay of Plenty Group meeting
14th Tillandsia Group meeting
17th Bay of Plenty Group garden visits
23rd Society monthly meeting at
 
Greyfriar’s Hall, corner of Mt Eden and
Windmill roads, starting at 7.30pm. The
Monthly Choice competition: Green
 
leafed tillandsias. There will also be a
discussion on these tillandsias.
 
27th/28th ‘Fiesta’ Show, Competition and
Plant Sale at Mt Eden War Memorial
Hall, 489 Dominion Road, Balmoral,
Auckland. 9.00am to 3.00pm both days.
 
FRONT COVER: Ursulaea macvaughii coming into flower in Northland, photo by
Erin Titmus. This month we focus on the genus Ursulaea in our ‘Learning about the
genera’ article, starting on page 13.
 

PRESIDENT’S PAGE
 
Happy New Year everyone and
I hope you’re looking forward
to another great year with your
broms and enjoying your society.
 
The days certainly seem to whizz past
this time of year. This summer looks
like it will be long and dry so don’t
forget to check out plant positioning
with the burning midday sun and keep
plants well watered. It’s amazing how
fast water can evaporate and pots
can completely dry out. I am nearly
watering daily in the greenhouse that
is regularly around 35ºC in the early
 
afternoon. One trick I am using, for
pots in the sun, is to cover the top of
 
the mix with a dense layer of pine bark.
This helps keep the mix below moist
for much longer. It also helps keeps the
 
weeds and moss growth down, which
 
is an issue at this time of year.
 
For those who couldn’t make it to our
 
November meeting, we had a great end-
of-year prize giving rare plant auction
 
and supper. Congratulations again to
all our monthly competition trophy
 
winners and place-getters. Without
 
your efforts we wouldn’t have great
plants to look at each month. Special
 
congratulations to Jocelyn Coyle,
 
winner of our annual Bea Hanson
 
Memorial Trophy… a much deserved
 
recognition for all her hard work over
the years. A special award was also
made to Peter Coyle for reaching the
milestone in 2015 of one hundred
registered BSI hybrids. Peter is the
 
first New Zealander to reach this mark,
which is a significant achievement
 
in over 10 years hybridising. The
scary thing is he is fast heading
 
towards two hundred, I hope he can
 
remember all the names by then!
 
Alongside Peter, we are very lucky
 
to have a good number of extremely
 
talented hybridists in New Zealand,
 
that are producing some of the best
 
new neoregelia, vriesea, billbergia
 
and bigeneric hybrids in the world. To
highlight this and give all members
a closer insight into some of the new
 
plants being registered, we are starting
a new series in the Journal this year
 
focusing on ‘New Zealand Hybrids’.
 
Be sure to check out the first article
 
on our inside front cover. An early
 
reminder, our annual ‘Fiesta’ Show
 
and Sale 2016 is on a week later than
usual… February 27th – 28th. For those
showing and selling plants, now is the
 
time to start getting them prepared
 
– don’t leave it too late. Remember,
any financial BSNZ member is able to
enter plants, displays or artwork in any
of the competition categories. Please
see ‘Fiesta’ schedule of classes and
entry conditions on page…
 
I look forward to seeing you all at
 
the next society meeting on January
 
26th. I am bringing along most of my
Aechmea nudicaulis collection for
 
a brief talk on this species and Dave
 
Anderson will also give us a ‘judges
perspective’ for plants in the ‘Fiesta’
competition.
 
Cheers,
 
Graeme Barclay
 

Bromeliad Society November Meeting
News – Notes by Bev Ching. Photos by Peter Coyle and Graeme Barclay.
 
President Graeme Barclay chaired Our November 8th ‘Broms in the Park’
our final meeting of the year with day at Totara Waters was enjoyed by
53 members present. There were all who attended, with many members
4 visitors and 2 members who have from out of town joining in the fun.
moved from Whangarei to Auckland.
Welcome! Cont’d P6
 
 
 
Tillandsia ‘Aunt Betty’ – Lynette Nash. Alcantarea ‘Bobby’s Gold’ – Peter Coyle.
First equal ‘Plant of the Month’ First equal ‘Plant of the Month’
 
Judy Graham’s winning Christmas Decoration
Tillandsia yunckeri
– John Mitchell.
First in Open Flowering section
 
Cont’d from P5 – Bromeliad Society Meeting News
 
Many thanks to Peter and Jocelyn who
 
again hosted this day at their property
and also for the generous donation to
the society.
 
The monthly meeting programme was
changed slightly to allow time for our
auction of over 20 plants which added
to the interest and the joviality of the
evening. It was interesting to note that
plants did not reach the high prices
of previous auctions but buyers were
happy and everything contributed to
the funds of the society. There were
 
several rare and special tillandsias,
neoregelias, and vrieseas, all of which
 
were snapped up quickly. Thanks
to Peter Coyle and Peter Waters for
running the auction. There usual banter
going on is also enjoyed by members.
 
Members working at our ‘Fiesta’ and
Sales Day coming up need to ensure
 
that no trays from sellers are given to
the public to take their plants home.
Use cardboard boxes or bags.
 
Our end of year prizes and trophies
for the 2015 monthly competitions
were presented. (see page 10 for full
results). Congratulations to all the
winners. Please note – members can
bring along a maximum of two plants
 
each meeting for different tables,
 
i.e. – Flowering, Foliage, Tillandsia,
Neoregelia, Plant of the Month. Points
are awarded for each plant. These
points contribute to the end of year
 
total. And, please remember, the plants
must be on the tables by 7.20pm.
 
‘Show and Tell’ this month had three
tillandsias. First up was a plant thought
to be Tillandsia mitalensis in flower,
 
but was considered to be Tillandsia
pueblensis which is slightly different
 
but has a similar flower spike. Next
a tillandsia to be named, possibly a
 
tenuifolia. The member will bring
 
back when in flower for a positive
identification. Next was a plant thought
 
to be a Tillandsia latifolia hybrid. The
plant had very narrow leaves with the
usual Tillandsia latifolia flower.
Raffles – Door prizes where won
by Win Shorrock, Hazel Frost and
Genneth Marshall-Inman. The main
raffle was also won by Genneth
Marshall-Inman.
 
Jocelyn Coyle receives the Bea Hanson
Memorial Trophy from president Graeme
Barclay.
Peter Coyle with his special award for
reaching the milestone, in 2015, of one
hundred registered BSI hybrids.
 
COMPETITIONS
Open Flowering: First and second
 
was John Mitchell with Tillandsia
yunckeri with two flowering heads
and Vriesea ospinae var gruberi.
Also on the table were Vriesea
‘Crimson Bling’, xNeophytum ‘Ralph
Davis’, Guzmania ‘Hilda’, Fosterella
penduliflora, Vriesea ‘White Lines’,
 
Aechmea nudicaulis var aequalis.
 
Open Foliage: First and second was
Peter Coyle with Neoregelia ‘Spotted
 
Devil’ x ‘Skotak Carcharodon Tiger’
 
andAlcantarea ‘Bobby’s Gold’. Also on
the table were Neoregelia ‘Barbarian’,
Neoregelia ‘Velociraptor’, Neoregelia
‘Marshall Select’, Neoregelia ‘Totara
Twist’, Neoregelia ‘Africa’ and
Neoregelia carolinae x cruenta.
 
Tillandsia: First with a flowering ‘Aunt
Betty’ was Lynette Nash, second, Peter
Coyle with a flowering xerographica.
Also on the table were Tillandsia ‘Red
Fountain’, Tillandsia x floridana,
Tillandsia seleriana, Tillandsia roezlii,
Tillandsia deppeana.
 
Foliage: First was John Mitchell with
 
Vriesea ‘Yellow Wave’ x ‘Hunua
 
Embers’, second Peter Coyle with
 
Alcantarea ‘Bobby’s Gold’. Also
on the table was Vriesea ‘Lace
Hybrid’, xNeophytum ‘Galactic
Warrior’, Vriesea fosteriana (rubra)
hybrid, Neoregelia ‘Treasure Chest’
x ‘Carcharodon Tiger’. Neoregelia
carolinae x cruenta x ‘Skotak’s Tiger’.
Christmas Decoration: First was
 
Judy Graham with a very nice large
decoration, 2nd was Lynette Nash, and
 
there were two others on the table.
Plant of the Month – Alcantarea
‘Bobby’s Gold’ (Peter Coyle) equal
with Tillandsia ‘Aunt Betty’ (Lynette
Nash).
After the business and auction was
 
completed, a delicious supper was there
 
to be devoured – and it was! Thanks to
all our members who brought supper.
 
NEXT MEETING: January 26th.
Monthly Choice is Aechmea nudicaulis
 
and cultivars.
 
NOTICe OF
ANNuAL
GeNerAL
MeeTING
 

The Annual General
Meeting of the
Bromeliad Society of
New Zealand Inc. will
be held at 7.30pm on
Tuesday March 22nd at
Greyfriar’s Hall in Mt
Eden. The AGM will be
followed immediately
by the Society’s normal
monthly meeting.
 
7
Bromeliad Society Dinner...
during ‘Fiesta’ 2016 weekend
Saturday February 27th
starting 7.15pm
at Tusk Restaurant (Thai),
590 Dominion Road, Balmoral.
$34.50 per person for banquet meal.
Wine corkage $6.00 per bottle.
Society members, partners and friends welcome.
Parking at rear of restaurant.
If you’d like to attend please contact
Dave Anderson 09-638 8671.
 
BROMELIAD SOCIETY OF N.Z.
(INC) COMPETITIVE SHOW 2016
 
CONDUCTED AS PART OF OUR ANNUAL
2016 Bromeliad
 

SCHEDULE OF CLASSES
 

Class
 
1. Aechmea
3. Billbergia
4. Cryptanthus or Orthophytum
5. Guzmania
6. Bromeliad species (any genus)
7. Neoregelia
8. Neoregelia Midi size
9. Nidularioids
10. Tillandsia Small Blooming
11. Tillandsia Small Foliage
14. Tillandsia Large Blooming
15. Tillandsia Large Foliage
16. Vriesea Blooming
17. Vriesea Foliage
CONDITIONS OF ENTRY
 
1. Exhibitors must be financial
members of the Bromeliad
Society of N.Z.
 
2. A maximum of two plants may be
entered in each class.
3. Plants must have been grown by
exhibitor for at least six months
prior to show.
4. Plants must be clean and healthy,
18. Bigeneric or other genus not
listed above
19. Miniature bromeliad
20. Variegated bromeliad
21. Pitcairnioideae
23. Dish or tray garden or
novelty planting
 
24. Bromeliad arrangement
25. Artistic or floral arrangement
26. Decorative container
27. Hanging container
28. New Zealand hybrid
29. Original Bromeliad Art Work
30. Educational display
free from scale and insects and
drained of water. Pots must be
clean and potting mix free of
weeds and other plant material.
 
4a. Each plant should be correctly
labelled with name, or if
unnamed, with parents, and with
no abbreviations. (ie. Neoregelia
hybrid is unacceptable). This rule
 

does not apply to classes 16, 17
 
and 28. Labelling not necessary in
 
Classes 23 to 25, and 29.
 
5. Plants may be potted only in
standard clay or terracotta pots,
 
green or black plastic pots or
unadorned bonsai pots. They may
also be mounted on any suitable
material.
 
6. No commercial leaf shine, cream
or milk may be used to enhance
the appearance of the plant.
 
7. A pot may contain single or
multiple plants provided they are
attached to a single rootstock.
This applies to Classes 1 to 9, 16
to 21 and 28.
 
8. Neoregelia Midi size is for plants
less than 200mm high and 250mm
wide.
 
9. Nidularioids include Nidularium,
Canistropsis, Canistrum,
Wittrockia and Edmundoa.
10. Tillandsias must be firmly
attached to mounts and must look
established. They may be single or
multiple plants of one type only,
within the stated measurements.
Fiji Trophy awarded for Best
Tillandsia.
 
11. Tillandsia sizes are: Small (up
to 20cm (8in)), Large (20cm up
(8in plus)). These measurements
exclude inflorescence and mount.
 
12. Miniature bromeliad may be
single or have multiple heads
 
attached to a single rootstock,
 
no plant more than 12.5cm (5in)
 
high excluding inflorescence.
 
Tillandsias are not permitted in
this class.
 
13. Variegated bromeliad is a
plant with white, pink or red
 
longitudinal stripes on leaves.
 
14. Pitcairnioideae includes Dyckia,
Puya, Pitcairnia, Hechtia, Navia
and Deuterocohnia.
15. Olive Allan Trophy for Best of
Show chosen from Classes 1 to 22
and 28 only.
16. Class 24 Bromeliad Arrangement
uses bromeliads only and can
incorporate only natural materials.
Plastic pots are not allowed.
Ern Bailey Trophy for Best
Arrangement awarded to winner
of this class.
 
17. Class 25 Artistic or floral
arrangement may use other
types of plant but must include a
significant amount of bromeliad
material.
 
18. Class 26 Decorative Container
where emphasis is placed on
harmony or contrast between
plant and container, and Class 27
Hanging Container where balance
is sought, may contain more than
one plant but of one type only.
 
19. Class 29 May be painting,
drawing, photograph, needlework
or other original work of art
executed by the exhibitor.
 
20. Class 30 May be any collection
of bromeliads and/or other visual
aids designed to educate on any
phase of bromeliad horticulture.
Maximum size is 1 sq. metre.
 
21. Entries may not be removed from
show until after 3pm. on Sunday
28th February.
 
22. Unless mentioned above other
rules as BSI standard show. Final
decision rests with Competition
Stewards.
23. Entries will be accepted between
1pm and 5pm only on Friday 26th
February.
 

2015 Trophy Winners
 

Judged over eleven monthly meetings of the Bromeliad Society.
BeA HAnSon TropHy – Most points in Monthly Choice competitions
Judy Graham
 

CenTenniAl TropHy – Most points overall for the year
peter Coyle
 

GreenouGH TropHy – Plant of the month competitions
peter Coyle
 

BeA HAnSon MeMoriAl TropHy
 
Awarded to a member who has given outstanding service to the Society
and who typifies the founding spirit and commitment of Bea Hanson.
(Judged by our President and Patron)
 
Jocelyn Coyle
 
SPECIAL AWARD – For reaching the milestone in 2015 of 100 registered BSI hybrids.
 
peter Coyle
 
2015 Monthly Competition Winners
 

Judged over eleven monthly meetings of the Bromeliad Society.
FlowerinG neoreGeliA
1st John Mitchell
2nd Graeme Barclay
3rd Peter Coyle
38 points
34
28
1st peter Coyle 57 points
2nd Graeme Barclay 22
3rd Diana Holt 17
FoliAGe
1st peter Coyle
2nd John Mitchell
49 points
41
MonTHly CHoiCe
1st Judy Graham 32 points
2nd Graeme Barclay 27
3rd David Goss 19
3rd David Goss 22
TillAnDSiA
1st Lynette Nash
2nd Lester Ching
3rd David Anderson
70 points
35
20
BeST plAnT oF THe MonTH
(Over the 11 months)
1st peter Coyle 5 wins
MoST poinTS overAll
1st peter Coyle 161 points
2nd John Mitchell 98
3rd Graeme Barclay 87
 

Group News
 
Eastern Bay of Plenty Bromeliad
and Orchid Group – Alison Iremonger
 
The final get together for the year, was
 
an enjoyable Christmas luncheon at the
 
Hui Bar and Grill, Ohope Beach. Each
 
member brought along a ‘brom in a
brown paper bag’ as a mystery gift to
another member. Special thanks went
 
out to Maureen, who was unable to
attend, for the organising of trips and
 
the notice of monthly meetings during
the year.
 
Several members received recognition at
the recent ‘Pride of Whakatane’ garden
 
competition. Ross and Gail won ‘Most
 
prestigious garden’ and ‘Best overall
 
garden’, Joy won ‘Most imaginative
 
garden’ and was also third in ‘Best
 
Water Feature’, while Gail Anderson
 
had her garden ‘Highly commended’.
 
Our overall competition winner for the
 
year was Alison. The raffle for the day,
won by Rose, was a box of plants kindly
 
donated by the Whakatane Garden
 
Centre. Thank you Des.
 
Next Meeting: A pot luck lunch in
 
February. Visitors are always welcome
 
to our monthly meetings. Contacts:
Ross Fergusson 07-3125487, Sue
Laurent 07-3071323, Maureen Moffatt
07-3222276.
 
Bay of Plenty Bromeliad Group
 
– Lynley Breeze
Our guest speaker was Ross Fergusson,
president of the Eastern Bay of Plenty
group. Ross was first given a Vriesea
 
platynema in 1999 and he quickly
got the bromeliad bug. Ross and Gail
bought a 5-acre property overlooking
Ohiwa Bay and Ross has been extending
 
and developing it so that it is now 30%
 
– 40% covered in bromeliad gardens.
Ross showed before and after photos
 
and members are asking when we can
go for a visit. As a practical man he has
even invented many particular tools for
clearing the land and for tending the
bromeliads (e.g. an axe with a vertical
 
handle). Ross has many imaginative
 
vertical structures supporting
 
bromeliads, and has built a huge
propagating, potting and growing shed.
 
Since retirement he can now devote the
dawn to dusk hours to the gardening and
the results are outstanding. The vistas of
mass plantings of Vriesea hieroglyphica
resulting from his propagating work
 
are fantastic. Ross’s photo presentation
of his magnificent garden was an
 
inspiration and a delight.
 
We had a very successful display and
sales day open to the public on Saturday
14th November 8am – 12 noon, held at
the Matua Hall.
 
Competition Results:
 
Plant of the Month – variegated
bromeliads: 1st Kevin Pritchard with
Neoregelia carolinae, 2nd Gill Keesing
with Neoregelia ‘Hot Gossip’ and 3rd
Graeme Alabaster with Neoregelia
‘Orange Crush’. Also tabled were
 
Neoregelia ‘Dr Oeser’ variegated and
Neoregelia ‘Van Dourme’.
‘Show and Tell’: A Neoregelia ‘Yellow
King’ with the pup a plain yellow colour.
It was recommended that it be removed
 
Cont’d P12 11
 

Cont’d from P11 – Group News
 
from the plant. There were also some
seedlings that had been grown on and
another beautiful display by Kevin
 
Pritchard of flowering tillandsias.
 
Novice Section: 1st Neila Fairweather
with a Nidularium named ‘Fulgens Pink’
and 2nd Kerry Crosbie with Neoregelia
‘Big Pinkie’.
Open competition: 1st Barbara
Nalder with Vriesea ‘Autumn Vista’,
2nd Margaret Mangos with Vriesea
 
‘Crimson Vista’ and 3rd Gill Keesing
with xNeomea ‘Strawberry‘. Also tabled
was Billbergia ‘Hallelujah’ .
Tillandsia Competition: 1st Audrey
Hewson with Tillandsia ionantha,
2nd Jo Elder with Tillandsia
atroviridipetala, 3rd Bertha Schollum
with Tillandsia tectorum. Also tabled
were Tillandsia duratii, kautskyi,
streptocarpa, foliosa and schiedeana.
 
Next Meeting: Wednesday 10th
February 2016 at the Yacht club. Open
day to the public with a large bromeliad
display and multiple sales tables.
There will be a committee meeting on
3rd February 1.30pm to organise this.
 
Members selling plants need to bring at
 
least one plant for the spot prizes.
 
Garden Visits: Wednesday 17th
 
February starting at 10.00 am.
 
1. Tom and Heather Slee, 6 Hinewa Rd,
Otumoetai
 
2. Jo Elder, 4 Hinewa Rd, Otumoetai.
EXTRA…
 
Our final meeting for the year was a
 
social pot luck lunch held at the home
of Barabara Parnwell on the hills in
 
Ohauiti, with sweeping views across
the harbour and out to Mayor Island.
 
Barbara has not been in the home for
long but she and her husband have done
 
a lot of work in the garden. They have
developed a wonderful shade house
and a plastic house for the more cold
tender bromeliads. It was an enjoyable
social occasion and we had our usual
continuous auction which meant that all
members went home with at least one
treasure or thanks to the generosity of
 
some, people had more than one prize
 
to take home. We did not have the usual
plant of the month or competitions.
 
Tillandsia Group Auckland
 
– Nancy Murphy
The December Meeting (Christmas
Meeting) was held at Larry and Nancy
Murphy’s garden ‘Ohaunui’, with 33
 
members attending – many bringing
plants for the ‘C’ discussion. There
 
were many beautiful, large clumps,
 
obviously they had been growing for
many years. A plant of Tillandsia rauhii
and Tillandsia werneriana was entered
for ‘Show and Tell’ to demonstrate
the name change from Vriesea rauhii
to Tillandsia werneriana. Visually it
 
appears to be a sensible re-classification
 
as this plant has a very distinct tillandsia
appearance.
 
A sumptuous afternoon tea supplied by
the members was enjoyed and Larry
had prepared small pohutukawa rounds
for members to help with the mounting
of smaller plants.
 
Next Meeting: At Dave and Joan
Anderson’s garden, 33 Marsden Ave,
Mt Eden on February 14th at 1.30 pm.
Tillandsia species starting with ‘D’ will
 
be for discussion. Looking forward to
seeing everyone in 2016 – bring along
 
an interested friend, visitors welcome.
 

Learning about the genera : Ursulaea
– Graeme Barclay
Ursulaea is one of the more recent genera to be established. It was
introduced in 1994, when Ulrich and Ursula Baensch (co-authors
of the outstanding bromeliad book ‘Blooming Bromeliads’ that
was soon to be published and include the new genus) along with American
botanist Dr. Robert W. Read proposed plants in the Aechmea subgenus of
Podaechmea, deserved a genus of their own.
 
Earlier In 1992, a plant of then labelled
 
Aechmea macvaughii bloomed in
 
the Baensch’s nursery in Nassau,
 
Bahamas. They attempted hybridising
with it and were successful with using
it as a pollen parent on a number of
Aechmea species and as the seed
parent crossed with Billbergia species
and Androlepis skinneri. An interesting
observation was the seedlings crossed
with Billbergia grew much more
 
vigorously and stronger than the others,
 
suggesting a very close relationship.
Their suspicions it was not actually
an Aechmea were also piqued noticing
some differences to Aechmea flowers,
so they consulted their friend Robert
Read, who agreed that they were
 
without doubt unique and different.
 
Essentially the sepals surrounding the
 
petals are “symmetric or nearly so”
(mirrored same shape in both halves) in
 
Ursulaea, whereas in Aechmea, one of
the defining taxonomic features at the
 
time was they all have “asymmetric”
sepals (two different shaped halves).
 
One other similar looking species,
 
Aechmea tuitensis, fell into the same
category when it also bloomed in the
 
Baensch’s collection, so it was also
 
included in the new genus proposed by
 
Dr. Read, named in honour of Ursula
 
Baensch. The fact that Ursulaea
tuitensis is only found in the wild in
the same Mexican state as Ursulaea
macvaughii, adds further credence to
 
the argument these two plants are very
closely related and thus part of the
same genus.
 
Both of these beautiful species
have been in New Zealand for
 
many years, but unfortunately
they are difficult to cultivate well
 
and hence are very rare here.
 
Ursulaea macvaughii – Originally
described as Aechmea macvaughii in
 
1964 by Dr. L. B Smith after being
collected at 500-600m elevation by
McVaugh and Koelz in 1959 near
Pihuamo, Jalisco State in Mexico. It
 
mostly grows as an epiphyte in tropical
forest and can grow very large in
habitat with leaves to over a metre long.
 
The leaves are very stiff, heavily
 
serrated and form a large water
holding. They are normally light
to olive green colour but can turn
 
a sandy-golden when grown in full
sun. The inflorescence is very large
 
Cont’d P14 13
 

Cont’d from P13 – Learning about the genera
 
and pendulous with huge, rose-pink
 
scape bracts. The entire structure is
covered in dense white scales that give
 
the effect of being covered in fluffy,
powdered snow, creating a stunning
visual display with its purple-petalled
flowers. After anthesis, the pink scape
bracts often fade to creamy-white, but
 
the scape and ovaries stay prominently
scurfy white for many months if seed
 
pods are developing, as seen in other
species with similar inflorescences
 
such as Billbergia zebrina.
 
Being from the warm, coastal state
of Jalisco, Ursulaea macvaughii likes
to be kept protected and warm in a
greenhouse during our New Zealand
 
winters, otherwise outer leaf die-back
is very difficult to prevent. It should
also be kept relatively dry over winter,
 
but best results come from feeding and
 
watering well in summer, when it can
 
grow well outside in full sun and rain
without problems. It is shy to bloom
 
and has pups after flowering, but the
 
effort and wait is certainly worth it.
 
Ursulaea tuitensis – Originally
described as Aechmea tuitensis in
 
1986 by P. Magana and E. J. Lott after
 
being collected at 1050m elevation
 
near El Tuito, in the state of Jalisco
in Mexico, where it grows profusely
 
on boulders in forested areas. Named
 
after its habitat locality, this plant is
 
much smaller more succulent that
Ursulaea macvaughii with triangular
shaped leaves that do not form a
water holding tank. They are normally
 
green to greyish-brown colour but
 
can turn brilliant shades of crimson
 
and red when grown hard, creating
 
a spectacular looking rosette. The
 
inflorescence is erect, with prominent
 
reddish scape bracts and resembles
 
a smaller, upright version of the
pendulous inflorescence of Ursulaea
macvaughii, also covered in dense
white scales with large, globose ovaries.
 
There are reportedly at least two
different forms in cultivation of
 
Ursulaea tuitensis, one with a more
vase-like habit and narrow leaves
and one with a flatter more open
rosette and wider, recurving leaves.
 
Cultivation requirements in New
Zealand are basically the same as
Ursulaea macvaughii as mentioned
 
above, though from my experience it
 
would appear it often has pups before
 
blooming, as well as afterwards.
 
REFERENCE: Ursulaea; A New Genus
 
of Mexican Bromeliads, Robert W. Read
and H. Ulrich Baensch, JBS 44(5), 1994,
pg 205-211.
 
2016 Bromeliad Saturday February 27th
and Sunday February 28th
plAnT SellerS...
please contact president Graeme Barclay to discuss your space requirements.
phone 09-817 4153
 
Ursulaea macvaughii emerging into
flower in Northland. Photo taken in late
May by Colleen Pyne, kindly forwarded
by erin Titmus. This magnificent plant
was brought along to a meeting of the Far
North Bromeliad Group during 2015. The
owners got the pup about five years ago
with the guideline ‘to keep it dry.’ It was
left aside for ages in a spot that turned
out to be perfect conditions in filtered
light, dry and sheltered.
Ursulaea photos…
 
Ursulaea macvaughii bloomingin Australia. PHOTO: CArOyLN CLArke
Ursulaea macvaughii flower detail.
PHOTO: rICk CAIrNS
Ursulaea tuitensis rosette.
PHOTO: MCGreGOr SMITH
Ursulaea tuitensis blooming.
PHOTO: DAve WeSTON
Ursulaea tuitensis flower detail.
PHOTO: GAry BeAuMONT
 
Group Meeting photos…
 
Thirty three members attended the Tillandsia Group’s final meeting of the year at Larry
and Nancy Murphy’s garden in Waiuku. Peter Coyle supplied these photos for us.
 
Tillandsia ionantha – Lynette NashTillandsia velutina – Lynette Nash
At the Murphy’s.
ross Fergusson’s ‘wall’ of Vriesea
hieroglyphica in the eastern Bay
of Plenty. PHOTO: GrAeMe BArCLAy
 
OFFICERS
 

Patron: Patricia Sweeney
President: Graeme Barclay 09-817 4153
Vice Presidents: Jocelyn Coyle 09-416 8272
Don Brown 09-361 6175
Secretary: Bev Ching 09-576 4595
Treasurer: Peter Waters 09-534 5616
Life Members: Dave Anderson, Patricia Perratt,
Patricia Sweeney, Peter Waters
 

Scientific Officer: Peter Waters 09-534 5616
Librarian: Noelene Ritson 09-625 8114
Committee: Dave Anderson 09-638 8671
Lester Ching 09-576 4595
Alan Cliffe 09-479 1451
David Cowie 09-630 8220
Chris Paterson 09-625 6707
Diane Timmins 09-415 9066
Editor: Murray Mathieson 09-418 0366
 
MEMBERSHIP SUBSCRIPTION
 

New Zealand
 
Ordinary membership NZ $35.00 ($5.00
discount if paid before the end of February).
 
Dual membership (same household) NZ $45.00
 
($5.00 discount also applies as above).
 
Overseas
 
NZD $45.00. Send all payments to the Treasurer,
Peter Waters, 22 Half Moon Rise, Half Moon
Bay, Auckland 2012.
 
Correspondence
 
All general correspondence should be sent to the
 
Secretary, Bromeliad Society of New Zealand,
 
P.O. Box 108-168, Symonds Street, Auckland,
New Zealand. The opinions expressed in letters
 
or articles in the Journal are the contributors’
 
own views and do not necessarily express the
views or policy of the Bromeliad Society of
New Zealand Inc.
 
Society Website
 
www.bsnz.org – For past Journal archive –
 
growing tips – articles – sales information
 
BROMELIAD JOURNAL
 
Editorial Committee
 
Dave Anderson
Murray Mathieson
 
Peter Waters
 
Production
 
Murray Mathieson
 
Distribution
 
Don Brown
 
All enquiries and contributions welcome, please
 
contact any member of the editorial committee
 
or send to Peter Waters, 22 Half Moon Rise,
Half Moon Bay, Auckland 2012 or email:
 
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 
Deadline
 
For all editorial and advertising, the first
 
Tuesday of publication month
 
Display Advertising
 
Rates are:
 
Full Page $60.00
Half Page $30.00
Quarter Page $15.00
 
‘Buy & Swap’
 
Listings in ‘Buy & Swap’ are FREE for
 
members of the Society (max. 30 words).
 
For advertising enquiries and material, please
contact Murray Mathieson ph (09) 418 0366
or email: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
 

To go with our Aechmea nudicaulis subject at our January meeting and
following on from the article last month on Aechmea ‘Parati’, we look at
 
another special clone from Brazil.
 
Aechmea ‘Xavante’
 
This plant is a very old cultivar
of Aechmea nudicaulis that
was originally always known as
either Aechmea nudicaulis (rubra) or
Aechmea nudicaulis var. rubra. This
of course is in reference to the red
patching and streaked markings the
leaves attain when it is grown stressed,
or in very high light.
 
In 2003, BCR Registrar Derek
 
Butcher* decided to give the plant a
 
registered cultivar name, as references
 
to ‘rubra’ are not considered valid
taxonomic species names and it was
doubtful this particular clone would
ever be formally described. After
 
consultation with Oscar Ribeiro of
Bromelio Imperialis Nursery in Rio de
Janeiro, who confirmed this clone does
exist in the wild, they decided on the
 
name ‘Xavante’. This is in reference to
the actual name of a native Brazilian
native tribe that paints members red at
ceremonial times with the seeds of a
 
bixa orellana – the lipstick tree. Hence,
 
if you still have this plant labelled
 
Aechmea nudicaulis (rubra), or similar,
 
please change the label to ‘Xavante’.
 
The shape of the inflorescence of
 
Aechmea ‘Xavante’ means it is
actually a form of the variety Aechmea
nudicaulis var. capitata, where the
flowers are bunched together in a head
pointing upwards, rather than spread
 
along the scape. It was also distributed
in Florida as Aechmea nudicaulis
var. capitata ‘Red Form’ at one stage
(and perhaps still is), highlighting
 
why it is sometimes necessary
to give special species clones a
cultivar name to keep an accessible
record and prevent confusion.
 
While it can be slow growing in our
cooler climate, Aechmea ‘Xavante’ is
relatively common in New Zealand
 
collections, is easy to grow and is
 
hardy like other clones of Aechmea
nudicaulis. It propagates pups on
thin stolons that can be up to 15cm
long and should always be grown
in full sun or very high light with
 
minimal, if any, feeding to attain the
 
attractive red leaf colouring. As with
 
Aechmea ‘Parati’, these attributes also
 
make it an excellent pot or epiphytic
specimen.
 
* REFERENCE: Cultivar Corner: Aechmea nudicaulis, Derek Butcher, JBS 53(5),
2003, pg. 233.
 
Aechmea ‘Xavante’. Aechmea ‘Xavante’ potted clump.
 
PHOTO: JOHN MITCHeLL PHOTO: MCGreGOr SMITH
 
Aechmea ‘Xavante’ epiphytic clump
at Pinegrove Nursery, Wardell, NSW.
PHOTO: GrAeMe BArCLAy
 
2016 Bromeliad
 
 
 
BROMELIAD
SHOW & SALE
 

Saturday 27th and
Sunday 28th February
Mt eden war Memorial Hall
489 Dominion road,
Balmoral, Auckland
9.00am – 3.00pm both days
 
• We hope you are preparing your plants.
• Plant sellers… if you haven’t already
done so, please contact president
Graeme Barclay to discuss your space
requirements. Phone 09-817 4153.
• For competition rules and classes please
see page 8 in this Journal.
 
 
 
 
 
 

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